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The State of American Health: Comparing Data of Death Rates, Obesity, Cancer, Life Expectancy, Infant Mortality, and Health Insurance Coverage (1950-2006); Introduction

Results III.

Results

Infant, Neonatal, and Postneonatal Mortality Rates (United States) 1950-2006: Heavy Decline and Tapering off in recent Years 27.00

 Determine which topics require urgency of new and necessary research methods.  Quantify data presented in respective research topics.

Results

 22.00

In regards to the overall graph including all cancers, there is a very steady decline that starts in 2001 and shows potential for continual decline in the future. Prostate Cancer numbers overall are very high compared to other types of cancer. Prostate Cancer in Black and African Americans are very high compared to all other types of cancer. Numbers of Prostate Cancer cases are improving but still generally high.

VI.

17.00

Health insurance coverage among persons under 65 years of age in the United States (1984-2007): Medicaid Increasing, Uninsured Increasing

Infant 20.0

Neonatal 12.00

18.0

Postneonatal

16.0 7.00

Deaths from All Causes: Progressively Decreased through All Years (1950-2006

14.0 Percentage

Deaths per 1,000 Live Births

Objectives

  

2006

2005

2004

2003

1999

1998

1997

1993

1992

1991

1990

1986

1985

1984

1980

1970

1950

2.00 1960

 Presentation of health data to help determine the possible need for new studies into other, less prominent areas that need more attention.  This could present a possible shift from areas of research like breast cancer to areas like prostate cancer.

I.

compiled by Dina Alkhateeb

Deaths From All Causes 1950-2006

900.0 700.0

IV.

1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Uninsured

2.0

Heavy decline between 1950 and1984, and in all age groups, though death rates in infant stage is still much higher than neonatal and postneonatal death rates. Decline is stabilizing in the last 7 years of research.

0.0

Overweight and Obesity in Adults within the United States (1960-2006): Obesity Spikes Rapidly

Private

Deaths from Diabetes, Heart Disease, Cancer, Stroke, Chronic Lower Respiratory Disease, Unintentional Injuries

78.0

Adults Ages 20-74

*deaths per 100,000 people

80.0

74.0

70.0

72.0

Percentage

60.0

50.0 45.0 40.0

50.0

Overweight including obese

40.0

Chronic lower respiratory diseases

30.0

70.0 68.0 66.0

Overweight but not obese

30.0 20.0

35.0

76.0

Percentage

Deaths from Diabetes and Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases: Fluctuations In Deaths through Years 1950-2006

64.0

Obese

10.0

62.0

0.0

60.0 1984 1989 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

25.0 20.0

*Standard error for all data +/- 1

15.0

*Standard error no greater than +/- 3 for all data

In adults, there is a rapid spike in obesity beginning in 1980 with a steady increase in progressing years. Progression of obesity shows signs of tapering off and decreasing in later years. Other data shows that the percentage of overweight children (below age 19) is increasing at a fast pace, especially between the years of 12-19, with percentages slightly decreasing in recent years between the ages of 2-11.

10.0

 

5.0 1950 1960 1970 1980 1981 1982 1983 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1998* 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

0.0

V. Deaths per 100,000 people (*comparability-modified)

Life Expectancy Comparison between Males and Females, and Blacks and Whites through the Years of 1970-2006: Gradual Rise across Years

Life Expectancy 85.0

New Cases of Cancer Among all Races and Genders (1990-2006): Steady Decline beginning in 2001 520.0

New Cases per 100,000 Population

Overall, causes of death in regards to these diseases are lowering. Death from Diabetes has risen and fallen between the years of 1983 and 2006. The trend shows signs of increasing again. Death from Chronic Lower Respiratory Diseases has increased and wavered as well but shows signs of continuing to increase in the future.

II.

500.0 480.0 460.0 All Persons 440.0 420.0

80.0 400.0 Years

75.0 Years

70.0 65.0

New Cases of Prostate Cancer in White, Black, and African Americans (1990-2006): Unsteady Declines

1970

1980

1990

1997

2000

2001

2004

2005

2006

Male

67.1

70.0

71.8

73.6

74.1

74.2

74.9

74.9

75.1

Female

74.7

77.4

78.8

79.4

79.3

79.4

79.9

79.9

80.2

White male

68.0

70.7

72.7

74.3

74.7

74.8

75.4

75.4

75.7

Black male

60.0

63.8

64.5

67.2

68.2

68.4

69.3

69.3

69.7

White female

75.6

78.1

79.4

79.9

79.9

79.9

80.4

80.4

80.6

Black female

68.3

72.5

73.6

74.7

75.1

75.2

76.0

76.1

76.5

*Death rates used to calculate life expectancies for 1997-1999 are based on postcensal 1990-based population estimates; life expectancies for 2000 and beyond are calculated with death rates based on Census 2000. Data for 2000-2006 are based on a newly revised methodology and may differ from previous editions of <mdit>Health, Unite States<med>. Deaths to nonresidents were excluded beginning in 1970.

A common, slow, and gradual increase is visible throughout male and females, as well as black and whites. Black males face the lowest life expectancy rate.

Prostate Cancer 350.0 300.0 250.0 White Black or African American

200.0 150.0 100.0 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

55.0

New Cases per 100,000 Population

60.0

8.0

1984 1989 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

1,100.0

Medicaid

4.0

months of life.

1,300.0

10.0 6.0

*Infant is defined as less than 1 year of age, neonatal as less than 28 days of age, and postneonatal as 28 days through 11

1,500.0

 

12.0

*(Data are based on the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program's 13 population-based cancer registries)

  

Medicaid continues to increase and is not an issue. The percentage of uninsured individuals is also increasing at a slow but progressive rate. The amount of people who have private insurance has been steadily decreasing since 1999 and is comparatively low next to the 1984 numbers.

Conclusions  Deaths from Diabetes and Chromic Respiratory Diseases are increasing and more information on the cause is necessary to reduce increasing numbers.  Black males have the lowest life expectancy of any other race, therefore there is a priority on research behind this conclusion.  Most cancers are decreasing but Prostate Cancer has dangerously high numbers (especially within the White and Black or African American communities) of patients and is an urgent priority that needs new research methods to determine potential cures and decreased numbers.  The percentage of uninsured individuals is slowly increasing. New discussions of universal or affordable health care should be discussed to reduce this number.

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