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‘The perfect place’ A magical gala at the

Thatcher-Young Mansion

The Herald Journal

Jan. 21-27, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

What’s inside this week

Magazine

The wonder of words

Arts & Entertainment Calendar On the cover: Magician Richard Hatch shows off a trick at the Herald

Journal’s photo studio. Turn to page 8 to read more about Hatch and the new classes he is offering at the Thatcher-Young Mansion. (Photo by Eli Lucero/Herald Journal)

From the editor VERY NOW AND THEN, E I’m reminded that it’s a small world. On Wednesday, I had the

kburgess@hjnews.com

taries and developed a bit of a crush on him, but never imagined we’d encounter each other in person. Then he randomly found me on Friendster pleasure of meeting local magician (Facebook’s great-grandfather) Richard Hatch, who and said we should hang out. stopped by the HJ I guess what this really comes office and performed down to is the tight-knit nature some awesome of Utah’s arts and entertainment sleight of hand for subculture — which brings me our staff. Turns out (in a very roundabout way) to that Richard was a this week’s cover story. Writer mentor to one of my Kate Rouse took a look at excitfriends — Vegasing changes coming to Logan’s based mentalist Thatcher-Young Mansion, includPaul Draper, who is ing new classes in music, phooriginally from the tography, and of course, magic. It’s Salt Lake City area. Paul and I first wonderful to see the development of bumped into each other at the birthadditional forums for local arty types day party of another pal, former HJ to meet, share their work, form concopy editor William Hampton. Early on, Paul and I found another interest- nections and maybe even get a date. ing connection — I had briefly dated I applaud everyone involved and look forward to seeing the Thatcherhis best friend, filmmaker Nathan Young Mansion grow. Meier, years earlier. Call it Six Degrees of Paul Draper. — Kim Burgess Even more oddly, before I met Cache Magazine editor Nathan I had seen one his documen-

Slow Wave

(Page 4) Magificant murder mystery

(Page 10)

(Page 5)

Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

A Sundance mini-preview

(Page 7)

Cute

Tony award winner coming to USU

pet photo of the week

This cat is available for adoption! Pet: Jade From: Four Paws Rescue Why she’s so lovable: “Jade is a beautiful Siamese mix. She is very sweet and loving. She is about 1 to 2 years old, but is very quiet and friendly. Jade would love to have an indoor-only, loving, forever home for the holidays. If you would like to meet Jade or learn more about her, please call Sheri at 787-1751. The adoption fee for most Four Paws cats is $75, which includes spay/neuter and shots.

Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


New exhibit on Native American life

U

TA H S TAT E University’s Museum of Anthropology celebrates the opening of its newest exhibit “Through the Looking Glass: Obsidian, Travel and Trade in the Ancient Great Basin.” The exhibit is the spotlight of the next “Saturdays at the Museum” activity Saturday, Jan. 22. The exhibit highlights the use of obsidian, a volcanic glass, among ancient groups in the Great Basin, focusing on ancient trade and exchange relationships and how peoples

moved across landscapes in search of obsidian Stone tool making demonstrations using obsidian will be featured for museum visitors. The official exhibit opening takes place between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. at the museum. Light refreshments will be served. “This exhibit is a unique addition to our anthropology museum,” said Monique Pomerleau, museum curator. “It explores the technology and science behind obsidian — what it was used for in the past and the scientific appli-

cations of obsidian today. The exhibit brings to light how archaeologists are able to use obsidian to reconstruct

past human behavior and how ancient peoples moved across the diverse landscapes of the Great Basin.” The USU Museum of Anthropology is on the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. In addition to its Saturday program hours, the Museum of Anthropology is open to USU students and members of the public six days a week, with regular hours MondayFriday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. For Satur-

day activities, free parking is available in the adjacent lot, south of the building. Funding for Saturday events is provided by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services. More information about the IMLS is available online (www.imls. gov) For more information about this event, call museum staff at 797-7545 or visit the museum website (anthromuseum. usu.edu). The Museum of Anthropology is part of the Anthropology Program at USU.

Getting a jump on it: Local team shows off skills at fundraiser

J

ust Jumpin’, A local jump rope team, presents THE JOLT, a day-long jump rope workshop and master jump rope exhibition. The event is scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 29, at the Smithfield Recreation Center, 315 E. 600 South, Smithfield. The workshop will run from 1 to 4 p.m. with a silent auction at 6 p.m. and a jump rope show at 7 p.m. Cost for the workshop is $20 per jumper and includes a new rope. The master jump rope exhibition is $5 per person or $20 per family. Workshop instructors include USA Jump Rope All Stars Jeremy Lindstrom, Lee Reisig, Billy Jackson and the Just Jumpin’ rope team. The event will raise money for the team to compete in the USU Jump Rope National Championship in June in Galveston, Texas. The only competitive jump rope team in Utah,

Just Jumpin’ includes 14 advanced jumpers from Cache Valley. The group has been performing and jumping competitively for seven years. Just Jumpin’ appears at schools, community events and half time shows throughout the state. The team teaches beginning, intermediate and advanced jump rope skills at weekly workshops for children and youth in Cache Valley and Park City and has taught

more than 3,000 students. Three of THE JOLT’s staff are USA Jump Rope All Stars who perform throughout the United States and around the world in jump rope exhibitions. The trio have performed on national television shows like America’s Best Dance Crew, Ellen DeGeneres and the Disney Channel’s Shake It Up. For more information, contact Patrice Winn at patricewinn@thejumpinco.org or go to www.justjumpin.org.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

All mixed up


Page 4 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Stage

Something wicked...

Utah State University photo

Shawn Hansen (as Gordon) and Reagan Kent (as Newton) in “Do Not Hit Golf Balls Into Mexico.”

Original Utah State theater production chosen for L.A. fest o NOT HIT GOLF “D Balls Into Mexico,” an original production pre-

sented in spring 2010 by the Fusion Theatre Project and the Utah State University Department of Theatre Arts, was selected to perform at a regional theater festival in Los Angeles, Calif., Feb. 11. “A primary focus of the play is on the American attitudes towards Mexican migrants who are often dehumanized, yet they sacrifice so severely for their families,” said Shawn Fisher, founder of the Fusion Theatre Project. “Utah is a very family-focused place and I thought an honest depiction of those sacrifices should be accessible for our audiences.” Out of 65 productions entered for consideration, “Do Not Hit Golf Balls Into Mexico” was one of 10 selected for the Region VIII

Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF). “We are proud of the company’s efforts toward this collaborative work and this regional recognition,” said Colin Johnson, interim department head of USU’s department of theatre. The KCACTF regional board uses selective criteria when deciding which productions will be invited to perform. Criteria include the play’s content, type, uniqueness, interest and importance. “We were impressed by the student and faculty field-trip research that went into creating the show, the theatricality of the performance and the show’s exploration of a current political issue in our country,” said Char Nelson, Region VIII KCACTF national playwriting chair.

I

n their first performance of the new year, Logan Youth Shakespeare presents Macbeth in its entirety at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main in Logan. Showtimes are 7 p.m. Jan. 27 to 29 and Feb 3 to 4 with a matinee at 2 p.m. on Feb 5. Tickets available at the door, $5 for adults, $3 for 18 and under. No children under five. This beloved play follows ambitious Macbeth, a Scottish lord who receives a tantalizing prophecy of royal success. When Lady Macbeth convinces him to kill the king, Macbeth becomes trapped in a spiral of horrific events in one of Shakespeare’s most intense and action-packed plays.

‘Rehearsal’ a classic whodunit “R EHEARSAL for Murder” will play at 7:30 p.m. every Monday, Friday and Saturday through Feb. 5, at the Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Highway 89, Perry. A matinees will start at 2 p.m. Jan. 22. Tickets are $9 for adults and $8 for seniors and children. For reservations, call 435-723-8392. The play follows Alex Dennison, a wellknown playwright but much-burdened man. Last year he opened his latest and greatest play starring Monica Welles, a woman with

whom he was deeply in love. However, after the play opened to mixed reviews, Monica was found dead in the street in front of her apartment building. Everyone thinks it was suicide. Alex knows it was murder. One year later, Alex brings back former cast members to the theatre, convinced that one of them killed Monica. Through a series of confrontations, Alex proves that each person has a very valid reason for killing Monica. Will Alex discover the real murderer in time?

Chuck Wheeler as David Matthews and Carolyn Abel of Brigham City as the doomed Monica Welles.


UDRA MCDONALD, A four-time Tony Award winning singer and actress, joins in

the Celebration of the Arts Week at Utah State University Friday, Jan. 21, for the Grand Gala in the Kent Concert Hall. The Grand Gala is part of the Caine College of the Arts’ “Celebration of the Arts” week at USU. McDonald maintains a successful television career acting as Dr. Naomi Bennett in the hit ABC television series “Private Practice.” She also earned an Emmy nomination for her role in the made-for-TV movie version of “A Raisin in the Sun.” “She is a stunning artist with

one of the most beautiful voices ever heard,” said Craig Jessop, dean of the Caine College of the Arts. “Her unbelievable talent is something I’m so excited to share with this community, and she is, without a doubt, one of the best professionals I have ever worked with. She is a true friend to this college.” The Grand Gala also features the talents of students and faculty from the Caine College of the Arts. Vocal, instrumental and theatrical talents will be shared as well as aspects of dance, art and cinematography. The evening of glitz, glam and entertainment honoring Marie Eccles Caine, Manon

Caine Russell and Kathryn Caine Wanlass begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Kent Concert Hall of USU’s Chase Fine Arts Center. Tickets are $10 general admission; free for USU students. McDonald, soprano, earned an unprecedented three Tony Awards before the age of 30 (“Carousel,” “Master Class” and “Ragtime”) and a fourth in 2004 (“A Raisin in the Sun”). McDonald is frequently compared to legendary performers like Judy Garland and Barbra Streisand. For more information about Celebration of the Arts or for tickets to the Grand Gala, visit http://arts.usu.edu.

Brazilian guitarists to perform at Utah State

I

N BRAZIL, THE Brazilian Guitar Quartet is referred to as the “Dream Team,” four of the country’s most brilliant musicians. Since their first appearances outside of Brazil in 1999, the BGQ has become one of the world’s most sought-after guitar ensembles. At 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 26, the quartet will perform as part of the 2010-2011 Chamber Music Society of Logan’s concert series. Tickets are $24 or $10 for students and are available at www.arts.usu.org. The show takes place at the Manon Caine Russell Kathryn Caine Wanlass Performance Hall. The BGQ consists of Everton Gloeden, Tadeu Do Amaral, Luis Mantovani and Gustavo Costa. Mantovani is the only guitarist to win the prestigious Arts Diploma from the New England Consevatory of Music in Boston and is a recent winner of the coveted Pro Musicis International Award. The BGQ is unique for incorporating two eight-string

guitars in their ensemble. BGQ founding member Paul Galbraith, a member of the quartet until 2003, developed the eightstring guitar as an innovative instrument that increases the range, sound and repertoire of guitar music. The quartet has played in major performance halls around the world. U. S. engagements have included the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the 92nd Street Y in New York City. BGQ’s repertoire ranges from Bach, Brazilian music of many styles and masterworks from Spain. For their Logan performance, the BGQ will play music from Baroque master J.S. Bach, Brazilian composers Heitor VillaLobos and Ronaldo Miranda andSpanish composer Isaac Albeniz. The concert will open with excerpts from Bach’s Orchestral Suite #3, BVW 1068. Bach’s Four Orchestral Suites were written from 1717to 1723. The suites were composed for varied instrumental combinations, with

Bach himself at the harpsichord. The Air from Suite No. 3 is one of the most famous pieces of classical music and has become known as Air on the G String. Heitor Villa-Lobos, Brazil’s important composer, penned 17 string quartets over 42 years. String Quartet No. 12 was composed in 1950 while Villa-Lobos was a patient at Memorial Hospital in New York City. Rinaldo Miranda a contemporary Brazilian composer began his career in 1977. His composed works includes solo instrumental pieces, chamber works, symphonies and an opera. The Variacoes Serias piece alludes to Mendelssohn’s piece of the same name. The Variations are featured on BGQ CD, Encantamento. The piece premiered in 2004 with the Baltimore Symphony. Issac Albeniz a colorful child prodigy, pianist and composer was born in Spain in 1860. He composed his 12-piece suite Iberia for piano, though the BGQ has adapted it for guitar.

Page 5 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Broadway, TV star takes the stage


Page 6 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Film Still playing “True Grit” Rated PG-13 ★★★ One of the most mainstream, crowd-pleasing films Joel and Ethan Coen have ever made. It’s sort of a screwball Western, if you will, with vivid performances and strikingly vast, picturesque vistas, the always gorgeous work of the always great Roger Deakins, the Coens’ frequent cinematographer. But it’s a minor entry from the writing-directing brothers, especially when you consider the inventiveness and strength of their canon and the close aesthetic resemblance to “No Country for Old Men,” their masterpiece. While “True Grit” is entertaining, it’s also surprisingly lacking in emotional resonance, as well as the intriguing sense of ambiguity that so often permeates Coen pictures. Only toward the end does it feel like anything is at stake, but at least it’s enjoyable while you’re waiting. Hailee Steinfeld in her film debut is a revelation as Mattie Ross, the 19th-century pioneer teenager who demands vengeance for her father’s murder. She seeks help from a man she hears has true grit: one-eyed, alcoholic U.S. Marshal Rooster Cogburn. Jeff Bridges plays the role that earned John Wayne his only Academy Award as gruff and grizzled, a lawman who’s lived a long and well-lubricated life, but who also has attained a certain self-possession about it. Matt Damon again proves he can do anything, joining the duo on the trail as a preening Texas Ranger. PG-13 for some intense sequences of western violence including disturbing images. 110 minutes. “Black Swan” Rated R ★★★1⁄2 At once gorgeous and gloriously nutso, a trippy, twisted fantasy that delights and disturbs in equal measure. Darren Aronofsky takes the same stripped-down fascination with, and appreciation for, the minutiae of preparation that he brought to his Oscar-nominated “The Wrestler” and applies it to the pursuit of a different kind of artistry: ballet. But then the director mixes in a wildly hallucinatory flair as “Black Swan” enters darker psychological territory. Working with his frequent cinematographer, Matthew Libatique, and incorporating some dazzling visual effects, Aronofsky spins a nightmare scenario within a seemingly gentle, pristine world. The visions and dreams soar over-the-top at times, but always knowingly so, and with great style; “Black Swan” wallows in its grandiosity, and if you’re willing to go along with it, you’ll find yourself wowed by one of the best films of the year. Natalie Portman gives it her all in a brave and demanding performance as Nina, a driven but innocent New York City ballerina. When it comes time to stage a bold, new production of “Swan Lake,” the company’s artistic director (a skeevy and manipulative Vincent Cassel) thinks Nina is perfect to play the White Swan. But he needs a dancer who also can portray the fierce sexuality of the Black Swan. Enter Lily (Mila Kunis), a savvy and confident newcomer who represents Nina’s biggest threat to getting the lead role. R for strong sexual content, disturbing violent images, language and some drug use. 110 minutes.

Find a full PDF version of Cache Magazine online

www.issuu.com/cachemagazine

Entertainment

Auditions

2011

Saturday, January 22, 2011 LAGOON AMUSEMENT PARK Farmington, Utah 375 North Lagoon Drive Check in: 9:30 am Open Audition: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

• Callbacks: 7:00 pm

Friday, January 28, 2011

COVEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS Provo, Utah 425 West Center Street Check in: 3:30 pm Open Audition: 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm • Callbacks: 7:00 pm

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For more information:

lagoonpark.com /auditions or (801) 451-8059

• Callbacks: 7:00 pm


T

HE TIME HAS come once again for the eyes of entertainment to focus on our small little state as the Sundance Film Festival comes barreling into Park City. Sometimes it’s still hard to believe that our state is home to one of the world’s largest and most famous film festivals. Celebrities from all over will be flocking to the little town in the mountains to promote their movies. I’ll be there covering some of the movies for The Herald Journal. Many people equate film festivals with artsy movies that they’ll never actually see in their local theaters. This couldn’t be further from the truth. While it is true that many of the films at Sundance won’t see wide releases, there are quite a few that gain notoriety there and wind up in the mainstream a few months down the line. Movies like “(500) Days of Summer,� “Memento,� and “Moon,� all came from Sundance and then enjoyed relatively successful runs in the box office and on home video. Oscar time is rolling around and movies from last year’s festival like “Winter’s Bone� and “The Kids Are All Right� are hanging on and could be in line for a few awards. Sundance isn’t just home to art movies that no one outside of the festival will see. It’s packed full of movies with well-known celebrities that you’ll be seeing in the theaters in the coming months. In order to give you a taste of the kinds of films that will be at Sundance, which have a good chance at getting wide releases, here’s a list.

City at Midnight. This “Open Water,â€? where two year promises to be just people were stranded in as fun with a wide variety the ocean being circled of horror and comedy by man-eating sharks, films. comes “Silent House.â€? • “The Troll Hunterâ€? Not quite sure exactly By Aaron Peck This is a Norwegian film what the movie’s about that takes the idea of “Clo- other than a mysterious verfieldâ€? and adds giganhouse that makes creepy tic, rampaging trolls to the noises, but it just goes to mix. You wouldn’t have show you that Sundance thought that Sundance fea- even branches out into tured many movies with the horror genre. Really, mammoth CG special there’s a little something effects would you? This is for everyone to love at one of the films I’m most the festival. excited to see, because the These are just a small premise is so outlandish sampling of the movies it’s got to be fun. A group that you’ll be able to catch of people follow around at Sundance or in the An image from the troll hunters who are theater after the festival Sundance film ‘Silent Houseâ€? charged to keep Norway is over. safe from giant marauding • “My Idiot Brotherâ€? lar over the past few years), “Cop Out.â€? He’s said that he doesn’t want to do any trolls. I mean, how can This movie is sure to Zachary Quinto (“Star Film critic Aaron Peck has press for his new film that this movie not be fun? be one of the big films Trekâ€?), Demi Moore, Paul a bachelor’s degree in • “Silent Houseâ€? premieres at this year’s at the festival. Starring Bettany, Stanley Tucci and English from USU. FeedFrom the directing duo festival, but the more he Paul Rudd (“I Love You, Jeremy Irons. “Margin back at aaronpeck46@ that brought the world doesn’t talk about it, the Manâ€?), “My Idiot BrothCallâ€? is about the 24-hour gmail.com. more I’m clamoring to erâ€? is about a wayward period before the stock see it. It doesn’t look like son who returns home to market plummeted into the normal Kevin Smith his dysfunctional famthe recession we’ve found stuff, instead it looks ily. It’s weird to see Paul ourselves in today. more like a psychological Rudd looking more like • “Red Stateâ€? horror film. Charles Manson than his Director Kevin Smith Believe it or not, but charming self, but I’m (“Jay and Silent Bobâ€?) A Reunion of Cowboy Poets, Musicians & Artisans Sundance also harbors excited to see the actor has made a huge stink with Featured Artists a lot of wonderful genre take on something a bit over the past few months flicks. Last year we got out of his norm. about not wanting to talk “Spliceâ€? and “Buriedâ€? • “Margin Callâ€? to press because of the from the widely popular This movie stars Kevin terrible reviews critics Sundance section Park Spacey (a Sundance regugave his awful movie 1-":*/(+"/ Action!

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21,

Most anticipated films at Sundance 2011


Left: Levi Sim talks to students during a photography class Wednesday (Alan Murray/Herald Jouranl). Above: Richard Hatch at the Thatcher-Young Mansion (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal) Above right: Rosemary Hatch plays the violin at the mansion. (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal) Right: Levi Sim. (Alan Murray/Herald Journal)

THATCHER- YOUNG GRAND OPENING SCHEDULE:

‘The perfect place’ T his Saturday, Jan. 22, the Thatcher-Young mansion is celebrating a new beginning and inviting the community to see what is now being done with the historic home, which has been used as an arts center for the community for 10 years. With a magical ribbon cutting at 2 p.m. to kick things off, there will be music and magical presentations by Richard, Rosemary and Jonathan Hatch at 2 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. A string quartet from USU, Serendipity Quartet, will play from 6 to 9 p.m., and work by local artists will be displayed, with a silent charity auction for the Ferguson family and light refreshments throughout the afternoon and evening. Ten years ago, the historic Thatcher-Young Mansion, nestled in back of the Ellen Eccles Theatre in downtown Logan, was remodeled and repurposed as a community arts center. The 1878 Victorian mansion held an open house July 24, 2001, and became the new home for the Alliance for the Varied Arts.

Under AVA, the mansion provided gallery space for local artists, offered art classes, held concerts and art receptions and provided a place for the community to celebrate local talent. When AVA closed its doors and merged its programs with the Cache Valley Center for the Arts last June, the CVCA board wondered how the mansion could continue to offer those things for the community, while being financially sustainable at the same time. Transition coordinator Wendi Hassan said in a Herald Journal article last September that while the vision of the mansion was to put it to “artistic use,” the final decision would be driven by sustainability. This fall, the question of what to do with the mansion was opened up for public discussion, and Hassan told the Herald Journal that she was hoping people would “just come out of the woodwork.” And come out of the woodwork they did — ideas included a children’s museum, a bead museum and even converting the space into

offices for a local insurance company, according to local photographer Levi Sim. “Those were great things and people really wanted them, but (the board) didn’t see a way to sustain it,” Sim said, adding that CVCA wanted to keep the mansion as a public place for the arts and that people generally wanted it to stay as a gallery at least. Sim’s idea was one of those that ultimately rose to the surface, and two weeks ago Sim moved his photography business, SDesigns, to the mansion, utilizing the space as a studio and a gallery for his and other local artists’ work. In addition to his own images, the mansion now features work for sale from local photographers Mel Torrie and Don O’Leary, sculptor Cynthia Hailes and painter Jason Rich. “I want people to know they can shop for art in this valley,” Sim said. “There are so many artsy people in the valley, so many people who like art but who think they have to go somewhere else to buy it. I’m trying to get people away from that, to raise awareness of art in the

• 2 p.m. Magic Ribbon Cutting & Refreshments • 2 to 9 p.m. Open House & silent artwork auction to benefit the Ferguson family of Mendon • 2 to 9 p.m. Artwork by Jason Rich, Cynthia Hailes, Mel Torrie, and Don O’Leary. Display of historic magic show posters. • 3 p.m. Magic & music performances • 4 p.m. Magic & music performances • 6 to 9 p.m. Serendipity String Quartet • 9 p.m. Auction closing

valley and get away from the starving artist idea.” Sim uses the mansion to teach photography classes and as a home for the Cache Valley Photographers club, which Sim said now has 243 members. He rents out studio space on the second floor of the mansion to semi-professional and amateur photographers for $25 per hour, and plans to hold monthly art shows and receptions for local artists. He said the mansion will be available to rent for weddings, meetings, studio space and even for local musicians to just come and jam. He said he’s very open and flexible, and the mansion will remain a place for the community to enjoy the arts. Upstairs, local music teachers will teach private violin, guitar and piano lessons, renting from CVCA. In the loft, would-be magicians of all ages will find the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music. Richard Hatch, a professional magician for 28 years, has given magic shows for notable

celebrities and traveled around to world to perform. He said the loft, which was carpeted and refurbished to be a children’s storytime area at one time and used recently as a storage space, is the perfect place to start a school of magic. What seems to be an unassuming closet door on the second floor of the mansion actually leads to a set of narrow carpeted stairs, so steep they might almost be a ladder, Hatch said. The loft opens up to a cozy carpeted room with a sloping attic ceiling and a bright cupola with beautiful Victorian windows that can be seen from the street. Hatch, who attended Logan High and USU and moved back to Cache Valley in October to be near his parents, will teach Magic 101 and Mentalism group classes, as well as private lessons. He plans to hold monthly meetings there for the Cache Valley Conjurers club, as well as a monthly performance of Music and Magic by the Hatch Academy along with his wife, Rosemary, who will be teaching private violin lessons at the mansion.

“We’re both very happy,” Richard Hatch said of the arrangement. “She’s got the perfect place for her (to teach violin) and I’ve got the perfect place for me.” As part of the plan he presented to the CVCA board, Sim said he will organize a volunteer advisory board for the mansion, which will include people from CVCA, his business mentor, a marketing professional and possibly a gallery owner in San Francisco. Sim said he plans to utilize the advisory board to continuously review what he’s doing with the mansion, and to make sure it stays profitable and continues to meet the needs of the the art community. “There have to be checks and balances, so it’s not just my photography business taking over the building,” Sim said. “And it can’t be, that’s part of the deal.” The mansion is still owned by the public and managed by the Cache Valley Center for the

Arts, and while Sim coordinates events and how the mansion is used, he rents the space from CVCA along with Richard and Rosemary Hatch and the other music teachers. Sim said there is still plenty of room at the mansion for any local artists or musicians looking to use the space. For more information about SDesigns, photography classes or scheduling an event at the mansion, visit sdesignsphotography.blogspot.com or call Sim at 5351501. For more information about the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music, visit www. hatchacademy.com or call Hatch at 535-1501.

— Story by Kate Rouse


Left: Levi Sim talks to students during a photography class Wednesday (Alan Murray/Herald Jouranl). Above: Richard Hatch at the Thatcher-Young Mansion (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal) Above right: Rosemary Hatch plays the violin at the mansion. (Eli Lucero/Herald Journal) Right: Levi Sim. (Alan Murray/Herald Journal)

THATCHER- YOUNG GRAND OPENING SCHEDULE:

‘The perfect place’ T his Saturday, Jan. 22, the Thatcher-Young mansion is celebrating a new beginning and inviting the community to see what is now being done with the historic home, which has been used as an arts center for the community for 10 years. With a magical ribbon cutting at 2 p.m. to kick things off, there will be music and magical presentations by Richard, Rosemary and Jonathan Hatch at 2 p.m., 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. A string quartet from USU, Serendipity Quartet, will play from 6 to 9 p.m., and work by local artists will be displayed, with a silent charity auction for the Ferguson family and light refreshments throughout the afternoon and evening. Ten years ago, the historic Thatcher-Young Mansion, nestled in back of the Ellen Eccles Theatre in downtown Logan, was remodeled and repurposed as a community arts center. The 1878 Victorian mansion held an open house July 24, 2001, and became the new home for the Alliance for the Varied Arts.

Under AVA, the mansion provided gallery space for local artists, offered art classes, held concerts and art receptions and provided a place for the community to celebrate local talent. When AVA closed its doors and merged its programs with the Cache Valley Center for the Arts last June, the CVCA board wondered how the mansion could continue to offer those things for the community, while being financially sustainable at the same time. Transition coordinator Wendi Hassan said in a Herald Journal article last September that while the vision of the mansion was to put it to “artistic use,” the final decision would be driven by sustainability. This fall, the question of what to do with the mansion was opened up for public discussion, and Hassan told the Herald Journal that she was hoping people would “just come out of the woodwork.” And come out of the woodwork they did — ideas included a children’s museum, a bead museum and even converting the space into

offices for a local insurance company, according to local photographer Levi Sim. “Those were great things and people really wanted them, but (the board) didn’t see a way to sustain it,” Sim said, adding that CVCA wanted to keep the mansion as a public place for the arts and that people generally wanted it to stay as a gallery at least. Sim’s idea was one of those that ultimately rose to the surface, and two weeks ago Sim moved his photography business, SDesigns, to the mansion, utilizing the space as a studio and a gallery for his and other local artists’ work. In addition to his own images, the mansion now features work for sale from local photographers Mel Torrie and Don O’Leary, sculptor Cynthia Hailes and painter Jason Rich. “I want people to know they can shop for art in this valley,” Sim said. “There are so many artsy people in the valley, so many people who like art but who think they have to go somewhere else to buy it. I’m trying to get people away from that, to raise awareness of art in the

• 2 p.m. Magic Ribbon Cutting & Refreshments • 2 to 9 p.m. Open House & silent artwork auction to benefit the Ferguson family of Mendon • 2 to 9 p.m. Artwork by Jason Rich, Cynthia Hailes, Mel Torrie, and Don O’Leary. Display of historic magic show posters. • 3 p.m. Magic & music performances • 4 p.m. Magic & music performances • 6 to 9 p.m. Serendipity String Quartet • 9 p.m. Auction closing

valley and get away from the starving artist idea.” Sim uses the mansion to teach photography classes and as a home for the Cache Valley Photographers club, which Sim said now has 243 members. He rents out studio space on the second floor of the mansion to semi-professional and amateur photographers for $25 per hour, and plans to hold monthly art shows and receptions for local artists. He said the mansion will be available to rent for weddings, meetings, studio space and even for local musicians to just come and jam. He said he’s very open and flexible, and the mansion will remain a place for the community to enjoy the arts. Upstairs, local music teachers will teach private violin, guitar and piano lessons, renting from CVCA. In the loft, would-be magicians of all ages will find the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music. Richard Hatch, a professional magician for 28 years, has given magic shows for notable

celebrities and traveled around to world to perform. He said the loft, which was carpeted and refurbished to be a children’s storytime area at one time and used recently as a storage space, is the perfect place to start a school of magic. What seems to be an unassuming closet door on the second floor of the mansion actually leads to a set of narrow carpeted stairs, so steep they might almost be a ladder, Hatch said. The loft opens up to a cozy carpeted room with a sloping attic ceiling and a bright cupola with beautiful Victorian windows that can be seen from the street. Hatch, who attended Logan High and USU and moved back to Cache Valley in October to be near his parents, will teach Magic 101 and Mentalism group classes, as well as private lessons. He plans to hold monthly meetings there for the Cache Valley Conjurers club, as well as a monthly performance of Music and Magic by the Hatch Academy along with his wife, Rosemary, who will be teaching private violin lessons at the mansion.

“We’re both very happy,” Richard Hatch said of the arrangement. “She’s got the perfect place for her (to teach violin) and I’ve got the perfect place for me.” As part of the plan he presented to the CVCA board, Sim said he will organize a volunteer advisory board for the mansion, which will include people from CVCA, his business mentor, a marketing professional and possibly a gallery owner in San Francisco. Sim said he plans to utilize the advisory board to continuously review what he’s doing with the mansion, and to make sure it stays profitable and continues to meet the needs of the the art community. “There have to be checks and balances, so it’s not just my photography business taking over the building,” Sim said. “And it can’t be, that’s part of the deal.” The mansion is still owned by the public and managed by the Cache Valley Center for the

Arts, and while Sim coordinates events and how the mansion is used, he rents the space from CVCA along with Richard and Rosemary Hatch and the other music teachers. Sim said there is still plenty of room at the mansion for any local artists or musicians looking to use the space. For more information about SDesigns, photography classes or scheduling an event at the mansion, visit sdesignsphotography.blogspot.com or call Sim at 5351501. For more information about the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music, visit www. hatchacademy.com or call Hatch at 535-1501.

— Story by Kate Rouse


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Word Power

I

HAVE ALWAYS KNOWN

words were important whether it was a well-timed quip, insult or insight. Even if you never read a book, newspaper or frozen burrito wrapper, words shape who you are and what you do. It doesn’t matter if it’s a movie, sappy pop song, text message, tweet or graffiti on a greasy bathroom wall; words matter. People may not often care what you say, but they will remember what you say. OMG it doesn’t matter if you LOL or not; you are communicating with words. You cannot get from here to there without words. Words don’t only reside in the dictionary; many are made up. Weekold babies experiment with forming sounds until they find the one that gets the desired response. Our dog has several distinctly different barks that get her what she wants. There are the danger barks, the anxiety bark and the will-you-come-get-theball-out-from-under-the-couch bark. Likewise dogs understand words and get more excited about them than any human could. Go up to any dog and say the single word “walk.” You can say it 23 times a day and each time the reaction will rival that of a last second winning touchdown on Super Bowl Sunday. Would that we could experience such repetitive glee. Words don’t stand alone; they live for context. Behind humor lies little bits of truth; sarcasm is a tamer form of anger. Pausing, inflection and punctuation can give an identical group of words dozens of different meanings. Try saying this sentence out loud putting the inflection on a different word each time: “I didn’t say you were an idiot.” Notice the nuance? “Punctuation Save Lives” is one of my favorite comedy bits going around the Internet. Without a simple correctly placed comma, “Let’s eat, grandma” turns into a Stephen King movie. And while we are in the neighborhood, there is a big difference between forgetting a comma and forgetting a coma. A dessert in the desert would be tasty, while desert in your dessert would be rather gritty. Some words just feel good to say; such as parsimonious, slime, tepid,

Slightly Off Center By Dennis Hinkamp

fish skins, erudite, bliss, conflagration, rapture, élan, festoon, rapacious and I could go on and on. Some words you can’t write or say in public media because they carry such weight. Words are fun and furious. This all leads up to say that yelling at each other is probably not the best way to use words. It is entertaining at sporting events but not so much in political discourse. Volume does not equal certainty and calling it rhetoric does not absolve anyone from anything. Few people would stand for products that didn’t stand up to their words. “Hey, the package said this was a 55-inch television, but when I got it home it was only 5.5 inches.” We should expect no less from those deciding the fate of the nation and sometimes world with their words. We should expect the news to at least aspire to truth over entertainment. Words aren’t everything, they are the only thing. (R.I.P Vince Lombardi)

As always, Dennis Hinkamp would like to thank you for reading words. He is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal as part of an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. Feedback at dhinkamp@msn.com.

Want a piece of the action? E-mail your submissions to kburgess@hjnews. com or call 7927229 for more information!

By Roxie McBride “This is Bella (my 3-year-old yellow lab) with one of her puppies. She had her second litter of 11 puppies (pictured above) this past spring. With her looks and personality, her puppies have a great chance to become the best little labbies around. Bella is a very vocal girl and will let you know when something is not right. She will talk up a storm and tell you stories that you have never heard before. Her world comes crashing down when her best friend “DIGGS” (black lab) is not by her side. The two of them can’t stand to be apart. She brings joy and laughter to the whole neighborhood, especially when they start in on their “duet” at 2 am when they both can hear sirens. I swear, they know when the sirens are coming before they are even called out!!!”


asn’t” W I y a D “The each B n o s k by Jac a leaf I am not g to the ground. fallin a turtle I am not n gree y slow. and reall gray I am not dark rious. or myste n me. the moo I am not many craters on h it w a needle I am not y in k s n small . and sharp angry I am not ated s u fr tr or upset.

“The T alebea rer” by Bill y Bird The Ta leb

“Numbers” by Glenda Grindeland There are a lot of numbers that are considered magic. From snake eyes, three’s, eleven’s and seven’s. Three is the magic number for some things, especially if you’re thinking of diamond rings. People seem to think that the third time is the charm. With number three you are not supposed to come to harm. It took number four for me to have my dreams come true. Why couldn’t one of the other marriages keep me from feeling sad and blue? When you held me in your arms, I knew I had come home. How come it took so many times to feel I didn’t have to roam? You wanted me in your life. You were not looking for a wife. We had a few golden years. There was no time for tears. We were married in real life. We were able to deal with the strife. Of all the married years I had, The one with you was never bad. I thought we would have a lot of tomorrows. Life took us by surprise and gave us only sorrows. You were here and then you were gone. I hope our time apart won’t be too long. This is not supposed to be a sad song. It is life as you are dealt it, where you belong.

ear that ha er is a busyb o s a job It isn’t to do. dy, br to folks inging sunsh ine like me and yo , u. Life wo uld be o if frien h so s But tho ds we all cou weet, se bus ld be can ma y carrying ta . ke an e le nemy. s, Let’s b ek Put an ind to one an en o Let’s b d to all this s ther, uild a b trife. ette let’s bu ild a be r world, tter life . And wh en the b u sybody comes Show th to tell a lie. , e m the and tell them g door, oodbye .

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! From short stories to poems to recipes to photos to unique tips when it comes to rearranging your closet, Cache Magazine wants your stuff! Send it to kburgess@hjnews.com, or mail it to Cache Magazine, 75 W. 300 North, Logan, UT 84321. We’ll be waiting!

Page 11 - The Herald Journal - Cache Magazine - Friday, January, 21, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board

Biographer to discuss book on Joseph Pulitzer newspaper mogul Joseph N Pulitzer is the focus of a lecture

INETEENTH-CENTURY

at Utah State University by the author of an acclaimed new biography of one of the most famous names in American press history. James McGrath Morris, author of “Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power,” will deliver the first Morris Media & Society Lecture of 2011 at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 25, in Eccles Science Learning Center, Room 046. The lecture, sponsored by the USU Journalism and Communication Department, is free and the public is invited. Morris spent five years researching and writing the first biography of Pulitzer, whose

newspaper wars with William Randolph Hearst helped mold both the American press and American politics at the end of the 19th century. Morris Like Alfred Nobel, Pulitzer is better known today for the prize that bears his name than for his contribution to history. Yet, in nineteenth-century industrial America, while Carnegie provided the steel, Rockefeller the oil and Vanderbilt the railroads, Pulitzer ushered in the modern mass media. Morris (no relation to the family that endows the lecture series)

is a former journalist who also worked in book publishing and the magazine business. His writing has appeared in “The Washington Post,” “The New York Observer,” “The Baltimore Sun,” “Wilson Quarterly” and other publications. He is editor of the monthly “Biographer’s Craft” and author of two previous books. His book has been applauded as “one of the ten best biographies 2010” by “Booklist,” and “The New York Times Book Review” says, “This well-researched, exhaustive biography reads like a novel, with fleshed-out characters…. It is the story of a man, but also of a time.” Pulitzer, whose name has become the yardstick for journalistic excellence through the

annual Pulitzer Prizes, was a Jewish Hungarian immigrant who arrived in America penniless in 1864. He founded the “St. Louis Post-Dispatch” and later moved to New York, where, as owner and publisher of the “New York World,” Pulitzer recognized the vast social changes of the industrial revolution. Harnessing the converging elements of entertainment, technology, business and demographic change, Pulitzer transformed the role of the newspaper, making it an essential feature of urban life. Fighting for freedom of the press and battling both political (Teddy Roosevelt tried to send him to prison) and newspaper foes, Pulitzer’s efforts transformed the role of newspapers.

“Pulitzer is one of the towering figures in American journalism who helped define the press in a time of rapid change,” said JCOM department head Ted Pease. “It is intriguing to think what lessons we can take from him now as the mass media again are changing so radically.” As today’s media world anticipates changes ahead in the information age, “Pulitzer” is a timely and important work that offers valuable insights into the development of modern mass media and the ever-changing landscape of American journalism. The event is part of the Department of Journalism and Communication’s Morris Media & Society Lecture Series, which brings media experts to campus.


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Book reviews

F

Honor and lies accompany ‘A Man in Uniform’ By The Associated Press

A

UTHOR KATE TAYLOR’S portrait of honor and deception in turn-of-the-century Paris is alluring and suspenseful, an even greater testament to her skills as a writer when one considers that she draws her story from France’s most notorious political scandal. The outcome of the Dreyfus Affair has been dramatized in plays and films, including the Oscar-winning “The Life of Emile Zola” in 1937. Taylor, though, envisions the

struggle to free an innocent man as a trigger for a French attorney to reconsider his own values. Lawyer Francois Dubon is comfortable in mid-life — and no wonder. He enjoys a successful if boring practice, a dutiful wife and child, social prominence and a mistress he visits nearly every afternoon on his way home from the office. What he lacks is the moral conviction that had invigorated his life as a young man. Shaking up his world is a widow, Madame Duhamel. A friend of the

Dreyfus family — or so she claims — she beseeches Dubon to take on an appeal of the court-martial that has condemned French army officer Alfred Dreyfus to Devil’s Island for espionage and treason. Her confidence that he can find the real spy beguiles Dubon as much as her beauty and manner. Drawn deeper into the mystery — is the Jewish army captain guilty after all or a victim of lies, indifference and anti-Semitism? — Dubon must decide whether to risk all that he has to join the fight for Dreyfus’

freedom. He begins to realize that truth is not as valued as reputation and appearance in Belle Epoque France. The fate of Dreyfus is a historical fact, a question easily answered by a Google search. “A Man in Uniform” provides twists and turns fitting for a cozy mystery with an interesting historical setting. The charm of Taylor’s novel lies in her seemingly effortless prose and plotting — and her ability to make room for touches of subtle humor.

Experts discuss effects of Internet on thought By The Associated Press

I

F YOU’RE INTERESTED IN answers from 127 experts (count ‘em!) to the question in the title of this book, it’s a volume that will keep you busy for a while. “Is the Internet Changing the Way You Think?” contains short essays in the experts’ own words. Many of the essays are bright and easily readable, and some use scientific terms and philosophic speculation that themselves challenge a reader’s way of thinking. Frank Wilczek, 2004 Nobel laure-

ate in physics, uses this example from chess of how the Internet has multiplied the skill of computer users: “Pioneering programs allowing computers to play chess by pure calculation debuted in 1958,” he notes, “they rapidly became more capable, beating masters (1978), grandmasters (1988), and world champions (1997).” He foresees: “Some not unrealistic possibilities ... lossless power transmission, levitated supertrains, and computers that aren’t limited by the heat they generate ... batteries that would enable cheap capture

and flexible use of solar energy and wean us off carbon burning, superstrong material that could support elevators running directly from Earth to space.” Editor John Brockman has also edited or written 22 other books on mostly scientific subjects. He maintains a scientific impartiality on this one. He gives prominence to a dismissal by Steven Pinker, professor of psychology at Harvard. Pinker’s reply to the question about the Internet bringing changes in people’s thinking is titled, “Not at All.” It

pokes a little fun at the idea of the Internet enabling users to accomplish many tasks at once. “So-called multitaskers,” he writes, “are like Woody Allen after he took a speed-reading course and devoured ‘War and Peace’” — Leo Tolstoy’s 1,500 page-novel — “in an evening. His summary: ‘It was about some Russians.’” Brockman also allows two and a half pages to a reply from Andy Clark, a philosopher at the University of Edinburgh, under the title, “What Kind of a Dumb Question Is This?”

An enchanting memoir of illustrious Iraqi family By The Associated Press

I

N THIS SWEEPING, enchanting memoir, Tamara Chalabi pieces together her illustrious family’s history and exile from Iraq in an attempt to uncover her own, fractured identity. The author’s father, Ahmad Chalabi, is the character readers may be most curious to learn about; a key leader in the opposition to Saddam Hussein, he provided the U.S. with intelligence on weapons of mass destruction leading up to the costly invasion of Iraq that proved to be faulty. But the controversial Iraqi politician is not the protagonist of this

tale. This is Tamara Chalabi’s story; one of an inheritance of exile and a struggle to connect with a distant, troubled homeland. “He has his own tale to tell, although I acknowledge that my father has played a pivotal role in shaping my relationship with his country, Iraq,” Chalabi writes. “As with everything in the Middle East, nothing makes sense until you understand the past, and the past is never straightforward.” Chalabi, who earned her doctorate in history from Harvard, brings life to the history of a country whose story has been dominated by headlines of war and death.

She tells of Abdul Hussein, the family patriarch and a prominent member of the Shia Muslim community; his son, Abdul Hadi, a

businessman turned politician; and a host of other relatives who each reflect a piece of Iraqi society and culture in its founding, golden age and later turmoil. The most compelling tale is that of Bibi Bassam, the author’s grandmother. At 16, she becomes the wife of Abdul Hadi through an arranged marriage. Strong willed and good humored, she becomes an integral part of the Chalabi household and eventually the mother of nine children, the last of which is Ahmad. Traditional yet unreserved, Bibi holds weekly gatherings for women at the beautiful Deer Palace and, in

her own way, pushes for women’s rights and liberation. When the family is forced into exile, Bibi, through her stories and songs, becomes a key link to the past for future generations. Chalabi also provides the reader with fascinating anecdotes of Iraqi history, from the country’s haphazard beginning and early leaders like King Faisal and archaeologist Gertrude Bell to the efforts of Iraqi exiles to remove Saddam Hussein. In 2003, Chalabi accompanied the Free Iraqi Forces, a volunteer battalion, the only female to do so apart from a newspaper correspondent embedded with the group.


Portman enjoying a year of love, success By The Associated Press

F

O R NATA L I E Portman, 2011 is already shaping up to be an unforgettable year. The actress is getting big awards buzz for her turn as a ballerina gone mad in “Black Swan.” She already won a Golden Globe, she’s up for a Screen Actors Guild award and she’s sure to hear her name when Oscar nominations are announced next week. Portman also has four other movies slated for release this year — including the first produced by her own company. Oh, and she’s pregnant with her first child and engaged to be married. “I’m very, very excited,” she says during an interview to promote her romantic comedy “No Strings Attached,” which opens Friday. “I feel very, very lucky.” And maybe just a bit overwhelmed. Ever poised in interviews, and always the picture of perfection at events, the Harvard grad and Oscar nominee (for 2004’s “Closer”) says having four movies in the pipeline at the same time she’s starting a family is “a little insane.”

Not that she’s letting it get to her — or letting it show, except for maybe the family part. Though she has a spate of scheduled appearances coming up — awards shows, film festivals, premieres — she’s not dashing around town juggling meetings and fittings. Instead, the star who recently relocated to Los Angeles from her hometown of New York says she’s just relaxing with her mom and enjoying the West Coast weather. “I think because so much is going on, it’s just sort of going over my head,” Portman says, her petite frame folded on a sofa, her hand intuitively resting on her bourgeoning belly. “I don’t know that I’m taking it all in. I’m just like, ‘Oh, the sun is shining. I’m with my mom. I’m with my dog. Life is good.’” Indeed, things are good for the 29-year-old. She’s engaged to Benjamin Millepied, a ballet dancer and choreographer who worked on “Black Swan,” and they are expecting their first child together. He was her date at the Globes, and when she was named best actress in a drama, she thanked him for “helping me to continue this creation of creating more life.”

Portman is also giving life to new movies through her production company, handsomecharlie films. The company’s first feature, “Hesher,” in which she stars with Joseph Gordon-Levitt, premiered at Sundance and is set for release this year. Handsomecharlie is also developing “Best Buds,” a road-trip tale of a bride-to-be who staves off a nervous breakdown by hanging with her friends and smoking marijuana. Portman is set to star. “We like all sorts of movies:

* This week’s New York Times Bestseller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “The Girl...The Hornet’s Nest” by Stieg Larsson 2. “What The Night Knows” by Dean Koontz 3. “Dead Or Alive” by Tom Clancy with G. Blackwood 4. “The Confession” by John Grisham 5. “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett PAPERBACK ADVICE 1. “Eat This, Not That! 2011” by D. Zinczenko and M. Goulding 2. “What To Expect...” by H. Murkoff and S. Mazel 3. “The Five Love Languages” by Gary Chapman 4. “Crazy Love” by Francis Chan with Danae Yankoski 5. “Radical” by David Platt HARDCOVER ADVICE 1. “The 4-Hour Body” by Timothy Ferriss 2. “Broke” by Glenn Beck and Kevin Balfe 3. “Cinch!” by Cynthia Sass 4. “Change the Culture...” by R. Connors and Tom Smith 5. “Straight Talk, No Chaser” by S. Harvey with D. Millner

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/ pages/books/

drama, thriller, sci-fi, comedy,” she says of herself and producing partner Annette Savitch. “But I think something that definitely appeals to us, just because of the lack of it, is strong female comedies, and also female friendship movies — unlike ‘Black Swan’ where they’re ripping each other’s hair out — where girls are funny, supportive friends for each other.” Portman dabbles in onscreen female friendship in “No Strings Attached.” She plays Emma Kurtzman, a doctor for whom love is like a nasty rash: irritating, painful and best avoided. Meanwhile, her colleagues (played by Greta Gerwig and Mindy Kaling) want boyfriends and lament the lack of good guys out there. They support Emma as she enters a sex-only relationship with Adam (Ashton Kutcher), zinging one-liners and cracking wise throughout. It’s the rare romantic comedy where women get laughs, Portman says. “I had been looking for a funny female character for a long time,” she says. “I feel like in romantic comedies often it’s just the girl who gets to kind of wear cute clothes and wants to get married at the end, which is

always fun to watch but it’s not necessarily a challenge or exciting to do.” Director Ivan Reitman says Portman found the script on her own and asked for the part. He recalls being surprised at her interest, then met with her. “I realized as I was talking to her: Oh, this is the girl,” he says. “She is as smart as this character is, because she needs to be that intelligent, but more than that, she has the strength that this girl has, and she has the complexity to portray somebody that is a little bit messed up.” The role called for Portman to be saucy, sexy and even drunk in one scene. Her character is bold, confident and sexually self-assured — the complete opposite of her award-winning “Black Swan” character, who is repressed, girlish and afraid. The back-to-back contrasting roles was “one of those sort of accidents,” the actress says. “I’d been with ‘Black Swan’ for 10 years before it got made, and I’d been with this movie for like three years before it got made, and it just happened to get financing in the same period,” she says. “But it’s always welcome to completely shed a character and do something very, very different.”

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Film


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Crossword 98

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

by Myles Mellor and Sally York 1. 5. 10. 15. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 26. 27. 28. 29. 31. 33. 35. 36. 37. 39. 41. 42. 45. 49. 52. 53. 54. 55. 57. 62. 64. 65. 66. 72. 73. 74. 76.

Across Dark region on the moon Fish species Bone of contention Fortify Oenologist’s interest Irritate Keyed E.U. member Attempts to ease the pain of a bad experience Attain Off the wall Plotting Mathematical operation Armeria maritima Levy Baksheesh Former Boston drummer Hashian Quetzalcoatl worshiper Fetor Swagger stick Pretentious American folk song aka “Birmingham Jail” Execute, in a way Skimmer, e.g. Yemeni’s neighbor Pilothouse abbr. Jolie or Magda Spontaneous spectacles Curvature of the spine Sakhalin people Swing site Deliberate carefully Masefield play “The Tragedy of ___” In the Red? Exiguity Wicked one?

81. Jag 82. Stretch of turbulent water 83. Jibe 84. Tropical snake 85. Kind of value 87. Performs wedding coordinators’ tasks 94. Ball of yarn 95. Diaper cream ingredient 96. Libertine 97. Numbers game 100. One of twelve: abbr. 101. See 100-Across 103. Impressed 105. Exposure 109. Cooling-off period 111. Gum olibanum 112. Sonata section 114. It has moles: abbr. 115. Vince Gill song 119. Clavell’s “___-Pan” 120. Somewhere else 121. Sang-froid 122. First word of “The Raven” 123. Gelderland town 124. Paul Bunyan, at times 125. Experimental computers by Xerox 126. Drew on Down Stories Home with a view New Delhi salad James Whitcomb Riley’s “___ I Went Mad” 5. Measuring instrument 6. Blew out of the water 7. Firkin 1. 2. 3. 4.

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 23. 24. 25. 30. 32. 34. 35. 38. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 46. 47. 48. 50. 51. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 63. 64. 67. 68. 69.

Stirring One who cries foul? He follows Jon at night Carefree Savvy about Root word? Lacquer ingredient Temperate Awakening ___ Cinema, subsidiary of Time Warner Disappointment, in London Musical direction Thwack Toe the line British system of with- holding tax: abbr. Fails to be Crossword feature Baneberry Karate blow 42nd President Genesis shepherd Distinctions In that place Edwin Starr single Johnson or Morrison Groove-billed ___ Popeyed Pizzazz Took the bait Personnel director Asian buffalo Hindu month Widespread Stalkless Kitchen set Notre Dame niche Have a cow? Revolt Postal creed word

70. 71. 75. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 84. 86. 87.

Active sort Manitoba native Shoot ___ de deux Apt name for a lawyer? Alloy of nickel and iron Hinder Peruvian money Bundle Nae sayer Doctor Who villainess,

A Kate and William marathon on TLC By The Associated Press

T

HE TLC CHANNEL IS giving the wedding of Britain’s Prince William the royal treatment. In the five days leading up to the April 29 nuptials of William and Kate Middleton, the channel will air specials featuring archived and other footage, interviews and a round-table discussion with experts on royalty, TLC said Wednesday. The U.K.-themed week, in partnership with ITV Studios, also will include a show focusing on British and U.S. hoarders and “extreme”

collectors of royal memorabilia. The channel plans live coverage of the wedding, with a condensed version of the event set to air April 30-May 1. Next month, TLC will show

“The Queen,” a new two-hour special that explores romance, weddings and divorce among members of Queen Elizabeth II’s family. The special will air on Feb. 13 (9 p.m. EST). The program will be preceded by repeats of two specials about William and his fiancee: “William & Kate: A Royal Love Story” (7 p.m. EST) and “William, Kate & 8 Royal Weddings” (8 p.m. EST). For TLC, home of “Four Weddings, “Say Yes to the Dress” and other wedding-themed shows, the weeklong coverage is intended to enhance viewers’ “overall royal experience.”

with “the” 88. Declaim 89. Roman Catholic devotion 90. Obscurity 91. Pant 92. Anchor part 93. No-goodnik 98. Straightens up 99. Fox or turkey follower 101. Get along 102. Capital of West-

ern Australia 104. Taradiddle 106. Graphic symbols 107. Tone down 108. Alleviated 110. Passage 111. Well-developed muscle 113. Sleep ___ 116. French beverage 117. Balancing pro 118. Marker

Answers from last week


Friday Linden Olsen will perform live music from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Ave. Troop 1 Boy Scouts will have a spaghetti dinner from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Friday at 12 S. 200 West. Cost is $5 per person or $20 for a family of six. All proceeds support training, supplies and scout activities. Utah State University’s Science Unwrapped series continues at 7 p.m. on Friday in the Emert Auditorium, Room 130, of the Eccles Science Learning Center on campus. USU physicist Robert Davies will deliver a presentation titled “Earth’s Changing Climate.” Stokes Nature Center invites toddlers ages 2 to 3 to join them for Parent Tot from 10 to 11 a.m. on Friday. Explore animals, plants, and nature through music, crafts and games. This program is parent interactive, and all toddlers must have a parent present to participate and explore along with their child. The cost is $3 ($2.50 for SNC members). To register, call 755-3239 or e-mail nature@ logannature.org. Audra McDonald, four-time Tony Award winning singer and actress, joins in the Celebration of the Arts Week at Utah State University at 7:30 p.m. on Friday for the Grand Gala in the Kent Concert Hall. Tickets are $10 for general admission; free for USU students. To purchase, go to http://arts.usu. edu.  An evening of one-act plays will be presented at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday at USU’s Chase Fine Arts Center, Studio Theatre. Students showcase their skills by writing, directing, producing and acting.

Saturday The Cache Practical Shooters (CAPS) will hold its monthly pistol match at 9 a.m. on Saturday at the Cache Valley Public Shooting Range on Valley View Highway. A required New Shooter Orientation Class will begin at 7:45 a.m. The match starts at 9 a.m. Free to first-time shooters or shooters who have not shot with us previously. Match fees are $12 for members and $17 for non- members. For more information, go to www.utahshooters. org or contact Rich Meacham at 787-8131 or e-mail drmeacham@comcast.net. The Western singing duo Tumbleweeds will perform from 6 pm to closing on Saturday at the Cracker Barrel Cafe in Paradise. Kids ages 3 and up are invited to make a craft, have a treat and watch a video from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday at the Macey’s in Providence. See the largest multi-block ice sculpture in Utah illuminate the night sky at the USU Performance Hall promenade. The Caine College of the Arts and ASUSU combine forces to present PoBev, the once-a-month open-mic style performance of the written word and music, accompanied

by a beverage. The event will be from 9 p.m. to 12 a.m. on Saturday at USU’s Taggart Student Center ballroom. The Thatcher-Young Mansion is hosting an open house from 2 to 9 p.m. on Saturday in the Mansion (35 W. 100 South). There will be a magic ribbon cutting, magic and music performances, historic magic posters and artwork by Mel Torrey, Jason Rich, and Cynthia Hailes on display, followed by refreshments and a string quartet. The event celebrates new magic, music and photography class offerings. Three actors take on the herculean task of reenacting the entire repertoire of Shakespeare in less than two hours during “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged).” The show will be from 4 to 6 p.m. on Saturday at the Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center Street. Cost is $15. For $20, enjoy the show and a dinner at the Prix Fixe honoring emeriti from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Bluebird Restaurant Jeremy Threlfall will be performing a concert at 3 p.m. on Saturday, at Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. Free. For more information, call 792-0353.

Tuesday Health for Life will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday in the public meeting room of the Logan Library, 255 N. Main St. Free. The speaker will be certified hypnotherapist Craig Smith, who will speak on “Subconscious Training and the Power of Suggestion.” Enjoy the USU Art Exhibition and lunch at 10 a.m. on Tuesday with OPTIONS for Independence. The exhibit is free; lunch prices will vary. This activity is part of the Community Integration Program at OPTIONS for Independence which encourages people with disabilities to take part in a variety of activities. To sign up, schedule transportation or for more information, contact Mandie at 753-5353 ext. 108. USU Extension in Cache County will offer a workshop titled “Heathly Couple Relationships” at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday in the TSC Skyroom at USU. The speaker will be Dr. Kay Bradford, a professor in the Family, Consumer, and Human Development Department at USU. A light dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. followed by the relationship workshop. The cost is $6 per person; $10 per couple. To register, call 752-6263. The AARP Senior Defensive Drivers class will be held from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday at Cache County Senior Center. Cost is $12 for AARP members; $14 for nonmembers. The certificate of completion will reduce auto insurance rates. Call Susie at 753-2866 to make a reservation. The Brazilian Guitar Quartet will perform from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. on Tuesday at USU’s Performance Hall. Cost is $24 for general admission. For more information, go to http:// arts.usu.edu.

Wednesday Scott Bradley teaches a class on the Constitution called “To Preserve The Nation” at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays at the BookTable. Free. For more information, call 753-2930 or 753-8844. USU Opera Theatre presents “Scenes from Giulio Cesare in Egitto (1724) by George Frideric Handel” from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. from Wednesay through Saturday at the Caine Lyric Theatre, 28 West Center. Tickets are $8 to $13. For more information, go to http://arts. usu.edu.

Thursday The Friends of the Utah Avalanche Center in Logan and the Utah State UniversityOutdoor Recreation Program are offering a Level 2 Avalanche Course from Jan. 27 to 30. Cost is $290. Registration at the USU ORP. For more information, call 7973264 or 757-2794. USU Extension Cache County Food$ense program will hold a class titled “Balancing Act!” at 11 a.m. on Thursday. Free. Come learn how to balance a busy lifestyle with healthy eating by setting up a delicious, nutritious, and cost-effective meal plan. We are also excited to introduce new fruit and grain lessons. This month we will highlight grapefruit. Call and reserve your spot today!  Stephanie Skewes will present hearty meal ideas like hunters stew and pot roast from 7 to 8 p.m. on Thursday at the Macey’s in Providence. Eyes Lips Eyes with Battleschool and Till We Have Faces will perform alternative rock and electronic music at 8 p.m. on Thursday at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Cost is $5.

Upcoming events Join us at Chick-fil-A for a fun time! We provide a craft, story time, singing and playdough time. Free. From 10 a.m. to noon every Monday at 1323 N. Main St. The Bel Canto Women’s Chorus is beginning its Spring Rehearsals on Tuesday evenings at the Logan Fourth/Yorkshire Ward Building, 294 N. 100 East. Women interested in joining the chorus should contact Laurel Maughan, 245-3204, for audition information. Singers are needed for all sections (S,SS,A). The Utah State Courts is offering a free class each month for children 9 to 12-years old whose parents have filed for divorce or whose parents are divorced. There is no charge to attend the class, which is offered from 3:30 to 5 p.m. the last Thursday of the month at the Cache County Courthouse, 135 N. 100 West. For more information, call 7501300 or go to www.utcourts.gov and click on Divorce Education Classes. USU Extension is now registering for the 2011 Beginning Master Gardener Classes. Weekly class topics include soils, fertilizers, fruits, vegetables, insects, turf grasses, pes-

ticides, ornamental plants, diseases and others. Many participants join the Master Gardener Organization that serves the community in a variety of ways including 4-H, fair judging, landscape tours, community gardens and other fun activities. Classes start Feb. 1. Registration is $95. To download a registration form or for further information, visit: http:// extension.usu.edu/cache/htm/horticulture or call 752-6263. The Logan Family History Center offers free classes on topics like ancestry.com, Legacy, Hispanic research, and others. Class sizes are limited. To assure a seat, register in advance by calling 755-5594. To see a list of classes and obtain a class handout go to www.rootsweb.com/~utcfhc. Nordic United and its partners have begun grooming Green Canyon for cross country skiing. Please check the website www.nordicunited.org for a grooming schedule. Take a historical journey through an exhibition of Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art permanent collection highlighting different themes of art from Post Surrealism to Postmodernism, at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, 650 N. 1100 East or check the website at www.artmuseum.usu.edu. Attention Dog Lovers: Dog training classes will now be held every Wednesday at 5 p.m. at the Cache Humane Society shelter, located at 2370 W. 200 North. This class is mandatory for dog volunteers that joined CHS before December. We will discuss how to train shelter dogs basic obedience skills like sit, down, stay; all without punishment or pushing. We will also learn the “wrap” technique for dogs that drag you, loose leash walking, how to read dog body language, etc. Many new techniques at the shelter to learn for the dog volunteers. You must register for the class as space is limited. Please contact Marcia Robinson at marciacachehumane@ gmail.com and confirm the month and day you are interested in. A weekly Peace Vigil is held from 5:30 to 6 p.m. on Fridays on the east side of Main Street between Center Street and 100 North. For more information, e-mail info@loganpeace.org or call 755-5137. Ye Olde Tyme Quilters meet at 10 a.m. on Wednesdays at OPTIONS for Independence, 1095 N. Main St. Lunch will follow. Prices will vary. For more information or to schedule free transportation, contact Royella at 753-5353 ext 105. The Post-Mormon Community’s Cache Valley chapter meets every Sunday at 6:30 p.m. is a non-sectarian organization of individuals and families who have left Mormonism. The Cache Valley chapter meets for dinner and socializing at a local restaurant, every Sunday evening at 6:30 p.m. We welcome new-comers! For more information call Jeff at 770-4263, or go to our website at, www.postmormon.org/logan. The Knotty Knitters meet from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursdays at the Senior Citizens Center. Come in through the South Doors by the Dining Room. Come knit, crochet, or spin. For more information, call Cathy at 752-3923.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

Calendar


Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 21, 2011

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Profile for The Herald Journal

Cache Magazine  

Cache Valley's arts and entertainment magazine

Cache Magazine  

Cache Valley's arts and entertainment magazine

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