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Cache

Magazine

The tension

between line and color Andrew Williams-Dremeaux explores the interplay of human order and the poetry of nature.

The Herald Journal

Jan. 14-20, 2011


Page 2 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

Cache The Herald Journal’s

Arts & Entertainment Calendar

A piece by Andrew Williams-Dremeaux titled “Lago — Red.” Read more about Williams-Dremeaux’s work on page 8. Photo submitted by the artist.

From the editor my boyfriend, Bruce, made his debut appearance in my editor’s column and now I am proud to say that he is my fiancé. WOOT, WOOT, WOOT, WOOT! Sorry, just had to get that out of my system — back to professional mode. The proposal happened Tuesday evening at the P.F. Chang’s restaurant in downtown Salt Lake City. We had just finished a delicious dinner, when Bruce got down on one knee by the table (now “our table,” #64) and asked me to be his wife. I replied with a wholehearted “yes,” and he presented me with a stunning Tiffany ring. My parents were witnesses and many of P.F. Chang’s waitresses also celebrated

Slow Wave

(Page 5) Foreign vs. domestic wines and William’s new picks

Magazine

On the cover:

K I’M JUST GOING TO O come right out and say it — I have a big announcement. Last week,

What’s inside this week

kburgess@hjnews.com

with us — stopping by the table to offer congratulations. I can truly say that it was a magical night, and I’ve never been happier. Bruce and I have settled on 11/11/11 as the wedding date, which fits nicely with our engagement date, 1/11/11. The big event will take place on the Riverwalk in San Antonio, Texas — my intended’s hometown. Isn’t it amazing how your whole life can change in a moment? Things feel different, full of new promise and possibilities. Since I’m now a betrothed woman, I welcome any reader comments, tips, cautionary tales or funny anecdotes on how to make a marriage last. Feel free to e-mail me — I’ll share some of my favorite reader advice in my column during the coming weeks.

— Kim Burgess Cache Magazine editor

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Books .......................p.13 Crossword.................p.14

Brazilian guitar masters to perform at Utah State

(Page 11)

An agonizing ‘Dilemma’

(Page 7) More cute pets being cute!

Cute

pet photo of the week

This dog is available for adoption! Pet: Mrs. Fields From: Cache Humane Why she’s so lovable: “Our beautiful German shorthair pointer Mrs. Fields just had her puppies! Fourteen babies came from this little momma! There will be no holds or reservations. Instead, the puppies will be adopted first come, first served when they are the proper age. Keep an eye out for their six-week birthday, around the second week of January 2011, when they will officially be available for adoption! For more information, call 792-3920.”

Slow Wave is created from real people’s dreams as drawn by Jesse Reklaw. Ask Jesse to draw your dream! Visit www.slowwave.com to find out how.


A week of arts events at Utah State

U

TAH STATE University’s Caine College of the Arts (CCA) is hosting the first “Celebration of the Arts” with a variety of events, including theater performances, concerts, art exhibits and a paint-by-gum wall mural. Activities take place Jan. 18 to 22. “Celebration of the Arts is a terrific occasion and a great way to launch a tradition for the college,” said Craig Jessop, dean of the Caine College of the Arts. Traveling campus performers, known as CCA Buskers, kick off festivities Tuesday, Jan. 18, by entertaining university audiences as they replace the typical lunch-

time lull with musical magic. Wednesday, Jan. 19, will lighten the evening as the Caine College of the Arts hosts “Raising Caine,” a concert featuring CCA faculty, staff and students. In addition, the concert offers a special performance featuring Jessop and Gary Amano, professor and assistant department head for the department of music and head of the department’s piano program. “We are proud to share the talents of our students and faculty with the community,” Amano said. “We are honored to have this chance to collaborate with distinguished USU alumni and other special guests.”

The free concert begins at 7:30 p.m. in the USU Performance Hall and an ice sculpture will be unveiled at 9 p.m. outside the Performance Hall. Hot chocolate will be served.

On Thursday, the Caine College of the Arts takes the court at the USU Aggie basketball game. The game starts at 7:05 p.m. in the USU Spectrum and by halftime, the CCA’s visual spectacle and special guest are bound to have fans dancing in the aisles. “The Celebration of the Arts: Grand Gala” is at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 21, and provides an evening of glitz, glam and world-class entertainment honoring Marie Eccles Caine, Manon Caine Russell and Kathryn Caine Wanlass. The concert is held in the Kent Concert Hall of the Chase Fine Arts Center. “For many years, the generosity of the Eccles and Caine

families has allowed for buildings, programs and education projects to be funded wholly or in part throughout USU’s campus and the valley,” Jessop said. “In addition, the Caine family’s kindness and generosity in supporting the arts, especially to the Caine College of the Arts, is unprecedented and exceptional.” The Gala will also recognize top students as well as artistic highlights from 2010. Tickets are $10 general admission; free for USU students. Throughout this week, dozens of exhibitions, performances and events will be held. For more information, go to http://arts.usu.edu.

USU presents big ice sculpture

O

NE OF THE largest multi-block ice sculptures in Utah will light the night sky Wednesday, Jan. 19, as part of Utah State University’s Celebration of the Arts week, hosted by the Caine College of the Arts. The illuminated ice sculpture, “CCA Electrifies,” is a multi-block sculpture constructed of 24 crystal-clear ice blocks. When constructed, the structure, at 17 feet long, 7 feet wide and more than 7 feet high, will weigh more than 7,500 pounds. At approximately 9 p.m. outside the Performance Hall, the sculpture’s lights will appear, showcasing a sparkling display of ice and colored lights. “It will be a grand illumination of an expressive and pivotal piece of art that will commemorate the first of many celebrations for the Caine College of Arts,” said Craig Jessop, dean of the Caine College of the Arts. “The piece is designed to

capture the light and youthfulness of this brilliant new college, while honoring some of our most treasured friends.” The arrangement of the blocks of ice relate to the structure of the building behind them, the Chase Fine Arts Center. The central structure will have four blocks fused together, while the remaining 20 blocks will be arranged at slight angles to provide contrast, said Victoria Rowe Berry, executive director of the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art. “At that scale, it will be an impressive piece of art when it is completed,” said Jeff Petercsak, executive director of the National Ice Carving Association, a global organization based in the United States with more than 400 members. Ice is a unique medium that continues to be impacted by its environment, he said. The sun, wind and temperature continue to change and define an ice piece uniquely from any

other form. “Ice is a fascinating material,” Berry said. “At the unveiling we will flood the structure with brilliant colored light. When illuminated, the beams of light will bounce off the various facets of the ice — like jewels in the night — creating a lasting and memorable visual impression.” John Simpson, ice sculptor and executive chef at Culinary Concepts, will supervise and help fabricate the ice piece. Simpson estimates that it will take three days of working sideby-side with students to fuse, carve and carefully assemble the 24 blocks of ice; altering them from individual pieces into a singular, visual and cohesive object. “I know people that sculpt — I sculpt,” Simpson said. “However, the characteristic of this sculpture is the sheer volume. It’s extreme. It didn’t just happen.”

This piece will echo pyramidal design and mimic the historical tradition of monuments such as the Egyptian pyramids, said Berry. This really isn’t a work of art as much as an object that will perform the creative process. “I think one of the appealing characteristics is its ephemeral qualities — it is going to melt and go away after all the effort,” said Berry. “In a week or two, it will be weathered and reduced to piles of ice.” “CCA Electrifies: The Unveiling” will light-up the evening following “Raising Caine,” a free musical concert hosted by the Caine College of the Arts featuring faculty, staff and students. In addition, the concert will offer a special performance featuring Jessop and Gary Amano, professor and assistant department head for the department of music.

A

photography exhibit opens the new year and exhibition schedule at Utah State University’s Merrill Cazier Library. “The Canyon: Recreation in Logan Canyon, 1890s-1970s” can be seen in the library’s lobby through mid-March. The exhibition was assembled by Daniel Davis, Merrill-Cazier Library’s Special Collections and Archives photograph curator. Included are a sampling of images from the Logan Canyon Photograph Collection housed in Special Collections and Archives. The exhibit includes more than 20 images of recreational activities in Logan Canyon from the 1890s to the 1970s.

Page 3 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

All mixed up


Page 4 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

All mixed up

Brazilian guitarists to perform at Utah State

I

N BRAZIL, THE Brazilian Guitar Quartet is referred to as the “Dream Team,” four of the country’s most brilliant musicians. Since their first appearances outside of Brazil in 1999, the BGQ has become one of the world’s most sought-after guitar ensembles. At 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 26, the quartet will perform as part of the 2010-2011 Chamber Music Society of Logan’s concert series. Tickets are $24 or $10 for students and are available at www.arts.usu.org. The show takes place at the Manon Caine Russell Kathryn Caine Wanlass Performance Hall. The BGQ consists of Everton Gloeden, Tadeu Do Amaral, Luis Mantovani and Gustavo Costa. Mantovani is the only guitarist to win the prestigious Arts Diploma from the New England Consevatory of Music in Boston and is a recent winner of the coveted Pro Musicis International Award. The BGQ is unique for incorporating two eight-string

guitars in their ensemble. BGQ founding member Paul Galbraith, a member of the quartet until 2003, developed the eightstring guitar as an innovative instrument that increases the range, sound and repertoire of guitar music. The quartet has played in major performance halls around the world. U. S. engagements have included the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the 92nd Street Y in New York City. BGQ’s repertoire ranges from Bach, Brazilian music of many styles and masterworks from Spain. For their Logan performance, the BGQ will play music from Baroque master J.S. Bach, Brazilian composers Heitor VillaLobos and Ronaldo Miranda and Spanish composer Isaac Albeniz. The concert will open with excerpts from Bach’s Orchestral Suite #3, BVW 1068. Bach’s Four Orchestral Suites were written from 1717 to 1723. The suites were composed for varied instrumental combinations, with

Bach himself at the harpsichord. The Air from Suite No. 3 is one of the most famous pieces of classical music and has become known as Air on the G String. Heitor Villa-Lobos, Brazil’s important composer, penned 17 string quartets over 42 years. String Quartet No. 12 was composed in 1950 while Villa-Lobos was a patient at Memorial Hospital in New York City. Rinaldo Miranda, a contemporary Brazilian composer, began his career in 1977. His composed works includes solo instrumental pieces, chamber works, symphonies and an opera. The Variacoes Serias piece alludes to Mendelssohn’s piece of the same name. The Variations are featured on BGQ CD, Encantamento. The piece premiered in 2004 with the Baltimore Symphony. Issac Albeniz a colorful child prodigy, pianist and composer was born in Spain in 1860. He composed his 12-piece suite Iberia for piano, though the BGQ has adapted it for guitar.

Get healthy at Utah State’s Wellness Expo HE UTAH STATE T University Wellness Expo is schedule for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Gentle Yoga is one of the offerings at USU’s Wellness Expo, scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 20.

on Thursday, Jan. 20, on the second floor of the Taggart Student Center (TSC). “As a joint effort with Student Services and Human Resources, this event’s purpose is to inspire others and engage people to fulfill their potential of living strong, successful, and healthy lives,” said USU Wellness Coordinator Caroline Shugart. The Wellness Expo is open for students, employees, and the community. Interactive booths, displays, and health screenings will be available offering information about

nutrition, fitness, relaxation, sustainability and financial health. Try on a 20-pound body fat suit and experience how difficult it is to perform simple tasks, or find out your current health numbers and how you can improve your lifestyle. Health screenings to determine body mass index, body fat percentage, blood pressure, blood sugar, grip strength, and flexibility will be open to attendees. Free diabetes and blood sugar screenings will be available thanks to the support of Logan Regional Hospital. To schedule an appointment, call 797-0122. Walk-ins will

also be welcome. To participate in a free hearing test provided by the USU Hearing Clinic, call 797-1375. Come enjoy a free gentle yoga class the day of the event at noon in the TSC Ballroom. No prior yoga experience is required, but comfortable clothing is recommended. The halfhour session will be followed by a motivational yoga documentary from 12:30 to 1:20 p.m. Chair massage will also be accessible for participants. More information is available at www.usu.edu/wellness or by contacting Shugart at caroline.shugart@usu.edu, 797-0735.


T

he Thatcher-Young Mansion is getting a new look! On Jan. 1, the Hatch Academy of Magic & Music and The Studio moved into the building, which will now host a variety of arts activities under the direction of Levi Sim, professional photographer and instructor with The Studio. The mansion is still managed by the Cache Valley Center for the Arts and with the addition of new programs and interest, CVCA is looking forward to this partnership and arts incubator concept. To celebrate, an open house is planned for Saturday, Jan. 22 in the Mansion, 35 W. 100 South. From 2 to 5 p.m., the focus will be on The Hatch Academy followed by highlight from The Studio from 6 to 9 p.m. A magical ribbon cutting ceremony is scheduled at 2 p.m., with brief performances at 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. A sampling of Hatch’s collection of rare magic posters and lithographs will be on display in the mansion for the open house celebration. Works from artists Mel Torrey, Jason Rich and Cynthia Hales will be on display. A string quartet will also perform.

“This opportunity will help the mansion continue to provide arts instruction and artistic development,” said Wally Bloss, executive director at the Cache Valley Center for the Arts. “All the artists that utilize the space are full of energy and committed to creating a thriving arts incubator space.” Levi Sim has been an active leader in the community and created the Cache Valley Photographers, a group of 237 photographers working in the extended Cache Valley area. He is a locally based professional photographer and instructor at Bridgerland Applied Technology and has the energy and drive to make the Mansion come alive. He is working with The Hatch Academy of Magic & Music, Ryan Conger, Kris Krompel and the Cache Valley Photographers and others in the arts community to increase awareness and provide ongoing arts education and instruction opportunities. The Studio provides gallery space, ongoing classes, studio rental, equipment rental, facility rental, and live performance space. This addition complements the activity already hap-

Coming soon: The Mollies • Who: Salt Lake City-based indie rockers. Band includes a ukulele player • With: Libbie Linton, Buffalo • When: 8 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 20 • Where: Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. • Cost: $5 • More information: www.myspace. com/whysound or www.myspace.com/themolliesmusic

Rosemary Kimura Hatch teaching violin. Photo courtesey of the Cache Valley Center for the Arts.

pening in the Bullen Center and Ellen Eccles Theatre. The mansion was built by George W. Thatcher and his wife, Eunice Caroline (Luna) Young Thatcher. The space was remodeled by CVCA and then mayor Newel Daines in 2001 to provide gal-

lery space. This partnership allows artists to continue to feature their work with extended business hours and new opportunities. The mansion will continue to serve as a beacon for the arts and artists. There has always been an

Page 5 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

A new era at Thatcher-Young Mansion

element of music and classes offered at the mansion — now they will be accentuated by the combination of music and a center for photography and arts. Call 752-0026 or visit the website www.cachearts.org for more details.

‘Rehearsal for Murder’ coming to Heritage EHEARSAL “R for Murder” will play at 7:30 p.m. every

Monday, Friday and Saturday, Jan. 14, through Feb. 5, at the Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Highway 89, Perry. A matinees will start at 2 p.m., Jan. 22. Tickets are $9 for adults and $8 for seniors and children. For reservations, call 435-723-8392. The play follows Alex Dennison, a well-known playwright but much-burdened man. Last year he

opened his latest and greatest play starring Monica Welles, a woman with whom he was deeply in love. However, after the play opened to mixed reviews, Monica was found dead in the street in front of her apartment building. Everyone thinks it was suicide. Alex knows it was murder. One year later, Alex brings back former cast members to the theatre, convinced that one of them killed Monica.


Page 6 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

Film Still playing “Tron: Legacy” Rated PG ★★1⁄2 Lots “Tron: Legacy” - Hugely high-tech and forward-thinking in its day, “Tron” now looks cheesy and quaint in retrospect, with its blocky graphics and simplistic blips and bleeps. The original film from 1982 was all about the possibility of technology and the human imagination, and the adventures that could result from marrying the two, but only now are the computer-generated effects available to render this digital world in its fullest potential. Hence, we have a sequel, which is in 3-D (of course) but is actually best viewed in IMAX 3-D. The whole point of the story and the aesthetics are that they’re meant to convey an immersive experience. We’re supposed to feel just as trapped inside this challenging and dangerous electronic realm as the film’s characters. And at over two hours, we are indeed trapped - there is no justifiable reason for such a lengthy running time. While director Joseph Kosinski’s feature film debut is thrilling and cool-looking for about the first half, its races, games and visuals eventually grow repetitive, which only draws attention to how flimsy and preposterous the script is from Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz. “Tron: Legacy” is a mishmash of pop culture references and movie rip-offs, Eastern philosophy and various religions, and one insanely cute, strategically placed Boston terrier. And with the return of Jeff Bridges, there’s plenty of Dudeishness for you fans of “The Big Lebowski.” PG for sequences of sci-fi action violence and brief mild language. In 3-D and IMAX 3-D. 125 minutes. “Black Swan” Rated R ★★★1⁄2 At once gorgeous and gloriously nutso, a trippy, twisted fantasy that delights and disturbs in equal measure. Darren Aronofsky takes the same stripped-down fascination with, and appreciation for, the minutiae of preparation that he brought to his Oscar-nominated “The Wrestler” and applies it to the

pursuit of a different kind of artistry: ballet. But then the director mixes in a wildly hallucinatory flair as “Black Swan” enters darker psychological territory. Working with his frequent cinematographer, Matthew Libatique, and incorporating some dazzling visual effects, Aronofsky spins a nightmare scenario within a seemingly gentle, pristine world. The visions and dreams soar over-the-top at times, but always knowingly so, and with great style; “Black Swan” wallows in its grandiosity, and if you’re willing to go along with it, you’ll find yourself wowed by one of the best films of the year. Natalie Portman gives it her all in a brave and demanding performance as Nina, a driven but innocent New York City ballerina. When it comes time to stage a bold, new production of “Swan Lake,” the company’s artistic director (a skeevy and manipulative Vincent Cassel) thinks Nina is perfect to play the White Swan. But he needs a dancer who also can portray the fierce sexuality of the Black Swan. Enter Lily (Mila Kunis), a savvy and confident newcomer who represents Nina’s biggest threat to getting the lead role. R for strong sexual content, disturbing violent images, language and some drug use. 110 minutes. “Yogi Bear” Rated PG ★★ Inspired by Art Carney’s Ed Norton from “The Honeymooners” and originally voiced by Daws Butler, Yogi Bear has always had an intelligence that surpasses that of your typical clawed mammalia. He has finally gotten his own movie - in 3-D, no less - and so it comes with little surprise but still some disappointment that “Yogi Bear” is a bland pic-a-nic, indeed. There he is, in trademark green tie and white collar and voiced by Dan Aykroyd, with the bow-tied Boo Boo (Justin Timberlake) at his side. Of course, this being the highly advanced 21st century, simple animation won’t do, so we must suffer through the mediocre, lifeless computergenerated animation of this treasured twosome. They’re in an otherwise live-action film with Tom Cavanagh (“Ed”) as Park

law from hell again puts Stiller’s nervous son-in-law under surveillance. The whole gang returns, including Dustin Hoffman, Barbra Streisand, Owen Wilson, Teri Polo and Blythe Danner, with Jessica Alba, Laura Dern and Harvey Keitel joining the cast. Hopefully, the Fockers will call it quits after this. We don’t need these in-laws coming to visit again. PG-13 for mature sexual humor throughout, language and some drug content. 98 minutes.

“Season of the Witch” Rated PG-13 ★ So here’s the gimmick: This takes place during the 14th century, but everyone speaks in contemporary language, which might have been acceptable if the dialogue were clever or intelligent or funny or, you know, good. Instead, Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman are the knights who say ... nothing of any particular note in a supernatural action thriller that’s never actually thrilling. You expect this kind of schlock in January, but “Season of the Witch” isn’t even bad in an enjoyable way. The scenery is drab, the battles are interchangeable, and no one seems particularly interested in being here. At the same time, Ranger Smith and Anna Farris as Rachel Johnson, a documentary filmmaker visiting Jellystone Park, most likely trying to beat Ken Burns to the punch. A fight ensues to save Jellystone from greedy politicians (Andrew Daly and Nate Corddry) and the whole ordeal is over in little more than an hour and a quarter. Directed by effects veteran Eric Brevig, it’s blessedly brief, and Aykroyd and Timberlake supply good voice work. But Yogi deserves better jokes and more wildness in which to roam free. Can’t a bear get some lunch around here? PG for some mild rude humor. 80 minutes.

Dominic Sena (who previously directed Cage in “Gone in Sixty Seconds”) never flat-out goes for it in a schlocky, B-horror kind of way. What we’re left with is just bloated, boring and utterly forgettable. Cage isn’t even in full-on, wheels-off mode here, sadly; instead, he delivers his lines in a dreary monotone. After killing untold numbers of men in the name of god during the Crusades, Cage’s character, Behmen, and his wisecracking sidekick, Felson, decide to pack it in. But to avoid being imprisoned for desertion, they must transport a suspected witch (Claire Foy) to a faraway abbey for trial. PG-13 for thematic elements, violence and disturbing content. 100 minutes. “Little Fockers” Rated PG-13 ★1⁄2 Meet the latest in Robert De Niro and Ben Stiller’s comedy franchise. Grit your teeth through the fairly short though agonizing duration of its stay. Then wave goodbye in relief as its huge cast of characters departs like the annoying in-laws they are. “Meet the Parents” was a tolerable trifle and “Meet the Fockers” was a bloated bore. But this third installment is tasteless trash, filled with abysmally unfunny gags involving vomit, enemas, erectile dysfunction and the like. Director Paul Weitz delivers a string of dumb episodes as De Niro’s father-in-

“True Grit” Rated PG-13 ★★★ One of the most mainstream, crowd-pleasing films Joel and Ethan Coen have ever made. It’s sort of a screwball Western, if you will, with vivid performances and strikingly vast, picturesque vistas, the always gorgeous work of the always great Roger Deakins, the Coens’ frequent cinematographer. But it’s a minor entry from the writing-directing brothers, especially when you consider the inventiveness and strength of their canon and the close aesthetic resemblance to “No Country for Old Men,” their masterpiece. While “True Grit” is entertaining, it’s also surprisingly lacking in emotional resonance, as well as the intriguing sense of ambiguity that so often permeates Coen pictures. Only toward the end does it feel like anything is at stake, but at least it’s enjoyable while you’re waiting. Hailee Steinfeld in her film debut is a revelation as Mattie Ross, the 19th-century pioneer teenager who demands vengeance for her father’s murder. She seeks help from a man she hears has true grit: one-eyed, alcoholic U.S. Marshal Rooster Cogburn. Jeff Bridges plays the role that earned John Wayne his only Academy Award as gruff and grizzled, a lawman who’s lived a long and welllubricated life, but who also has attained a certain self-possession about it. Matt Damon again proves he can do anything, joining the duo on the trail as a preening Texas Ranger. PG-13 for some intense sequences of Western violence including disturbing images. 110 minutes.

— All reviews by The Associated Press


‘T

HE DILEMMA’ is the most frustrating romantic comedy I’ve ever had to sit through. It’s a movie that is so utterly contemptible that you shouldn’t ever have to face the dilemma of seeing it or not. The characters are mean and exasperating. The plot is absurd on so many levels it’s hard to know where to begin. In short, this is already atop the “Worst Of� list for 2011. Ronny (Vince Vaughn) and Nick (Kevin James) are best friends. They do everything together. They even work together, and right now they’re working on a job for General Motors that could determine whether they make it or have to file bankruptcy. Ronny is matched up with Beth (Jennifer Connelly). Beth’s friend, Geneva (Winona Ryder), is married to Nick. They all love each other. Ronny announces that Geneva and Nick are his “hero couple.� Everything seems to be going swimmingly. That is until Ronny accidentally spots Geneva making out with someone who definitely isn’t Nick. This is where “the dilemma� comes in. Does Ronny tell Nick about his wife and risk blowing this job with General Motors they’ve worked so desperately for? Or does he keep the secret from Nick for a now in order to not distract him from his very important work? Best friends everywhere would tell their friend. Right? There would be no wondering this or that, if you’re someone’s best friend you’d tell them exactly what you saw the first chance you got. That’s what best friends do. If you waver one moment, and consider keeping it a

1/2 star

“The dilemma� Rated R secret, well then you should probably reconsider calling that person your best friend. “The Dilemma� drags on for 112 minutes as Ronny does everything from try to catch Nick’s wife in the act of cheating to confronting her boyfriend and getting in a brawl with him. It just so happens that Ronny’s backstory involves him being a habitual gambler, and that everything he ends up doing in secret looks to everyone else like he’s gambling again. This is one of those movies that relies on the sole fact that people just won’t listen to other people when they have something important to say. This becomes increasingly frustrating as Ronny tries to talk to Nick, but Nick blows him off only to hate Ronny in the end for not telling him sooner. How was he supposed to say something? You were never listening. Vince Vaughn does his very best Vince Vaughn impression and chews up Action!

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the screen with bloated rant after bloated rant. His shtick is wearing very old, and he does the exact same thing here that he’s done in dozens of movies before. Petty misunderstandings rule romantic comedies. Movies like this are built on convenient mix-ups that have people thinking oppositely than they should. In real-life we’d find ourselves handling this situation much more gracefully and, well, reasonably. Reason is not found in “The Dilemma.� Instead

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at this part or is it a serious moment?� Just stay away from “The Dilemma� — it’s an agonizing moviegoing experience. Film critic Aaron Peck has a bachelor’s degree in English from Utah

State University. He also writes for BlogCritics.org, HighDefDigest. com, and is starting a new movie website called TheReelPlace. com. Send feedback to aaronpeck46@gmail. com.

A Reunion of Cowboy Poets, Musicians & Artisans with Featured Artists

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common sense has been replaced with lunacy. Then we gander at who directed this awful movie, and it’s hard to take in. Ron Howard? Really? The same guy who directed “Apollo 13� directed this? It’s a travesty on all fronts. “The Dilemma� is an ugly, confused movie that doesn’t know if it wants to be a comedy, a drama or a love story. It’s full to the brim with instances that aren’t meant to be funny, but because the audience wants to laugh these moments garner a few awkward guffaws from the crowd no doubt thinking, “Am I supposed to be laughing

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Andy nelson Cowboy Poet & Humorist

elI BARsI Canada’s Cowgirl

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Page 7 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14

‘Dilemma’ is utterly contemptible


The tension

between line and color

A

Top: Acrylic piece titled “Lago Red.” Left, bottom: Brenda Piece titled “Plinko — Microdots” Right, bottom: A piece titled “Codex — Sonne” Far top: Piece titled “Ipso Facto 80” Far bottom: “Rummikub” Center: The artist photographed by Jennifer Meyers

fter Andrew Williams-Dremeaux gets home from work, he heads to his studio for, well, more work. An artist for about a decade, the process for him is a painstaking one where experimentation with color is paramount. He’s been busy crafting pieces for an upcoming show set to open later this month. “I love being in the studio,” he said. “It’s almost cliché for artists to say they love working with color, but I do.” A Logan resident, Williams-Dremeaux, 34, is a non-objective painter who employs a grid system to demonstrate the tension between lines and color — the interplay between human order and the poetry of nature. But his work hasn’t always taken an abstract course. While studying fine art at Utah State University, he did a lot of representational landscape painting, which would have a profound effect on his subsequent work. “I would take a portable easel and go out into the valley,” he said. “I ended up painting probably everywhere from Paradise at the south end all the way up to Richmond.” But as he studied art history, he became inspired by the work of Agnes Martin, a Canadian-American minimalist painter who pioneered the use of grids, and Richard Diebenkorn, the Bay Area abstract expressionist. WilliamsDremeaux said he found his landscape paintings becoming more abstract. “Rather than going for really deep pictorial space, like most landscapes have, I started to flatten out the picture plane so that I was focusing more on surfaces and color combinations,” he said. “At that point, you’re paying more attention to the artifices of color and placement of shapes, rather than trying to make a tree look like it’s so far away or the sky receding to an appropriate distance.” Over time, Williams-Dremeaux said his considerations for color became more important than representing landscape, and he began working with grids. The process starts by making the grid itself, either by drawing the lines by hand, using masking tape, or snapping

on a chalk line. Once the grid is created, it is then filled in with color — using everything from wax, to acrylic, to oil paint. That results in an “eroding effect” on the grid, he said. “The grid starts to disappear,” he said. “At that point, the colors almost have nothing to hold onto, and they start to shift. It feels unsettling; so I reintroduce the grid on top of that.” He then adds more color. The process continues that way until he is content with the final product. For the upcoming art show — to be held later this month at the JF Prince Gallery in North Logan — he will have at least 20 pieces, ranging in size from 8 inches by 8 inches to 4 feet by 6 feet. The latter dimension accounts for his own height. “I think every part of a piece of art should have a reason,” he said. The title of the show is “Color Memory,” which relates to the ways in which he has experienced color over the years, as well as the effect the colors may have on the viewer. “I’ve acquired this whole inner catalogue of what color means to me,” he said. “That’s the same for every human being. We have sort of our own response to color and what colors do to us.” While the grid is important to his artwork, WilliamsDremeaux said it isn’t designed to be the defining feature. That designation belongs to the displays of color. “The grid is necessary because it basically divides up the picture and gives me a chance to play with color,” he said. “So the grid becomes an easy system of division-making that allows me to create intricate variegations of color.” Though his work is abstract, Williams-Dremeaux believes it is still very much true to life. Pointing at a red color scheme in one of his paintings, he concluded, “Painting like this is really authentic because it’s not trying to represent anything else. It is what it is. There’s no illusion. It’s red. It’s a red square. ... It’s the most direct form of painting that you can possibly do.”

— Story by Charles Geraci

“Color Memory” by Andrew Williams-Dremeaux Reception from 7 to 9 p.m. on Jan. 27, at JF Prince Gallery, 2600 N. Main St., Ste. 106, North Logan. Show continues from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Jan. 28, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Jan. 29. Free.


The tension

between line and color

A

Top: Acrylic piece titled “Lago Red.” Left, bottom: Brenda Piece titled “Plinko — Microdots” Right, bottom: A piece titled “Codex — Sonne” Far top: Piece titled “Ipso Facto 80” Far bottom: “Rummikub” Center: The artist photographed by Jennifer Meyers

fter Andrew Williams-Dremeaux gets home from work, he heads to his studio for, well, more work. An artist for about a decade, the process for him is a painstaking one where experimentation with color is paramount. He’s been busy crafting pieces for an upcoming show set to open later this month. “I love being in the studio,” he said. “It’s almost cliché for artists to say they love working with color, but I do.” A Logan resident, Williams-Dremeaux, 34, is a non-objective painter who employs a grid system to demonstrate the tension between lines and color — the interplay between human order and the poetry of nature. But his work hasn’t always taken an abstract course. While studying fine art at Utah State University, he did a lot of representational landscape painting, which would have a profound effect on his subsequent work. “I would take a portable easel and go out into the valley,” he said. “I ended up painting probably everywhere from Paradise at the south end all the way up to Richmond.” But as he studied art history, he became inspired by the work of Agnes Martin, a Canadian-American minimalist painter who pioneered the use of grids, and Richard Diebenkorn, the Bay Area abstract expressionist. WilliamsDremeaux said he found his landscape paintings becoming more abstract. “Rather than going for really deep pictorial space, like most landscapes have, I started to flatten out the picture plane so that I was focusing more on surfaces and color combinations,” he said. “At that point, you’re paying more attention to the artifices of color and placement of shapes, rather than trying to make a tree look like it’s so far away or the sky receding to an appropriate distance.” Over time, Williams-Dremeaux said his considerations for color became more important than representing landscape, and he began working with grids. The process starts by making the grid itself, either by drawing the lines by hand, using masking tape, or snapping

on a chalk line. Once the grid is created, it is then filled in with color — using everything from wax, to acrylic, to oil paint. That results in an “eroding effect” on the grid, he said. “The grid starts to disappear,” he said. “At that point, the colors almost have nothing to hold onto, and they start to shift. It feels unsettling; so I reintroduce the grid on top of that.” He then adds more color. The process continues that way until he is content with the final product. For the upcoming art show — to be held later this month at the JF Prince Gallery in North Logan — he will have at least 20 pieces, ranging in size from 8 inches by 8 inches to 4 feet by 6 feet. The latter dimension accounts for his own height. “I think every part of a piece of art should have a reason,” he said. The title of the show is “Color Memory,” which relates to the ways in which he has experienced color over the years, as well as the effect the colors may have on the viewer. “I’ve acquired this whole inner catalogue of what color means to me,” he said. “That’s the same for every human being. We have sort of our own response to color and what colors do to us.” While the grid is important to his artwork, WilliamsDremeaux said it isn’t designed to be the defining feature. That designation belongs to the displays of color. “The grid is necessary because it basically divides up the picture and gives me a chance to play with color,” he said. “So the grid becomes an easy system of division-making that allows me to create intricate variegations of color.” Though his work is abstract, Williams-Dremeaux believes it is still very much true to life. Pointing at a red color scheme in one of his paintings, he concluded, “Painting like this is really authentic because it’s not trying to represent anything else. It is what it is. There’s no illusion. It’s red. It’s a red square. ... It’s the most direct form of painting that you can possibly do.”

— Story by Charles Geraci

“Color Memory” by Andrew Williams-Dremeaux Reception from 7 to 9 p.m. on Jan. 27, at JF Prince Gallery, 2600 N. Main St., Ste. 106, North Logan. Show continues from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Jan. 28, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Jan. 29. Free.


Page 10 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

Foreign vs. domestic in the wine world

I

KNOW THAT I WRITE more about foreign wines than domestic wines. Our main domestic wines are Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir and Zinfandel. Most of the people I talk to about wine have favorite producers for these wines, and the shelves of our wine stores are loaded with American wines. Ninety percent of American wine is produced in California. Of the top 100 wines for 2010 listed by the Wine Spectator, 35 are from America, 19 from France, and no other country had more than nine. From the 10 wines that I recommended for the holidays, six came from the West Coast. This was due to the rise in quality of American sparkling wines. However, I will continue to focus on foreign wines for the diversity of grape varietals available. My family and friends celebrated my 80th birthday last month with several events that lasted 10 days. My advice for sparkling wine was followed with the consumption of Korbel, Gloria Ferrer and Argyle. I provided some special red wine that had been stored for at least two years. We did not just sit around to eat and drink all of those days. We went to Beaver Mountain for skiing, riding

tubes at the top of Parleys Canyon and seeing the elk at Hardware Ranch. I also got in several days of backcountry skiing up Logan Canyon. I could not think of any better way to celebrate than to enjoy winter activities in our mountains. The best way to finish a day of skiing is with home brewed ale that any Englishman would recognize as “the very best bitter.” I was told by the manager of the Logan Liquor Store that business was excellent for the Christmas season. Alcoholic beverage sales seem to be somewhat recession proof. While I like to recommend modest priced wines, there are two surprises that I found this month. Helen Turley became famous for producing outstanding Zinfandel wines, and none was to be found in Utah. While her brother still owns Turley Wines, Helen now concentrates on fine Pinot Noir for Marcassin Wines. In Logan, we have the 2008 Turley Zinfandel Cedarman Howell Mountain at $30.10, and the 2009 Turley Zinfandel California Juvenile at $20.80. I have not had a chance to taste these wines, but the Wine Advocate rates the Howell Mountain at 93 and the Juvenile at 89. These are must buys for the Zinfandel aficionados, and the prices are lower

Cache Wines By William Moore

than the national average. Another wine to explore is the 2006 Chateau MontRedon Chateauneuf-du-Pape at $29.99. While this winery is not in the top tier of Chateauneuf-du-Pape wineries, with a rating of about 89 and at less than half the price of the best Rhone wines I would make it a best buy. We rarely see any good CNP wines in Logan and there are not many anywhere in Utah. This is the style of wine that I store for 3 to 10 years before drinking. For example, I have two

‘Science Unwrapped’ continues

T

HE SCIENCE

Unwrapped series at Utah State University is kicking off the frigid New Year with a “hot” new series. “Climate” is the topic for the program’s spring 2011 presentation series. The free, monthly lectures, offered in a family friendly format for all ages, focus on varied aspects and disciplines of science. “In our new series, we’ll talk about the science of climate,” says Shane Larson,

Science Unwrapped committee chair and assistant professor in USU’s physics department. “We’ll discuss what it is, how we measure what’s happening with it and what scientists are learning about it.” The series starts at 7 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 21, with the presentation, “Earth’s Changing Climate” in the Emert Auditorium, Room 130, of the Eccles Science Learning Center on campus. Featured

speaker is physicist Robert Davies of the USU-based Utah Climate Center. “Earth’s changing climate is fast emerging as this century’s preeminent challenge,” Davies says. “A diverse collection of broad, deep, independent lines of evidence has led to robust scientific conclusions: Earth is warming, principally attributable to humans, and posing a serious threat to humans, human society and the human ecosystem.”

Recommended F 2008 Turley Zinfandel

Cedarman Howell Mountain at $30.10 F 2009 Turley Zinfandel California Juvenile at $20.80 F 2006 Chateau Mont-Redon Chateauneuf-du-Pape at $29.99 F 2008 Columbia-Crest Grand Estates Cabernet Sauvignon at $11.99 F 2009 Carchelo at $13.99 F 2009 Voghera Moscato D’Asti at $11.99 F 2007 Mas Donis Barrica at $11.99

of these wines from the 1999 vintage that were purchased in 2001 and one is a 1999 Chateau Mont-Redon. Following is a list of new wines that I would like to try in the next month or so. The 2008 Columbia-Crest Grand Estates Cabernet Sauvignon at $11.99 should be a very nice red wine at a good price. The 2007 vintage was one of top wines for 2010 listed by the Wine Spectator. The 2009 Carchelo at $13.99 from Spain is 40 percent Monastrell, 40 percent Tempranillo and 20 percent

Cabernet. Finally, there is the 2009 Voghera Moscato D’Asti at $11.99 from Italy. This is a light and sweet fizzy wine for easy drinking. A wine that I come back to over and over is the 2007 Mas Donis Barrica at $11.99 from Spain. This red wine is 85 percdent Grenache and 15 percent Syrah and has rich flavors of dark berries and chocolate. The last five vintages have rated between 90 and 92. I cannot remember any other wine being so consistent over that time period. Wine books come and go, but there is one that is never out of style. It is the “Oxford Companion to Wine” by J. Robinson at approximately $40. Whenever I have a question about a region or a varietal I go to this book. William Moore is retired from the Utah State University chemistry and biochemistry department and currently lives in Smithfield. He is among a number of freelance writers whose columns appear in The Herald Journal in an effort to expose readers to a variety of community voices. He is not an employee of the newspaper. Feedback at wmoore3136@ msn.com.


Photos submitted by Dianne Liebes. Left: Lady, a 2-year-old German ahorthair is “pointing a grasshopper in this picture instead of birds, like she should. She is very beautiful, smart, obedient, loving, and thinks she is a lap dog, too.” Center: “Our huge 20-pound Sylvester...He is big on boxes and claims any and all he finds no matter the size. My lap will do in a pinch or if I’m sitting on ‘his’ chair.” Right: Muffit, a yea- old Morkie (Maltese/Yorkie) who is the family clown and perfect poser. “She’s a car show buff, attending car shows all over the state and elsewhere with my husband and me. She is sure the people come to see her, not the cars.”

“Free Your M ind” by Trevor O. Larsen

Free your min d Live your life Free your min d Escape your past Free your min Examine your d min Free your min d d Set your stag e Free your min d Start your goal s Free your min d Aim, patient, fire Free your m Explore what ind you se Free your min ek Question ever d ything Free your min d Ignore the Wro ng Free your min d Listen to yo ur influence Free your min d Speak your m ind Free your min d Set yourself fre e Free your min d Set yourself fre e

“Skies Are Cloudy” by William Phillip Humphrey Skies are cloudy, since you went away. My how I miss you, Honey, come back home and have your way. Sorry if you were not happy, why not try once more to make things right. Come back to your sweet pappy, and I promise we’ll not fight. Then we could share our love together, that is all I really need. I won’t worry about the weather, the sun will shine when you come through the door. It will make my poor heart happy, to share your love forever more.

“Night Watch Blues” by Billy Bird Oh the moon comes up, And the stars are in the sky. I walk my post and the time goes by. I’ve got those lonesome night watch blues. I have my orders to keep things secure with my handcuffs and revolver, I don’t need nothing more. I’ve got these lonesome night watch blues. It’s lonesome when you guard a place, especially at night. No one to talk to, no one in sight, I’ve got those lonesome night watch blues. You have done your duty, though you were all alone. Now it’s time to check out, and time to go on home.

GET YOUR STUFF PUBLISHED! The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board is a place for our local community to share, well ... anything! Send your stuff to kburgess@hjnews.com, or mail it to Cache Magazine, 75 W. 300 North, Logan, UT 84321. We’ll be waiting!

Page 11 - The Herald Journal - Cache Magazine - Friday, January 14, 2011

The Cache Magazine Bulletin Board


Page 12 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

Culture

Actor Paul Giamatti thrives on chaos By The Associated Press

I

Travolta celebrates new baby

By The Associated Press

7-week-old baby boy is “a new J beginning” for his family.

N CHARACTERS LIKE the uncommonly candid Harvey Pekar of “American Splendor,” the frank, impudent John Adams of the HBO miniseries, and, now, the self-destructive Barney Parnofsky of “Barney’s Version,” Paul Giamatti has brought very human, messy lives to movie screens more accustom to simpler, neater portraits.

Himself more worn and

OHN TRAVOLTA SAYS HIS shaggy than the average

movie actor, Giamatti’s tousled appearance works The actor and wife Kelly Preston, in tandem with his wartsposed with their son, Benjamin, for and-all performances. the cover of the new issue of People Think of his wine-enthusimagazine. Travolta says Benjamin ast Miles in “Sideways,” a has “brought us a new beginning” and man of refined taste who “given the house a renewed spirit and nevertheless erupts by purpose.” Travolta and Preston’s old- pouring a vat of wine over est child, son Jett, died in 2008 at the his head. age of 16. “Maybe I have a propensity to want to mess things

up,” Giamatti granted in a recent interview over coffee at a restaurant in his New York neighborhood of Brooklyn Heights, where he lives with wife Elizabeth and son Samuel. “I certainly would err on the side of being more interested in things being messy and messy characters or situations.” “Barney’s Version,” Richard J. Lewis’ adaptation of

Mordecai Richler’s belovedin-Canada novel, gives Giamatti wide berth to revel in imperfection in the title role as well as a nomination for best actor in a musical or comedy at Sunday’s Golden Globes. Barney is a boozy, egoless, cigar-smoking TV producer (he cares little for his schlocky product, naming his Montreal production company Totally Unnecessary Productions), who thinks enough of decorum that he flagrantly pursues his third wife at the wedding to his second. Much of the joy of the film — which is divided into three parts, one for each wife (Rachelle Lefevre, Minnie Driver, Rosamund Pike) — is seeing Giamatti play Barney across time (he ages some 30 years in the film), sickness, folly and love. It’s another lead perfor-

mance for the 43-year-old actor, who, after years of smaller character roles, has proven that his acclaimed performances in “American Splendor” and “Sideways” weren’t leading-man aberrations, after all, but the start of a busy decade that would also include an Oscar nomination for “Cinderella Man,” an Emmy for “John Adams” and notable films including “The Illusionist,” ‘’Duplicity,” ‘’The Last Station” and “Cold Souls.” “I have no idea how I’ve pulled it off,” laughs Giamatti. “The luckiest thing that I’ve had happen to me is that, yeah, I’ve gotten to play lead roles in things, but the supporting stuff that I’ve been offered and gotten the opportunity to do has been so interesting. Lots of times, it’s more interesting than the lead roles I get offered.”

Surrealism in the spotlight at Dali Museum grand opening By the Associated Press

F

AP photo

Dana Rizzuto, of Clearwater, Fla., a Salvador Dali look alike, poses for a photo during a parade before the grand opening ceremony for the new Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla., on Tuesday

OR A FEW HOURS Tuesday, St. Petersburg, Fla. was transformed into a Surrealist canvas in honor of Salvador Dali, the genre’s master. A man wearing a large snail hat led a parade of drummers, who were followed by a phalanx of pirates past shimmering water and vibrant palm trees. Wild green parakeets fluttered in the air. Spanish royalty was on hand, as were several mayors, dozens of reporters and hundreds of art lovers. A number of people had attached pencil-thin Dali mustaches to their upper lips. Everyone gathered beneath a glass and concrete building

— the new, $36-million museum that features a priceless collection of Dali’s works. It replaces the old Dali Museum, more than doubling the exhibition space and improving hurricane protection. It is considered the world’s most comprehensive collection of Dali’s work. Princess Cristina of Spain, who is the duchess of Palma de Mallorca and the youngest daughter of King Juan Carlos and Queen Sofia, called the museum a “superb setting, a state of the art building” that evokes the waves, magic and light of Dali’s native Mediterranean sea. The museum’s signature architectural detail is a wave of

glass paneling that undulates around the building — a striking feature that was designed by architect Yann Weymouth, who had a hand in creating the glass pyramid at the Louvre in Paris. “The city of St. Petersburg gains a landmark and outstanding beacon of cultural beauty,” the princess said. Floridians believe the museum will be the centerpiece of an arts renaissance in the Tampa Bay area, which recently saw the renovation of a new museum of art in nearby Tampa and the opening of a gallery devoted to popular glassmaker Dale Chihuly in St. Petersburg. Officials said the Dali museum took 14 years from conception to ribbon-cutting.


Chinese mom pens memoir on strict parenting By The Associated Press

A

MY CHUA IS AN American-born daughter of Chinese immigrants from the Philippines. She’s a professor of law at Yale, married to another law professor at Yale who comes from an Orthodox Jewish family. So it’s no surprise that her first two books dealt with minorities and governments. Her third book, “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother,” is a chatty, witty, intimate memoir of how she raised two daughters in hyper-severe Chinese style, despite the surrounding children of permissive American parents. Chua’s father, a leading theorist of advanced mathematics, gave her a model for perfectionism. In eighth grade, she placed second in a

history contest. Someone else was named best all-around student. She invited her family to the ceremony. “Afterward,” she writes, “my father said to me: ‘Never, never, disgrace me like that again.’” She pursued that model. Though generous with family fun and affection, she denied her daughters, Sophia and Louisa (Lulu), experiences that are important to many young Americans: no TV, no pets, no computer games, no sleepovers, no play dates, no grades under A, no parts in school plays, no complaints about not having parts in school plays, no choice of extracurricular activities, nothing less than top places in any school class except gym and drama, no musical instruments except piano or violin.

Compulsory for the girls: speed drills in math, exclusive use of the family’s Chinese dialect at home, lessons in Mandarin Chinese, long hours of music practice closely coached by Chua, with double sessions on weekends and no

* This week’s New York Times Best-seller List * HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “What The Night Knows” by Dean Koontz 2. “Dead Or Alive” by Tom Clancy with G. Blackwood 3. “The Girl...The Hornet’s Nest” by S. Larsson 4. “The Outlaws” by W.E.B. Griffin and W.E. Butterworth IV 5. “The Confession” by John Grisham

HARDCOVER ADVICE 1. “The 4-hour Body” by Timothy Ferriss 2. “Straight Talk, No Chaser” by Steve Harvey with D. Millner 3. “Barefoot Contessa” by Ina Garten 4. “Debt Free For Life” by David Bach 5. “Getting More” by Stuart Diamond CHILDREN’S PAPERBACK BOOKS 1. “Witch And Wizard” by James Patterson and G. Charbonnet 2. “Fallen” by Lauren Kate 3. “Hush, Hush” by Becca Fitzpatrick 4. “The Book Thief ” by Markus Zusak 5. “When You Reach Me” by Rebecca Stead

Chua fled, running. She had a fleeting thought the guards at Lenin’s tomb across the square would shoot her, but she returned to the cafe, announcing: “You win. It’s over. We’re giving up the violin.” Back home, Lulu turned to tennis, but said she missed the orchestra. Her tiger mother, clandestinely, did some research. Occasionally, at breakfast or while saying goodnight, Chua would burst out with something like “more rotation on the swing volley!” Lulu would plug her ears. There was much family discussion of how the book would end. Chua finally suggests a possible road toward reconciling Chinese and American attitudes toward education. Parents can judge how practical it may be.

9/11 burn victim writing memoir

By The Associated Press

Aburned to death by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks is ready to tell WOMAN NEARLY

PAPERBACK NONFICTION 1. “Just Kids” by Patti Smith 2. “Inside of a Dog” by Alexandra Horowitz 3. “Eat, Pray, Love” by Elizabeth Gilbert 4. “What The Dog Saw” by Malcolm Gladwell

5. “Are You There, Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea” By Chelsea Handler

break on vacations. Music has been a primary concern — Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Debussy, Dvorak. The program worked, in part. Sophia won a contest at 14 that brought her a piano recital at Carnegie Hall in New York City. Lulu, at age 6, didn’t want to learn to play the violin. Chua bullied her with threats of a spanking and a missed dinner. Good teachers helped Lulu develop an affinity with the instrument and she became concert master of a youth orchestra. Lulu’s rebellion climaxed on a vacation in Russia. At a cafe in the GUM, the big shopping mall on Moscow’s Red Square, she refused Chua’s command to just taste the caviar — and smashed a glass in defiance.

Page 13 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

Books

Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/ pages/books/

her story in a memoir, her publisher announced Monday. Lauren Manning, who was a partner at Cantor Fitzgerald in the World Trade Center, has a deal for “Every Day, a Choice,” which will come out in the fall, around the 10th anniversary of the attacks, publisher Henry Holt and Co. said. The book “is the story of her incredible transformation, both mentally and physically, in the wake of such an unforeseen and drastic change” and “how the experience of life is so much more than the story of a single terrible day,” according to the publisher. Manning had just entered the lobby of the trade center when a fireball exploded from an elevator

AP photo

In this Sept. 30, 2001, file photo, the World Trade Center destruction is shown.

shaft, burning over 80 percent of her body. “For years I’ve been privileged to receive words of thanks and encouragement from people all over the world, often simply asking how I’m doing,” Manning said in a statement. “I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to share my story in the hope it will continue to resonate with people facing challenges in their own lives.”


Page 14 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

Utah State museum highlights civil rights

Answers from last week

J

OHN F. KENNEDY MADE a powerful and concise statement on civil rights in a radio broadcast on June 11, 1963, that rings as true today as it did nearly half a century ago. “We are confronted primarily with a moral issue … whether all Americans are to be afforded equal rights and equal opportunities — whether we are going to treat our fellow American human beings as we want to be treated.” Building from this theme, Utah

State University’s Museum of Anthropology presents “Civil Rights: A New Perspective” as the second event of the semester in its ongoing “Saturdays at the Museum” program. Activities take place Saturday, Jan. 15, and event organizers promise a day that will provide new, interesting information on the civil rights movement from across time. The event features two guest speakers who appear at 1 p.m.: Rachael Brighton, USU Mul-

Crossword 97

ticultural Program coordinator, and Maure Smith-Benanti, USU LGBTQA program coordinator. Their presentation looks at the struggle for civil rights. Following the presentation, they are open to questions and further discussion. The USU Museum of Anthropology is on the USU campus in the south turret of the historic Old Main building, Room 252. “Saturdays at the Museum” event hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com

By Myles Mellor and Sally York 1. 7. 12. 18. 19. 20. 22. 23. 24. 25. 28. 29. 30. 31. 34. 35. 37. 40. 41. 43. 45. 47. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 60. 65. 66. 70. 71.

Across Mommas’ mates Quarters Molten rocks Interstice Bet on Old-fashioned flyers Plate, in a way Companion of Artemis Roughly similar Becomes more ill, perhaps Medieval stringed instruments “I knew it!” Boat with an open hold Early Jackson 5 single 60’s protest Driver’s lic. and others Jimmy Mins. and mins. Emulates the Salahis “Peter and the Wolf” bird Fast no more Made an unwelcome appearance Brace Chemical ___ “To Autumn,” e.g. “Bye now” “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice ___ Agin)” (1970 hit) Wilderness guide Peck at Beryl variety Cut off Sour cream

73. Defraud 74. Some elections 77. Send back facilitator 78. ___ 51 80. Literary collection 81. Encircle 83. Liabilities 87. Is at a loss 93. Take in 94. Hard work 95. Water flea 96. Keyboard key 99. Old polit. cause 101. Marshaled 102. Low-ranking worker 104. Deck (out) 105. Singer Tori 107. It’s spotted in casinos 109. Place to build 110. Shed tears 120. Metal testers 121. Like some change 122. Bearish 123. Disloyal person (old word) 124. Pitch 125. French painter John Francois 126. Fragments 127. Observation balloon 128. Wraps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Down Huff and puff Cantatrice’s offering Gregory ____ Place for a pig Some are pale On the payroll Rabbitlike rodent

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 20. 21. 26. 27. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 38. 39. 42. 43. 44. 46. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 59. 61. 62. 63. 64. 66. 67. 68.

Desolate Straws in the wind Tone ___ Taro variety Accident Church alcove Radiate Grinding stones Old-style revolutionary Electric eye, e.g. Shellacking Seethes Tallies Haile Selassie disciple New Testament book Champagne designation ___ package Finish, of a sort Class Directly Trades in Go on and on Scrooge’s look Soiled Black, to Blake Dick Kind of talk or rally Most trifling Interjects Couturier Ricci Indian bread Anahat ___ Vagabond Reporter’s question Scare Film company sans studio, informally Take back “Heavens to Betsy!” Catalan surrealist Weapon

69. Easy two-pointer 72. Choppers, so to speak 75. Family members, in the U.K. 76. Miss the mark 79. Pack animal 82. Figure out 84. Baseball move 85. Chamber group, maybe 86. Hitch

88. Franco-Spanish botanist 89. Young hooter 90. Kind of hour 91. Large amount of money 92. Fits 96. Turkic language 97. Diverts 98. Beet soup 100. Prettifies 102. Decorated 103. Faze

106. Bag 108. Research facil. 109. Literary alias 111. Observer 112. ___ language 113. Pianist Myra 114. Fair 115. Habeas corpus, e.g. 116. Christiania, now 117. Lunar trench 118. Patella’s place 119. Math groups


Friday The Cache Valley Stargazers will hold their monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. on Friday in room 244 of the Science-Engineering-Research (SER) Building on the USU campus (free parking in the lot adjacent to SER, behind the Performance Hall). The meeting will feature a joint talk by Dale Hooper and Blaine Dickey entitled “Backyard Observatories: Shelters to help you enjoy the night sky.” For information, visit www.cachestargazers.org or e-mail cache.stargazers@gmail.com. Cache Community Connections Interfaith and Civic Council will host the first annual Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration at 7 p.m. on Friday at the Logan Tabernacle. The keynote speaker will be the Rev. France A. Davis, pastor of the Calvary Missionary Baptist Church in Salt Lake City and a member of the State Board of Regents. Hillary Murray will perform acoustic music at 8 p.m. on Friday at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Cost is $5. The Food $ense girls will share lowcost potato recipes from noon to 1 p.m. on Friday at the Macey’s in Providence. No Gallery Stroll this week. The next Gallery Stroll is April 8.

Saturday The Sports Academy and Racquet Club will hold a Bieber Fever Dance Class for kindergarten through 6th graders. Learn dance rountines to Justin Beiber songs, followed by a performance for parents. This is a two-week event. The class runs from 10 to 11 a.m. starting on Saturday at the Sports Academy, 1655 N. 200 East, North Logan. The cost is $20. Contact Natalie for more information and to RSVP at753-7500 or nbattaglia@sportsacademy.com. The Western singing duo Tumbleweeds will perform from 6 p.m. to closing on Saturday at LD’s Cafe in Richmond. Stokes Nature Center invites ages 12 and up to a Full Moon Hike at 7 p.m. on Saturday in Logan Canyon. Naturalist Jack Greene will lead the trek and participants will look for creatures of the dark and observe the night sky. Free. Bring your cross country skis or rent snowshoes from SNC. Meet at the Logan Ranger District parking lot to carpool. Space is limited, registration is required. For more info or to register, call 7553239 or visit www.logannature.org.

The Bear River Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution will meet at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 15, at the Iron Gate Grill ,155 Church Ave. We will celebrate the chapter’s anniversary with guest speakers Tami Pyfer, member of the State Board of Education, and Christie Cooley, member of the Logan City Board of Education. The public is invited to attend. Please RSVP to Patti Atkinson at 755-9653 The Nathaniel James Moving Show will perform acoustic music at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 15, at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Cost is $5. Bonnie Shaffer will sing at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 15, at Pioneer Valley Lodge, 2351 N. 400 East, North Logan. Free. For more information, call 7920353.The public is invited to attend.

Sunday Todd Milovich will perform live music from noon to 2 p.m. on Sunday at Caffe Ibis, 52 Federal Ave.

Monday Celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day by helping replenish the Cache Community Food Pantry from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Monday at the Whittier Center, 290 N. 400 East. Admission is $3 per person or $10 per family with discounts for food donations. Music by local Beatles tribute band Get Back. Get $1 off admission for every can of food you donate. A fundraiser for the Multicultural Center of Cache Valley will be held from 5 to 10 p.m. on Monday at Cafe Sabor. A portion of all purchases during this time will benefit the Center. The event includes soft live music and poetry reading.    DUP William Hyde Camp will meet at 1:30 p.m. on Monday in the Hyde Park Civic Center upstairs. Joanne Mckenna will give the lesson.

Tuesday Prints, paintings, installations, props, models and lighting design samples created by USU faculty and students will be on display in the Mentor/ Mentee show at the Tippets Exhibit Hall at USU’s Chase Fine Arts Center. State legislator Ken Ivory will give a presentation on state sovereignty at 7 p.m. on Tuesday at New Dawn

Technologies, 843 S. 100 West. Other invited legislative guests include Cache Valley Representatives Curt Webb, Jack Draxler, David Butterfield, Lee Perry, and Senators Pete Knudsen and Lyle Hillyard. The Cache Valley Gluten Free Group will meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday at Logan Regional Hospital classrooms 2 and 3. The hospital’s lead dietitian will discuss gluten intolerance basics. The annual meeting of The Friends of the North Logan Library will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday in the library meeting room, 475 E. 2500 North, North Logan. The featured speaker is Peggy Rogers, author and founder of Zambia’s Scholarship Fund. She will discuss her reactions to the poverty and lack of education she encountered in 1998 when she travel to Zambia. USU theater students will perform an evening of one-act plays at 8 p.m. on Tuesday at the Black Box Theatre at USU’s Chase Fine Arts Center, 4030 Old Main Hill. Free.Citizen’s Center, with lunch at noon and game day at 12:30 p.m.

Wednesday It’s Bingo night and pizza at OPTIONS for Independence at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 19. The cost for dinner is $2. To sign up, schedule transportation or for more information, contact Mandie at 753-5353 ext 108. Scott Bradley will lead a class on the Constitution titled “To Preserve The Nation” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 19, upstairs in the BookTable. No charge. For more information, call 753-2930 or 753-8844.

Thursday Mike and Rosa Jackson will share recipes and stories from 7 to 8 p.m. on Thursday at the Macey’s in Providence. Learn to make enchiladas Rosa’s way, including tortillas from scratch. Bridgerland SHRM will hold a luncheon from noon to 1 p.m. on Thursday, at Hamilton’s restaurant. Cost is $10 for SHRM members, $12 for non-members. The speaker will be Jeanine Wilson, SPHR, who will address the topic “Interview Answers You Want To Hear — And Those You Don’t!” RSVP to danene. dustin@usu.edu or register online at www.bridgerlandshrum.org by Tuesday, Jan. 18.

The Mollies w/Libbie Linton and Buffalo will perform acoustic and folk music at 8 p.m. on Thursday at Why Sound, 30 Federal Ave. Cost is $5. The Utah State University Wellness Expo will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday on the second floor of the Taggart Student Center (TSC). The Wellness Expo provides a way to make our 2011 resolutions a success. More information is available at www.usu. edu/wellness or by contacting Caroline Shugart at caroline.shugart@usu.edu, 797-0735. The Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Spring Creek Camp will hold its monthly meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday at Cafe Sabor, 600 W. Center St. Hostess for the evening is Kaly Dushku.

Ongoing events The Utah State Courts is offering a free class each month for children 9 to 12 years old whose parents have filed for divorce or whose parents are divorced. There is no charge to attend the class, which is offered from 3:30 to 5 p.m. the last Thursday of the month at the Cache County Courthouse, 135 N. 100 West. For more information, call 750-1300 or go to www.utcourts.gov and click on Divorce Education Classes. The Eccles Ice Center offers Family Night from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. on Mondays at the center, 2825 N. 200 East, North Logan. Up to eight people can skate for $30, including skates. Call 752-1170 for an updated, daily schedule as times are subject to change. For more information, call 787-2288. A weekly Peace Vigil is held from 5:30 to 6 p.m. on Fridays on the east side of Main Street between Center Street and 100 North. For more information, e-mail info@loganpeace.org or call 755-5137. Ye Olde Tyme Quilters meet at 10 a.m. on Wednesdays at OPTIONS for Independence, 1095 N. Main St. Lunch will follow. Prices will vary. For more information or to schedule free transportation, contact Royella at 753-5353 ext 105. The Post-Mormon Community’s Cache Valley chapter meets every Sunday at 6:30 p.m. at a local restaurant/ The non-sectarian organization includes individuals and families who have left Mormonism. For more information call Jeff at 770-4263, or go to the website at, www.postmormon.org/logan.

Page 15 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

Calendar


Page 16 - The Herald Journal - Cache, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 14, 2011

CACHE MAGAZINE DINING GUIDE

Happy New Years HJ Dining guide

L

B S

Logan Burgers & Sandwiches

Delicious Food at Reasonable Prices

Charbroiled Gourmet Burgers • Gyros • Souvlaki BBQ Pork • Kababs •Calamari Salads Seafood Dinners • Falafel coupon

Breaded Chicken Bacon Swiss Sandwich

(with fries & soda) Only $4.99 coupon

Chipolte Swiss Burger (with fries & soda) Only $4.99 coupon

Greek Gyro Dinner (with salad & fries) Only $5.99

Cache Valley’s favorite for over 20 years! NOW Serving Frozen Yogurt With Probiotics

coupon

BBQ Chicken Dinner

(with salad, fries & garlic toast) Only $5.99

Offer Expires 1/21/11 • Must Present Coupon • Limit 4

1085 North Main, Suite 130, Logan

435-752-1215 • Mon-Sat 10:30-8:00pm The Heart of Historic Downtown

Indian Cuisine & Beyond

Cooking Class @ Kitchen Kneads Jan 15th

Belly SHOW

dancing

Jan 22nd • 8:30 pm & Valentine’s Day Late Show MUST PURCHASE MEAL

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Now Serving Wine & Indian Beer (Taj Mahal & Kingfisher)

Buy One Entree get

$1.00 OFF the second entree Expires 1/30/11. Not valid with any other offer.

Dine In • Take Out • Catering

720 East 1000 North 750-OVEN (6836) Gift Certificates Available

For information about advertising on this page please call 792-7263 • Monday – Friday 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Profile for The Herald Journal

Cache Magazine  

Cache Valley's arts and entertainment magazine

Cache Magazine  

Cache Valley's arts and entertainment magazine

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