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Portfolio

Chelsea Adams


Table of Contents

1 Business Card Flyer 2 3 Newsletter Book 4


Business Card

This business card was created to appeal to people interested in investing money. It was TLHU[[VPUZWPYLJVUÄKLUJLPU[OLIYVRLY It uses bright colors and the sun to convey [OLPKLH[OH[[OL`^PSSOH]LHIYPNO[ÄUHUJPHS future if they invest money with him.

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stratoswealthpartners.com


CRAIG P. ADAMS CFP Partner

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Flyer

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Blues

Feel the

Blue Tango @ OZZ Studio 490 N. Freedom Blvd

Thursdays ($5) Lessons: 8pm Dancing: 9pm–11:30pm


Newsletter

This newsletter was created to inform BYU students, faculty, and alumni of the goings on around campus. Circles and blue and gold colors are used as unifying elements throughout the newsletter. The newsletter Z[YP]LZ[VRLLWHJHZ\HSMLLS[OH[JHUHWWLHS to the wide audience.

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Newsletter

BYU  Campus

May  2012     Issue  #  4

“This exhibition embraces every aspect of Ottoman art and a dynasty that spanned more than six centuries.”

Index

Tapestry from “Empire of the Sultans” art exhibit

“EMPIRE  OF  THE  SULTANS”  WILL  CLOSE  JANUARY  20 “Empire of the Sultans: Ottoman Art from the Khalili Collection,” a spectacular exhibition highlighting the rich artistic heritage of one of the most extraordinary world powers in the history of Europe and the Middle East, will end its run January 20 at the Museum of Art. This exhibition embraces every aspect of Ottoman art and a dynasty that spanned more than six centuries with more than 200 objects ranging from Holy Qur’ans, arms and armor to rich textiles, treasury objects, gilt manuscripts, ceramics, scientific instruments and more. The exhibition

is organized and circulated by Art Services International, Alexandria, Virginia. Admission for Museum Members is free. Regular tickets cost $8 for BYU faculty, staff or students with ID. Ticket price also includes an audio guide. Group and family pricing for the exhibit is also available. To purchase tickets or for more information, call the Marriott Ticket Office at 1-800-422-BYU1 or ext. 2-BYU1. The works are drawn from the Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, one of the largest collections of its kind. “Empire of the Sultans” marks the first time this collection has been seen in the United States. Continued on page 6

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Empire of the Sultans BYU Resurrects Furniture Design Courses

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Accounting Teams Dominate Competition

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Happenings on Campus

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Trails of Hope

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BYU  RESURRECTS  FURNITURE  DESIGN  COURSES Craig Kartchner Recent BYU graduate Ben Rabner doesn’t plan to pursue the English degree he earned in April in a traditional fashion. His passion, he has discovered, is much more hands-on.

Student Design Show in Anaheim. Aside from being a giant pat on the back, the award has boosted his already budding career and convinced him that starting his own design business would be

“ I n it i a l l y, it w a s a m a tt e r o f ut i l ity -‐ I n e e d e d a c h a i r s o I b u i lt o n e . ” Rabner is an aspiring furniture designer with national awards and international contracts to justify his career switch. Despite the fact that BYU didn’t have a furniture design program until this semester, Ben slated every woodworking class the university offered and worked closely with faculty members like Kip Christensen to satisfy his desire to learn the art and business of furniture design.

more fulfilling than pursuing graduate studies. Ben’s brother, Peter, proved sawdust runs in the Rabner blood when he won first prize in the occasional category (tables and accent pieces) at the

“Initially, it was a matter of utility — I needed a chair so I built one,” says Rabner. “Then I started noticing furniture form and design in magazines and decided functionality wasn’t enough.”

“I’m convinced many students come and go from BYU and have no idea we have a very nicely equipped studio where they could learn to design and build furniture,” says industrial design professor Kip Christensen. Recent restructuring within the BYU School of Technology has included the resurrection of two furniture design classes — Industrial Design 33R (Introduction to Furniture Design) and 435R (Advanced Furniture Design). Although these classes have been on the books for years, they’ve not actually been taught for at least a decade. The industrial design classes will replace the previous woodworking classes taught through Technology Teacher Education, and will increase emphasis on creative design and traditional production techniques. “Both of these young men are really talented and have a passion for the art,” says Christensen. “All their work is of their own initiative. None of it fills a requirement for graduation.”

Ben’s extra-mile approach not only satiated his thirst for design knowhow but also earned him second place in creative chair design last year at the

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International Woodworking Fair in Atlanta August 22. With a formidably demanding application process, few candidates are even asked to attend the fair, which makes the award all the sweeter for Peter.

Having already contracted to custom-build several pieces for houses in the Parade of Homes, and with a mass-market international deal on the horizon, the future looks promising for Ethan Allen’s newest competitor. „ Design elements designed by BYU students.


COUGAR     SPIKERS,     HAWAII   COLLIDE     AT  MARRIOTT     CENTER   Jeff Reynolds The Marriott Center attendance at Friday night’s men’s volleyball game against Hawaii marked the second largest crowd in BYU volleyball history. The 11,513 fans also marked the largest crowd to watch a men’s volleyball match in the country this season. “The crowd was great,” BYU head coach Tom Peterson said. “They were absolutely fabulous. The Marriott Center is different than playing in the Smith Fieldhouse. It brings a different emotion, a different atmosphere. We went from the Fieldhouse to an arena that is like the arena Hawaii plays in. We’re not used to such a huge, cavernous place. But the fans were absolutely fabulous.”„

BYU  ACCOUNTING  TEAMS  DOMINATE     TAX  COMPETITION A team of four accounting graduate students from the Marriott School won first place in the national Deloitte & Touche Tax Challenge competition. The school’s undergraduate team placed second in a separate division. “We’re extremely proud of our students’ performance,” says Ned C. Hill, dean of the Marriott School. “BYU is the only university to ever have both teams place in the top three in the same year. We have achieved this for five consecutive years and six times since the competition began 11 years ago.” Deloitte & Touche officials selected six graduate and six undergraduate teams as finalists to compete in two divisions from 60 teams representing 40 colleges and universities in regional competition.

were given only five hours to solve the client’s problem and write a solution. “This competition requires students to think creatively,” says Ron Worsham, associate professor of accounting and graduate team advisor. “Some parts of the problem have basically one right answer, but other parts are open-ended. Being able to apply creative solutions distinguishes the winners.” Graduate team members Alicia Carlson, Aurora, Colorado; Laura Hancock, Bothell, Washington; Mats Dobberfuhl, Barron, Wisconsin; and Jennifer Borneman, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, will each receive a $1,000 scholarship, and the Marriott School’s School of Accounting and Information Systems will receive a $10,000

“ BY U i s t h e o n l y u n i ve r s i t y t o e ve r h a ve b o t h t e a m s p l a c e i n t h e t o p t h re e i n t h e s a m e y e a r. ” Finalists were presented with a complex case study that required them to analyze data, identify issues and consider tax solutions for a fictitious client. Students

grant. Undergraduate team members Terry Jackson, Henderson, Nevada; Marianne Hafen, Las Vegas, Nevada; Matt Walton, Campbell, California; and Linda Andrews, Taylorsville, Utah, will each receive $500 scholarships and a $5,000 grant for the school. „

Campus Community is published monthly during the academic year by University Communications. Editor: Cecelia Fielding, C-347 ASB, BYU, Provo, UT 84602; 801-422-4377. Photo Editor: Mark A. Philbrick.„ Joseph Peters, Senior, Forward BYU Volleyball player spikes the ball .

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the Scriptures Friday and Saturday, October 27–28, will feature Elder L. Aldin Porter of the First Quorum of the Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Andrew Skinner, dean of Religious Education. The symposium will begin at 6:30 pm in the JSB auditorium. Lectures will continue until 9:30 pm in the auditorium and the nearby Martin Building. Lectures will resume Saturday morning at 9 am in the JSB auditorium and will continue through 11 am. No admission fee or registration are required.

BREAST CANCER SCREENINGS

Human Resource Services is sponsoring the 10th annual View from the JFSB roof. Early Breast Cancer Detection Campaign. HAPPENINGS  ON  CAMPUS   BYU has arranged with DMBA and Utah Valley Regional Medical DEVOTIONAL Center to provide high-quality care Elder Charles Didier of the First in a comfortable and professional Quorum of the Seventy of The atmosphere. Female personnel and Church of Jesus Christ of Latterspouses of male personnel with day Saints will speak at a devotional DMBA health care plans are invited Tuesday, October 2, at 11:05 am in to make appointments during the the Marriott Center. BYU screening period November The devotional will be broadcast 3–19. Appointments for the mamlive on KBYU-TV (Channel 11), the mograms may be made online at BYU-Television and BYU-Radio http://www.byu.edu/hr/wellness. For satellite networks and at broadcastadditional information, call Danielle ing.byu.edu. It will be rebroadcast Palmer at ext. 2-5723. Sunday (October 7) at 6 am on KBYU-TV, on BYU-Television at 8 am and 4 pm, and on KBYU-FM at LINGUISTICS MEETING 8 pm. The annual Deseret Language and Born in Belgium, Elder Didier is Linguistics Society Symposium will be currently a member of the presThursday and Friday, December 6–7, idency of the First Quorum of from 9 am to 4 pm in 3241 WSC. The the Seventy. symposium will include 40 presenta-

SPERRY SYMPOSIUM

The BYU Sperry Symposium on

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tions on current research in language and linguistics. For more information, contact David Bowie at ext. 2-9168.„


Trail s  o f  H          o          p          e             DIGITAL COLLECTION AVAILABLE Joseph Hadfield

History teachers and students can now access an on-line library to take a more personal look at the lives of their ancestors and other trailblazers who trekked westward during the Gold Rush and Mormon migration. The “Trails of Hope” digital collection, developed at BYU, contains 59 diaries penned on the Mormon, California, Oregon and Montana trails between 1846 and 1869. Interactive maps, photos and essays supplement the diaries, most of which were previously unpublished. “I can see teachers downloading sections and pieces to be viewed in the classroom,” said Susan Fales, curator of digital historical collections at the Harold B. Lee Library. “We hope schoolchildren can read and see the actual handwriting as well as the transcripts.” The youngest of the diarists is Emmeline B. Wells, who at 18 years of age was part of the Mormon exodus from Nauvoo, Illinois. After settling in Utah, Wells became known for her work as an advocate of women’s suffrage and as the fifth general president of the Relief Society of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. But she first experienced the hardships of trail life. “It looked like pictures I have seen of the ancients pitching their tents and journeying from place to place with their cattle and their goods,” wrote Wells when she joined the pioneer camp. As time passed, punctuation vanished from her diary but vivid description remained. “Just across the creek someone had set the prairie on fire how we were to

“We want to reach out to people who would never walk through our doors.”

cross this was a question it ran like lightning through the grass making a crackling among the bushes resembling the noise of burning crackers....” “The fact that both the original manuscript and a typed manuscript are provided makes the collection a very reliable source,” said Professor Richard Rieck of Western Illinois University, who used the Web site to research geography and death on the overland trails. “One day when using Google to look for any trail diaries I could find, up popped one from the collection and that day I dropped everything else and began to ‘mine’ it for everything I could use.” The Web site — located at http://overlandtrails.byu.edu — also features biographies of each of the diarists and search options to locate journal entries about specific places and events. Construction of the collection began in 1998 when the Lee Library won a $65,000 grant from the Library of Congress/Ameritech Digital Library Competition. Library staff then combined materials from their Special Collections Continued on page 6

Entry from Wells’ Diary

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FACULTY/STAFF  NOTES Continued from page 5

department with resources from other institutions. The finished product consists of 9,350 scanned images of the writings along with the searchable, text-based transcripts of each diary. The information is also hosted on the Library of Congress Web site. Producing digital versions of the diaries not only protects the original diaries from overuse but also makes the writing and history accessible to a broader audience, Fales said. “One of the key components is that we developed this for everybody,” she said. “We want to reach out to people who would never walk through our doors.” In addition to “Trails of Hope,” the Lee Library hosts 12 other digital collections, such as the BYU Museum of Art Collection and the journal Marriage and Families (see www.lib.byu.edu/ hbll/). „ Continued from page 1

Among the treasures are calligraphic medallions in gilded wood that decorated mosques, brilliantly decorated armor and jewel-encrusted weapons used in battle by Suleyman the Magnificent, exquisite Persian carpets and painstakingly illustrated albums and books. The spectacular exhibition reveals the originality and resilience of Ottoman artistic expression in religious, military, administrative and daily life and the central role of imperial patronage. The exhibition is arranged in four sections which are titled “In the Service of God,” “Sultans, Soldiers, and Clerks,” “Arts and Crafts” and “Books, Paintings and Scripts.” „

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CHUCK STIGGINS

of the Department of Physical Education in the College of Health and Human Performance has been appointed to the Huntsman World Senior Games Board of Trustees. Stiggins will be responsible for overseeing the health screening of the Senior Games’ participants. He and several other faculty members will also be conducting a study regarding balance, coordination and equilibrium. He is considered to be a leading authority in the fields of athletic strength and conditioning, health, fitness and wellness.

LEE PERRY, MARK H. HANSEN, C. SHANE REESE and G. W. FELLING received the best paper prize from The Strategic Management Society at the organization’s 22nd annual international conference in Paris, France. Their paper, “A Bayesian Application of the Resource-Based View: Narrowing the Gap between Theory and Practice,” proposes an advanced statistical model that can be used to predict the consequences of an organization’s decisions on its financial performance.

JOHN LAMB

and the BYU Chemistry Department recently hosted 150 scientists from 25 countries for the 27th International Symposium on Macrocyclic Chemistry in Park City. Lamb chaired the organizing committee, composed largely of Chemistry Department faculty. The symposium focused on the chemistry of a class of molecules that form cavities which can trap other chemical species selectively. A special session was held to honor retired BYU professor Reed M. Izatt, who started the program.„


book

;OPZYLJPWLIVVR^HZJYLH[LK[VHWWLHS[V families. It uses various shades of green and purple circles to unify the pages and to give [OLIVVRHM\UMHTPS`MYPLUKS`MLLS0[HSZV\ZLZ four different page layouts to accommodate the different lengths of the recipes.

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After decades of being pestered by the foodies of their community, the Adams Family is finally revealing some of their best kept food secrets. In this book you will find some of their most popular recipes, including their famous butter cream frosting, kiwi lime sorbet, and minted lemonade.

The Adams Family Favorites Recipes that will bring families together for decades to come.


First Edition Copyright Š 2012 Chelsea Adams


The Adams Family Favorites Recipes that will bring families together for decades to come.


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Main Dishes Manicotti with Cheese..................1

The Adams Family Favorites

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Herb Crusted Chicken Breast........3 Buttermilk Pancakes......................4 Lime Chicken Kebabs...................5

Side Dishes Minted Lemonade.............................................................7 German Potatoes...............................................................8 Garlic Bread......................................................................9 Spinach Strawberry Salad with Poppy Seed Dressing.......10 Strawberry Salad with Shallot-Honey Vinaigrette.............11

Desserts Lemon Sorbet..............................13 Kiwi Lime Sorbet.........................14 Butter Cream Frosting...................15 Banana Drop Cookies..................16 Dixon’s Pie Crust.........................17 Apple Pie....................................18

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Manicotti with Cheese Ingredients 1 package manicotti, uncooked 1¾ cups (15 oz. container) part-skim ricotta cheese 2 cups (8 oz.) shredded mozzarella cheese ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 3 cups (28 oz. jar) spaghetti sauce

Directions 1.

Cook pasta according to package directions.

2.

Leave in strainer to cool.

3.

Preheat oven to 350°.

4.

In a large bowl, stir together cheeses, parsley, salt and pepper.

5.

Spoon cheese mixture into pasta tubes.

6.

Spread thin layer of sauce on bottom of a 13x9 baking dish.

7.

Arrange filled pasta in single layer over sauce.

8.

Pour remaining sauce over pasta.

9.

Cover with foil.

10. Bake for 40 minutes. Remove foil and bake 15 minutes more.

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Herb Crusted Chicken Breast

Ingredients 6 boneless skinless chicken breast Italian bread crumbs Âź cup melted butter

Directions

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1.

Preheat oven to 350°.

2.

Spray 13x9 pan with nonstick cooking spray.

3.

Dredge chicken breasts in butter and then the bread crumbs.

4.

Place chicken in 13x9 pan.

5.

Cook for 1 hour or until juices run clear.


Buttermilk Pancakes Ingredients 1 egg 1¼ cups buttermilk or sour milk 2 tablespoons cooking oil 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt

Directions 1.

In mixing bowl, beat egg with fork. Beat in buttermilk or sour milk and cooking oil. Set aside.

2.

In separate mixing bowl, stir together flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

3.

Add egg mixture to flour mixture.

4.

Stir mixture until blended but still slightly lumpy.

5.

Lightly grease a griddle or heavy skillet.

6.

Heat till water sprinkled on the griddle dances across the surface.

7.

Pour about ¼ cup batter on griddle for each pancake.

8.

When pancakes have a bubbly surface and slightly dry edges, turn to cook other side.

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Lime Chicken Kebabs Ingredients 6 boneless skinless chicken breasts 2 cups freshly squeezed lime juice (12–15 limes) 1 red bell pepper 1 green bell pepper 36 white mushrooms 1 small onion 1 minced clove garlic salt and pepper to taste Ÿ cup vegetable oil 12–15 bamboo or metal skewers

Directions 1.

Cut chicken breasts into 1-inch cubes and place in marinade container.

2.

Cut onion into 1-inch slices and place in marinade container.

3.

Place minced garlic in marinade container.

4.

Pour lime juice in marinade container. Put lid on marinade container and refrigerate for about an hour before making kebabs.

5.

If using bamboo skewers, soak in water while meat marinades.

6.

Cut peppers into one inch slices.

7.

When chicken is marinated, make kebabs by alternating chicken, onion, peppers, and mushrooms.

8.

5

Grill kebabs until chicken juices run clear. Baste chicken with marinade while grilling to keep chicken moist.


Minted Lemonade Ingredients 2 cups Splenda 6 cups water 2 cups fresh lemon juice ½ cup mint leaves

Directions 1.

Place lemon juice in a large pitcher.

2.

Add 4 cups water in with lemon juice.

3.

In a separate bowl, mix 2 cups water with 2 cups Splenda Once the Splenda is dissolved, pour the mixture in with the lemon juice and water.

4.

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Stir in mint leaves and refrigerate for 1 hour. Serve over ice.


German Potatoes Ingredients 2 bags frozen hash browns 2 cans cream of chicken soup 1 square butter 1 pint sour cream 1 small onion ¾ cup cheese 2 cups crushed corn flakes

Directions 1.

Preheat oven to 350°.

2.

Mix hash browns, cream of chicken soup, and cheese in a large bowl. Set aside.

3.

Chop onion and mix into hash brown mix.

4.

Melt ¾ of the butter and mix in with hash brown mix.

5.

Spray 13x9 pan with nonstick cooking spray.

6.

Transfer mixture into a 13x9 baking pan.

7.

Spread crushed corn flakes evenly over top of mixture in pan.

8.

Melt the remaining butter and pour evenly over the cornflakes.

9.

Bake for 45 minutes.

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Garlic Bread

Ingredients 1 loaf French bread ½ cup butter 1 large clove garlic 1 teaspoon fresh chopped parsley (optional)

Directions 1.

Preheat oven to 350°.

2.

Cut French bread in medium slices at a 45° angle.

3.

Mince garlic and place in cup with butter. Melt butter with garlic.

4.

If desired, add parsley to butter mixture.

5.

Using a pastry brush, brush butter mixture onto one side of each French bread slice.

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6.

Wrap loaf in tinfoil.

7.

Bake for 15 minutes.


Spinach Strawberry Salad with Poppy Seed Dressing Ingredients 4 cups baby spinach 1 small red onion 1 jar crumbled bacon 1½ cups sliced strawberries ž cup sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup oil 1/3 cup vinegar 1 tablespoon grated onion 2 tablespoons poppy seeds

Directions 1.

Clean and prepare baby spinach.

2.

Chop red onion.

3.

Combine baby spinach, chopped red onion, sliced strawberries, and crumbled bacon in a large bowl. Set aside.

4.

Combine remaining ingredients in a small container with a lid.

5.

Cover container with lid and shake until the dressing ingredients are combined.

6.

Drizzle the dressing over the salad and toss to coat.

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Strawberry Salad with Shallot-Honey Vinaigrette Ingredients ¼ cup lemon juice 2 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon minced shallot 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup chopped almonds 2 tablespoons white sugar 1 pinch salt 2 cups mixed salad greens ½ pint strawberries, quartered

Directions 1.

Combine the lemon juice, honey, shallot, thyme, salt, and red pepper flakes together in a bowl; vigorously whisk the olive oil and vegetable oil into the lemon juice mixture. Set aside.

2.

Place a small skillet over medium-high heat; toss the almonds, sugar, and salt together in the hot skillet until the sugar caramelizes on the almonds, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat immediately.

3.

Place the salad greens in a large bowl. Drizzle the dressing over the salad mix and toss to coat. Top with the almonds and strawberries to serve.

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Lemon Sorbet

Ingredients 3 cups freshly squeezed lemon juice (10 to 13 lemons) 1 cup freshly squeezed orange juice (2 to 3 oranges) 1½ cups cold water 3 cups Splenda

Directions 1.

Combine Splenda and water. Mix until Splenda is dissolved.

2.

Combine all ingredients and pour into an ice cream maker.

3.

Process according to manufacturer’s instructions.

4.

When done, scoop into a container and then place in the freezer to cure and harden.

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Kiwi Lime Sorbet Ingredients 8 to 10 kiwifruit, peeled and sliced ¾ cup freshly squeezed orange juice ¼ cup freshly squeezed lime juice 1½ cups water 3 cups Splenda

Directions 1.

Combine Splenda and water. Mix until Splenda is dissolved. Set aside.

2.

Place the kiwifruit in a food processor and puree.

3.

Add the Splenda-water mix, orange juice, and lime juice to kiwifruit and puree once more.

4.

Pour mixture into an ice cream maker and process according to manufacturer’s instructions.

5.

When done, scoop into a container and then place in the freezer to cure and harden.

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Butter Cream Frosting Ingredients ž cup shortening Ÿ cup butter 4 tablespoons milk 2 teaspoons flavoring 4 tablespoons chocolate (for chocolate icing) 1 pound powdered sugar

Directions 1.

Mix all of the ingredients at high speed for about 5 minutes.

2.

If stiff frosting is desired for decorating, add one egg. If pure white frosting is desired, add two egg whites and no yolk. Then mix again for 3 to 5 minutes.

3.

Can be refrigerated for 5–7 days. If covered tightly, will not harden.

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Banana Drop Cookies Ingredients 1½ cups butter 1½ cups brown sugar 2 eggs, beaten 4 ripe bananas, mashed 3½ to 4 cups flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 1½ teaspoons baking powder

Directions 1.

Preheat oven to 350°.

2.

Cream butter and sugar.

3.

Add remaining ingredients, beating well after each addition.

4.

Drop by teaspoonfuls on lightly greased cookie sheet.

5.

Bake for 10 minutes.

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Dixon’s Pie Crust Ingredients 3 cups flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup vegetable shortening 2/3 cup ice water

Directions 1.

Put flour and salt in mixing bowl.

2.

Add vegetable shortening. Using a pastry cutter, cut shortening into flour mixture until shortening is about pea sized.

3.

Slowly add ice water, mixing as you go, until pie crust dough sticks together.

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Apple Pie Ingredients 2 pounds apples (6 to 8 apples) 1 tablespoon lemon juice ¾ to 1 cup sugar 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour ½ to 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon Dash ground nutmeg Dash salt 2 tablespoons butter or margarine Dixon’s pie crust

Directions 1.

Peel, core, and thinly slice apples. Sprinkle with lemon juice.

2.

Combine sugar, flour, spices, and dash salt. Mix with apples.

3.

Prepare pastry; fill.

4.

Dot with butter.

5.

Adjust top crust. Brush with milk and sprinkle with sugar, if desired.

6.

Cover edges with foil. Bake in 375° oven for 25 minutes. Remove foil and bake for 20 to 25 minutes more.

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