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HISTORIC PRESERVATION 1


THE STORY OF PLACE. For 45 years BVH Architects has sought to preserve the history of our built environment through the architectural design, protection and adaptive reuse of existing structures. While cultural values continue to adapt to a world of changing resources, it only solidifies our long-held belief that we must learn from and protect what we already have. Historic preservation is more than simply repairing what's been broken by time—it is restoring a place so that its story may continue to be told. Here are some stories that we’ve been lucky enough to be a part of.


6 OUR TEAM 12 THE ART OF PRESERVATION 14 NEBRASKA STATE CAPITOL 28 GATEWAY ARCH MONUMENT 36 CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL 46 THE ROSE THEATER 52 TRUMAN HISTORIC SITE 60 THE VILLAGE OF NICODEMUS 68 WILLIAM J. CLINTON BIRTHPLACE 74 RASPBERRY ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE 80 ST. CECILIA CATHEDRAL


DAN WORTH, AIA, FAPT SENIOR PRINCIPAL

Mr. Worth has over 35 years of experience in project programming, master planning, project management, facilities analysis, urban design, community and regional planning, building remodeling and rehabilitation, historic preservation, and educational design. Since 1980, his focus has been on historic preservation and rehabilitation through historic building surveys, historic preservation planning, numerous certified rehabilitation/restoration projects, and in research and writing.

Dan’s recent experience includes over 50 projects for the Midwest Region of National Park Service for work on historic sites in a 13-state region, as well as clients including State of Nebraska, Nebraska State College System, the University of Nebraska and the Smithsonian Institution. Dan is active in local, state, and national historic preservation organizations, and is a member of the College of Fellows of Association for Preservation Technology International and chair of the Nebraska State Historic Preservation Board.

AWARDS/CITATIONS: 2010 NE Preservation Professor of the Year Award 2010 Preservation Association of Lincoln Preservation Award 2010 Lincoln Green Business of the Year Award 2001 NE AIA Firm of the Year Award

William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home Historic Structure Report & CLR/EA Mount Rushmore NRHP Nomination Nebraska State Capitol Restoration Interior Master Specification Landscape Restoration Master Plan Masonry Restoration Courtyard Fountains Central High School Cultural Landscape Report & HSR Title I Theodore Roosevelt Peaceful Valley Ranch HSR J. Sterling Morton Mansion and Carriage House Condition Assessment Morton Public Library Master Plan, Renovation & Expansion Newtonia Battlefields Protection Master Plan Nicodemus National Historic Site HSR Perry’s Victory National Monument Condition Assessment Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield Foundation Sweeney Museum Rehabilitation McElhaney House Rehabilitation JNEM, Old Courthouse Historic Structure Report Museum Collections Storage Moat & Courtyard Rehabilitation JNEM, Gateway Arch Historic Structure Report Corrosion Investigation Phase I & II Building Condition Assessment Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer Restoration

CONTRIBUTIONS TO PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY: Fellow Association of Preservation Technology Co-Chair APT Technical Committee on Sustainable Preservation 2009-Current V.P. APT – 2007-2009 Board APT – 2004-2009 APT Membership Chair 2004-2009 Chair Nebraska Preservation Board SIGNIFICANT PROJECTS: Apostle Islands Raspberry Lighthouse Title I, II & III North Dakota State Capitol Study & Restoration William Howard Taft NHS HVAC Renovation and Title II Rialto Theater Structural Stabilization Feasibility Study David City Downtown Redevelopment Plan George Washington Carver National Monument Carver Trail Relocation & Cultural Landscape Report/EA Sleeping Bear Dunes BOQ Renovations Grand Portage National Monument Cultural Landscape Report Harry S. Truman National Historic Site Wind Cave National Park HSR & Cultural Landscape Report

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STEPHEN J. KELLEY, FAIA, SE, FAPT, FICOMOS STRUCTURAL ENGINEER, INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANT

Steve Kelley is a registered architect and structural engineer in private practice who has devoted his skills to the preservation of our built cultural heritage. With 35 years of experience, his award-winning projects are located throughout the United States, Asia, Europe, Africa, South America and the Caribbean basin. He has developed and worked closely with state-ofthe-art multidisciplinary teams designed to meet the demand of each project. He has published widely on various aspects of preservation and is an educator who has taught at the university level thus sharing his experience with the next generation of preservation professionals.

Mr. Kelley is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. He has served on the Board of Directors of both the US Committee of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (US/ICOMOS) and the Association for Preservation Technology (APT) and was elevated to Fellowship in both organizations. Mr. Kelley was chair of ASTM E6.24 and was the principal author of ASTM Standard Guide for Selection of Cleaning Techniques for Masonry, Concrete, and Stucco Surfaces. He is a UNESCO Tangible Heritage Expert and is Vice President of the International Scientific Committee on the Analysis and Restoration of Structures of Architectural Heritage (ISCARSAH).

AWARDS/CITATIONS: 2015 AIA College of Fellows 2013 UNESCO Tangible Heritage Expert 2010 Preservation Association of Lincoln President’s Award 2011 Nebraska Preservation Award 2008 US/ICOMOS College of Fellows 2006 Chicago Landmarks Award for Preservation Excellence

Qasr al-Bint Temple Ruin (4 BCE), Petra, Jordan Preservation, Engineering and Seismic Consultation JNEM, Gateway Arch Corrosion Investigation and Building Condition Assessment St. Cecilia’s Cathedral Investigation and Restoration Design Wangdue Phodrang Dzong Wangdi, Bhutan (1638) Technical Team Leader Apostle Islands Raspberry Lighthouse Title I, II & III Rathje Windmill, Peotone, IL, Condition Assessment Fort Robinson, Crawford, NE Reconstruction and Site Preservation Holy Family Church, Chicago, IL Investigation and Restoration Exterior Masonry and Structural Systems Tserkva Spasa na Berestove (12th Century), Kyiv, Ukraine Historic Structures Report and Conservation Eisenhower Executive Office Building Interior Restoration Kentucky State Capitol Conservation and Preservation Consultation Historic Structures Report and Preservation Master Plan 9

CONTRIBUTIONS TO PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY: V.P., ISCARSAH – 2014-Current Adjunct Associate Professor, Columbia University – 2015 President, ISCARSAH – 2008-2014 Board of Directors, APT – 2003-2007 New Orleans, Hurricane Katrina, and Global Climate Change, 2006 ASTM STP 1258: Standards for Preservation and Rehabilitation, 1996 SIGNIFICANT PROJECTS: Tribune Tower Building, Chicago, IL, Facade Restoration Nebraska State Capitol Restoration Roof and Masonry Restoration Ani Cathedral (1004) and Surp Prikitch (1037) Armenian Church ruins, Ani, Kars Region, Turkey


GREG MUNN, AIA ASSOCIATE ARCHITECT

Greg has over 22 years of professional experience with historical architectural preservation, rehabilitation, contextual design and research. His many years of historic preservation experience include architectural planning, historic buildings research and documentation, renovation design, construction drawing development and project administration. Greg’s recent work has involved numerous successful historic preservation projects for the National Park Service, and local neighborhood revitalization efforts through historic sturcture.

Greg holds a Master of Architecture and Bachelor of Environmental Design from the Technical University of Nova Scotia, Halifax, Canada. He is a member of the Association for Preservation Technology International Central Plains Chapter and Atlantic Canada Chapter; Chair, City of Lincoln Historic Preservation Commission; and the Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation.

AWARDS/CITATIONS: 2015 Preservation Association of Lincoln, Integration of Old and New Award 2013 Preservation Association of Lincoln, Award for Renovation of Chi Phi Fraternity

Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer Rehabilitation Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Center Aguilar State Bank HSA Chadbourn Spanish Mission HSR Chi Phi Fraternity Restoration Church of the Visitation of Blessed Virgin Mary Grand Manse Interior Restoration Mayhew Cabin/John Brown Cave Condition Assessment McAllister House HSR Mead Building Rehabilitation (SD State Museum) Nebraska Statewide Historic Preservation Survey Old Federal Building Rehabilitation Pioneers Museum HSA Pueblo County Courthouse Rio Grande Railroad Station Rulo Bridge HABS Assessment NEARNG Camp Ashland Training Site Atlas Missile Publication NeighborWorks Rehabilitation, Lincoln, NE St. Mane Theater Restoration UNL Student Union Ballroom Restoration The Living Center Rehabilitation

CONTRIBUTIONS TO PRESERVATION TECHNOLOGY: Chair, Historic Preservation Commission – 2011-Current Member, Association for Preservation Technology-Central Plains – 2001-Current Member, APT-Atlantic Canada Chapter – 2012-Current Prince Edward Island Museum and Heritage Foundation – 1982-current Gothic Dreams: The Architecture of William Critchlow Harris 18541913, selected photographs and illustrations SIGNIFICANT PROJECTS: National Park Service Cedar Pass Badlands NP Visitor Center Harry S Truman Home Restoration James B. Weaver House NHL Stabilization Little Rock Central High School Mount Rushmore Sculptors Studio/ Residence William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home Wilson’s Creek Civil War Museum FP

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THE ART OF PRESER VATION


Historic buildings and sites are living documents of our history. Their preservation presents a number of unique challenges due to their varying locations, fascinating histories, and physical character. They set their own standards and are often not adaptable to modern building codes and construction practices. Therefore their preservation often requires a collaborative effort of many disciplines. Built cultural heritage is vulnerable not only to environmental exposure and natural events but also to past interventions and additions no matter how well intended. Buildings last much longer than we do and our strategies must be sensitive to the physical resources that we have at our disposal. Buildings speak, but it takes experience and training to know how to listen to them. Only through this understanding can the root causes of building distress be addressed in a sustainable manner. Then the building can lend itself successfully to continued use or rehabilitation.

The BVH network offers the skill of developing and managing multidisciplinary teams; addressing the unique problems presented in a sustainable manner; developing design programs to sensitively repurpose our built heritage; and meet the client’s needs with an eye to the betterment of the goals of historic preservation. Our multidisciplinary approach to preservation includes: • • • • • • • • •

Historic Structure Reports National Register nominations Materials conservation analysis Investigation of architectural systems Field and laboratory testing and analysis Specialized engineering solutions Restoration design Construction documents preparation Construction observation

Equipped with extensive knowledge and years of field experience, BVH Architects is dedicated to the preservation of historic architecture, and creating architecture worth preserving.

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NEBRASK STATE CAPITOL


KA

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA ARCHITECT /

BERTRAM GOODHUE CONSTRUCTED /

1922-1932

DESIGNATED NHL /

1976

RESTORED /

1996-2010


VIEW OF TOWER FROM THE NORTHWEST COURTYARD.


“OF ALL THE BEWILDERING THINGS ABOUT A NEW COUNTRY, THE ABSENCE OF HUMAN LANDMARKS IS ONE OF THE MOST DEPRESSING AND DISHEARTENING.” WILLA CATHER


NORTH ELEVATION RENDERING, BERTRAM GOODHUE

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As settlers drifted west across the wind-swept American plains, those who would make their home in the land of the flat water sowed the seeds of character and tradition which would come to characterize this nation. Completed in 1932 at a cost of $9.8 million, the Nebraska State Capitol is a lasting testament to the pioneering spirit of Nebraskans. Strong and sure, the design, construction and future care of the capitol remains firmly rooted in the history of its people. The National Historic Landmark designed by Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue is a monumental structure that envelopes architecture, art and landscape design. Goodhue’s vision was a radical departure from the classical model of capitol design embracing the new American skyscraper. The Capitol is composed of a large, square, three story base bisected by transepts forming interior courtyards. A symbol of the pioneers’ dreams of a noble life built on the vast prairie, the soaring 400-foot tower rises above the Lincoln skyline, surmounted by a dome of gold tiles and the 19-foot-tall “Sower.”

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In 1997, the Capitol Commission, noting severe exterior deterioration, initiated a multi-phase/ multi-year comprehensive restoration project. BVH Architects led an extensive condition survey for the Indiana limestone masonry exterior, bronze window systems, gold tile dome, tile murals, copper roofs, and roof plazas. Detailed

computer mapping of the deteriorated surfaces, mortar/stone analysis, and window air infiltration testing was also performed. A restoration master plan was prepared which included historical background, repair and maintenance history, assessment of the existing conditions, as-built drawings, and prioritized recommendations.

ORGANIC GROWTH COVERING THE LIMESTONE EXTERIOR. DETERMINING THE CAUSE OF CRACKS ALONG THE TOWER FACADE LED TO RECONSTRUCTION OF PRESSURE RELIEVING JOINTS. INSPECTION OF DETERIORATION OF THE DOME TILES AND THUNDERBIRD MOSAIC DRUM.

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SCAFFOLDING COVERS THE ENTIRE TOWER, DOME AND “SOWER” STATUE DURING THE FIRST TWO PHASES OF RESTORATION. TUCKPOINTING THE INTERIOR COURTYARD. RESTORATION OF PRESSURE RELIEF JOINTS. DOME AND THUNDERBIRD MOSAIC PRIOR TO RESTORATION.

During the twelve year project the entire exterior façade was cleaned and organic growth and dirt removed; all four entrances were dismantled and rebuilt to prevent water infiltration; the parapet walls of the four cardinal entrance pavilions were dismantled and rebuilt; all existing exterior mortar joints in the base and tower were tuck pointed. Ineffective original expansion relief joints in the tower limestone walls were replaced at each floor level and fractured stones were repaired or replaced; the tower corner turrets and observation deck walls were dismantled and reset; the gold glazed tile dome was cleaned and re-grouted; the tower octagon windows were re-glazed using unbroken original amber window glass and newly manufactured matching amber glass. A new 100-year, two and a half acre, 20 oz. batten copper roof over insulation added to improve energy efficiency in the Capitol.

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ENTRANCE STAIRS AND BISON WALLS WERE DISASSEMBLED AND REPAIRED TO PREVENT DAMAGING WATER INFILTRATION.


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While not part of the original restoration plans, the multi-phase nature of the project afforded the team the opportunity to restore “The Sower,” the 19-foot, nine-ton bronze sculpture which has stood atop the capitol dome since 1930. An inspection of the sculpture’s interior found the structure to be remarkably sound. The bronze was cleaned, an even layer of patina was reapplied, and the sculpture was coated with a lacquer sealant and paste wax to preserve coloration. The Nebraska State Capitol Exterior Masonry Restoration and Reroof Project was ultimately completed on schedule and within the $57.4 million budget.

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GATEWAY ARCH MONUME


Y

ENT

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI ARCHITECTS /

EERO SAARINEN, HANNSKARI BANDEL CONSTRUCTED /

1963-1965

NRHP INDUCTION /

1987

STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT /

2005-2010


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Built as a monument to westward expansion and constructed between 1963 and 1965, the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri, is the centerpiece of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. As a world renown monument, the Arch serves not only as a symbol of American tenacity, but as a benchmark in architectural achievement. Drawing equal inspiration from nature and mathematics, master architect Eero Saarinen designed the 630-foot structure as an inverted weighted caternary curve, with a tapering triangular cross section. Assessing a means of restoring and preserving the stainless steel-clad monument involved a rigorous two-phase investigation.

“PROBING EVEN MORE DEEPLY INTO DIFFERENT POSSIBILITIES ONE FINDS MANY DIFFERENT SHAPES ARE EQUALLY LOGICAL—SOME UGLY, SOME EXCITING, SOME EARTHBOUND, SOME SOARING.” EERO SAARINEN

CREEPER CRANES AND 35-TON JACKS ALLOWED FOR PRECISE PLACEMENT OF PREASSEMBLED LEG SECTIONS DURING CONSTRUCTION.

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CREEPER CRANES DURING EARLY STAGES OF CONSTRUCTION VISITORS ENJOY THE VIEW FROM ATOP THE ARCH. A MAINTENANCE CREW CALIBRATES THE TRAM CAR. VISITORS APPROACH THE NORTH LEG OF THE ARCH.


Since the Arch was completed, faint discoloration and streaking had developed on the exterior stainless steel skin of the monument. The interior carbon steel skin was also exhibiting rust at a number of locations. The National Park Service commissioned BVH Architects to conduct a two-part investigation whose goal it was to determine the factors responsible for the deterioration of the steel skins and to develop treatment recommendations for the long-term preservation of the monument. The first phase of the investigation involved field reconnaissance surveys of the exterior and interior skin of the monument to inventory the corrosion and existing conditions, and to make recommendations for additional analysis and testing. The findings were summarized in a report that was presented to the National Park Service in early 2006.

These conclusions led to the NPS initiating a second phase of the study led by Steve Kelley. Close-proximity observation was suggested, along with analysis and testing of corrosion samples to help determine the proper course of action to remediate the conditions. These surveys would include an extensive documentation of the condition of all 2,592 stainless steel panels that make up the exterior skin of the arch, as well as the carbon steel interior. Welding between panels would be carefully examined and assigned a condition. Finally, temperature and humidity sensors were to be placed throughout the structure to assess climate stressors and their potential effects on the steel. In 2010 BVH Architects issued a full Historic Structure Report intended to help the Park Service restore and secure the monument for generations to come.

STAINING AND CORROSION DUE TO RAIN RUNOFF OF ALTERNATING FIELD AND SHOP WELDS. TYPICAL GRAFFITI AND SUBSEQUENT CORROSION AT BASE OF STRUCTURE. DEPOSITS AND CORROSION FROM MOISTURE ON THE INTERIOR SURFACE. SOUTH LEG INTERIOR VIEW OF WATER COLLECTION WICK (CABLE) AND PREVIOUSLY PAINTED AREAS OF CORROSION (ORANGE).

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THE ROSE THEATER


OMAHA, NEBRASKA ARCHITECT /

JOHN EBERSON CONSTRUCTED /

1926

DESIGNATED NRHP /

1974

STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT /

2008-2010


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Opened in 1927 as The Riviera, this storied theater was billed as one of the most lavish and elegant in the Midwest. Architect John Eberson sought to create a truly dramatic experience, using atmospheric effects to simulate a romantic Mediterranean setting complete with night skies, twinkling stars and drifting clouds. Crowning the wrap-around marqueed entrance is a large copper dome with two smaller domes flanking it. Enveloping the exterior is a diamond-patterned brick facade punctuated by oriel windows, sculpted balconies, terra cotta friezes and griffen-clad towers. After it was sold and renamed several times­—the Paramount in 1929; the Astro in 1962—the theater was purchased and restored by Omaha-native Rose Blumkin in the early 1990's. The newly christened Rose Blumkin Performing Arts Center now serves as the proud home of the Omaha Theater Company. In 2008, BVH Architects began professional consulting services for the restoration of the Rose Theater. Visual surveys were done of the three copper domes, roof, cupola and exterior brick and terra cotta envelope of the building.

THE PARAMOUNT THEATER, c. 1930

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After initial recommendations were made, the team proceeded with the physical analysis and partial removal of deteriorated parapets, balustrades, balconies and decorative column components. This detailed investigation aimed to determine the project scope and full extent of the work required so that accurate cost estimates could be obtained from a restoration contractor. BVH Architects provided technical details and specifications for the terra cotta, metals and roofing systems for bidding purposes. Other aspects of the project such as lightning protection, exterior lighting, electrical systems, roof access and window replacements were also included in the renovation recommendations. The final exterior restoration of the building was completed in 2010.

WATER DAMAGE CAUSED BY CONDENSATION WITHIN WOOD FRAME OF LARGE CENTRAL DOME GRIFFIN COLLUMNS ALONG EAST ELEVATION ORNATE TERRA COTTA FRIEZES ACCENT THE THEATER'S BRICK EXTERIOR EXAMINATION OF CRACKED AND DETERIORATED TERRA COTTA ON TOWER SCREEN WALL LARGE COPPER DOME, DETAIL

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CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL


L

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS ARCHITECTS /

GEORGE R. MANN, EUGENE JOHN STERN, JOHN PARKS ALMAND, GEORGE H. WITTENBERG, LAWSON L. DELONY CONSTRUCTED /

1927

DESIGNATED NHL /

1982

STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT /

2009


“TO SIN BY SILENCE WHEN THEY SHOULD PROTEST MAKES COWARDS OF MEN.” ABRAHAM LINCOLN

ELIZABETH ECKFORD WALKS DOWN SOUTH PARK STREET SURROUNDED BY REPORTERS AND AN ANGRY CROWD, SEPT. 4, 1957.


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ILLUSTRATION COMMEMORATING THE SCHOOL'S INAUGURATION, 1927

Built in 1927, the four-story Little Rock Central High School was hailed as the most expensive, most beautiful, and largest high school in the nation. Yet in 1957 the school became the battleground of a national civil rights debate when nine black students, known as the Little Rock Nine, were denied entrance to the school in defiance of

the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court ruling ordering the desegregation of public schools. Due to the significant role they played in this tumultuous era, the school and surrounding properties were listed on the National Register of Historic Places on August 19, 1977, and designated a National Historic Landmark on May 20, 1982. 49


In addition to being a National Landmark, Central High is still an operating high school. As part of an effort to preserve the historic and architectural integrity of Central High, BVH Architects was brought on to prepare a Historic Structure Report in order to document the historic significance, existing conditions, and recommended treatment approach for the primary buildings on the site which include the school, field house and stadium, and the nearby Magnolia Mobil Gas Station. Several repair campaigns throughout the school's history have assuaged the weathering and aging of this historic building. However, a thorough study of the site as a whole was needed to identify areas of immediate need, and to create a plan for long term preservation and future use. Examination of the school's

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existing condition found several trouble areas, including cracked, eroded and stained brick and mortar; corrosion of original and non-original attachments; damaged or failing window and door units; water damage to much of the original exterior wood installations; inadequate water drainage from roofs; extensive damage to ceiling tiles, concrete and reinforcing steel due to water infiltration; and exposure of the building's subsurface waterproofing system due to settlement of surrounding soil. Examinations of the accompanying buildings, including the Tiger Field house and Quigley Stadium, were made. While the condition of these structures was considered to be in relatively better condition, the need remained for rehabilitation for their indended purposes while retaining their architectural character.

DETAIL VIEW OF THE MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE HIGH SCHOOL, 1927

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PRESS BOX OVERLOOKING THE WEST STANDS OF QUIGLEY STADIUM. SOUTHEAST ENTRANCE STAIRS SHOWING MASONRY CRACKS AND STAINING. DOUBLE STAIRS AS THEY APPEAR FROM THE MAIN HALLWAY. WEST ELEVATION OF THE TIGER FIELD HOUSE.

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Recommendations for preserving both the architectural and historic integrity of Little Rock Central High School were submitted in 2010. Along with suggesting measures for repairing the existing buildings, the preservation team

developed a series of solutions which would allow the school grounds to grow and adapt with future use while still retaining the architectural integrity relating to this significant period in history.

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TRUMAN HISTORIC SITE


C

INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI GRANDVIEW, MISSOURI ARCHITECTS /

GEORGE PORTERFIELD GATES CONSTRUCTED /

1867-1885

NHS INDUCTION /

1983

STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT /

2006


HARRY AND BESS TRUMAN’S MASTER BEDROOM.

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Born to a farmer and livestock dealer, the boy who would become the 33rd President of the United States spent his formative years in the unassuming heartland of America. Harry S. Truman was born in Lamar, Missouri, in 1884. When he was three his family moved to his grandparent’s farm. Thought he would move again to Independance when he was six, he would return to the farm as a young man before entering the army in 1917. During these early years Truman often visited his cousins Nellie and Ethel Noland at their home across town, and their neighbor, a young Bess Wallace, who lived across the street. Following a long courtship, Harry and Bess married in 1919 and moved into her home at 219 N. Delaware. Truman rose to political prominence as a U.S. senator before being elected Vice-President in 1944. Upon the death of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1945, Truman became President and held the office until 1953. Throughout his political career, Truman remained closely tied to his roots in Independence, making the Independance, MO, home their “Summer White House.” Upon retirement he and Bess returned to live in the house permanently.

“YOU KNOW THAT BEING AN AMERICAN IS MORE THAN A MATTER OF WHERE YOUR PARENTS CAME FROM. IT IS A BELIEF THAT ALL MEN ARE CREATED FREE AND EQUAL, AND THAT EVERYONE DESERVES AN EVEN BREAK.” HARRY S. TRUMAN

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The Harry S. Truman National Historic Site is comprised of the Truman and Noland homes in Independence, Missouri, and the Truman Farm Home in Grandview, Missouri. The homes are kept by the National Park Service as historic museums preserving the life and legacy of the 33rd president. The National Park Service requested that BVH Architects conduct an evaluation of the current environmental conditions within the Truman Farm Home and Truman Home, and to develop alternatives and recommendations for new systems to meet the environmental control goals for each structure. Because the Truman Home possesses original architectural materials, finishes and contents of the family home, interior environmental conditions must meet minimum museum collection storage standards. Architects developed plans to restore interior plaster and finish materials which have deteriorated over the years due to inadequate HVAC systems. Special attention was given to minimize the impact of the new equipment on the historic fabric of both properties. The ultimate goal for this effort was to identify HVAC systems to aid in the preservation of the buildings and their contents for the benefit of visitors. TRUMAN FARM HOME, GRANDVIEW, MISSOURI

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TRUMAN HOME, INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI

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Due to its significant role in the life and career of Harry S. Truman, the Noland House is an important part of the Truman National Historic Site. A team of preservationists led by BVH Architects conducted a thorough investigation, documentation, and rehabilitation of the property. These efforts were initiated through the completion of a Historic Structure Report (HSR) for the Noland House. This in-depth report documents the history of the house, assesses its existing conditions, and develops treatment recommendations. Following completion of the report, BVH helped develop the first phase of construction documents for the rehabilitation of the Noland House. This work addressed the property’s most urgent needs, and included a complete foundation replacement along with selected site improvements and utilities upgrades. Future phases of work will continue to address the remaining interior rehabilitation of the Noland House and site accessibility issues so the property can eventually be used as a visitor staging area and Park Service office space.

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THE NOLAND HOUSE, CA 1950. DETERIORATION OF THE FOUNDATION OF THE NOLAND HOUSE BECAME A PRIORITY DURING PRESERVATION EFFORTS. OUTSIDE THE NOLAND HOUSE.

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THE VILLAGE NICODEM


OF MUS

NICODEMUS, KANSAS ESTABLISHED /

1877

NHS INDUCTION /

1976

STRUCTURAL ASSESSMENT /

2000

BATES’ FAMILY HOMESTEAD NEAR NICODEMUS, KS. IRVIN AND MINERVA W. SAYERS, ca. 1885.


Founded in 1877 in the northwestern area of Kansas hailed as “the Promised Land,” Nicodemus was one of the first settlements established by freed slaves from the south. Preceding the mass migration of black settlers after the Civil War, the town established a strong precedent for AfricanAmerican pioneers hoping to build a new life in the west. Today, Nicodemus is the oldest and most substantially preserved community among many established in the west by freed slaves. Five structures on the National Historic Site— two limestone churches (built 1885 and 1907), a wood-frame schoolhouse (1918), a hotel and residence (1880), and township hall (1939)— were chosen for their historic significance to undergo preservation efforts in 2000. BVH Architects conducted a condition survey of the five buildings, some of which remain in active use while others are abandoned and partially collapsed.

DISTRICT NO. 1 SCHOOL AS SEEN FROM SCHOOLYARD GATE, 1953. AERIAL VIEW OF NICODEMUS FROM NORTHEAST SHOWING SCHOOL HOUSE (1), A.M.E. CHURCH (2), FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH (3), FLETCHER-SWITZER HOUSE/HOTEL (4), AND TOWNSHIP HALL (5), 1953.

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1 2

3

4 5

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Based upon historical research and an architectural analysis of the contributing features of the vernacular construction, recommendations for immediate stabilization were devised, and the goals of future restoration were defined for the buildings. The material properties of the locally-quarried limestone used for four of the five buildings were investigated and its long-term durability was assessed. BVH prepared a Historic Structures Report to provide a compilation of the findings of research, condition assessment, and evaluation of the five historic buildings. The Historic Structures Report serves as the basis for decision-making for the presentation of the buildings of the National Historic Site. The report also serves as a record of the existing conditions and as a basis for planning future stabilization and restoration efforts.

DISTRICT NO. 1 SCHOOLHOUSE IN INCREASING STATES OF DECLINE. TOWNSHIP HALL, SHOWING ADVANCED LIMESTONE DECAY. ST. FRANCIS HOTEL (FLETCHER-SWITZER HOME), ONE OF THE OLDEST REMAINING BUILDINGS IN NICODEMUS. THE ONCE-STUCCOED AMERICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH NOW BARES CUT LIMESTONE WALLS.

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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH, 1943, AFTER A 1930s WINDSTORM BLEW OFF THE ORIGINAL BELL TOWER. EXTERIOR RESTORATION EFFORTS BEGAN IN 2005. BROKEN STUCCO REVEALS LIMESTONE BUTRESSES ALONG THE EAST SIDE OF THE CHURCH. LAYERS OF WOOD SHINGLES COVER THE VESTIBULE ENTRANCE ROOF COMPLETED RESTORATION, INCLUDING NEW STUCCO AND ROOF.

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WILLIAM CLINTON BIRTHPL


J.

N ACE

HOPE, ARKANSAS ARCHITECT /

H.S. GARRETT CONSTRUCTED /

1917

NRHP INDUCTION /

1994

HISTORICAL ASSESSMENT /

2012


The William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace National Historic Site, located in Hope, Arkansas, was recently established by the National Park Service. The site interprets the early developmental life of the 42nd President of the United States and contains three buildings and a memorial garden. President Clinton resided in the Cassidy House, 72

his grandparent’s house, with his mother and grandparents from 1946 until moving to another house in 1950. Young Bill Clinton continued to visit his grandparent’s house until the passing of his grandfather in 1956, developing boyhood relationships that remain beyond his presidency.


At the request of the National Park Service, BVH Architects prepared a Historic Structures Report and Cultural Landscape Report with the goal of developing critical planning and design documents that will serve as a guide to the long-term care and preservation of the site and buildings well into the future.

THE CLINTON BIRTHPLACE HOME AT 117 SOUTH HERVEY STREET. A YOUNG BILLY BLYTHE (CLINTON) PLAYS OUTSIDE THE HOME, 1949

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The scope of services included developing measured drawings, conducting historical research and oral interviews, performing detailed condition assessments of the site and buildings, performing building/life safety

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and accessibility evaluations, structural and hazardous materials assessments and developing preservation treatment alternatives for the preservation and maintenance of the site and historic structures.


CLINTON HOME DINING ROOM. VIEW OF THE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE, INCLUDING VISITOR CENTER (LEFT), UTILITY SHED AND MONUMENT.

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RASPBER ISLAND LIGHTHO


RRY

OUSE

BAYFIELD, WISCONSIN ARCHITECT /

H.S. GARRETT CONSTRUCTED /

1862

NRHP INDUCTION /

1977

PRESERVED /

2012


The Apostle Islands National Lakeshore comprises over 69,000 acres across 22 islands on the southern lakeshore of Lake Superior in northern Wisconsin. One of six light stations established on the Apostle Islands, the Raspberry Island lighthouse was originally constructed in 1862 and later reconfigured and expanded in 1906. A century of exposure to Lake Superior’s harsh environment took its toll on the “Showplace of the Apostles.” To restore the lighthouse and ensure its sustainability, the National Park Service initiated a major rehabilitation project in 2003 which included Title I, II and III Design Services which led to a full restoration of the site.

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APPROACHING THE 150 YEAR-OLD LIGHT STATION ON THE SOUTH END OF RASPBERRY ISLAND.

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THE NEWLY RESTORED LIGHTHOUSE INCLUDES A MUSEUM AND HOUSING FOR NPS STAFF.

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THE ORIGINAL LANTERN LENS, NOW ON DISPLAY IN THE MUSEUM, WAS REPLACED BY A BATTERYOPERATED BEACON IN 1957.


“OCTOBER 13, 1906 — MR. R. G. HURST WITH HIS MEN LEFT THE STATION AT 3:30 PM, AFTER COMPLETING THE NEW DWELLING. MADE THE GENERAL INSPECTION. FOUND EVERYTHING IN GOOD ORDER. THIS HAS BEEN A VERY FINE DAY.” KEEPER CHARLES HENDRICKSON, AFTER CONSTRUCTION OF THE CURRENT LIGHTHOUSE

Restoration of the lighthouse exterior included several improvements to critical areas of the foundations and lighthouse catwalk. New metal shingle roofing, flashings, gutters and downspouts were installed. Repairs and restoration were made to wood windows, wood doors, wood trim elements and replacement of rotted wood porch floors and siding. Repairs were also provided at the lighthouse lantern including glazing restoration, repairs to railings, sheet metal copper decks, structural floor repairs, and lantern cladding. Interior work consisted of renovation of the Keeper’s residential unit into an interpretive house museum and the rehabilitation of the Assistant

Keeper’s unit into lodging quarters for NPS seasonal personnel. Rehabilitation also involved the reconstruction of a portion of the foundation and the installation of mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection, and site utilities systems. The $3 million project returned the property to a state of utility while retaining its historical, architectural and cultural significance. The newly remodeled lighthouse, bearing the interior trappings of its former 20th century life, has once again claimed the title of “Showplace of the Apostles.”

81


ST. CECILI CATHEDRA


IA AL

OMAHA, NEBRASKA ARCHITECT /

THOMAS ROGERS KIMBALL CONSTRUCTED /

1905

NRHP INDUCTION /

1979

RESTORED /

2002


Beneath twin bell towers reaching 20 stories above the Omaha skyline, the heavy bronze doors of St. Cecilia welcome visitors into the amber-lit cathedral. Inside, the small columned narthex opens to a long center aisle, leading past well-worn oak pews and marble columns to the majestic white Carrera marble altar and baldachin framing the monumental “Victorious Christ” crucifix. The nearly eighty-foot-high vaulted ceiling rains a harmony of colors upon eight magnificent Charles Connick stained glass windows, and upon alternating arched columns spanning the nave. Lancet stained glass windows, remembering nine saints, illuminate the ambulatory. Bronze sculpted stations of the cross ring the nave on each column. Beautiful liturgical mosaic tiles, bronze railings, tromp l’oiel paintings, and marble floors compliment the Indiana

84

A WORKER STANDS ATOP SCAFFOLDING DURING THE RENOVATION PHASE OF THE CATHEDRAL’S APSE.


limestone walls and decorative plaster. St. Cecilia Cathedral is the seat of the Archdiocese of Omaha. Designed in the Spanish Renaissance style by nationally renowned architect Thomas Rogers Kimball of Omaha, it ranked as one of the ten largest cathedrals in the United States upon its completion. Groundbreaking occurred in 1905, the cornerstone was set in 1907, and the first services were held in 1916. Since the Bishop had established a “no debt� policy, work continued into the 1920s and through the ‘40s, followed by a ceiling renovation in the early 1950s. In 1956 the tower domes were completed, and in 1958 St. Cecilia was consecrated. Today the cathedral is home to more than 850 households, leads a school of more than 320 kindergarten through eightgrade students, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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In 1997, the Archdiocese of Omaha found the 80 year-old roof was leaking, causing staining and water problems along the interior. BVH Architects completed a study of the structure, finding the clay tile roof, underlayment, and furring all to be in need of complete replacing. The vast ceiling of the nave would also require complete restoration, as much of the ceiling was stained and acoustic 86

tiles, installed in the 1940s, were deteriorating and falling. The restoration of the roof presented an opportunity to restore the original plaster ceiling, with a new paint and dĂŠcor scheme to better represent the intentions of the original design. With modern acoustic and sound technology incorporated, the ceiling tiles added in the ‘40s could now be removed.


The roof was stripped, and new underlayment, furring and clay tiles were installed. 85% of the existing tiles were reused, with the remaining tile obtained from either the original manufacturer or from locally stored tile of the same era and manufacturer. Newly designed copper gutters were installed, with new downspouts added that matched existing ornamental work.

AERIAL VIEW OF CATHEDRAL FROM SOUTHEAST (LEFT) AND SOUTHWEST (RIGHT). REROOFING THE CATHEDRAL WITH OVER 15,000 CLAY TILES.

87


Inside, acoustic tiles were removed, and all plaster repaired and repainted. A new color scheme was devised based on historic data. Decorative painting, plaster details, and faux-mosaic ‘shields’ were all added, which represent major historic milestones in the development of the Archdiocese of Omaha. The original woodwork and bronze rails were restored. The scope also included a new sound system featuring under-pew speakers, 88

additional lighting to highlight the ceiling and chancel, repair and cleaning of the stone walls, and painting restoration for interior walls, chapels, and auxiliary spaces. The roof and ceiling/interior restoration was completed in November 1999, providing for celebration of the Christian Jubilee year of 2000, as planned.


THE APSE OF ST. CECILIA, INCLUDING HALF-DOME WITH NEWLY DESIGNED COLOR SCHEME AND WHITE MARBLE ALTAR.

89


Copyright Š 2015 Bahr Vermeer Haecker Architects All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted without express permission. BVH Architects 440 N. 8th Street Lincoln, NE 68508 1425 Jones St. Omaha, NE 68102 Interior images Š Bahr Vermeer Haecker Architects except: Nebraska State Historical Society Archives (Cover, 14); Missouri Historical Society (10); Tom Kessler (12); Nicholas Goodhue (16); Missouri History Museum (30, 32); AquaVelvet (33); Ryan Claus (38); U.S. Natl. Archives and Records Admin. (40); Will Counts, Arkansas Democrat, AP (46-47); Little Rock Central High School Archives (48-51); National Park Service (54, 56, 61.1, 73); Historic American Building Survey (62-65, 68).


BVH Architects

bvh.com

440 N 8TH STREET SUITE 100 / LINCOLN NE 68508 / 402.475.4551 1425 JONES STREET / OMAHA NE 68102 / 402.345.3060

Historic Preservation  

The story of historic structures told through preservation.

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