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School of Architecture College of Architecture, Art & Design Mississippi State University 899 Collegeview St 240 Giles Hall Mississippi State, MS 39762 www.caad.mssstate.edu Editors Patrick Brown Aryn Phillips West Pierce Design/Editing Lorrianna Baker, Patrick Brown, Devin Carr, Emma Kate Morse, Sang Nguyen, Aryn Phillips, West Piece, Cody Skinner, Cody Smith, Megan Vansant, Tyler Warmath, Hannah Waycaster Advisors Alexis Gregory, Emily McGlohn Proofreaders Alexis Gregory, Emily McGlohn Typeset in Aqua Grotesque, Helvetica Light Printed by Blurb 2014 School of Architecture College of Architecure, Art & Design Mississippi State University All rights reserved All photographs and drawings are courtesy of the contributors and students unless otherwise noted. All efforts have been made to obtain lawful permission from the publisher, except for copying permitted by sections 107 and 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law and except for reviewers for the public press. Every effort has been made to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, opinions or statements appear in this publication. The data and opinions appearing in the articles herein are the responsibility of the contributors concerned.

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BRICK INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION COMPETITION

2

0

1

4

Caledonia, Mississippi Fire Station

School

of

Architecture

Department of Building Construction Science

Mississippi State University

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BRICK INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION COMPETITION 2 0 1 4 Caledonia, Mississippi Fire Station

School

of

Architecture

Department of Building Construction Science

Mississippi State University

COLLABORATIVE STUDIO Spring 2014 ARC 3546 BCS 3126

PROFESSORS Tom Leathem Alexis Gregory Emily McGlohn

EDITORS Patrick Brown Aryn Phillips West Pierce

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Letter From the Director

6

Brick Industry Association

7

Project Statement

8

Program Statement

9

Collaborative Design

10

Site Visit and Analysis

12

Guest Reviewers

14

Client

16

Faculty

17

Winner

18

Honorable Mention

22

Studio Work

26

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LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR In the Spring Semester 2014, the School of Architecture (S|ARC) received a $5,000 grant from the Brick Industry Association (BIA) in order to provide extra-curricular support, and student awards, for the Third-year Collaborative Tectonic Studio Design Competition. This particular studio is specifically focused on the tectonic systems of buildings and the collaborative practices between architects and constructors. This is the fourth year in a row that the School has received generous funding from the Brick Industry Association. We truly owe our sincere thanks for this innovative collaboration to Nathan Moore, Development Officer for the College of Architecture, Art + Design, and Jewel Warlick, Director of Marketing for the Brick Industry Association in the Southeast Region. It continues to be a reality as a result of their guidance and persistence. The office of the Director would also like to thank the Third Year faculty, Assistant Professor Alexis Gregory and Assistant Professor Emily McGlohn, along with this year’s Building Construction Science faculty member, Assistant Professor Tom Leathem, for their leadership and inventiveness in developing and leveraging these funds in order to provide the students with both a memorable and a highly educational experience. The funds supported items such as guest jurors, studio materials, and this publication. The reality of this type of private support significantly raises the bar above the normal expectations of our students. It strategically provides a structure for students to engage with industry and practicing architects from the region, ultimately having a profound impact on the professional education of these young designers and constructors. In closing, the School truly appreciates the external support and encouragement of our alums, friends, and industrial partners. Increasingly, we have come to depend on you in order to continue to deliver these extra-ordinary educational opportunities to our students, and to have vehicles such as this important monograph to celebrate their stellar designs and work products. Michael A. Berk AIA | F.L. Crane Professor Director – School of Architecture

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Brick industry Association Competition

BRICK INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION The Brick Industry Association (BIA) is the national trade association representing distributors and manufacturers of clay brick and suppliers of related products and services. Since its founding in 1934, the association has been the nationally recognized authority on clay brick construction and represents the industry in all model building code forums and national standards committees. BIA is involved in a broad range of activities that appeal to architects, builders, community officials, and consumers, including Technical Notes on Brick Construction, Brick in Architecture, Brick in Home Building, Builder Notes, national award competitions, educational seminars, and numerous other programs. BIA also advocates for the industry at the federal, state, and local level with its environmental, health, and safety work as well as educational programs for local municipal and planning officials. Along with the national headquarters, BIA is comprised of regional associations that manage programs in the Heartland, Midwest/ Northeast, Southeast, and Southwest.

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PROJECT STATEMENT Lowndes County Volunteer Fire Department District 1 requested a new volunteer fire station to be located at 34 Cedar Street, Caledonia, MS. The building was to be approximately 10,000 SF, complete with apparatus bay, bunk rooms, day room, training room, administration offices, possibly a public forum space, and other spaces typical of a fire station. Bridging documents were provided by the client to aid in the development of the designs and final documents. The final proposal included building designs and construction strategy information. Projects were judged based on not only their creativity, thoroughness, and tectonic detailing, but for the study and integration of brick design. The project spanned the entire Spring semester of 2014, starting with a field trip to Caledonia, MS. Jurors chose one winning team and one honorable mention. Students on the winning team were awarded a scholarship, courtesy of the Brick Industry Association.

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Brick industry Association Competition

PROGRAM STATEMENT Each team was comprised of at least two architecture students and one building construction science student. This was a collaborative studio and was formatted as such from concept development to final presentation, working in conjunction through a system of checks and balances within each team. This setup was done to insure a holistic project delivery in order to provide the client with the best possible design, keeping in mind finances and requirements given. These proposals evaluate the following (in no particular order): [1] building design intent [2] building material makeup [3] cost estimate [4] complete project schedule [5] quality assurance and control plan [6] site utilization plan [7] site safety plan [8] space adjacencies [9] circulation [10] sustainability [11] site plan [12] construction This program accommodated the needs of a volunteer fire station, while also aiming for the potential to transform into a full-time station in the future, if the need arose. The day room was a focus for the program because of the importance of the community relaxation space for the fire fighters. Plenty of sleeping and eating space was also provided for those working long hours at the station. The need for the station to be flexible was also accommodated for in this program. The request for a training room, a safe room and a space for possible community functions (i.e. elections, town hall meetings, etc.) was met in creative ways throughout the group of projects. One of the main goals was to create a space where the fire fighters might actually WANT to be, even if they are not working.

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COLLABORATIVE DESIGN It is important during college that students be exposed to real-life situations related to their respective fields of study. Students gain experience that will help them be better prepared for a job upon graduation by being involved with a work-like environment. During the Spring semester of 2014, Architecture students are involved in the second portion of the Tectonic Studio series. This semester had a strong focus on the details of building design and how they can be achieved in a realistic manner. In order to help fully understand the implications related to design decisions, the Architecture students are teamed up with Building Construction Science (BCS) students to work together on a single project. These majors are grouped together in order to begin understanding the importance of a strong relationship between the respective majors. Each team was composed of three to four members: 2-3 Architecture students and 1-2 BCS students. These teams worked together on the project design the entire semester, each giving input where most needed to help further the quality of the design. The full involvement of the two parties throughout the design process affected the overall outcome as well as its legitimacy in a realistically budgeted environment.

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Team Names Address BMW Colective Crew Evolve Fusion Harmony Incorp Merge Ocho Synth Tritones


Brick industry Association Competition

Harmony Studio’s Ryan Mura and Hannah Waycaster crafting a plaster model.

Members of District 12, collaborating in the Bob and Kathy Luke Library, within Giles Hall.

Devin Carr mixing plaster in preparation for Address’s model.

Carter Brown and Casey Walker ,of BMW, designing floor plans.

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SITE VISIT AND ANALYSIS The city of Caledonia, MS is about 2.8 square miles, and 17.6 miles northeast of Columbus, MS, and provides a rural background that is common to smalltown Mississippi. The city’s population consists of 1,030 people and has a growth rate of 1.5% each year. This benefits the city to become an ideal location with growing opportunities for large-scale projects. Since the city is of a smaller scale, there are few employment opportunities in the area. Therefore, the average person must commute outside of Caledonia in order to maintain employment. While at the site visit, the students were to analyze the surrounding contexts of the site, the conditions of the streets, the landscape, wind conditions, the movement of the sun, the materiality of the surrounding houses, and the elevations of the site. The project site is three acres and sits at the corner of Main Street and Lawrence Drive. The surrounding context of the site is a typical rural, residential neighborhood. Currently Caledonia does not have an actual fire station, but is served through the outlying county stations. The idea of designing a new fire station addresses the issue of response time to the area. The site where the proposed fire station will be is in an ideal location because of the close proximity to the neighboring houses, which will help connect the fire station to the community and possibly become a precedent for future development.

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Brick industry Association Competition

Site visit tour guide, Mark Spears, with a Lowndes county volunteer fire truck.

Architecture students Caledonia, MS site.

Mark Spears discussing the necessities of a fire station program and function.

surveying

the

Architecture student surveying the site.

Daniel

Nail

Students listening to Mark Spears lecture about the essentials of fire fighting.

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GUEST REVIEWERS Allison H Anderson, AIA, LEED-AP Unabridged Architecture Bay St. Louis, Mississippi Allison Anderson graduated with a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Southern California and received her Master of Architecture from the University of Texas. In 2002 she became the first LEED-Accredited Professional in Mississippi. Allison has taught architecture at the University of Texas, Louisiana State University, and Tulane University. Currently, she is a Principal Architect at Unabridged Architecture where she leads research efforts that focus on adaptation, defensibility, coastal hazards, and resilience. In addition, she leads historic preservation efforts to design more efficient and storm resistant building envelops to protect against future natural disasters.

John M. Anderson, AIA, LEED-AP Unabridged Architecture Bay St. Louis, Mississippi John Anderson is a resource for sustainability and green design issues under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. In 2002, he became the first LEEDAccredited Professional in Louisiana. John graduated from University of Southern California with his Bachelor of Architecture, and got his Masters of Architecture from University of Texas. He is currently a Principal Architect of unabridged Architecture in Bay St Louis, Mississippi. Prior to joining the firm in 2007, John worked at Eskew+Dumez+Ripple in New Orleans for thirteen years and taught at the University of Texas. Some of his works include the Waveland Business Center, the Key West Weather Forecast Office, and Dr. Nancy Foster Environmental Education Center.

John Beard, AIA Beard + Riser Architects PLLC Greenwood, Mississippi John Beard’s experience includes over twenty years as a design principal and project manager on a number of projects of various scale and scope. His background includes vast experience in modern design, as well as historic preservation and rehabilitation work, including courthouses and projects focusing on specific preservation issues. John un¬derstands that quality design demands an attention to detail that is only gained through a thorough understanding of all aspects of the project.

Glen Clapper Brick Industry Association Southeast Region Glen Clapper has been with the Brick Industry Association – Southeast Region (BIASE) since 2001. Prior to joining BIA-SE, his work experience included the investigation and repair of buildings and other structures. He began his career working for a small architectural fi rm where his responsibilities included schematic design, preparation of construction documents and site observation. During his summer breaks while attending college he worked in residential construction as a carpenter and as a mason’s apprentice. Glen received his Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies and his Master of Architecture from the University of Illinois and is a registered architect. Glen is also a member of ASTM, The Masonry Society, the Masonry Alliance for Codes and Standards, and AIA.

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Brick industry Association Competition

Ryan Florreich, AIA, NCARB JBHM Architects Jackson, Mississippi Ryan Florreich is a 2006 graduate of the Mississippi State University School of Architecture. Ryan has worked in a wide variety of markets including civic, corporate, higher education, K-12 education, and retail. Ryan has also designed and managed projects that involved various public funding sources including grants from FEMA and CDBG, and is well-versed in the administration of the federal guidelines and processes. His detail-oriented approach to design and project management makes him an asset to JBHM and his clients.

Mike Grote Gulf Coast Community Design Studio Biloxi, Mississippi Michael Grote is a project manager at the Mississippi State University School of Architecture Gulf Coast Community Design Studio (GCCDS). He holds a degree in Architecture from the University of Houston Gerald D. Hines College of Architecture, and a Masters in Building Construction - Design Build from Auburn University. Mike originally came to the Gulf Coast with Architecture for Humanity in June of 2006, working alongside the GCCDS throughout his time here. Since coming on board as GCCDS staff, he is helping to develop much of the studio’s project delivery, management and administration capacity, and works with studio instruction during the Biloxi Studio spring semester programs. [1]

Dale Riser, AIA, LEED-AP BD-C Beard + Riser Architects Greenwood, Mississippi Dale Riser graduated from Louisiana Tech University with a Bachelor of Architecture and a Bachelor of Arts and Technical Writing. Dale’s experience includes over sixteen years with practice involving a number of project types, from modernist high end commercial and residential design, to federal and insti¬tutional work and interiors. A LEED AP since 2004, Dale has vast experience with green building strategies for educational and federal projects.

References [1] http://www.gccds.org/studio/index.php#

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CLIENT Mark Spears Fire Chief, District #3 Lowndes County Fire Service Mark Spears is the Fire Chief for the District #3 Volunteer Fire Department of the Lowndes Country Fire Service. He is fourty-five years old with a beautiful wife, Amanda, and three children, Alex, Alexandrea, and Alexis. He has served the residents of the community for eighteen years. That has consisted as training officer, Captain, and then for the last eight years as Chief. His job is to insure that the men and women of his department have what they need to perform their job safely and as efficiently as possible while maintaining the operation readiness of the department while planning for the future. One of the most important aspects of his job is to educate people and teach children about fire safety.

Sammy Fondren Fire Administrator Lowndes County Fire Service Sammy Fondren is the Fire Administrator of the Lowndes Country Fire Service. Lowndes County is composed of five separate Fire Protection Districts which has eighteen Fire Stations with 145 men and women Volunteer Fire Fighters. These volunteer fire fighters are overseen by Sammy Fondren. This county position oversees county-wide compliance of record keeping and reporting requirements established by the Mississippi Commissioner of Insurance. The Fire Coordinator acts as a liaison between the volunteer fire personnel and the Board of Supervisors, and between the Board of Supervisors and the State Fire Coordinators office. The County Fire Coordinator assists in preparing and administering a budget for state and county money to be spent for fire protection, capital improvements, and expenses. [1]

Tim Younger Assistant Chief Lowndes County Fire Service Tim Younger was raised in the area of Steens, MS and joined the Lowndes County Fire Service in the 1990’s. He also served on the board as an elected member on and off for several years. He was the captain of Station #3 from 2000 to 2008, and has been the Assistant Chief since 2008. He is also the Board treasurer and has been since 2008.

References [1] http://www.lowndescountygov.com/detail.php?p=7&s=20

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Brick industry Association Competition

FACULTY Alexis Gregory Studio Coordinator Assistant Professor, Architecture Alexis Gregory is a registered architect and assistant professor in the School of Architecture at Mississippi State University. She has earned a master of science in Architecture with a concentration in women’s studies and history from Clemson University, as well as a bachelor of architecture from Virginia Tech. Her professional experience includes professional licensure in the Commonwealth of Virginia and ten years working in various architecture firms in Washington, D.C. During this time, she worked on a variety of architectural project types such as residential, corporate interiors, shopping centers, grocery stores, speculative office buildings, environmental/sustainable design and nonprofit architecture. Her teaching and research interests include construction technology and making, design/ build, low-cost/low-income housing and architecture, community design and diversity in architecture.

Tom Leathem Assistant Professor, Building Construction Science Born and raised in Midwest Illinois, Tom Leathem received a bachelor’s degree in construction management from Western Illinois University in 1999. Upon completion of his degree, he spent eleven years in Chicago working in construction management positions ranging from assistant field superintendent to senior project manager and business owner. The majority of Leathem’s industry experience focused in commercial/industrial construction on project types including manufacturing, distribution warehousing, office, medical, retail, and municipal. Three of his eleven years were spent as a business owner focusing in residential remodeling. In 2010, Leathem enrolled in the Master of Design Build program at Auburn University. Upon completing his degree in August 2011, Leathem worked as an Adjunct Professor in the McWhorter School of Building Science.

Emily McGlohn Assistant Professor, Architecture Born and raised in Alabama, Emily McGlohn received her Bachelor of Architecture from Auburn University and completed her thesis work at the Rural Studio. After graduation she stayed at the Rural Studio to serve as the Clerk of the Works and then co-taught the sophomore design/build studios. McGlohn next spent several years in professional practice at William McDonough + Partners and brwarchitects in Charlottesville, Va., and received her Master of Architecture degree from the University of Oregon. Thirteen members of McGlohn’s family are graduates of Mississippi State, and her grandfather, Maury Shurlds, taught in the Department of Mathematics and Statics for twenty years. (Emily McGlohn was the featured faculty in fall 2013.

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Project Winner BMW Carter Brown Patrick Brown Bryan Marks Casey Walker

ARC ARC BCS ARC

Through the development of knowledge and understanding of the program, structure, form, and the concepts of the project, the final design is developed to optimize efficiency and constructability. The fully developed proposal presents an argument about the idea behind the prefabricated sheds (the most cost efficient way). The proposal resulted in a solution that took the idea of the prefabricated shed and turned it into an architecturally functional and aesthetic government building. SITE PLAN

1

2

A

3

4 2

1

5

3

6

4

7

5

8

6

9 7

10

8

9

A

10

1

A

B

10

B

01

01 10

08

06

04

08

06

UP

02

04

02

Apparatus Bay

01

Apparatus Bay

02

Training Room

02

Training Room

03

Restroom

03

Restroom

04

Stairs

04

Stairs

05

Laundry Room / Elsctrical Room

05

Laundry Room / Elsctrical Room

06

Chief’s Office

06

Chief’s Office

07

Storage Room / Safe Room

07

Storage Room / Safe Room

07

Captain’s Office

07

Captain’s Office

08

DayRoom

08

DayRoom

09

Kitchen / Dinning Room

09

Kitchen / Dinning Room

10

Women’s Bathroom

10

Women’s Bathroom

11

Stairs

11

Stairs

12

Men’s Bathroom

12

D

C

5

Men’s Bathroom

14

Fitness Room

14

Fitness Room

15

Men’s Bunk Room

15

Men’s Bunk Room

16

Women’s Bunk Room

16

Women’s Bunk Room

Plan Details

B

Plan Details

B

Structural Details

3

6

4

7

5

8

6

05 09

03

05

03

12

15

16

DN

14

12

10

8

9

01

16

DN

B

B

C

C

D

D

13

13 17

11

C

A

SECOND LEVEL

11

C

A

C

A

C

A

FIRST LEVEL

9 7

01 14

15

UP

D

18

4 2

07

07

09

1

13

Structural Details

B

C

3

A

01

13

2

17

10


Brick industry Association Competition

SOUTH PERSPECTIVE FROM MAIN STREET

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

NORTHWEST ELEVATION

TRANSEVERSE SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

NORTHEAST ELEVATION

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION

19


Project Winner BMW The brick was the heavy material that defined the perimeter of the building and expressed the shift between the apparatus bay and the administration building. The porches are bound by brick screens that are based off of the partI, which is a system defined on thirds with one third being manipulated. INDUSTRIAL COLONADE SOUTHEAST FACE

NOITAVELE NEERCS KCIRB ”0 ’1 = ”8/3 :elacS

ELEVATION OF SOUTHWEST FACE WITH BRICK SCREEN PARTITION WALLS

NIGHT VIEW OF SOUTHWEST FACE WITH BRICK SCREEN PARTITION WALLS

20

NOITCES LLAW NEERCS KCIRB ”0 ’1 = ”8/3 :elacS

ON


Brick industry Association Competition

NORTH PERSPECTIVE FROM PARKING LOT

LIGHT STUDY ON 1” = 1’ SECTION MODEL

LIGHT STUDY ON 1” = 1’ BRICK SCREEN

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Honorable Mention HARMONY STUDIO Ryan Mura Allie Salas Mary Sanders Hannah Waycaster

ARC BCS ARC ARC

The concept for this fire station started with the idea of placing the entire program under one simply folded roof. With a simple elegant form, the details became the focus. The brick design is an offset of wythes where some of the brick is subtracted to bring light into needed spaces. A polycarbonate backup wall allows for the light to enter into the spaces during the day as well as become a beacon of light for the neighborhood at night. B

BRICK MODEL PHOTO

SECOND FLOOR 1/8” = 1’

FIRST FLOOR 1/8” = 1’

UP HVAC AND GENERATOR

FITNESS AREA

DN

DAY ROOM

D

RESTROOM

WOMEN’S SHOWER ROOM

LAUNDRY ROOM

MEN’S SHOWER ROOM

STORAGE

W

D

W

A

KITCHEN

STORAGE/SAFE ROOM

WOMEN’S BUNK ROOM STORAGE

APPARATUS BAY

OPEN TO BELOW

STORAGE

MEN’S BUNK ROOM

RECORD OFFICE TRAINNING ROOM

CHIEF’S OFFICE

OPEN TO BELOW

B

A

0’

FIRST LEVEL

22

20’

40’

0’

SECOND LEVEL

20’

40’


Brick industry Association Competition

NIGHT PERSPECTIVE

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

NORTHEAST ELEVATION

SECTION A

SECTION B

NORTHWEST ELEVATION

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION

23


Honorable Mention HARMONY STUDIO

ADMINISTRATION PERSPECTIVE

APPARATUS BAY PERSPECTIVE

24


Brick industry Association Competition

2” AIR GAP WASHER HEAD SCREW

BRICK VENEER

BALLAST

BRICK TIE

ALUMINUM BASE

NET

METAL STUD

POLYCARBONATE PANEL

BRICK AND POLYCARBONATE DETAIL

ELEVATION

ELEVATION

SECTION

SECTION

WALL SECTION MODEL ELEVATION

WALL SECTION

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ADDRESS Ryan Bridges Devin Carr Andrew Evans Danielle Nail

ARC ARC BCS ARC

Employing passive strategies with vernacular forms, we have designed a fire station that utilizes site for asthetics and function. Centering around a cooling tower, the station stretches out to give Caladonia residents a public outdoor space that gives ownership back to the community.

FIRST LEVEL

26

ENTRANCE PERSPECTIVE


Brick industry Association Competition

EXTERIOR PERSPECIVE

SOUTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

LATITUDINAL SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

NORTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

27


COLLECTIVE CREW Trey Brunson Alaina Griffin Megan Vansant

BCS ARC ARC

Collective Crew focused on simplicity in design and strived to design a fire station that would serve as a landmark within the Caledonia, Mississippi community as well as relate to the existing community and the values it had already established. Collective Crew also wanted this fire station to be a place where the community could occasionally gather and interact. Because of that, the fire station features a community space that can be used for this interaction.

FIRST LEVEL

28

INTERIOR HALLWAY

SECOND LEVEL


Brick industry Association Competition

SOUTHWEST PERSPECTIVE

ELEVATION

ELEVATION

SECTION

SECTION

ELEVATION

ELEVATION

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DISTRICT 12 Gage Adkins Lorianna Baker Garrett Little Morgan Powell

BCS ARC BCS ARC

Throughout the design process, the team strived to follow an overall parti inorder to make a fully functional space for a work live environment.

INTERIOR DAY ROOM PERSPECTIVE

SITE PLAN 2 AS_5.0

3 AS_5.0

1 AS_5.0

4 AS_5.0

UP

1

30

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1/8" = 1'-0"

FIRST LEVEL

1

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1/8" = 1'-0"

SECOND LEVEL


Brick industry Association Competition

SOUTHWEST PERSPECTIVE

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION 2

1

1/8” = 1’

SECTION 1

TRANSVERSE SECTION 1/8” = 1’

2

1/8” = 1’

SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION 1/8" = 1'-0"

2

WEST ELEVATION

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION 3

North Elevation

NORTH ELEVATION

East Elevation

South Elevation 1/8” = 1’

1

West 1/8" = 1'-0"

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EVOLVE Ericia Cox Kevin Flores Cody Smith Phillip Vance

ARC ARC ARC BCS

We came to the decision of placing the living quarters on the second floor of our building in order to minimize the overall footprint of the building, therefore, reducing the cost. We then made a series of moves in order to make the second floor more inviting to the community. We did this through a sense of compression caused by the building itself along with the gabion wall. This sense of compression leads the inhabitants to a set of exterior stairs, which are set to work with the compression by starting off narrow and widening upon introduction to the second floor.

FIRST LEVEL

32

SECOND LEVEL BREEZEWAY

SECOND LEVEL


Brick industry Association Competition

SOUTHWEST PERSPECTIVE FROM MAIN STREET

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

NORTHWEST ELEVATION

TRANVERSE SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

NORTHEAST ELEVATION

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION

33


4

FUSION Donald Drummond Kurt Reynolds Cody Skinner Taylor Yates

BCS BCS ARC ARC

Using the prominent clerestory window to highlight the path of the fire fighters, we created a central focal point at the intersection of their path with the public’s path. The training room is located at this focal point, as it is seen as the place where the public meets the private. Brick was used here as a way to emphasize the focal point. It is used in a screen that wraps around the room with varying degrees of permeability, allowing the room to subtly connect with the spaces outside its boundaries.

Mechanical

Bedroom

Bathroom Bedroom

Bathroom

Laundry

Fitness

Apparatus Bay Training Room

5688 SF

Storage

BRICK PLAN DETAIL CALLOUT

File Office

Chief's Office

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1/8" = 1'-0"

FLOOR PLAN

SITE PLAN

INTERIOR LOBBY PERSPECTIVE


SOUTH PERSPECTIVE FROM MAIN STREET

1

West 1/8" = 1'-0"

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

NORTHWEST ELEVATION

TRANSVERSE SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION 1/8" = 1'-0"

SOUTH EAST ELEVATION 1/8" = 1'-0"

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION

NORTH WEST ELEVATION 1/8" = 1'-0"

SOUTH EAST SECTION 1/8" = 1'-0"

NORTHEAST ELEVATION NORTH EAST ELEVATION 1/8" = 1'-0"

35


INCORP Savanah Harvey West Pierce Bill Plott Scott Polley

BCS ARC BCS ARC

Utilizing the dog trot vernacular and sustainable approach to design, Incorp reinterpreted the forms and logic to suit the programatic elements of the civic place, and sought to successfully bridge the gap often associated between civic responsibilities and residential contexts. The use of brick was achieved by drawing from the original parti and articulating the different scales associated with fire stations. Specifically the human and the fire truck. The bricks were structural and of the same size as the load bearing concrete masonry units, allowing them to be charged with their integrity as structural components.

PERSPECTIVE OF BREEZEWAY

MECHANICAL

FITNESS RM.

CAPT. OFFICE

REPORT OFFICE

DAY ROOM

APPARATUS BAY

LNDRY / LCKR

PARKING

KITCHEN

BTHRM CLOSET

BTHRM 2 BTHRM 1

TRAINING ROOM

BUNK RM. 1

COMMUNITY GATHERING SPACE

FIRST LEVEL

36

SECOND LEVEL

BUNK RM. 2


Brick industry Association Competition

OUTSIDE BUILDING PERSPECTIVE RENDER

FRONT VIEW PERSPECTIVE FROM MAIN STREET

SOUTH ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

TRANSVERSE SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

WEST ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

37


MERGE Daniella Bustillos Kenan Hamilton Frankie Jackson Aryn Phillips

ARC BCS BCS ARC

This design focused on separating the living quarters located on the second floor and the public and work spaces located on the first floor. A transitional “exchange� space would be located in the center of these elements that would act as the main circulation path for fireman. Using the absence of bricks in some areas to drive people through the space the absence would connect these two separate entities. The two offset entrances would allow the compressed public entrance to be closest to the street and be closer to the scale of the neighborhood, while the highest and most industrial parts of the building would remain pushed back away from the street.

INTERIOR TRANSITIONAL SPACE

SITE PLAN

FIRST LEVEL

38

SECOND LEVEL


Brick industry Association Competition

FRONT ENTRANCE FROM MAIN STREET

SOUTH ELEVATION

ELEVATION

WEST SECTION

NORTH SECTION

WEST ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

39


OCHO Stefan Balcer Taylor Johnson Dalton McMillen Emma Kate Morse

ARC BCS BCS ARC

In an effort to highlight our main material of brick masonry and reinvent the typical industrial fire station, we developed our building through a series of designs, focusing mainly on functionality through ease of access, proportionality through materials, and constructability. This was done through a tight collaboration between the two fields composing our team, strongly focused on frequent communication between the group members.

VIEW FROM SECOND LEVEL HALLWAY

SITE PLAN

FIRST LEVEL

40

SECOND LEVEL


Brick industry Association Competition

SOUTH PERSPECTIVE FROM MAIN STREET

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION

NORTHWEST ELEVATION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

TRANSVERSE SECTION

NORTHEAST ELEVATION

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

41


SYNTH Joseph Rose Ross Ware Tyler Warmath Evan Willis

ARC BCS ARC BCS

A firestation is unique in that it must serve the individual needs of its residents while also serving the public. With effeciency, functionality, and budget in mind this project evaluates how space can retain a sense of privacy while also serving the public. This public relation is highlighted by the use of brick around and within the building. All areas that provide a space for the community to utilize contain brick which serves as a warmer surface to create a more personal aethetic and feeling.

SECOND LEVEL CORRIDOR

P U

42

N D

P U

FIRST LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL


Brick industry Association Competition

SOUTH PERSPECTIVE FROM MAIN STREET

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION

TRANSVERSE SECTION SW

LONGITUDINAL SECTION SE

NORTHEAST ELEVATION

NORTHWEST ELEVATION

43


TRITONES Lake Jackson Sang Nguyen Nenyatta Smith

BCS ARC ARC

Through the development of the design, the team worked with the intentions of incorporating practicality, functionality, sustainability, and simplicity in order to create something that would respond to the individual context and to the surrounding environment. The use of brick allowed for the fire station to respond to the context in a holistic manner that allowed for the fire station to become a part of the community.

LOBBY SPACE PERSPECTIVE

N

N

FIRST LEVEL

44

SITE PLAN


Brick industry Association Competition

NORTH VIEW BUILDING PERSPECTIVE

NORTH EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION

TRANSVERSE SECTION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

NORTH WEST ELEVATION

SOUTH EAST ELEVATION

45


SPECIAL THANKS TO Advisors and guest critics Brannen Park, SP Design Group Brick Industry Association JBHM Architecture Lowndes County Fire Service Unabridged Architecture



Brick Industry Association Competition book 2014