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Cache Magazine Arts Week

at Utah State University

The Herald Journal

JANUARY 13-19, 2012


contents

January 13-19, 2012

MUSIC 4 Crumb Brothers Bak-

ery will host an a cappella concert

10 Read about local band The Pretty Darns

theater 3 Logan Youth Shake-

speare is ready to perform again

PROFILE 5 Meet Kris Krompel

MOVIES 7 See Aaron Peck’s review of ‘Contraband’

COLUMN 12 Lael Gilbert shares the history of the kitchen

MISC. 5 Annual Scrabble Scramble

coming up Jan. 27

BOOKS 13 See reviews and best sellers

CROSSWORD 14 Try completing this week’s puzzle

CALENDAR 15 What’s happening this week

An ice sculpture for USU’s Caine College of the Arts is displayed in front of the Performance Hall on campus during last year’s Arts Week. This year Arts Week will be held Jan. 17 to 21. On the cover: A close-up view of last year’s ice sculpture. (photos courtesy USU)

FROM THE EDITOR

A

round this time four years ago I was transitioning from studying as a full-time student to working fulltime at The Herald Journal. It was a bit of an adjustment because I was used to having a different schedule every day with various classes and dozens of people. It seemed every hour and a half I was in a different place and I liked it that way. Soon after graduation I went through withdrawals, not because I didn’t like my job, but because I also liked a mixed-up routine. I’m sure many other

college graduates feel the same way. My time for the first three years at The Herald Journal involved writing long feature stories for Cache Valley Magazine and then eventually the features section of the newspaper. The topics were fun, interesting and varied between events, restaurants, religion, health and food. After a while I stopped missing school. For any college students out there, believe me when I say life is better without homework. Ten months ago, when I started working as editor of Cache Magazine I more fully realized all the events and art-related activities USU has to offer. As a student I didn’t pay enough attention or was busy

with 10,000 other things. Now I feel I can appreciate the university with a whole new perspective. I don’t have to be a student to go to the plays, concerts and museums. The best thing about this? I go because I want to, not because there’s an assignment attached. Next week the Caine College of the Arts is presenting their second annual Arts Week with activities and events every day from Jan. 17 to 21. There will be music, ice sculpting, USU’s Got Talent, new exhibits and more. Read all about it on page 8. And student or not, I hope there’s something you can enjoy, support and participate in. — Manette Newbold


Logan Youth Shakespeare’s “Merchant of Venice” opens Friday, Jan. 20, at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema, 795 N. Main. Performances are at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 20, 23, 26 and 27, with matinees at 2 p.m. Jan. 21 and 28. Tickets available at the door. Cost is $5 for adults, $3 for kids. Children younger than 5 will not be admitted. Bright and beautiful Portia is trapped by her dead father’s command that she marry the man who can solve his riddle. Bassanio, a charming but reckless young man who has squandered his fortune, uses his wealthy merchant friend, Antonio, as collateral on a risky loan from Shylock, a Jewish moneylender long persecuted by Antonio. Meanwhile, Lorenzo, a friend of Antonio and Bassanio, runs away with Shylock’s daughter. When Antonio’s ships are lost at sea, Shylock is determined to hold him to the terms of the loan, a pound of Antonio’s flesh. Courtroom drama meets fairy tale romance in Shakespeare’s beautiful tale of justice and mercy, love and revenge, loss and longing. Logan Youth Shakespeare is thrilled to bring this beautiful and intense play, which is rarely performed by youth companies, to life. Logan Youth Shakespeare is a Cache Valley Center for the Arts program. For Nerissa (Sophie Cutler) and Portia (Emmalee Clark) watch anxiously as more information about LYS, call Mary Jacksonthe Prince of Arragon (Maria Luisa Bates) reads the riddle of the silver casket, attended by his nurse (Lauren Leiker). Smith at 760-1061.

– Lael Gilbert, page 12

PET OF THE WEEK Available for adoption

New exhibit is open at USU’s Nora Eccles Harrison museum A new exhibit featuring and programs at the Admission is free. approximately 25 drawmuseum. Parking for the museings by contemporary For more information um is available in the artist Jim Starrett will be or to schedule a tour of orange lot west of the hosted by the Nora Eccles the Nora Eccles Harrimuseum for $5. Parking Harrison Museum of Art son Museum of Art call is free after 5 p.m. and on on Utah State Univer435-797-0165. The Nora weekends. Call Rachel sity’s campus throughout Eccles Harrison Museum Hamm for reservations the spring semester. of Art is located on at 435-797-1414. Parking “Starrett addresses the USU’s campus at 650 N. is also available in the intersection of symbols, 1100 E. in Logan. InforBig Blue Terrace located power and authority by mation is also available near the Taggart Student creating mixtures of conat the museum’s website Center for $1.50/hour. (artmuseum.usu.edu). The Free parking after 5 p.m. Photo courtesy USU Public Relations flicting images to connect museum is open Monday is available at the blue lot “Kristallnacht,” by Jim Starrett is part of the difficult subjects of through Friday from 10 located at the corner of an exhibit that can be seen at USU’s pacifism and the Holo700 North and 1200 East Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art caust,” said Deb Banerjee, a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturcurator for exhibitions day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. by Aggie Ice Cream. through spring semester.

Pet: Boo From: Cache Humane Society Why she’s so lovable: Boo is a lovable, goofy dog. She wants to play and cuddle. She is looking for a home where she can be part of the family, which will be easy since she’s already house-trained. Boo loves kids, but may get too rambunctious with small children, so she will need supervision around them. She does not do well with other dogs but may be OK with small cats. She is eager to learn, love and be loved.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

Logan Youth Shakespeare will present ‘Merchant of Venice’

“When I became the woman of my own house, I peered into the kitchen and said, ‘There is more to be done in this room than bologna sandwiches.’”

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ALL MIXED UP

Quotable


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

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all mixed up Vintage photographer will visit USU Thursday Professional photographer Joni Sternbach, who specializes in 19th century photographic processes, will speak at 5 p.m. in the Utah State University Performance Hall on Thursday, Jan. 19. “Sternbach is one of the leading wet plate collodion photographers in the country,” said Christopher Gauthier, photography professor in USU’s Department of Art and Design. “What makes her unique is how she contextualizes the way things are now by using modern day people, clothes and backgrounds instead of doing historical reproductions like other collodion photographers.” Wet plate collodion is a 19th century photographic process where the liquid solution, collodion, is poured onto a piece of glass that goes directly into the camera. An image is then captured, exposed and developed while the plate is still wet. “USU has one of the longest running 19th century photography courses available so it made perfect sense for us to invite Sternbach,” said Gauthier. “Chris & Dan,” a photo by Joni Sternbach from her “SurfLand” exhibition. Sernbach will “Some of the photography students will be a guest speaker at Utah State University on Thursday, Jan. 19, at 5 p.m. in the USU also have the chance to take a workshop from Sternbach, which will be a Performance Hall.

once in a lifetime opportunity.” Sternbach’s photography has taken her to some of the most desolate deserts and prized surf beaches in the world. Her solo exhibition, “SurfLand,” featuring portraits of surfers, is an ongoing venture and has been exhibited at venues such as the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass. “My picture taking exists in a place where time is slowed down,” said Sternbach. “My methods are deliberate, antiquated and out-of-date because I don’t compete with the speed of the digital world. In return this affords me time; time to engage and interact with my subject and the world in a surprising way.” Sternbach graduated from the International Center of Photography at New York University with a master’s in art photography in 1987. She was part of the adjunct faculty at NYU for more than 20 years and participates as a faculty member at ICP and Center for Alternative Photography workshops teaching wet plate collodion. The USU event is free and open to the public. For more information contact the CCA Box Office at 435797-8022.

A cappella folk group Rolling Home coming to Logan

The Bridger Folk Music Society presents a concert with the singing group Rolling Home on Saturday, Jan. 21, at 7:30 p.m. at Crumb Brothers Bakery, 291 S. 300 West in Logan. Tickets are $13 and are available at the door or by calling 435-757-3468. Seating is very limited, so advance purchase is recommended. The concert is sponsored by Import Auto and Utah Public Radio. Rolling Home started in 2003 after their friend, Barre Toelken, suffered from a stroke. Toelken has an extraordinary knowledge of folk songs but after the stroke, the tunes he knew were unavailable to anyone. The group

began meeting at the Toelken residence weekly for harmony therapy. As time went on and songs began to come out of Toelken and the weekly meetings became less and less about him, and more and more about the music. Now Rolling Home sings for pleasure, performing a cappella in traditional style. The concert in Logan will be devoted to audience participation, with many of the tunes performed in call-andresponse form. with the audience encouraged to sing along. The evening will include traditional tunes, harmony singing and folk music. For more information, go to Rolling Home members from right to left: Barre Toelken, Miiko Toelken, Allen Christensen, Michael www.bridgerfolk.org Spooner, Sylvia Spooner and Ron Goede.


W

hen Kris Krompel was a young teenager, he not only knew what he wanted to do when he grew up, but he managed to start his future career. For 15 years now, since he was 14-and-a-half years old, Krompel has been teaching others to play guitar. Originally from Price, Utah, he began taking lessons at age 12 and two years later Krompel’s teacher let him take over his students. He says his favorite aspect of working with students is “just sharing things that I’m excited about and hopefully they become excited about it, and just watching them progress and grow as guitarists and musicians.” • At age 18 Krompel moved to Cache Valley to attend school at USU. He graduated in guitar performance and was able to teach classes as an adjunct professor while professor Mike Christiansen was on sabbatical. • He currently teaches lessons at KSM music and usually performs a couple times a week.

• Krompel has also done some recording with local band Zero to Ballistic whose album just came out. • When he’s not performing with Kategory V, Krompel says he does solo shows featuring classical guitar, jazz and folk music. He says he’s inspired by new musicians all the time. • “I’m constantly finding new ones every day. There’s tons of wonderful musicians out there in all genres of music. Too many to name.” • In his free time Krompel says he enjoys studying music, studying music theory and lifting weights. • As for the future, Krompel says he plans to continue what he does best: teaching and performing. • “That’s what I enjoy doing. (Music) sort of told me what I wanted to do. It dictated what I’m doing.” Text by Manette Newbold Photo by Jennifer Meyers

• “Since I was 14 teaching and performing has been my only source of income. Right now I teach so much that it doesn’t allow for a whole lot of traveling (with music). If I do it’s just kind of a weekend traveling thing.” • Krompel is also a member of Kategory V, a progressive rock band based in Salt Lake City. They recently finished recording an album which should be released in a matter of months.

Scrabble Scramble will raise funds for Bridgerland Literacy One letter at a time. That’s how students at Bridgerland Literacy gain reading skills and that’s how the community can show its support at the seventh annual Scrabble Scramble. By attending Bridgerland Literacy’s biggest fundraising event of the year, donors will provide the funds to purchase educational materials and support infrastructure for a truly great cause. This nonprofit was established 27 years ago by former Herald Journal editor Cindy Yurth and many volunteers continue today to provide free tutoring to adults throughout Cache Valley. Health issues such as stroke or brain injury, learning disabilities and childhood poverty are a few of the factors that have contributed to the alarming report that one in eight adults in Utah is illiterate. In addition to offering a three-round tournament, the Scrabble Scramble also features a silent auction with hundreds of items generously donated by local businesses and artists. One of the most valuable bid items this year is an extraordinary handmade

quilt donated by Needles and Friends Quilt Guild. Local plastic surgeon Dr. Casey Isom has also donated a treatment of Botox (retail value is $600) and a treatment of eyelash enhancement. Veteran Scrabble Scramble host Lee Austin, formerly of Utah Public Radio at USU, will return as the event’s emcee and he will award fun prizes throughout the evening. The event will take place Friday, Jan. 27, at Hamilton’s Steak and Seafood at 2427 N. Main St., in Logan. The cost of the Scrabble Scramble tournament is $75 per team of three (two players and one scorekeeper) or $10 per spectator. Late registration will be accepted at the door for $90 per team. Doors to the Scrabble Scramble open at 6 p.m. for registrants to begin bidding at the silent auction and the tournament begins at 7 p.m. Reservations are required for an optional fundraising dinner at 5:30 p.m. for $25 per plate. To learn more about the event or to register a team, call 435-770-0587 or go online to www. bridgerlandliteracy.org.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

Guitarist/teacher

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Meet KRIS


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

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movies Corny ‘Joyful Noise’ is full of catfights By Christy Lemire AP Movie Critic

★ ‘Joyful Noise’

If some incarnation of “Glee” were to be develDirector // Todd Graff oped for the Christian Starring // Queen Latifah, Dolly Parton and Keke Broadcasting Network, it Palmer would probably look a lot Rated // PG-13 for some language, including a like “Joyful Noise.” sexual reference You’ve got your squeaky-clean reworksive barbs at each other in Competition. ings of pop tunes from a continuation of a longGraff, who previously various decades, which standing hatred that’s directed the similarly are intended to please never fully explained, musical “Camp” and viewers of all ages; some and probably should “Bandslam,” jumps romance, although nothhave been. Guess they around awkwardly ing too hot and heavy; just plain don’t like each between catfights, perforand a large dollop of other. So when G.G.’s mances and surreptitious prayer, as the characters nebulously naughty snuggle sessions between struggle to find answers grandson, Randy (Jeremy the two young stars, both with the Lord’s help. It’s Jordan), moves back to of whom can really sing really rather canny the town and promptly falls (Jordan has appeared on Warner Bros. way writer-director Todd Broadway in “Bonnie Dolly Parton, foreground from left, Keke Palmer and Queen Latifah are shown in a for Vi Rose’s blossomGraff’s film caters to ing, 16-year-old songbird and Clyde”). scene from “Joyful Noise.” these large, wholesome daughter, Olivia (Keke Except for a climactic audiences — ones that to take over, rather than could be about Jesus if imagine Parton’s “Steel Palmer), the women’s confrontation in which are largely underserved the late director’s widow, Magnolias” character had animosity boils over and you wanted it to be. Vi Rose finally snaps and in mainstream multiplex G.G. Sparrow (Dolly Par- become a couple decades threatens to destroy the A progressive push for unleashes her frustrafare — all at once. ton). Vi Rose is a modest, later, if you were to poncontemporary music vs. entire choir as we know it tion on the rebellious, But that doesn’t mean the tug of traditional spir- conservative Christian der such questions. — right as they’re gaining ungrateful Olivia, very it’s effective as entertainitual tunes is at the core of nurse raising her two Anyway, Vi Rose and momentum in the annual few sounds in “Joyful ment. Especially during teenage kids on her own “Joyful Noise” and repreG.G. hurl passive-aggres- National Joyful Noise Noise” ring true. the musical numbers while her husband’s away sents the primary source — which theoretically serving in the Army. G.G. of tension. That’s how should serve as the most is all sass and big hair little is at stake here. rousing source of emoand folksy metaphors, When the church choir tion, since the film is usually involving aniin depressed, small-town about a gospel choir mals: “There’s always Pacashau, Ga., loses its — there’s a weird disconfree cheese in the mouseleader (Kris Kristoffernect, a sense that the son) to a heart attack, vet- trap, but trust me, the songs are simultaneously mice there ain’t happy.” eran singer Vi Rose Hill overproduced and hollow, (Queen Latifah) is tapped It’s who you might and repeated cutaways to reaction shots of singers nodding and smiling further undermine their cohesion. A powerful EUrOpEAN-StylE BrEAD performance of Michael FINE pAStrIES Jackson’s “Man in the Mirror” toward the start SANDwIChES is a rare exception. If there’s one useful nugget to be gleaned here, 291 South 300 West in Logan, Utah though, it’s that virtually anything can be turned 435-792-6063 into a gospel song; apparHours: Mon - Fri 7 am - 3 pm, Sat 8 am - 3 pm ently “Yeah” by Usher

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would’ve been impossible given the time and circumstances he had to work with.” January is notorious for starting the year off with clichéd, half-interesting movies. “Contraband” completely fits that definition. It’s not so bad that you’ll find yourself groaning at the movie screen, but it never engages the viewer on any other level of intelligence. It expects you to sit there and believe everything that’s happening without asking questions of your own. You’re just supposed to believe it went down the way it did because the movie had to end at some point. Feedback can be sent to aaronpeck46@gmail. com.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

The Reel Place Aaron Peck

Heist movies usually follow the same formula. The main character has just decided to get out of the thieving way of life, but there’s something that draws him right back in for “one last score.” It never fails really. This formula is used so often because it’s somewhat effective. It’s not easy to root for people who are criminals for a living, but how about an ex-criminal who is stealing because he has no choice? “Contraband” is as generic as heist movies come. Chris Farraday (Mark Wahlberg) used to be a world-class smuggler. If someone wanted something snuck across international borders he was the guy. He’s since left that lifestyle though – sound familiar? He now runs a respectable business installing home alarm systems. However, there are people in Chris’ family who haven’t given up the life yet. Andy (Caleb Landry Jones), Chris’ brotherin-law has just pulled a smuggling job that went wrong. In order to not get caught with a bag full of drugs, Andy had to dump it over the side of the ship before U.S. Customs found it. Andy is now in debt to one of the city’s most ruthless criminals and Chris must pull one last job to save him. Here’s where you think the movie is going to get really good. If it doesn’t want to break from the stereotypical storyline of a heist movie, at least it will set itself apart with its acting, right? “Contraband” boasts two of Hollywood’s strongest character actors; Giovanni Ribisi plays Tim Briggs, the criminal who Andy is

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‘Contraband’ follows same old plot line


s t r A k e e W h a t U at

U

y t i s r nive

U e t Sta

tah State University’s Caine College of the Arts is gearing up for its second Arts Week, the activities of which are designed to highlight the programs the college offers — as well as the multiple talents of faculty and students. With a variety of artistic events — including performances, concerts, exhibits and a networking activity — the week brings traditional events back and new elements as well. “Arts Week will give students and community members a concentrated, entertaining, educational and inspiring look at all of the arts in a friendly, encouraging atmosphere,” wrote James Bankhead, USU music department head, in an e-mail. “People who participate will be given a broad spectrum of experiences with the arts intended to enrich their lives while being enjoyable and fun.” Mary Jacobson Whyte, student senator for the Caine College of the Arts, was on the committee that helped plan Arts Week. “My entire focus for Arts Week was to include every department of the college and also the community. All events were planned accordingly to bring out each department’s special contribution to the Arts. For the first time at Utah State, students will be able to compete in “USU’s Got Talent” on Jan. 19. Students from across campus will compete as singers, dancers, comedians and in many other acts during this first-time activity. “USU has a long history of presenting talent shows,” Bankhead said. “Playing off of the popular TV show is just the most recent incarnation of this concept. What we wanted to do is showcase

the talent and artistic skill of students who may not be art, music or theater majors.” Then there’s “Raise Your Voice with the ‘Sound of Music,’” at Morgan Theatre in the Chase Fine Arts Center, a sing-along and screening of the classic movie. The rest of the events will be traditional with a new twist. The Caine College of the Arts will host two performances of “Raising Caine,” a musical concert, featuring CCA faculty, staff and students that will lighten the evening of Jan. 18. The “Raising Caine” concert was a hit during the first Arts Week in 2011. Two performances are offered this year for the popular entertainment. The Grand Gala event, featuring Broadway star Christiane Noll, will be Friday, Jan. 20, at 7:30 p.m. The Gala will also honor top students as well as artistic highlights from the Caine College of the Arts fall 2011 semester. In addition to the CCA students, two previous theater department faculty members and department heads, Sid G. Perkes and W. Vosco Call, will be honored. “Christiane is a dynamic performer with talent and skills in many areas. She embodies passion, varied styles of expression and beauty ... the very essence of the arts,” Bankhead said. Arts Week is in its second year and officials anticipate more activities in the years to come. “We feel a very real obligation to share the nature and vitality of the arts with as broad an audience as possible,” Bankhead said. “Arts Week is part of this effort to make people’s lives more meaningful by having the arts a more prominent part of their lives.”

By Kevin Opsahl

Jan. 17-19   The second annual student art sale will be held all day at the Taggart Student Center Ballroom. Traveling campus performers, known as CCA Buskers, are back and ready to entertain university audiences with musical magic Jan. 17-19 at a variety of locations throughout campus. Performances are free and open to the public.   Jan. 17   A networking dinner designed especially for USU students features honored alumni — interior designer Nathan Fischer and ceramics program director Forrest LeschMiddleton. The dinner is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall and will provide an opportunity for students to connect with professionals. Cost is $8 for the

networking dinner or $10 for the dinner and “Raise Your Voice with ‘The Sound of Music,’” which will follow at 7:30 in the Morgan Theatre, Chase Fine Arts Center. Cost for “Raise Your Voice” is $5 for general admission and $3 for USU students with ID. The audiences will be invited to sing along with “The Sound of Music.”   Jan. 18   An opening reception for the Marion R. Hyde art exhibit will be at 4:30 p.m. in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall in the Chase Fine Arts Center. The event is free.   The Caine College of the Arts will host two performances of “Raising Caine,” a musical concert featuring CCA faculty, staff and students at 6 and 8 p.m. Cost is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and youth, $5 for USU faculty and staff and free for USU students with ID.

Fire & Ice: Sculpture Showcase will be at 7:15 p.m. at the Performance Hall. Free.  Jan. 19   The second annual Design Star will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the TSC Sunburst Lounge. Come watch students compete by using recycled materials to create amazing light displays. Free.   USU’s Got Talent will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Morgan Theatre, Chase Fine Arts Center. Cost is $5 for general admission or $3 with a can of food.   Jan. 20   Grand Gala featuring Broadway star Christiane Noll will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Kent Concert Hall. Cost is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and youth, $5 for USU faculty and staff and free for USU students with ID.

 Jan. 21   “Prix Fixe: Dinner and a Show.” The dinner-drama provides an opportunity to experience dinner at the Bluebird Restaurant, located on 19 N. Main St. in Logan, and an Old Lyric Repertory Company production of “Greater Tuna” by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard starring the OLRC’s very own W. Lee Daily and Stefan Espinosa at the Caine Lyric Theatre, located at 28 W. Center St. in Logan. Cost is $15 for dinner and a show and $10 for the show only. —Events listing provided by USU Public Relations   For tickets and more information on Arts Week, visit the CCA Box office located in Room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center, call 435797-8022 or go online to arts.usu. edu.


s t r A k e e W h a t U at

U

y t i s r nive

U e t Sta

tah State University’s Caine College of the Arts is gearing up for its second Arts Week, the activities of which are designed to highlight the programs the college offers — as well as the multiple talents of faculty and students. With a variety of artistic events — including performances, concerts, exhibits and a networking activity — the week brings traditional events back and new elements as well. “Arts Week will give students and community members a concentrated, entertaining, educational and inspiring look at all of the arts in a friendly, encouraging atmosphere,” wrote James Bankhead, USU music department head, in an e-mail. “People who participate will be given a broad spectrum of experiences with the arts intended to enrich their lives while being enjoyable and fun.” Mary Jacobson Whyte, student senator for the Caine College of the Arts, was on the committee that helped plan Arts Week. “My entire focus for Arts Week was to include every department of the college and also the community. All events were planned accordingly to bring out each department’s special contribution to the Arts. For the first time at Utah State, students will be able to compete in “USU’s Got Talent” on Jan. 19. Students from across campus will compete as singers, dancers, comedians and in many other acts during this first-time activity. “USU has a long history of presenting talent shows,” Bankhead said. “Playing off of the popular TV show is just the most recent incarnation of this concept. What we wanted to do is showcase

the talent and artistic skill of students who may not be art, music or theater majors.” Then there’s “Raise Your Voice with the ‘Sound of Music,’” at Morgan Theatre in the Chase Fine Arts Center, a sing-along and screening of the classic movie. The rest of the events will be traditional with a new twist. The Caine College of the Arts will host two performances of “Raising Caine,” a musical concert, featuring CCA faculty, staff and students that will lighten the evening of Jan. 18. The “Raising Caine” concert was a hit during the first Arts Week in 2011. Two performances are offered this year for the popular entertainment. The Grand Gala event, featuring Broadway star Christiane Noll, will be Friday, Jan. 20, at 7:30 p.m. The Gala will also honor top students as well as artistic highlights from the Caine College of the Arts fall 2011 semester. In addition to the CCA students, two previous theater department faculty members and department heads, Sid G. Perkes and W. Vosco Call, will be honored. “Christiane is a dynamic performer with talent and skills in many areas. She embodies passion, varied styles of expression and beauty ... the very essence of the arts,” Bankhead said. Arts Week is in its second year and officials anticipate more activities in the years to come. “We feel a very real obligation to share the nature and vitality of the arts with as broad an audience as possible,” Bankhead said. “Arts Week is part of this effort to make people’s lives more meaningful by having the arts a more prominent part of their lives.”

By Kevin Opsahl

Jan. 17-19   The second annual student art sale will be held all day at the Taggart Student Center Ballroom. Traveling campus performers, known as CCA Buskers, are back and ready to entertain university audiences with musical magic Jan. 17-19 at a variety of locations throughout campus. Performances are free and open to the public.   Jan. 17   A networking dinner designed especially for USU students features honored alumni — interior designer Nathan Fischer and ceramics program director Forrest LeschMiddleton. The dinner is from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall and will provide an opportunity for students to connect with professionals. Cost is $8 for the

networking dinner or $10 for the dinner and “Raise Your Voice with ‘The Sound of Music,’” which will follow at 7:30 in the Morgan Theatre, Chase Fine Arts Center. Cost for “Raise Your Voice” is $5 for general admission and $3 for USU students with ID. The audiences will be invited to sing along with “The Sound of Music.”   Jan. 18   An opening reception for the Marion R. Hyde art exhibit will be at 4:30 p.m. in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall in the Chase Fine Arts Center. The event is free.   The Caine College of the Arts will host two performances of “Raising Caine,” a musical concert featuring CCA faculty, staff and students at 6 and 8 p.m. Cost is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and youth, $5 for USU faculty and staff and free for USU students with ID.

Fire & Ice: Sculpture Showcase will be at 7:15 p.m. at the Performance Hall. Free.  Jan. 19   The second annual Design Star will be held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the TSC Sunburst Lounge. Come watch students compete by using recycled materials to create amazing light displays. Free.   USU’s Got Talent will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Morgan Theatre, Chase Fine Arts Center. Cost is $5 for general admission or $3 with a can of food.   Jan. 20   Grand Gala featuring Broadway star Christiane Noll will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Kent Concert Hall. Cost is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and youth, $5 for USU faculty and staff and free for USU students with ID.

 Jan. 21   “Prix Fixe: Dinner and a Show.” The dinner-drama provides an opportunity to experience dinner at the Bluebird Restaurant, located on 19 N. Main St. in Logan, and an Old Lyric Repertory Company production of “Greater Tuna” by Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard starring the OLRC’s very own W. Lee Daily and Stefan Espinosa at the Caine Lyric Theatre, located at 28 W. Center St. in Logan. Cost is $15 for dinner and a show and $10 for the show only. —Events listing provided by USU Public Relations   For tickets and more information on Arts Week, visit the CCA Box office located in Room 139-B of the Chase Fine Arts Center, call 435797-8022 or go online to arts.usu. edu.


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

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music The Pretty Darns talk touring and future plans By Manette Newbold Cache Magazine editor

Three girls, one car, two weeks and Harry Potter. That, in a nutshell, sums up the tour bluegrass band The Pretty Darns took last summer to Tennessee. Oh, and throw their upright bass player Kelin Gibbons in there, too. “Three girls and Kel Kel,” fiddle player and vocalist Lacey Johnson says, laughing. “I think we wore Kelin out with The Pretty Darns” adds Liz Woolley, mandolin player and vocalist. But if you ask Gibbons, he’ll disagree. “You’re making it sound like a good thing,” he says. “Three girls, one car and Harry Potter.” What could top that? For The Pretty Darns the tour really was an adventure to remember. The band has been together for three years and originally formed in Salt Lake City with Johnson, Woolley and Annemarie Neff, three friends who met at Snow College and later discovered they love playing together. Gibbons joined the group last summer and went on tour with the girls right away. During their trek across the country the group listened to Harry Potter on CD and made stops in St. Louis, Mo., Ashville, N.C., Columbus, Ohio, and Franklin, Nashville and Knoxville, Tenn., to perform. They got to play in sports grills, coffee shops, house concerts and bars while promoting their first full-length, selftitled album which was released last June.

Photo courtesy Liz Woolley

Liz Woolley (in back) Kelin Gibbons, Lacey Johnson and Annemarie Neff stop for dinner in Ohio while on tour last year. The group makes up the bluegrass band The Pretty Darns.

The Pretty Darns will perform at Why Sound on Thursday, Jan. 19, at 8 p.m. They are opening with acoustic guitarist Sarah Olsen for Benyaro. Cost is $5. “I thought it was cool to see how we fit in the bigger musical scheme of things,” says Woolley, who lives in Cache Valley while studying at USU. “We played our few little shows, but we were in Nashville. We were in Nashville as a band and got to play there. And we did pretty well for ourselves.” Neff, vocalist and guitar player, says she loved seeing a new part of the country and Johnson says she enjoyed seeing the places classic bluegrass

songs were written about. “We would pass freeway off-ramps ... and they were all in these old bluegrass songs.” The Pretty Darns members blend their vocals and instruments creating lovely harmonies and songs about their lives, memories, mistakes and experiences. The rest of their tunes are comprised of ideas and made-up stories. Since forming the band they’ve played several shows locally at various venues including Why

Sound and Summerfest. Last summer they also performed at the Utah Arts Festival in Salt Lake City and at the Helper Arts and Music Festival in Helper, Utah. Three of their members now live in Cache Valley with Neff being the only one left in the Salt Lake City area. They currently get together as often as they can to practice and in the summer they usually perform three to four shows a week. “It’s a long-distance relationship,” Neff says, laughing. All members of The Pretty Darns are also students trying to balance school with music and personal lives. Both Woolley and Neff will graduate in the spring (Woolley with a bache-

Photo courtesy The Pretty Darns

The three original members of The Pretty Darns, Lacey Johnson, Liz Woolley and Annemarie Neff, are pictured.

lor’s in music therapy and Neff with a master’s in music education from the University of Utah) while Johnson will continue studying artist management online through UC Berkeley and Gibbons will continue working on his guitar performance degree at USU. The Pretty Darns are also working on another album, Woolley says. They’ve written a lot of new songs over the last couple of years while they worked on their first album. They also dream

of touring in Europe. While graduation and upcoming internships may separate the group for a while in the future, Woolley says she hopes that will be temporary. “We’re a pretty chill band,” she says. “We’re pretty good at what we do, we enjoy playing together and it’s fun. And if we make it big in the meantime, that would be awesome. But we all have our respective educations and different things to worry about and deal with so we take it as it comes.”


Your Stuff “Illusion” By Lovelle Mortenson I looked into the mirror And was pleased as I could be At the beautiful reflection That was staring back at me. Her eyes were clear, her hair unmussed; Her flawless skin aglow, No pockets hung beneath her chin; Where did the wrinkles go? Her teeth were neatly spaced, and gleamed A brilliant, sparkly white. That magic face cream she had tried Had worked — in just one night. Well, there would be no need today To bother with repairs. She’d use the time for shopping, And perhaps, elicit stares.

To ensure her magic formula Would never cease to be, She’d stockpile an immense supply Behind a lock and key. Then never would she have to face The dreaded aging phase; She would forevermore retain Her precious youthful days. But then — her dream was shattered; The fantasy was gone, When she realized she just forgot To put her glasses on.

babes of 2011 DEAr PArEnTS & GrAnDPArEnTS, Congratulations on the new addition to your family! The Herald Journal will be publishing its fourteenth “Babes” edition. This year’s special, featuring photographs

of babies born during 2011, will be published on Sunday, January 29, 2012. A random drawing for several prizes donated by area businesses will be held after all entries are received.

win a prize from one of our sponsors! enter onlin

news.hjnew e at s.co babes_of_20 m/ 11 Send your poems and stories to mnewbold@hjnews.com.

Photos by you

enter online at news.hjnews.com/babes_of_2011

JUST FILL OUT THIS FORM

baby’s full name ________________________________________________________ Date of birth ______/______/______ (birth must be between 1/1/11 and 12/31/11) length _________________________________ weight _____________________________

parents' names ___________________________________________________________ siblings' names __________________________________________________________ Grandparents' names _____________________________________________________ Your name ______________________________ Day phone ______________________________ amount of check/money order $ __________ signature ______________________ entries paying by credit card must go online to new.hjnews.com/babes_of_2011 “Cattails on a Winter Afternoon” was taken in Blacksmith Fork Canyon on Jan. 1 by J.P. Spicer-Escalante of Logan.

Mail complete entry form with a clear picture of baby plus your $15 payment to Babes of 2011, The Herald Journal, PO BOX 487, Logan, UT 84323. Entries must be received by Jan. 23, 2012. If you wish to have your picture returned, please send a SASE along with your photo.


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

There are many reasons I’m grateful I’m alive these days ... the availability of antibiotics, technological wonders like cell phones, modern transportation, and my precious hot water heater. But there is another reason why I love when I live. When I am at work in my kitchen, I am basking in the afterglow of a turbulent era experienced by my mother and my mother-in-law ... one that swung like a pendulum from one extreme to another, and finally came to rest at a carefully balanced point, giving me the freedom to make a choice that is a first for my generation ... to cook in a liberated kitchen. Let me illustrate what I mean using the kitchen experiences of two women in my life ... my mother-inlaw and my mother. My mother-in-law was born on a farm in Hooper, Utah, in 1930. Her family raised the majority of the food they ate. They took a pig when it was born, provided food for it from their fields, cleared away its waste and cared for it when it was sick. When it was big enough they killed it, slaughtered the carcass and cured the meat or stored it in rented space in the community freezer at the local grocery. They did the same for beef and chicken. If they wanted to eat it, it had to be raised. Vegetables and fruits were grown, harvested, washed, trimmed and processed. Summertime canning was a full-time job. Late summer and autumn brought on a frenzy of preserving. My mother-in-law, her sisters and her mother spent a lot of time elbow-deep in peach peels and beet tops so that in the cold winter

Bread and Butter LAEL GILBERT

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Cooking is for everyone these days, even women

months, the family could open a jar of peaches or pickled beets for dinner. Meals were prepared from scratch. Bread was mixed, kneaded, raised and baked. Butter was made from milk. Milk came from your own cow. Dishes had to be washed immediately to make way for the next meal’s preparation. Leftovers were wrapped in paper and kept for a blessed break from cooking for breakfast. It was necessary. It was likely soul-enriching in many ways. But for the women of my mother-inlaw’s generation many days were, in a word, drudgery. In her memory, my mother-in-law doesn’t remember it as drudgery. Her father gave her the

option of going outdoors to shovel out barns with her brothers. She chose the kitchen as, to her, the more palatable option. But many women didn’t have any options. Then things began to change. Farm science advanced and farms began to produce more food more cheaply. People became more affluent. Buying food at the store became a possibility for the average family. Timesaving machines like the electric mixers and refrigerators became common household implements. The feminist movement of the 1960s and ’70s was initiated to address gender inequalities in culture in the United States. As women joined the workforce, convenience

foods like canned soup and store-bought bread became the norm for many families. All these combined to free American women from the drudgery of the kitchen. Then along came my mother’s generation. She was born in California to an independent-minded working mother who had been thrown into the workplace by the shortage of man-power during World War II. My mother grew up on skillet steak and store-canned green beans prepared haphazardly in the dusky hours after her mother returned from work. For special occasions they bought a cake mix and stirred it together carefully following the directions on the back of the box.

My mother never ate like a gourmet, never saw her meat slaughtered (with the exception of that one shocking year in 4-H) and never felt tied to the kitchen. When she became the woman of the house in the 1960s, she found that she had ambitions for her family, for her career, and for her time and experience in life that didn’t involve cooking. She threw her energy into these realms. To many of her generation being in the kitchen was seen as stepping backward, not forward. I was raised on canned cream-of-chicken soup over rice, bologna sandwiches with mayo, and frozen lasagna. I’m not complaining, I didn’t really suffer for it. But when I became the woman of my own house, I peered into the kitchen and said, “There is more to be done in this room than bologna sandwiches.” In graduate school I began taking cooking seriously ... at first homemade lasagna and brownies from scratch. Then homemade custards and complicated sauces from scratch. Then collecting recipes and perusing cookbooks and studying cuisine in my spare time. It became a bit of an obsession. The wonderful thing for me was where that

great social pendulum had come to rest during my time in the kitchen. I had the power to make a choice ... to be obsessed with food without the baggage of seeing myself as a kitchen drudge. To relish in the sensory joy of thrusting my hands into a pile of wet dough, taking in the bewitching aroma of melting butter and sizzling onions in a frying pan, taking a peppery bite of tender diced radish before throwing it onto a salad and dousing it with lemon and olive oil. Then, to tire of it all and leave it behind to write, to study, to work, or to go with my family and buy a turkey pesto sandwich at Great Harvest. It is my choice. I’ll enjoy it while I can. The great social pendulum is swinging back. People are realizing the toll industrialized farming has taken. People are buying local foods, touting organic products, and rejecting convenience and processed foods. Time will tell how the next generation will be using their kitchens. Lucky for him, the pendulum also inadvertently gave my husband a choice he didn’t have before. When women walked out of the home kitchen, it made room for the man to try on the apron. Men moved from the limited culinary venue of the barbecue and campfire and began expanding their horizons into the home hearth. My husband can whip up a batch of homemade crispy shoestring fries with roasted garlic and rosemary for our dinner and still be a manly man. Lucky him. Lucky me. Feedback can be sent to laelgilbert@hotmail.com.


By Dinesh Ramde Associated Press

In his popular books and newspaper columns, Dave Barry displays such a zany wit that on the rare occasions he’s being serious he actually has to specify, “I am not making this up.” Paragraph after paragraph, his columns are laugh-outloud funny. Unfortunately, that charm is lacking in “Lunatics,” a novel he co-wrote with “Saturday Night Live” writer Alan Zweibel. The book is certainly engaging and creative, and the reader is constantly wondering what will happen next, but the

humor is more muted. The comedy lies more in the story’s sheer outlandishness than in the classic zing that Dave Barry fans might expect. “Lunatics” is the story of a mild-mannered man who, while refereeing a girls’ soccer game, angers a distinctly loathsome parent. A simple offside call touches off a series of escalating confrontations and adventures that, somehow, end up having global implications. One of the protagonists is the gentle Philip Horkman, who owns a pet store named The Wine Shop and whose idea of watching the game is settling down for an episode of “Wheel of Fortune.” The other

is the detestable Jeffrey Peckerman, a selfish boor who can

take any situation and make it worse. The two characters take turns narrating the chapters. The technique makes clear just what a Ned Flanders-Homer Simpson vibe they share. Following Horkman’s disputed soccer call, the pair eventually find themselves involved in a road rage incident that New York authorities mistake for a terrorist plot. They escape a massive manhunt by stowing away on a clothing-optional cruise, and from there things get really crazy. With a Forrest Gump-like ability to land in historical moments, they’re thrust into

separate conflicts involving Cuba, China, Mogadishu, Israel and Palestine. There are even cameo appearances by Donald Trump and Sarah Palin. Without giving away too much, the protagonists end up with high-profile roles at a Republican National Convention (even though Horkman is a Democrat). U.S. presidential politics are never the same after that. The outlandish scenarios are certainly entertaining, and as bizarre as their adventures are, there’s a strange sense of believability to the story. That helps keep the story fresh and the pages turning.

Physicist writes how universe evolved new york times best sellers purpose” — and is destined to By Ann Levin Associated Press

In fall 2009, the theoretical physicist Lawrence M. Krauss gave a talk about recent discoveries in cosmology that he engagingly titled, “A Universe From Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing.” The popularity of the video, viewed nearly a million times on YouTube, prompted Krauss to develop the ideas in the talk into this short, elegant account of the origins of our universe and its likely demise trillions of years from now. The best-selling author of “The Physics of Star Trek,” Krauss possesses a rare talent for making the hardest ideas in astrophysics accessible to the layman, due in part to his sly humor. In another universe, Krauss could have been a standup comedian. Indeed, the evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, who contributes an afterword to the book, dubs his friend the “Woody Allen of cosmology.”

One favorite joke involves Edwin Hubble, whose life story, Krauss deadpans, bolsters his faith in humanity “because he started out as a lawyer and then became an astronomer.” In just under 200 pages, Krauss walks us through a hundred years of mind-bending breakthroughs in astrophysics, which have led scientists to the inescapable conclusion that our universe sprang out of nothing — “without design, intent or

return to that bleak, cold, dark space. A professor at Arizona State University, Krauss clearly relishes his iconoclastic role, gleefully demolishing all theories of creation that require a creator — that is, most religions. But one has to hope that this book won’t appeal only to the partisans of the culture wars — it’s just too good and interesting for that. Krauss is genuinely in awe of the “wondrously strange” nature of our physical world, and his enthusiasm is infectious. Here he is explaining how every atom in our bodies was forged billions of years ago in the nuclear furnaces of exploding stars: “We are all, literally, star children, and our bodies made of stardust.” The book bursts with such poetic conceits. For Krauss, the prospect of a godless universe is “invigorating,” not scary. “It motivates us to draw meaning from our own actions,” he writes, “and to make the most of our brief existence in the sun.”

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “77 Shadow Street,” by Dean Koontz 2. “11/22/63,” by Stephen King 3. “Death Comes to Pemberley,” by P. D. James 4. “Locked On,” by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney 5. “Kill Alex Cross,” by James Patterson HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Steve Jobs,” by Walter Isaacson 2. “Killing Lincoln,” by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard 3. “Unbroken,” by Laura Hillenbrand 4. “Thinking, Fast and Slow,” by Daniel Kahneman 5. “Through My Eyes,” by Tim Tebow with Nathan Whitaker PAPERBACK TRADE FICTION 1. “The Help,” by Kathryn Stockett 2. “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” by Stieg Larsson 3. “The Tiger’s Wife,” by Téa Obreht 4. “The Girl Who Played with Fire,” by Stieg Larsson 5. “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close,” by Jonathan Safran Foer Paperback Mass-Market Fiction 1. “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” by Stieg Larsson 2. “Spirit Bound,” by Christine Feehan 3. “Hidden Summit,” by Robyn Carr 4. “The Girl Who Played with Fire,” by Stieg Larsson 5. “A Game of Thrones,” by George R. R. Martin Keep your reading list updated at www.nytimes.com/pages/books/

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

‘Lunatics’ fun but lacks Dave Barry’s typical wit

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Books


The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

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CrossworD By Myles Mellor and Sally York Across 1. Level connectors 6. Cheese in a ball 10. Figure ___ 15. Deadly biters 19. Dart 20. Goggle 21. ___ Beach, Fla. 22. Canaanite deity 23. Frank 27. Without mercy 28. ___ burner 29. Wallace of “E.T.” 30. Endocarp 31. Top ___ Club, Beatles venue in Hamburg 32. Grayish browns 35. Type of ranked score, in statistics 37. Vulgarian 40. Wedding cake feature 43. Rechargeable battery 45. Unite 46. Frank 51. Category of arachnids 52. Peak near Taormina 53. Exhaust 54. Parting words 56. Barge ___ 59. Swiss canton 64. Color ___ 67. Potential lifesaver 71. John, abroad 72. Frank 78. Religious image: Var. 79. Iron ore used in dyeing 80. Ring-tailed animal 81. Family subdivisions 83. Long haul 85. Home run hitter, for one 90. Indigo-yielding shrubs 94. Mythology anthology 97. ___ Durance (Canadian actress) 98. Frank

104. Super server 105. It’s catching 106. Sacred Hindu writings 107. Corrodes 108. Trust 111. ___ Crown 113. Clangor 115. Christian ___ 116. Monopolize 118. Maiden name indicator 119. Ultimate 124. Frank 129. To be, to Brutus 130. Cereal killer 131. Iranian money 132. Free radicals 133. No longer secret 134. Crackers 135. Institution since 1701 136. First word in an Austen title Down 1. Party acronym 2. Healthful berry 3. Drop down? 4. Red body? 5. Commemorative marker 6. Vandalizes, in a way 7. Ambo 8. When D.S.T. begins 9. A Moore 10. Sheep disease 11. Colorful carp 12. Routine 13. Struck with the outer end of the head of a golf club 14. Like cornstalks 15. Fabric woven from goat hair 16. More mawkish 17. Tongue protuberance 18. Scheduled 24. “Fiddler on the Roof” role 25. Twisted, as a wet towel

26. Tappan ___ Bridge 32. West Indies island 33. Alternative to nude 34. Cheek 36. Quintal 37. Mineral springs 38. Nuts or crackers 39. Girasol, e.g. 41. Dander 42. Guinness Book suffix 44. It’s spotted in casinos 47. Water chestnuts 48. Bread served with korma 49. Gold bits 50. Barbary beast 55. Paraguayan monetary unit 57. Horse opera 58. Fed. agency 60. Bird’s beak 61. Twelfth Night, vis-àvis Epiphany 62. Dictionary abbr. 63. Social worker? 65. Gray 66. Circle meas. 68. Columba livia 69. “My man!” 70. Recognition response 72. Like a bunch 73. Arthur Godfrey played it 74. Oui’s opposite 75. Pilothouse abbr. 76. Last: Abbr. 77. Kitchen aid 82. Fan sound 84. Unagi, at a sushi bar 86. Adjust to a situation 87. Baltic capital 88. Genuine 89. Ship abandoners? 91. Start of a wonderful life? 92. Time to give up? 93. Melee memento 95. ___ job 96. Throw in

98. Needle-shaped 99. Backslide 100. ___ wolf 101. Terzetto 102. Persona non grata 103. Spoonbill, for one 104. Mountain spurs 109. “So there you are!” 110. Romance, e.g. 112. Circumspect 114. Pizarro’s conquest 117. ___ cheque 119. Bibliographic abbr. 120. Mouselike animal 121. Straddling 122. Treaty subject 123. Emit coherent light 125. Word with milk or line 126. Maniac leader? 127. Slip on 128. It has moles: Abbr.

answers from last week

Herald Journal one to two days prior to the event. Calendar items can be submitted Deadlines inbyThe email at hjhappen@hjnews.com. Any press releases or photos for events listed in the Cache Magazine calendar items are due Wednesday by 5 p.m. They will also run for free

first half of Cache Magazine can be sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com. Poems and photos can also by sent to mnewbold@hjnews.com and run on a space-available basis if selected.

www.ThemeCrosswords.com


Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold an ice fishing activity at Hyrum Dam on Friday, Jan. 13, from 2 to 4 p.m. Cost is $5. Call Bryce at 435713-0288 for details. The Cache Valley Stargazers will hold their monthly meeting Friday, Jan. 13, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 244 of the Science-Engineering-Research (SER) Building on USU campus. Free parking is available in the lot adjacent to SER, behind the Performance Hall. The meeting will feature “The Well-Equipped Astronomer,” the second annual Gadget Fair. Everyone is welcome. For information visit www.cachestargazers.org or email cache.stargazers@gmail.com. The Dry Lake Band will perform at Caffe Ibis on Friday, Jan. 13, from 4:45 to 6:45 p.m.

SATURDAY Join OPTIONS for Independence for a visit to Hardware Ranch and see the elk Saturday, Jan. 14, at 10:30 a.m. The group will go to lunch afterwards at Fredrico’s. Hardware Ranch is free, lunch prices will vary and transportation is $2. Call Mandie at 435-753-5353 to schedule a ride. Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a ski day Jan. 14 at Beaver Mountain. Cost is $25. Adaptive equipment will be available. All abilities are welcome or join the group as a volunteer. Call Bryce at 435-7130288 for details. Stokes Nature Center will hold a snowshoeing activity Jan. 14 from 1 to 4 p.m. Meet at Logan U.S. Forest Service District Office. Cost is a suggested $5 donation. The group will snowshoe in Logan Canyon and explore the stories of wildlife in winter. The trek will be led by Utah master naturalist Mark

Larese-Cassanova. Cocoa, treats and snowshoes will be provided. Registration is required. For details or to register call 435-755-3239 or email nature@ logannature.org.

per class. Cost is $50 if you bring you own deck of cards ($55 otherwise). For more information visit www.HatchAcademy.com.

for non-members. Please send an RSVP to Danene at danene. dustin@usu.edu by Tuesday, Jan. 17 at noon.

the Nation,” on Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 7 p.m. at The Book Table (upstairs). For questions call 753-2930 or 753-8844.

SUNDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

Tai Chi Chuan classes will be held each Saturday from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Whittier Community Center. Winter quarter registration begins at 8:45 a.m. Saturday, Jan 14. Tai Chi Chuan is a traditional martial art beneficial for health, vitality and mental clarity. For more information contact bearrivertaichi.org or call 563-8272.

New Folk Revival will perform at Caffe Ibis on Sunday, Jan. 15, from noon to 2 p.m.

Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold a ski day Wednesday, Jan. 18, at Beaver Mountain. Cost is $25. Adaptive equipment will be available. Call Bryce at 435-713-0288 for details.

Dr. Dee Stevens is having a free workshop for the public on revolutionary discoveries on feeling and looking younger or anti-aging. This will take place Thursday, Jan. 19, at 7 p.m. at Stevens Chiropractic, 1635 N. 200 East, in front of Sports Academy. Please RSVP or call 7557654 for more information.

A free youth gymnastics clinic will be held Saturday, Jan. 14, from noon to 1 p.m. in the USU HPER building Room 211. The clinic is for boys and girls ages 6 through 12. Participants will learn basic gymnastics skills and have the opportunity to use the equipment used by the USU gymnastics team. The clinic is limited to 60 participants. Aggie gymnasts will sign autographs afterward. To register, email GymnasticsClinic@UtahStateAggies.com with the participant’s and parent/guardian’s names, phone number address and age of participant. The Western Singing Duo Tumbleweeds will perform at Fredrico’s Pizza in Logan on Saturday, Jan. 14, from 6 p.m. to closing. Learn how to create extraordinary illusions using ordinary objects at “Magic 101: An Introduction to Sleight of Hand Magic.” The hands-on workshop will be taught Jan. 14 from 2 to 4 p.m. by Richard Hatch at the Thatcher-Young Mansion, 35 W. 100 South, Logan. Participants will learn basic sleight of hand magic including illusions with playing cards, coins, currency, rubber bands, rope and paper clips. All students are expected to adhere to the magicians’ code of secrecy regarding all techniques taught. The workshop is suitable for everyone ages 8 and older. There is a limit of six students

MONDAY Come sculpt your finest creation out of snow and have some free hot chocolate to enjoy the season on Monday, Jan. 16. USU’s SnowSculpt 2012 is part of Arts Week 2012. A Martin Luther King Jr. Service Fair will be held Monday, Jan. 16, from 3 to 7 p.m. at the Logan Rec Center, 195 S. 100 West, Logan. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. Activities will include a showcase of service projects from area students, volunteer information from local non-profits and community agencies as well as fun demos and performances.

TUESDAY USU Extension in Cache County is excited to announce Richard and Linda Eyre will be guest speakers at the monthly Dinner Date Night series Tuesday, Jan. 17, in the USU Skyroom. The Eyres will discuss “Living a Balanced Life in an Out of Balance World.” A dinner buffet will be served at 6:30 p.m. and the workshop will begin at 7:15. Cost is $8 per person or $15 per couple. USU students may attend for $6 per person or $10 per couple. You must pre-pay for the dinner in order to reserve your spot by Wednesday, Jan. 11. Phone 752-6263 for registration information or visit our office at 179 N. Main, Logan. The Bridgerland SHRM luncheon for January will be Thursday, Jan. 19, from noon to 1 p.m. at Alpine Cleaning and Restoration. The lunch will be catered by Lee’s Marketplace. Cost is $12 for SHRM members and $14

The Cache County Republican Party will be hosting a Town Hall Event with Utah Governor Gary Herbert on Wednesday, Jan. 18, at 7 p.m. at Wellsville Elementary School, 90 E. 100 South, Wellsville. This town hall event is free and open to the general public. Sarah Parslow will teach the basics of event planning and how to plan an event that will look expensive, but not be expensive at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s Little Theater on Jan. 18 from 7 to 8 p.m. Cost is $25 per person. Class size is limited. The Utah Assistive Technology Program will present a free online interactive training, “Assistive Technology to Support Communication Development in Early Intervention,” on Jan. 18 from 3 to 4:30 p.m. The training presented by Stacey Sessions will cover various types of assistive technology used to support communication development, specifically: picture communication boards, communication devices with voice output and devices such as PRC, Dynavox and the iPad. Participants will need a computer with high-speed internet access. Those interested in participating should RSVP by Monday, Jan. 16, to Storee Powell via email storee.powell@usu.edu, or call 435-797-7412. Participant instructions will be emailed to those who register. Scott Bradley will teach a free constitution class, “To Preserve

Common Ground Outdoor Adventures will hold an ice skating activity at Eccles Ice Center on Thursday, Jan. 19 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $5. Call 435-713-0288 for details. Allison and Colleen, with Utah Pork Producers Association, will teach how to make the perfect pork chops at a free cooking and community class at Macey’s Little Theater on Jan. 19 from 7 to 8 p.m. Stokes Nature Center and Caffe Ibis will hold a fun and informative evening suited for coffee amateurs and aficionados alike. The event will be Thursday, Jan. 19, at 7:30 p.m. at Caffe Ibis. Cost is $8 for SNC and Bridgerland Audobon Society members and $10 for nonmembers. Registration required. For details or to register call 435755-3239. The speaker for the January meeting of the Sons of Utah Pioneers will be Lamar Timothy. His topic is, “How Sugar Beets Helped the LDS Church Get Out of Debt.” The meeting will be held at The Copper Mill Restaurant on Thursday, Jan. 19, at 6:30 p.m. The Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Spring Creek Camp will hold its monthly meeting Thursday, Jan. 19, at 6:30 p.m. at Elements Restaurant, 640 S. 35 East, Logan. Hostess is Madeline Barlow.

The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

Friday

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The Herald Journal, Logan, Utah, Friday, January 13, 2012

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