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patterns • decorating tips • fiber art • culture

Issue No. 30

Quilts

Japanese Geisha, Fanciful Parasols, Soaring Birds and more

+

Super adorable & super easy: Sarubobo Plush Dolls


Asian Fabric

contents

Vol 7 Issue 6

quilts 14 Giragira Bed & Wall Quilts The Razzle Dazzle Collection

will light up the room

26 Gurrido Motte Fuseji Bed & Wall Quilts Two quilts showcase the

An easy-to-make project perfect for your Asian stash

9 Shop Directory

42 Parasoru Quilt

22 Hina Matsuri 12 Garden of Dreams Collection & Quilt

With a free 96" x 107" bonus pattern

Where to shop for Kona Bay

34 Book Review

Spring brings out beautiful Japanese umbrellas

features

departments

4 Publisher’s Note 5 How to Use the Magazine

just in Hana-bashi collection

38 Soaring Birds Quilt

Happy Girl's Day!

24 Hana-bashi Collection 55 Sarubobo Plush Doll

A sweet gift that will be treasured

Big-Print Patchwork

52 Food

Chirashi Sushi & Tamagoyaki

64 Travel

Takayama, Japan

78 General Instructions

Cover Photo: Kanji Eco Friendly Insulated Hot/Cold Bag

Special thanks to:

Used exclusively and recommended by Asian Fabric™ Takayama, Japan • pg 64

2013 Asian Fabric 3


publisher’s note

When I first started Kona Bay Fabrics in 1991, I knew that Kona Bay was going to be up against the “big boys” and giants in the quilting fabric industry. Somehow, I needed to make Kona Bay stand out and be recognized by quilt shops and fabric lovers all throughout the world. I decided at that time that I would concentrate on three things. First, make sure that our fabrics were unique and were of the very highest quality. We accomplished this by having Asian fabrics as our specialty and by printing only at the top fabric mills in Japan to make sure quality was the best. Secondly, our customer service had to be superb and top-notch. We took a very personal approach to making sure that every customer–regardless of their size–was treated as our #1 customer. From the President on down, I insisted that we personally communicate with our customers on the phone, at trade shows, through social media, quilt shop visits, etc. I was taught very early in business–even before the fabric days– that you take care of your customer…..or someone else will. Thirdly, as those of you who read my early day newsletters, and now countless Facebook and blog postings, Kona Bay is constantly preaching that quilters and all fabric lovers need to support the heart and soul of our industry—local quilt shops. These hard working and tireless entrepreneurs go through so much on a daily basis to make sure that fabric enthusiasts have a place to go to in their local community to see the latest fabric, patterns, books and supplies. Many have invested their life savings to make sure they have the best fabric shop to offer and, in all honesty, not all have been profitable during this recession. Yet, they continue to fight the fight because they love what they do. Like so many of these small quilt shops, Kona Bay and Asian Fabric magazine is still up against the “big boys.” Like us, I know I speak for all the quilt shops in saying “Thank You” to all the fabric lovers and quilters for your support. I know you are going to enjoy the wonderful projects and articles in this issue of Asian Fabric. Inside, you will find five beautiful quilts by Georgie Gerl, Kona Bay’s celebrated quilt designer. Katherine Alyce, our guest contributor, offers and easy-to-make quilt suitable for so many of your Asian stash. In addition to our usual travelogue and recipes, you’ll enjoy the tutorial for making a delightful Japanese sarubobo doll. You’ll want to make several. Plus, read about Sandy Turner’s new book, Big-Print Patchwork—Quilt Patterns for LargeScale Prints, from That Patchwork Place, a division of Martingale publishers. Kona Bay Fabrics and Asian Fabric magazine thanks you, once again, for your support. And, one more time, I urge you to please continue to support those dedicated and hard working quilt shop owners. Mahalo and aloha from Da Textile Samurai!!

Douglas (Textile Samurai) Eagleson Publisher • douglas@konabay.com

4 Asian Fabric 2013

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kona-Bay-Fabrics-SeattleBay-Fabrics-and-Asian-Fabric-Magazine/106593046936?ref=ts


Make the most of Asian Fabric

Asian Fabric™ Quilting and design ideas for inspired minds Issue #30 2013 • VOL 7 ISSUE 6

Publisher douglas Eagleson Quilt designer & EDITOR Georgie Gerl ggerl@comcast.net Facebook: Georgie Gerl Designer

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORs Kathie Alyce ASSISTANTS TO PUBLISHER Doris Eagleson 1923–2010 Cheryl Hamai Brittany Eagleson Simpson

Subscriptions Kona Bay Fabrics www.konabay.com 15812 NE 83rd St Redmond, WA 98052 800-531-7913

advertising and editorial inquiries

Share it with a friend 1. Click here and choose a method to share. 2. Follow prompts.

Use the easy links As you scroll over a page, active links will be highlighted in blue. This enables you to connect to additional pages and download additional patterns.

Print pages You must download the publication before you are able to print. 1. Click here to download the publication to your computer. 2. Open the .pdf to view it and print pages as you wish.

Subscribe for FREE— It’s easy! 1. Go to www.konabay.com 2. Click on “Subscribe” 3. Complete the information

Eagle Publishing www.PublishingPeople.com 328 E. Indiana Ave Spokane, WA 99207 866-638-1115 Editor and associate publisher Vicki Dar nwwoman@mac.com graphic design liminalogy.com INTERN Karen MacGeraughty

Kona Bay Fabrics © 2013 Asian Fabric™ is produced six times a year by Eagle Publishing for Kona Bay Fabrics. The magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. © Kona Bay Fabrics. All rights reserved. No piece, in part or full, may be reproduced without permission.

2013 Asian Fabric 5


downloadable patterns from Asian Fabric —$3.99 ea w w w.konabaygifts.com


Asian Fabric back issues —$5 ea

eco friendly insulated hot/cold bags —new designs!


What I Did with my Kona Bay fabric  projects from our readers 

There are 2 ways to submit— e all the e s o t g n rewardi nd y r e v s i It abrics a f r u o s way by you! d e creative t u c e s are ex n r e tt a p ho has w e n o y to ever esigns d r u o Thanks y hoto of p a s us all! d e r e i r p s n sha i k our wor Y . s u h t wi

1. Email: asianfabric@mac.com 2. Mail:

Eagle Publishing KB Project 328 E. Indiana Ave Spokane, WA 99207

www.konabayfabrics.com


shop directory: where to find kona bay The premiere shops across the country for exceptional service and a superb selection of Kona Bay Fabrics.

maryland arizona 35th Ave Sew & Vac Fabric World 3500 W. Northern Ave Phoenix, AZ 85051 602.841.5427 4939 W. Ray Road, STE 27 Chandler, AZ 85225 480.961.7363 Two convenient locations with 25,000 bolts combined, including a large selection of Asian fabrics. Notions, books, threads and all quilting supplies. Kits available from this issue. Hours: M-F 9-6; Sat 9-5; Sun 10-4.  www.35thavesewandvac.com

florida Boutique 4 Quilters, Inc. 2945 W New Haven Ave West Melbourne, FL 32904 321.768.2060 A shop with a Scandinavian ambiance. Large selection of Asian, Kaffe Fasset, Batiks and Silk fabrics. Hand dyed fabrics and Fiber Art by local artists. A place where Fiber Artists and Traditional Quilters gather. Come visit Florida’s most creative quilt shop! Hours: Mon & Tue 9:30am5pm; Wed 9:30am-7pm; Thur & Fri 9:30am-5pm; Sat 9:30am-4pm.  www.boutique4quilters.com

Patches Quilting & Sewing 308 S Main St Mount Airy, MD 21771 301.831.0366 A delight for your eyes with over 4,000 bolts of fabric. Our large selection of Asian prints, Batiks, and Black and Whites will aid you in any project. Don’t forget to check out our books, notions and classes.  www.patchesquilting.com Seminole Sampler 71 Mellor Ave Catonsville, MD 21228 866.407.2363 Dedicated quilt shop specializing in Asian, Batik and contemporary fabrics. Excellent service to meet all your quilting needs. Classes for all levels. Extensive selection of books, patterns and notions.  www.seminolesampler.com

michigan The Stitchery 1129 E Grand River Ave Howell, MI 48843 517.548.1731 The Stitchery carries many Kona Bay Fabrics. Full service quilt shop with over 5,000 bolts of fabric and supplies. Authorized Janome dealer, featuring the Memory Craft 11,000 Embroidery Machine. Conveniently located between Detroit and Lansing. Open Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat. 9-4.  www.thestitcheryonline.com 2013 Asian Fabric 9


minnesota Blue Bamboo 12865 Industrial Park Blvd Plymouth, MN 55441 800.323.1105 Gorgeous array of Asian fabrics which feature the best of Kona Bay in both fabric and kits. Choose from wall hangings, quilt and runner kits. Check our website for current fabrics and sign up for our newsletter. See over 5000 bolts of fabric which include Asian, flannels, brights, holiday and batiks.  www.mybluebamboo.com

missouri The Quilted Fox 10403 Clayton Road St. Louis, M0 63131 314-993-1181 toll free 877.993.1181 Huge selection of Asian fabrics both in-store and online. We also carry internationally oriented fabrics. Many kits available. Open Mon and Wed 10 am–5 pm; Tues and Thurs 10 am–6:30 pm; Fri and Sat 10 am–4:30 pm, and Sun Noon–4:00 pm.  www.quiltedfox.com

nevada The Quilted Dragon 2890 Yucca Terrace Ave Pahrump, NV 89048 775.751.9033 Just one hour NW of Las Vegas, we specialize in Oriental, Batik, and Wide Backing fabrics, Sashiko supplies and notions all at discount prices everyday. We stock over 1,700 book titles and 600 patterns at all times. Open MTW 9–3 and second Sat 9–3.  www.quilteddragon.com

10 Asian Fabric 2013

new york Discount Sewing & Jackie Lynn’s Fabric Center 475 E. Ridge Rd Rochester, NY 14621 585.544.4110 Exquisite selection of Asian quilting fabrics. Sales and Service Center for Brother, Janome, HandiQuilter, Elna and Tin Lizzie machines. Open Mon-Sat 10-5, Tues & Thurs 10-8.  www.discountsewingcenter.com

ohio Gramma Fannies Quilt Barn P. O. Box 270 Berlin, OH 44610 330.893.3243 Largest selection of Asian fabrics in Ohio’s Amish Country. You’ll enjoy our unique quilt shop located in an old barn as a part of Schrocks Amish farm. Locally made quilts plus 2500 bolts of beautiful fabrics specially designed for quilt shops. Just 1 mile east of Berlin, the heart of Amish Country, on State Route 39. Mon-Sat 10-5.  www.grammafanniesquilts.com

pennsylvania Sew Smart Fabrics 30 W Oakland Ave. Doylestown, PA 18901 215.345.7990 The best selection of Asian prints in Eastern Pennsylvania. We also carry silks, wools and other fabrics. Books, patterns, trends. Open everyday.  www.sewsmartfab.com


online shops

wyoming E.T. Quilts 80 S. Main Buffalo, WY 82834 307.684.9006 877.ETQUILTS (877.387.8458) Quality fabrics, including Wyoming’s largest collection of Asian prints, notions, kits, patterns, books and quilts. Salt City Candles, needlecraft supplies, and Boyd’s Bears also available. Check out our website and receive a free gift with your first on-line order. Open Mon–Sat 10–5.  www.etquilts.com

contact asianfabric@ mac.com n on for informatio Asian advertising in Fabric

eQuilter eQuilter.com is your online fabric store for quilting, sewing and fashion, with OVER 20,000 Fabrics IN STOCK! We specialize in Asian-Pacific and contemporary quilt fabrics. See our ad on page 2.  www.equilter.com SeaWatch Fabrics Mukilteo, WA • 866.407.2363 Extensive selection of Asian fabrics, Batiks and light Batiks. Unique patterns, “Wall Hanging of the Month” club, fat quarter bundles and Superior Threads. Free shipping on all orders over $25. Most orders shipped the same day.  www.seawatchfabrics.com Debsews Fabrics Wide selection of Asian fabrics • Tone-On-Tone fabrics • Fat quarter selections • Patterns & magazines • Special sale items. Debsews as been selling fabric to thousands of satisfied customers online since 1999 and we are very proud of our customer service. See our ad on page 50.  www.debsews2.com Shibori Dragon 253.582.7455 Specializing in Asian and Batik fabrics, Sashiko supplies, vintage silk kimonos– largest selection in the Pacific NW. Unique beads, buttons, needleart threads and embellishments.  www.shiboridragon.com

2013 Asian Fabric 11


available in stores quilt to dow


s this May ~ click the wnload a free pattern


Designer: Georgie Gerl This quilt will dazzle (giragira) and shimmer bringing fun and excitement to any room setting.


84” x 84”


Giragira Bed Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List

Giragira Bed Quilt

(Giragira means dazzle in Japanese)

*$” x *$”

material list Backing &w yards Batting (@” x (@” Read Cutting Tip prior to cutting fabrics. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut” pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat. Featuring fabrics from the Razzle Dazzle Collection.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

$ Fabric A RAZZ-01 Multi Block Center & Binding

@-@2 yards

Next Cuts

!(2” squares

These pieces are “Fussy Cut” yardage needed will vary depending on fabric motif selection.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Fabric E RAZZ-04 Blue Dark Pieced Border Accent

! !@

#2” x $@” ( !2” x $@”

@w” x $@”

$ !$ !#

&2” x $@” !^ &2” squares #2” x $@” !^ #2” squares !2” x $@” !^ !2” x !!2” !^ !2” x !)2” #@ !2” squares

Fabric F RAZZ-05 Moss Dark Accent Triangles

^

#2” x $@”

Note: Twelve #2” x 42” strips are used in strip-set construction.

Fabric G RAZZ-05 Green Light Accent Triangles

^

#2” x $@”

Fabric H RAZZ-02 Green Border

!@

#2” x $@” !@

# yards

Fabric C RAZZ-05 Gold Block Accent Border

@6 yards

strips are used in strip-set construction.

Fabric D RAZZ-03 Red Pieced Block Border

!3 yards

16 Asian Fabric 2013

!^ @ %” x $@” $) !2” x $@” @$ * Note: Twelve !2” x 42” !^

!@

#2” x $@”

%” squares !2” x @!2” !2” x !(2” !2” x !%2”

#2” squares

w yard

(

Fabric B RAZZ-05 Black Background

Next Cuts

w yard

w yard

!a yards

#2” x #&2”


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78-79) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

Making the Block

Instructions are for making the bed quilt if making the wall quilt note amount needed under each diagram. Pay close attention to the direction of the $%0 angle cuts in steps 2 and 4 in order to successfully piece this quilt units together. 1. Sew together lengthwise one #2” x $@” Fabric B strip, one !2” x $@” Fabric C strip, one #2” x $@” Fabric D strip, one !2” x $@” Fabric E strip, and one #2” x $@” Fabric F strip. Press. Make six. $@”

#2”

2. Align ruler along the $%0 angle and cut strip set as shown. Measuring from angle edge, cut strip set into thirtytwo #2”-wide segments as shown. $%0

#2”

$%0 Cut a $%0 angle as shown. From strip sets measure and cut #2”-wide strips from angle edge, 32 units for Bed quilt and 8 units for Wall quilt .

3. Sew together lengthwise one #2” x $@” Fabric G strip, one !2” x $@” Fabric E strip, one #2” x $@” Fabric D strip, one !2” x $@” Fabric C strip, and one #2” x $@” Fabric B strip. Press. Make six. $@”

#2” !2” #2” !2” #2” Make 1^ strips sets for bed quilt Make !2 strips sets for wall quilt

4. Align ruler along the $%0 angle and cut strip set as shown. Measuring from angle edge, cut strip set into thirtytwo #2”-wide segments as shown. $%0

!2” #2”

#2” !2” #2” Make 1^ strips sets for Bed quilt Make !2 strips sets for Wall quilt

$%0 Cut 32 units for Bed quilt Cut 8 units for Wall quilt

2013 Asian Fabric 17


5. Trim each strip set unit from step 2 and 4 as shown so each measures 11”. Be sure to allow at least 4” or more from each point as shown. !!”

!!”

Measure and cut 4” or more away from each point

6. Sew two strip sets together, one of each combination as shown. Press. Make thirty-two. Make 32 for Bed quilt Make 8 for Wall quilt

9. Refer to General Instructions ( p a g e s 7 8 – 7 9 ) fo r S i m p l e Triangles technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of four %” Fabric C squares and four #2” Fabric B squares. This will be your sewing line. Place four marked Fabric C squares on one unit from step 8 as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Sew remaining marked Fabric B squares to piece as shown. Trim and press. Make four.

7. Sew one !2” x @!2” Fabric C strip between two units from step 6 as shown. Press. Make sixteen. @!2”

!2”

Make 16 for Bed quilt Make 4 for Wall quilt

8. Sew one !(2” Fabric A square between two !2” x !(2” Fabric C strips. Press seams toward Fabric C. Sew this unit between two !2” x @!2” Fabric C strips. Press. Make four. !2”

!2”

@1!2”

Make 4 for Bed quilt Make 1 for Wall quilt

18 Asian Fabric 2013

Fabric C- %” squares Fabric B- #2” squares Unit from step 8 Make 4 for Bed quilt Make 1 for Wall quilt


10. Referring to step 12 diagram’s center section, sew one unit from step 9 between two units from step 7. Press. Make four. 11. Sew one unit from step 7 between two &2” Fabric B squares as shown. Press. Make eight. &2”

&2”

&2”

Make 8 for Bed quilt Make 2 for Wall quilt

12. Sew one unit from step 10 between two units from step 11 as shown. Press. Make four.

Make 4 for Bed quilt Make 1 for Wall quilt

13. Making Simple Triangle units, sew two !2” Fabric B squares to one !2” x !%2” Fabric C strip as shown. Press. Make sixteen.

Win Kona Bay fabric and be seen in Asian Fabric Magazine! Kona Bay is having a contest and you can win! The first ten people to make the Delightful Asian Star Quilt top and send us a picture will win 3 one yard cuts of their choice of in stock Kona Bay fabrics. All people entering the contest will also be entered into a grand prize drawing for 5 one yard cuts of in stock Kona Bay fabrics. Visit your favorite fabric store to get the fabrics needed to make this quilt: Kona Bay’s Kasa, Hanko and Flutter Friends fabric collections, available now. Entries must be submitted to Kona Bay by midnight April 14, 2013. The drawing will be held on April 15, 2013 and winners will be notified by e-mail. Please enter by submitting a picture of you with your quilt top to konabay@ konabay.com. All entries will have you and your quilt top picture featured in our Asian Fabric magazine. Go to http://konabay.com/mm5/ complimentary_patterns/Delightful_ Asian_Star_Quilt.pdf to download the FREE Delightful Asian Star Quilt pattern.

Fabric B- !2” squares Fabric C- !2” x !%2” Make 16 for Bed quilt Make 4 for Wall quilt

14. Sew one unit from step 13 between two !2” x !)2” Fabric B strips as shown. Press. Make eight. !)2”

!)2”

!2”

Make 8 for Bed quilt Make 2 for Wall quilt 2013 Asian Fabric 19


15. Referring to step 17 diagram’s center section, sew one unit from step 12 between two units from step 14 as shown. Press seams toward step 14 units. Make four.

16. Sew one unit from step 13 between two !2” x !!2” Fabric B strips as shown. Press. Make eight. !!2”

!!2”

!2”

Make 8 for Bed quilt Make 2 for Wall quilt

17. Sew one unit from step 15 between two units from step 16 as shown. Press. Make four. Block measures #&2” square.

Block measures #&2” square Make 4 for Bed quilt Make 1 for Wall quilt

Assembling and Finishing the Quilt 1. Referring to layouts on pages 15–16, arrange and sew together three #2” x #&2” Fabric H strips and two blocks. Press. Make two.

2. Arrange and sew together three #2” Fabric E squares and two #2” x #&2” Fabric H strips. Press. Make three. #2”

#&2”

#2”

#&2”

#2”

#2”

Make 3

3. Referring to layouts on pages 15–16, arrange and sew together rows from steps 1 and 2. Press. This completes the quilt top. 4. Cut backing fabric piece into three equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one (#” x !@)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure (#” x (#”.

5. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (page 79) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

20 Asian Fabric 2013


Giragira Wall Quilt Giragira Wall Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List material list Backing !6 yards (must measure at least 42”-wide) Batting 42” x $@” Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips. Featuring fabrics from the Razzle Dazzle Collection. Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage FabricA RAZZ-01 Purple Block Center & Binding

First Cuts ! $

Next Cuts

!(2” square @w” x $@” (Binding)

! 8 yards

&2” x $@” $ #2” x $@” $ !2” x $@” $ $ d yard * Note: Cut one #2” x 42” strip in

Fabric B RAZZ-05 Gold Background

! $ #

&2” squares #2” squares !2” x !!2” !2” x !)2” !2” squares

half for strip-set construction.

Giragira Wall Quilt #*” square

Fabric C RAZZ-05 Black Block Accent Border

! %” x $@” !) !2” x $@”

w yard

$ ^ @ $

%” squares !2” x @!2” !2” x !(2” !2” x !%2”

Note: Cut one !2” x 42” strip in half for strip-set construction.

Making the Wall Quilt 1. Refer to Giragira Bed Quilt, Making the Block instructions (pages 17–20) to make one block. Note: Cut one strip of each of the following fabrics in half as indicated in chart. (Fabric B−#2” strip, Fabric C−!2” strip, Fabric D−#2” strip, Fabric E −!2” strip, Fabric F − #2” strip, and Fabric G− #2” strip.)

2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

#2” x $@”

Fabric D RAZZ-03Purple Pieced Block Border

#

Fabric E RAZZ-04 Purple

#

!2” x $@” Note: Cut one !2” x 42” strips in half for strip-set construction.

Fabric F RAZZ-05 Moss Dark Accent Triangles

@

#2” x $@”

Fabric G RAZZ-05 Green Light AccentTriangles

@

Note: Cut one #2” x 42” strips in half for strip-set construction.

2 yard

Dark Piece Border Accent

4 yard

Note: Cut one #2” x 42” strips in half for strip-set construction.

a yard

a yard

#2” x $@” Note: Cut one #2” x 42” strips in half for strip-set construction.

2013 Asian Fabric 21


Happy Girl’s Day —

“Hina Matsuri”

On March 3, Japanese families will celebrate their daughters. Hina-Matsuri—a traditional doll display and other family traditions are practiced. Girl’s Day is focused on insuring girls’ future happiness, health and well-being. Elaborate festivals take place throughout

Most families will display their collection of hi-

Japan. One of the original customs of making pa-

na-ningyo dolls. The ceremonial hina-ningyo dolls

per dolls and setting them afloat in the water to

represent the emperor, empress and their court.

carry away bad luck is still practiced in some towns.

Several days before March 3, the dolls, which have

Hina Matsuri, also celebrated as the Peach Flower

been stored throughout the year, are set out in a

Festival, is also celebrated at home with the fam-

special tiered display with a red covering to honor

ily. The home is often decorated with peach blos-

the daughters in the home. The dolls are arranged by

soms which symbolize long life and happy marriage.

status with the Emperor and Empress on the top tier.

Both are important goals for the girls of the house.

The doll display is put away promptly following

22 Asian Fabric 2013


the holiday with the belief that any delay will result

One of the often prepared dishes is Chirashi

in delays later when it comes time for the daughters

Sushi. See our recipe on page 52. This easy form

to marry. A collection of dolls can require a large fi-

of sushi can be prepared quickly and topped with

nancial investment. Many families have passed their

a variety of tasty and colorful items—perfect for

hina-ningyo down through the centuries. On Hina Matsuri, young women dress up and pay

honor

to

the

dolls. It is a day of

a party. Sweet mochi cakes, in pink and other soft colors, are popular for the celebration and as an offering placed by the hina-ninygo display. Do you have girls at home?

with

Girl’s Day would be a great

the family also sharing

time to celebrate them and

specially prepared food

start a new family tradition.

celebration

and wishes for the girls’ happiness, health and well-being. 2013 Asian Fabric 23


Ha

available March 2


ana-Bashi

2013

â?§ collection


Gurrido Motte Fuseji Bed & Wall Quilts Designer: Georgie Gerl Grid (guriddo) with (motte) beautiful Geisha and flowers are featured in these dots/circles (fuseji).


Guriddo Soshite Fuseji Bed Quilt


Guriddo Motte Fuseji Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List

Guriddo Motte Fuseji Quilt (Meaning Grid with Dots/circles)

$$” square without binding $%” square with binding

material list Circle Backing ! yard Binding 2 yard Backing @w yards Batting $(” x $(” Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut” pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat. Featuring fabrics from the Hana-Bashi and Flutter Friends Collections Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

FabricA HANA-01 Black Center and Half-Circles

!Z @

FabricB HANA-06 White Background

!

Next Cuts

!@2” square cut on point Circles-template on page 32 “Fussy Cut”

! yard

@

!4 yards

Fabric C HANA-03 Gold Lattice

w yard

28 Asian Fabric 2013

!*4” square* (side) * cut twice diagonally (a” squares** (corner) **cut once diagonally

#

%2” x $@” !^ %2” squares

*

@2” x $@” !^ !^

@2” x !@2” @2” x %2”

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric D KORA-05 Black Quarter-Circles

First Cuts $

Next Cuts

Circle-template on page 32

q yard

Fabric E HANA-05 Black Cornerstone & Border

@ $8” squares* * cut twice diagonally

s yard

%

@2” x $@” $

@2” squares

Fabric F HANA-03 Burgundy Accent Squares

!

@2” x $@” *

@2” squares

8 yard


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

Adding the Appliqué

The circles in this quilt are “Fussy Cut” from motif fabric.

1. Refer to circle pattern page 32 to make circle template from pattern paper or template plastic. 2. Select the desired motif area to be featured in the circle remembering that these circles will be cut into two or four pieces when sewn to quilt. Trace around circle template on the wrong side of the fabric. Cut circle larger than drawn line to allow for seam allowance. The trace line will be your sewing line. 3. Place motif fabric right sides together with a circle-backing square. This will not show so muslin or fabric scraps can be used. Sew on traced line then trim circle 8” -4” from sewn line. Make two circles using Fabric A and make four circles using Fabric D.

4. To make half-circles (Fabric A) cut one circle unit in half as shown with red dash line. Turn half-circle right side out and press. Measure from straight edge w” and trace a line. Cut on traced line. Make four half-circles. Cut w” off bottom straight side. After stitching is complete cut on red dash line.

5. To make quarter-circles (Fabric D) cut one circle unit in four pieces as shown with red dash line. Turn quarter-circle right side out and press. Measure from both straight edge w” and trace a line. Cut on traced line. Make sixteen quarter circles. Cut w” off each straight side.

After stitching is complete cut on red dash lines.

6. Place one Fabric A half-circle on one Fabric B large side-triangle, centering the pieces and aligning straight edge as shown. Machine or hand stitch half-circle to Fabric B. Make four. Place quarter-circle on one %2” Fabric B square aligning straight edges as shown. Machine or hand stitch quartercircle to square. Make sixteen. Note: Keep original circle pieces together in groups of four quarter-circles. Use one set for Making the Quilt steps 1 and 3. Repeat process for other sets. %2”

%2” Make 4

Make 16

2013 Asian Fabric 29


Making the Quilt 1. Sew one O@2” x %2” Fabric C piece between two quarter-circle unit as shown. Press. Make eight. @2”

5. Arrange and sew together two side triangle units, two O@2” x O!@2” Fabric C strips and one block from step 3 as shown. Press. Sew one corner unit from step to 4 to top of unit from this step. Press. Make two.

%2” Make 8

@2”

@2”

2. Sew one O@2” Fabric F square between two O@2” x %2” Fabric C pieces as shown. Press. Make four. %2”

@2”

!@2”

%2”

@2”

Make 2

Make 4

3. Sew one unit from step 2 between two units from step 1 as shown. Press. Make four.

6. Arrange and sew together three @2” x 1@2” Fabric C strips and two @2” Fabric E squares as shown. Press. Make two. !@2”

@2”

!@2”

@2”

!@2”

@2”

Make 2

7. Arrange and sew together two units from step 3, two @2” x 1@2” Fabric C strips, and one 1@2” Fabric A square as shown. Press. @2”

Make 4

4. Sew one O@2” x O1!@2” Fabric C strip between two Fabric E triangles as shown. Press. Make four. Sew one unit from this step to one Fabric A corner triangle as shown. Press. Make four. !@2”

@2”

Make 4

Make 4

30 Asian Fabric 2013

1!@2”

@2”

!@2”


8. Sew unit from step 7 between two units from step 6 as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two units from step 4. Press.

9. Referring to layouts on pages 27–28, arrange and sew rows from steps 5 and 8 together. Press. Note: Bed quilt consists of four blocks. Measure block, if it measures larger than $)2” then use this size to cut @2”–wide Fabric E strips instead of those listed in bed quilt instructions. Delete steps 10 and 11 below if making bed quilt. 10. Measure quilt from top to bottom and side-to-side; these measurements should be the same. Cut four @2”–wide Fabric E strips to this measurement.

11. Sew quilt between two @2”–wide Fabric E strips. Press seams toward Fabric E. Sew one @2”–wide Fabric E strip between two @2” Fabric F squares. Press seams toward Fabric E. Make two. Sew to sides of quilt. Press.

Finishing the Quilt

This wall quilt can be finished either with or without binding.

1. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one $(” x *)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim to backing to measure $(” x $(”.

2. Binding Method: Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired OR

2. No Binding Method: Layer and center quilt top and backing right sides together on batting piece (wrong side of backing on batting). Using 14”-wide seam, stitch around all edges, leaving a 8–10” opening on one side for turning. Trim batting close to stitching and backing even with quilt edges. Clip corners, turn, and press. Hand stitched opening closed.

2013 Asian Fabric 31


Guriddo Motte Fuseji 10� Circle Template

Traced Line (This will be the sewing line) Placement Line

Trace half-circle twice aligning placement lines to make a whole circle pattern.

32 Asian Fabric 2013


Guriddo Motte Fuseji Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List

Guriddo Motte Fuseji Bed Quilt (!” x (!” material list Backing *4 yards Batting ((” x ((” Read Cutting Tip prior to cutting fabrics. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips Making The Quilt 1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) and Guriddo Motte Fuseji Wall Quilt (pages 29–32) to make four blocks. 2. Arrange and sew together three @2” Fabric F squares and two @2” x $)2” Fabric E strips. Press seams toward Fabric E. Make three. 3. Arrange and sew together three @2” x $)2” Fabric E strips and two blocks. Press seams toward Fabric E. Make two. Sew units from step 2 and this step to make quilt top.

Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut” pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat. Featuring fabrics from the Hana-Bashi and Flutter Friends Collections Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

$Z FabricA * HANA-01 Black Center and Half-Circles

@q-# yards

FabricB HANA-06 White Background

$ *

#a yards

Fabric C HANA-03 Gold Lattice & Binding

#6 yards

Next Cuts

!@2” square cut on point Circles-template on page 32 “Fussy Cut” amount varies depending on motif selection.

!*4” square* * cut twice diagonally (a” squares** **cut once diagonally

!)

%2” x $@” ^$ %2” squares

!) #!

@w” x $@” @2” x $@” ^$ ^$

@2” x !@2” @2” x %2”

4. Cut backing fabric piece into three equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one ((” x !@)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim backing to measure ((” x ((”. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Bind quilt as desired.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Next Cuts

Fabric D KORA-05 Black Quarter-Circles

!^

Circles-template on page 32

Fabric E HANA-05 Black Cornerstone & Border

*

$8” squares* * cut twice diagonally

!a yards

!#

@2” x $@” !^

Fabric F HANA-03 Burgundy Accent Squares

@

@2” x $@” @% @2” squares

@ yards

@2” squares

4 yard

2013 Asian Fabric 33


book review

Sandy Turner’s

by Vicki Dar

34 Asian Fabric 2013

Big-Print Patchwork “I love the fabric, but what do I do with it?… This is the first sentence in the Introduction for Big-Print Patchwork. The author goes on to explain that in her many visits to quilt shops, it was a chorus repeated again and again in regards to large scale fabric designs.


Reading it ignited an instant kinship. As a matter of fact, that very question is the reason Asian Fabric is here. Kona Bay Fabrics, long known for their exquisite large scale Asian designs, has always enjoyed a loyal legion of followers. I would often hear sewing enthusiasts ohh and ahh over new releases that they simply had to have. Later, as we spoke, many would tell me that they had boxes of Kona Bay that was just too beautiful to cut up. I was delighted when I saw Martingale (Pacific Northwest publishers and practicially neighbors of Kona Bay Fabrics) was releasing this much needed treasure written by Sandy Turner

in January. Sandy has been teaching quilt making for the past 20 years and helping her students address the question of what to do with large scale prints during much of that time. Sandy’s popular lecture titled, “I love the fabric, but, what do I do with it” and her love of what she refers to as, “pictorial fabric,” started her on the path towards her new book. Although Big-Print Patchwork will fill you with inspiration, you’ll also take away well written instructions on how to work with three traditional quilt blocks Sandy has found work well as companions to large scale prints.

Big-Print Patchwork builds on a foundation of three different blocks but the possible end results number many. Sandy starts by teaching the basic construction of each block and then moves on to show you how to scale the blocks to work with a variety of fabric designs. Before the instructions begin, Sandy teaches you what to look for in a pictorial fabric to insure a successful quilt. For instance, she suggests stepping back 10 feet from the fabric you’re considering and asking yourself if you can clearly distinguish the main motif. You’ll learn to scale the blocks to work with variances you’ll encounter. Examples and instruction are offered. 2013 Asian Fabric 35


Throughout the book, helpful, framed tip boxes appear. The tips provide both instructional tips and tidbits of quilting wisdom we can all appreciate. You’ll find everything from Sandy’s recommended stitch length, tips to prevent unwanted mishaps and design how-tos. Seven quilt projects and complete instructions are included that make use of the three companion blocks. The extensive additional quilt gallery section is sure to delight and inspire you. Sandy’s quilts use a wide range of motifs including Asian. As an unexpected bonus, Sandy suggests an additional thirteen traditional blocks that you’re likely to find useful in your quest to master working with large scale prints. For each of these blocks, she has provided cutting instructions for your convenience. Sandy Turner’s love of fabric and quiltmaking began in 1984. By 2005, she was selected as the National Quilting Association’s Certified Teacher of the Year. Sandy continues to teach and create. Visit her website at www.sandyturner. com to learn more about the author of Big-Print Patchwork. Look for the book at your local quilt shop

36 Asian Fabric 2013

or visit shopmartingale.com to find BigPrint Patchwork and many other wonderful titles that address everything creative from quilting to crafts. While you’re there, check out their free pattern downloads and fun gift items and helpful tools. Big-Print Patchwork—Quilt Patterns for Large-Scale Prints is available at shopmartingale.com in two versions. The print version + eBook sells for $24.99 and the eBook only is available for $16.99 and downloadable instantly.


The Korakuen Collection, in stores now. Click on the quilt to download a free pattern.


Soaring Birds Quilt Designer: Kathie Alyce This easy-to-make quilt using your favorite Asian prints can be displayed on the wall or placed on a bed as an accent runner.


Cutting Tip Fabric A and Fabric B are “Fussy Cut”; yardage needed varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat. For Fabric A and B cut larger pieces to smaller pieces as listed on chart. For remaining fabrics cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. The first measurement listed runs parallel to the selvage. Binding the quilt is optional, two different finishing techniques are given for this project. Read all instructions before beginning. Use an accurate 4”-wide seam allowance for this project.

Soaring Birds Cutting Chart & Material List Soaring Birds Quilt #$” x &@” or #%” x &#” with binding material list Backing @4 yards Batting $!” x &*”

Extra fabric may be needed for “Fussy Cut” pieces; amount varies depending on motif selection and fabric repeat.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Fabric A $ Large Squares & Four-Patch ! * !2 yards

!@2”squares !@2” x !)2” %2” squares These pieces are “Fussy Cut”

Fabric B Four-Patch

@ $

!@2” x %2” %2” squares These pieces are “Fussy Cut”

Fabric C Four-Patch & Accent Border

! @

%2” x $@” @ @2” x $@” $ !

%2” squares @2” x !$” @2” x !@2”

Fabric D Four-Patch & Accent Border

! @

%2” x $@” @ @2” x $@” $ !

%2” squares @2” x !$” @2” x !@2”

Fabric E Border

$ $

%2” x $@” #2” x $@” @ #2” x #$2” @ #2” x @$2” @w” x $@” Optional Binding

q-! yard

2 yard

2 yard

Read Cutting Tip prior to cutting fabrics. Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips

Next Cuts

!6 yards (no binding) ^ OR !s yards (with binding)

2013 Asian Fabric 39


Making the Quilt 1. Sew one %2” Fabric B square to one %2” Fabric A square as shown. Press. Make four. %2”

%2”

%2” Make 4

2. Sew one %2” Fabric A square to one %2” Fabric C square as shown. Press. Make two. %2”

5. Find center of each @2” x !$” Fabric C and D strips. These strips are sewn using a miter seam, strips are cut longer than needed and will be trim after the strips are sewn to the blocks. Only two border strips are sewn to each block, mark one step 4 block 4” away from corner as shown. Note: Check blocks and strips orientation prior to sewing, each unit placement is different.

%2”

%2” Mark block 4” from one corner. Make 2

3. Sew one %2” Fabric A square to one %2” Fabric D square as shown. Press. Make two. %2”

%2”

%2”

6. Align one Fabric C strip center mark to block center seam line, right sides together. Insert sewing machine needle at corner mark and sew border strip to block from mark to outside edge. Repeat step to sew other border strip to block, starting at corner mark. @2”

Make 2

4. Sew one unit from step 3 to one unit from step 1 as shown. Press. Make two. Sew one unit from step 2 to one unit from step 1 as shown. Press. Make two.

!$”

!$”

@2” Start stitching from 4” marked to opposite end. Repeat step to sew another strip to block.

Make 2

Make 2

See guest contributor Kathie Alyce’s bio on page 50.

40 Asian Fabric 2013

7. Fold corner of block diagonally, right sides together, matching seams and border. Place a long ruler along fold line extending across border. Draw a diagonal line across border from fold to edge of border. This is the stitching line. Starting at 4” mark, stitch on drawn line. Square block to measure 122” trimming excess border fabric. Press seam open.


8. Referring to photo (page 38) and layout (page 39) repeat steps 5-7 to sew Fabric C and D border strips to remaining blocks, noting block orientation and border strip positions.

11. Sew unit from step 10 between two #2” x @$2” Fabric E strips. Press. @$2”

#2”

9. Referring to diagram below to arrange and sew one !@2” Fabric A square to one block from step 7 or 8. Press. Make four, one of each variation. !@2”

!@2”

#2”

12. Referring to photo (page 38) and layout (page 39), arrange and sew rows from steps 9 and 11 together. Press. 13. Sew %2” x $@” Fabric E strips end-to-end to make one continuous %2”-wide Fabric E strip. Press. Measure quilt from top to bottom. Cut two %2”-wide Fabric E strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press. 14. Sew two #2” x #$2” Fabric E strips to top and bottom of quilt. Press.

Finishing the Quilt

Make 4 (one of each variation)

10. Arrange and sew together two !@2” x %2” Fabric B pieces, one @2” x !@2” Fabric D strip, one !@2” x !)2” Fabric A piece, and one @2” x !@2” Fabric C strip as shown. Press. %2”

@2”

!)2”

@2”

%2”

!@2”

Option 1 : Layer and center quilt top and backing right sides together on batting piece (wrong side of backing on batting). Using 4”wide seam, stitch around all edges, leaving an *”–!)” opening on one side for turning. Trim batting close to stitching and backing even with quilt edges. Clip corners, turn, and press. Hand stitched opening closed. Quilt as desired. Option 2 : Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

2013 Asian Fabric 41


Designer: Georgie Gerl Wrapped in the warmth and security of this quilt will bring protection against frigid conditions.


Parasoru Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Parasoru Quilt (Meaning is parasol)

&@" with Prairie Points or ^&" without Prairie Points

material list Backing $4 yards Batting &%” x &%” Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips Extra fabric may be needed if “Fussy Cutting” pieces. Featuring fabrics from the Kasa, Hana Bashi and Shadowland Collections. Fabric Name & Yardage Fabric A KASA-01 Red Block Center

First Cuts &” squares

*

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

s yard

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Fabric B KASA-01 Gray Light Backgroumd

%

!8 yards

@

@2” x $@”

Fabric C RAZZ-05 Black Center Block Background

!

&2” x $@”

%2” x $@”

Next Cuts @ @ $ $

%2” x #$2” %2” x @$2” %2” x !)2” @2” x !)2”

#

@ &2” squares @ &” squares #2” x $@” @$ #2” squares

@ ! @

&2” x $@” &” x $@” %2” x $@”

q yard

Fabric F RAZZ-05 Gold Accent Borders

d yard

First Cuts ^ &

Next Cuts

@2” x $@” * $ * !2” x $@”

@2” x !$2” @2” x !@2” @2” x %2”

@ Fabric G $ HANA-06 Red Accent & Prairie Points

&2” x $@” ^ &2” squares ^2” x $@” @@ ^2” squares

Fabric H SHAD-02 Ocean Diamond Dark

#

#2” x $@” #@ #2” squares

Fabric I SHAD-02 Ocean Diamond Light

#

#2” x $@” #@ #2” squares

Fabric J HANA-06 White Diamond

&

&” x $@”

!3 yards

2 yard

Fabric D SHAD-02 Charcoal Dark Background

!8 yards

44 Asian Fabric 2013

&2” squares &” squares %2” x !$2”

Note: One 7” square needs to be cut from &2” strip.

! Fabric E $ HANA-05 Red Accent & Prairie Points &

!2 yards

^ ^ $

&2” x $@” @ &2” squares ^2” x $@” @@ ^2” squares !2” x $@”

2 yard

!s yards

#@ &” squares


Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

Making the Center Block

This quilt uses both Half-square Triangle and Simple Triangle techniques, check which technique is being used in each step instructions prior to sewing.

1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Half-Square Triangle technique. Draw a diagonal line on one 7” Fabric J square. Place marked square and one 7”” Fabric C square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make two. Trim squares to ^2” to make four half-square triangle units.

2. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Simple Triangle technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one #2” Fabric H square. This will be your sewing line. Place marked square on one unit from step 1 as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Make four and label Unit 1. Unit 1

Fabric H- #2” square Unit from step 1 Make $

3. Making half-square triangle units, sew one 7” Fabric J square to one 7” Fabric A square as shown. Press. Make eight. Trim squares to ^2” to make sixteen half-square triangle units.

Fabric J- &””” square Fabric A- &””” square Make *

Square to ^2””” Make !^ Half-square Triangles Units

4. Making simple triangle units, sew one #2” Fabric H square to one unit from step 3 as shown. Press. Make sixteen and label Unit 2. Unit 2

Fabric J- &””” square Fabric C- &””” square Make @

Square to ^2””” Make $ Half-square Triangles Units Fabric H- #2” square Unit from step # Make !^

2013 Asian Fabric 45


5. Making half-square triangle units, sew one &2” Fabric E square to one &2” Fabric C square as shown. Press. Make two. Trim squares to &” to make four half-square triangle units.

8. Arrange and sew together two of Unit 1, one Unit 4 and one Unit 3 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make 2 Fabric E- &2””” square Fabric C-&2””” square Make @

Square to &””” Make $ Half-square Triangles Units

6. Making half-square triangle units, sew one unit from step 5 to one &” Fabric J square as shown, checking orientation of step 5 unit prior to sewing. Make four. Cut on drawn line. Press. Trim squares to ^2” to make eight units, four of each variation.

Fabric J- &””” square Unit from step 5 Make $

9. Arrange and sew together one Unit 3, two of Unit 2, and one Unit 4 as shown. Press. Make two.

Make 2

10. Arrange and sew together units from step 8 and 9 as shown. Press.

Make 8 (Four of each variation)

7. Making simple-triangle unit, sew one #2” Fabric I square to one unit from step 6 as shown. Press. Make eight, four of each variation and label either Unit 3 or Unit 4. Unit 3

ld Fo

Make 24 Fabric C

46 Asian Fabric 2013

Make 22 Fabric E

Make 22 Fabric G

ld Fo

Fabric I- #2” square Units from step 6 Make * (Four of each variation)

Fo ld

Unit 4

11. Fold one #2” Fabric C square in half diagonally wrong sides together. Fold again in half diagonally as shown. Press. Make twenty-four prairie points. Repeat step using ^2” Fabric E square and ^2” Fabric G squares to make forty-four prairie points, twenty-two of each variation. Set Fabric E and G triangles aside to be used in finishing the quilt.


12. Align prairie points (6 for each side) along unit from step 10 unit top and bottom edges matching raw edges as shown. Baste in place. Repeat to align prairie points to sides of unit. Baste in place. Keep prairie points pointing in toward center until step 13 is completed.

14. Sew one @2” x !)2” Fabric B strip between two @2” x !@2” Fabric F strips as shown. Press. Make two. Referring to layouts (page 43–44), sew unit from step 13 between units from this step. Press seams toward units from this step. !@2”

!)2”

!@2”

@2”

Make 2

15. Sew one @2” x !)2” Fabric B strip between two @2” x !$2” Fabric F strips as shown. Press. Make two. Referring to layouts (page 43–44), sew unit from step 14 between units from this step. Press. Center section measures #*2” square. !$2”

!)2”

!$2” @2”

Make 2

13. Sew unit from step 12 between two %2” x @$2” Fabric B strips. Press prairie points toward Fabric B. Sew this unit between two %2” x #$2” Fabric B strips as shown. Press. %2”

%2”

Making the Pieced Border 1. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Half-Square Triangle technique. Draw a diagonal line on one 7” Fabric J square. Place marked square and one 7”” Fabric D square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make six. Trim squares to ^2” to make twelve half-square triangle units.

#$2” Fabric J- &””” square Fabric D- &””” square Make ^

Square to ^2””” Make !@ Half-square Triangles Units

2013 Asian Fabric 47


2. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Simple Triangle technique. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one #2” Fabric H square. This will be your sewing line. Place marked square on one unit from step 1 as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Make twelve and label Unit 5.

5. Making simple-triangle unit, sew one #2” Fabric I square to one unit from 4 as shown. Press. Make twenty-four, twelve of each variation and label either Unit 3 or Unit 4. Unit 6

Unit 5

Unit 7 Fabric H- #2” square Unit from step 1 Make !@

3. Making half-square triangle units, sew one &2” Fabric D square to one &2” Fabric G square as shown. Press. Make six. Trim squares to &” to make half-square triangle units.

Fabric D- &2””” square Fabric G-&2””” square Make 6

Square to &””” Make 1!@ Half-square Triangles Units

4. Making half-square triangle units, sew one unit from step 3 to one &” Fabric J square as shown, checking orientation of step 3 unit prior to sewing. Make twelve. Cut on drawn line. Press. Trim squares to ^2” to make twenty-four units, twelve of each variation.

Fabric I- #2” square Units from step 4 Make @$ (Twelve of each variation)

6. Sew one Unit 6 to one Unit 5 as shown. Press. Sew one Unit 2 to one Unit 7. Press. Sew these two units together. Press. Make twelve.

Make 1!@

7. Sew one %2” x !)2” Fabric B piece between two @2” x %2” Fabric F pieces as shown. Press. Make four. @2”

Fabric J- &””” square Unit from step 3 Make !@

Square to ^2” Make 1@$

@2”

%2”

Make $

48 Asian Fabric 2013

!)2”


8. Sew one @2” x !$2” Fabric F strip between %2” x !$2” Fabric D piece and one unit from step 7 as shown. Press. Make four.

!$2” %2” @2”

Make $

9. Sew one unit from step 8 between two units from step 6 as shown. Press. Make four. Sew Center Block between two units from this step. Press seams toward border unit.

Make $

10. Sew one unit from step 9 between two units from step 6 as shown. Press. Referring to layouts (pages 43–44), sew to sides of quilt.

Make @

Assembling and Finishing the Quilt 1. Sew !2” x $@” Fabric E strips end-to-end to make one continuous !2”-wide Fabric E strip. Press. Measure quilt from side to side. Cut two !2”-wide strips to this measurement. Sew to top, and bottom of quilt. Press seams toward border.

2. Measure quilt through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two !2”-wide Fabric E strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press. 3. Referring to steps 1 and 2 to join, measure, trim, and sew !2”-wide Fabric F strips to top, bottom, and sides of quilt. Press.

4. Referring to layouts on pages 43–44, align Fabric E and G folded prairie points along top and bottom edge of quilt matching raw edges and alternating fabric placement as shown. Baste in place. Repeat to align prairie points to sides of quilt. Baste in place.

5. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one &%” x *)” approximate backing piece. Trim to measure &%” x &%”.

2013 Asian Fabric 49


Kathie kathie alyce Soaring Birds Quilt, page 38 For over twenty years, Kathie Alyce has been creating, designing and teaching everything quilting. Kathie believes there is an artist in all of us and she has devoted her quilting career to making sure as many quilters as possible find it in themselves. Kathie is a sought after teacher for the different classes and lectures she offers. Her years of experience and the topics covered have made for many satisfied students. On a personal level over the years, Kathie has received many awards for different pieces of work at all levels of competition. She considers herself a contemporary quilter and likes to work with a variety of fabric designs. Awards include judge’s choice, people’s choice and a range of ribbons from many sources. She still continues to find the time to create new projects and enjoys taking on the creative challenge of custom commissioned pieces. Kathie is a published AQS author. Her book, Flip Flop Block Quilts features 18 quilt projects made with the original Flip Flop Block curved template she developed. She is proud of the interest in her book and is working on several new ideas. Since the Flip Flop template, she has come out with several other helpful templates which can be used with many of her patterns. Kathie calls central Vermont home and finds inspiration for her series of landscape quilts in nature. To learn more about Kathy, visit her website at www.waterfallquilts. com.

50 Asian Fabric 2013

6. Two options are given for layering the quilt read both and use your prefer method.

Option 1: Layer and center quilt top and backing right sides together on batting piece (wrong side of backing on batting). Using 14”-wide seam, stitch around all edges, leaving a 15” opening on one side for turning. Trim batting close to stitching and backing even with quilt edges. Clip corners, turn, and press. Press prairie points to outside edge. Hand stitched opening closed. Quilt as desired. Option 2: Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to General Instructions (pages 78–79) for Finishing the Quilt. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired leaving 6” along outside edges free of quilting. Trim backing 14”- 12” larger than quilt. Press prairie points to outside edge. Turn under backing to match quilt edge and using a blind hand-stitch, sew backing close. Finish quilting outside edge.

Debsews Fabrics www.Debsews2.com

• Wide Selection of Asian Fabrics • Tone-On-Tone Fabrics • Fat Quarter Selections • Patterns, Magazines • Special Sale Items

Debsews has been selling fabric to thousands of satisfied customers online since 1999 and we are very proud of our customer service.

Email: debsews@pixi.com Items also available at our Ebay store: http://stores.ebay.com/Debsews-Fabrics


The Sanctuary Collection, in stores now. Click on the quilt to download a free pattern.


Chirashi Sushi & Tamagoyaki

C

hirashi means “scattered sushi” in Japanese. This easy to make dish is a common meal in Japanese homes, often requested by children and adults alike. It is also the perfect dish for festive occasions and parties. Different versions could be served—vegetarian or not, simple or complex. Your options are limited only by your imagination. Start with a batch of sushi rice and have fun adding ingredients of your choice.

Chirashi Sushi sushi rice ingredients

Bean sprouts

2 cups short grain rice

Bamboo shoots, julienned

¼ cup rice vinegar

Green onions, sliced

¼ cup sugar

Avocado, diced

1 tsp salt

English cucumber, sliced

chirashi ingredient suggestions

Shitake mushroom, sliced Hard boiled eggs quartered

Tamagoyaki (see instructions on next page)

Lotus root, sliced and parboiled

Sushi grade fish, sliced thin

Snow peas, parboiled

Shrimp, peeled and sauteed

Sauteed onion strips

Crab, chopped

Seaweed

Salmon roe

Sesame seeds

Carrot, julienned 2013 Asian Fabric 53


preparation Begin preparation by putting the rice on to cook according to package directions. While rice cooks, mix the the sushi rice ingredients and prepare your other ingredients. Start with cooked additions. When rice is finished cooking, allow it to sit for another 5-10 minutes. Transfer rice to a large bowl. The traditional sushi rice bowl is wooden but it is not necessary to run out and buy one. Glass bowls work well. Sprinkle some of the vinegar mixture over the rice. Using a flat wooden spoon, gently stir the rice. Toss it lightly but do not over handle the rice. The rice should glisten. Traditionally, sushi rice is fanned while it is mixed until it has come to room temperature. Try it. Begin to assemble the Chirashi. It is most often prepared and served in a large dish but may be served in individual bowls for a more intimate gathering. For a large dish, put a layer of sushi rice into the serving dish and add your chosen ingredients. Mix and serve. You could garnish with a few colorful items on top. If you are serving a smaller group and preparing individual bowls, some chose to artfully arrange ingredients in sections on top of the rice. The bowls are then mixed by the individual at the table. If you are not fond of seafood, explore other meats or go vegetarian.

Tamagoyaki

ingredients 2 large eggs 1 Tbs sugar 1 tsp mirin Âź tsp salt Âź tsp soy sauce

preparation Gently mix ingredients in a small bowl using a fork. Do not use a whisk. Heat a pan over medium-low heat. Lightly coat the pan with oil. Pour half of the egg mixture into the pan. Turn the heat to low and cook gently. Coax the edges into a uniform shape. Cook the egg until it is just set on the top side. With a spatula, begin at folding and rolling the flat cooked omelette from one side to the other until you have a tube. Set aside and repeat. Tamagoyaki is delicious alone or slice and added to Chirashi.

00 Asian Fabric 2013


Sarubobo Plush

TUTORIAL |

by Mai Fujisawa

mairuru.blogspot.com

materials neede d

Fabric Scraps Polyester Fiberfill Needle & Thread


variation #1 1. This is the basic recipe. Prepare the pattens of 5 cm (@”) diameter circle and 5 x 6 cm (@” x @a”) rectangle for the head and body. Measurement includes a 5 mm (4”) seam allowance for each.

56 Asian Fabric 2013

2. To make the head, sew edge of circle roughly using a basting stitch.


3. Stuff circle with polyester fiberfill and pull thread to make a ball. Stitched closed as shown.

4. To make the body, every corner is a hand or leg. And there should be approximately 1 cm (2�) to turn piece right side out.

5. Take one corner and fold it as shown in photo below. Sew starting at the middle of shorter side to the corner. I started to sew a few millimeters closer to the corner from the middle to make a larger space.

After the four limbs have been sewn it looks like the photo below.

6. Turn unit right side through center opening.

7. Stuff body with polyester fiberfill, stuffing little by little from the corner. Use a hair pin to fill ends of legs and arms.

2013 Asian Fabric 57


8. Hand-stitch opening closed. Body and head are complete.

58 Asian Fabric 2013

9. Sew head to the body. A strip of fabric was used for clothing.


variation #2

Refer to variation 1 to make body and head. Sew head to back of body as shown.

variation #3 1. This pattern is a little larger than variation 1. The circle is 6.5 cm (@s”) diameter, and the rectangle is 6 cm x 7 cm (@” x @d”).

2013 Asian Fabric 59


2. Make head following variation 1 instructions. To make the hat, cut a triangle that measures 5.4 cm (@8”) on short sides, 7.5 cm (#”) on long side and 3.8 cm (!8”) at center as shown in diagram below.

5.

4

3.8 cm

cm

7.5 cm

3. Fold each end to meet at center back placing right side inside as shown in diagram. Stitch point as shown in photo below.

60 Asian Fabric 2013

4. Fold top to meet to sewn point and stitch side as shown. Turn right side out.


5. Place hat on head folding edge under a little and stitch in place.

6. Stitch head to body.

variation #4

1. Make head following variation 3 instructions.

2. This variation uses a different pattern for the body. Draw 6 cm (@2�) square. Draw 2 cm (d�) square on the top middle section to make whole pattern. Cut fabric to size indicated.

2013 Asian Fabric 61


3. Sew each leg following variation 1 instructions leaving the 2 cm (d�) square free of stitches.

Note: If you make the body with a square, you leave the space in the center. In such case, you can make the clothing for it and hide the space. This is the traditional recipe.

4. Sew the two sides of the 2 cm (d�) square to close the space, only one side left.

5. Turn right side out, fill with polyester fiberfill and stitch opening closed. Stitch head to body to complete Sarubobo.

62 Asian Fabric 2013

Enjoy Sarubobo!


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2013 Asian Fabric 63


Takayama, Japan ~ Celebrating Tradition

H

igh in the mountainous section of

and festivals, a trip

the Gifu Prefecture sits picturesque

to Takayama is an

Takayama. The village’s name

unforgettable

expe-

translates to “tall mountain,� an apt moniker

rience to a timeless

for a place that sees more than 200 inches of

place.

snow every winter. As part of the Hida region,

Takayama sits like a jewel in the midst of the

the village is often referred to by the locals and

Japanese Alps. As a result, residents see four

guidebooks as Hida-Takayama, a name that

distinct seasons every year. Fall and spring

distinguishes this village from other places

are short, dry and pleasant. Summer brings

that include the word Takayama.

the rainy season but is nonetheless hot with

In addition to a name that sets it apart from

temperatures soaring to 80 and 90 degrees

other places, Hida-Takayama also differenti-

Fahrenheit. Winter in Takayama is similarly

ates itself through its long and illustrious history. Settled in the late 16th century by the Kanamori clan, which built a castle here, Takayama has flourished and grown ever since. Renowned for its sake breweries, marvelous carpentry,

museums 2013 Asian Fabric 65


66 Asian Fabric 2013


extreme. It is a long season stretching from December’s opening days until April with snowfall a common, everyday occurrence. During this season, snow banks line every street and the town’s well seasoned architecture becomes even more charming when it is draped in snow. Many of Takayama’s structures are historical in nature, little influenced by more modern designs. Much of this preservation of the village’s history is owed to its rather isolated nature. Accordingly, Takayama is the perfect place to catch a glimpse of a peaceful way of life that doesn’t exist in many of Japan’s communities today. Takayama boasts many attractions that highlight the village’s proud history. Foremost among these is the Old Town district.

2013 Asian Fabric 67


Old Town is a beautifully preserved neighbor-

number of sake breweries that are open to the

hood with a majority of structures that date

public. These businesses are identified by balls

from the Edo Period of 1600-1868. At the time,

made of cedar branches, called sugidama, that

Takayama was a wealthy village of merchants

hang at the entrance to each brewery. At most of

that brewed and sold sake and traded in the fine

these establishments, the sake may be sampled

items produced by its carpenters. The southern

before purchasing a bottle to take home.

half of the district runs along Sannomachi

The southern section is also a wonderful place

Street and features sake breweries, historic

to find museums rich with historical artifacts.

homes, shops and coffee houses. Many of the

The Takayama Jinya was a government office

commercial businesses in the area have been in

during the Edo Period. Today, the building is open

operation for centuries. Several historic homes

as a museum that commemorates the village’s

in Old Town’s southern portion have been con-

thriving lumber industry. The Hida Archaeology

verted into fabulous museums showcasing the

Museum is also found on Sannomachi Street

lifestyle of a typical Takayama resident during

along with the Hirata Folk Art Museum. Another

the Edo Period.

institution, known as the Museum of Local

Old Town’s southern section also boasts a

History, describes the village’s long, rich past. 2013 Asian Fabric 69


A closer look

The long history of brewing sake

T

he oldest written records regarding

was the earliest form of religious practice in

sake can be traced far back thousands

Japan and is still practiced by the majority today.

of years into Asian history. From the beginning,

Closely aligned with nature and agriculture, it

rice and water have have been brewed to create

was a common practice for farmers in ancient

sake—an alcohol with a distinctive and pleas-

times to brew sake and offer it to the Shinto gods

ant taste.

along with prepared food items and samplings

Sake is typically transparent with very little

of their harvest.

color. It’s appearance is similar to white wine

Although now enjoyed more casually in

but whereas the alcohol content of white wine

Japan, sake is still the primary drink associated

rarely exceeds 13%, the range for sake is nor-

with traditional customs and special occasions.

mally 10 to 20%.

Sake is one of Takayama’s local specialties. A visit to one of the several breweries located in

Takayama’s

old

town, referred to as kuramoto in Japan, is a must when you visit. Like American wineries, most are open daily and offer tastings. Records

of

sake

brewing at the Hirase A look back in history shows that sake played

brewery can be traced back to 1623. Although

an important role in spiritual rituals. Shintoism

not as old, the remaining kuramoto have been

70 Asian Fabric 2013


perfecting their craft for centuries, all having opened pre-1900. The Harada kuramoto offers a brewery tour and sells their local sake cheesecake and jelly. Join Douglas Eagleson in the April issue of Asian Fabric. He'll be sharing about his visit to the Sake One brewery in Forest Grove, Oregon. Only a handful of sake breweries exist in the United States. Don't miss it!

2013 Asian Fabric 71


Old Town’s northern section is where Hachiman

This incredibly intricate headgear is one of the

Shrine is found. Next door is the Yatai Kaikan

festival’s most beautiful sights. Each festival

where Takayama’s festival floats are on display.

lasts just two days, with the night between the

This is also the place to find the Shishi Kaikan,

two days providing a particularly lovely chance

or Lion Dance Ceremony Exhibition Hall, where

to see the floats lit up with hundreds of colored

visitors can view lion masks and the mechanical

paper lanterns.

dolls that are mounted on the floats twice a year.

Takayama is flooded with visitors whenever

Visiting the lion dance and festival float exhibi-

the spring and fall festivals draw near. This can

tions are a convenient substitute for visitors who

make it tricky to reserve accommodations while

don’t happen to attend at least one of the village’s

also making it difficult to appreciate Takayama’s

two important festivals. In the spring, locals

other delights like the Hida Folk Village. This

celebrate the Sanno Matsuri while Hachiman Matsuri is observed in the fall. Both festivals involve elaborate parades that feature floats and dragon dancers. Aboard the floats are various mechanical marionettes that create a colorful and engaging spectacle. Another popular sight on the parade route is the group of people sporting over-the-top hats featuring bird feathers. 2013 Asian Fabric 73


open air museum is the most visited spot in

Both markets are held in prominent spots in

Takayama. Approximately 30 old houses are on

Takayama, making them easy to find and a plea-

display here, featuring the traditional architec-

sure to browse. Carpenters and makers of lacquer

tural style of the region. Most of the buildings

ware all display their goods. The markets also

on the site had to be transported here from their

feature stalls where sarubobos are sold. These

original locations. The goal of the museum direc-

charms are closely associated with Takayama.

tors was to preserve a sample of the traditional

Traditionally, they were passed down maternal

lifestyle among the Japanese Alps and they have

lines from mother to daughter. This tradition is

succeeded admirably.

still observed, but visitors may also purchase a

The farmhouses that make up the folk village

charm in the markets. Pottery is also a common-

range in age from 100 to 500 years. Most are open

ly spotted product in the markets. These beauti-

for visitors to walk through, and each home is

ful pieces are crafted by local artisans using the

filled with fascinating artifacts from a bygone

same techniques that were first developed cen-

era. Of particular interest are the silkworm

turies ago.

growing displays, the clothing and the kitchen utensils. A stop at the village workshop is the perfect opportunity to observe artisans creating traditional crafts that are specialties of the region around Takayama. Wood carving, weaving and lacquer work are all prominently featured. Two markets operate throughout the year in Takayama. Each one represents an excellent opportunity to peruse local produce and to pick up some lovely souvenirs made by local craftspeople.

Takayama is a delightful place to enjoy a meal. Many of the restaurants feature dishes that can be found throughout Japan. Nonetheless, Takayama is recognized for certain local specialties that 2013 Asian Fabric 75


probably won’t be found elsewhere. Sansai, which

Though the village is concealed in a veritable

are mountain vegetables, are a particular favor-

mountain hideaway, most visitors are able to

ite. In addition to being health conscious, these

tour the area entirely on foot. Takayama is an

dishes are particularly tasty. They pair quite well

eminently walkable destination, with just a few

with the local wasakana, or river fish. The fish

attractions that might require transportation.

are rich in flavor and high in nutrients. In addi-

Not needing to rely upon cars to get everywhere

tion, they were probably just brought in from the

simply reinforces the old world feeling that is at

river in the morning, making this a singularly

the heart of Takayama. For a singularly memo-

fresh feast. Hida beef is also a predominant spe-

rable experience, many visitors choose to go by

cialty as are soba and ramen. Diners should be

rickshaw. These wheeled conveyances are drawn

prepared to be offered sake with every meal. Sake

by a runner on foot and typically accommodate

brewing is so much a part of life in Takayama

one or two passengers. From the seat of a tradi-

that many locals enjoy it on a regular basis.

tional rickshaw, Takayama is seen at its pictur-

One of the most wonderful things about visiting Takayama is the ease of exploring the area.

76 Asian Fabric 2013

esque best. In many ways, it is a place that is untouched by time. â–Ş


2013 Asian Fabric 00


general instructions

How-to Help You! Before You Begin We recommend washing and pressing your fabric prior to cutting it into strips and pieces. To help prevent fabric from fraying in the washer, clip corners at a 45 degree angle removing a small triangle piece.

Achieving a Perfect Block Accurate Seam Allowance Use 4”-wide seam allowance for all projects in this magazine unless otherwise stated. If seam allowances differ as little as z” assembling blocks will be difficult, especially when incorporating several block designs in a quilt. To check your seam allowances follow these steps.

Half Square Triangles

without breaking threads, continue this process to stitch additional units. Cut sections apart, press and continue with next step.

Fussy Cut This process is the selection and cutting of a particular motif pattern which is featured in a cut piece. Remember to center design and always allow for seam allowance.

Simple Triangles This is an easy way to make triangles from squares.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of fabric square that will become the triangle. This will be your stitch line.

Step 1 Cut three 12” x 6” pieces of fabric from assorted scraps. Sew pieces together to make one 32” x 6” piece. Press.

Step 2 Center strip should measure 1” x 6”. If piece measures differently check to see if seams have been pressed flat. If the piece still differs cut new strips and adjust seam allowance until you achieve the perfect stitch.

Pressing Press using steam or dry heat setting. Always use an “up and down” motion since a side-to-side motion can distort the block or unit.

Assembly Line Method Use this method when making multiple pieces or blocks.

Step 2 Place marked square on fabric piece shown in construction step matching raw edges. Sew on drawn line and trim 4” away from stitching.

Fabric A- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric B- 2 2" x 6 2"

Step 3 Press seams as indicated in construction diagram. Measure sewn piece to check accuracy.

Tip: There is a waste factor with this technique but you can stitch an additional 2” away from stitch line. Cut piece between stitching saving the smaller version for some future project. Diagram 3

Step 1

Position pieces right sides together, stitch unit.

Step 2 Align and sew the next unit

78

ASIAN FABRIC 2013

This technique differs from the Simple Triangle method; you will be making two triangles at one time.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one fabric square. Place marked square and one corresponding square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press.

Fabric F- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric D- 2 2" x 2 2"

Square to 2” Make 2

Step 2 Measure unit and trim as indicated in construction diagram.

Applique Technique Quick Fused Method This method joins fabric to each other with the use of fusible web. There are many types on the market and you will need to refer to manufacturer’s instruction for specific requirements. If quilt does not require laundering you can use heavy-weight fusible web and follow steps 1-4. If your quilt will require laundering use lightweight fusible web and follow all steps. Remember that appliqués when pressed to background fabric will be a reverse image from patterns provided.

Step 1 Trace all appliqué pieces on the paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from traced line.

Step 2 With fusible web paper side up, fuse to the wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 3 Cut on draw line. Remove future project

paper backing, a thin film of adhesive will remain on fabric.


General Instructions

Step 4 Referring to project photo, position and fuse all pieces of one appliqué design at a time onto background.

Tip: An Appliqué Pressing Sheet is very helpful when there are many elements to a design. Place your pattern (reverse image from pattern provided) under the pressing sheet as a guide. Arrange pieces on sheet and press following manufacturer’s instructions. Allow piece to cool, remove appliqué unit and arrange on background to fuse unit in place. If the piece is not cooled, the fusible web could remain on the sheet instead of the fabric.

Step 5 If using a machine, cut a piece of stabilizer larger than appliqué area and pin to wrong side of fabric. Stabilizer is used to achieve an even stitch. Using a satin stitch, blanket stitch or other decorative stitching to secure appliqué in place. Start stitching from the background to the foreground. Option: use a hand embroidery stitch instead.

Hand Appliqué If project specifies quick-fuse you will need to reverse all patterns and add 4”- wide seam allowance. The steps that follow will add the seam allowance after pattern is traced onto fabric.

Step 1 Make a template of all pattern pieces and indicate where pieces overlap. Place template on right side of selected fabric.

Step 2 Trace around template using a removable fabric marker. This will be your turn under guide. Cut out shapes approximately 4” beyond traced line. Step 3 When layering and positioning pieces always work from the background to the foreground.

Step 4 Enter from the wrong side of applique shape bringing the needle up on the traced line. Using the tip of the

needle turn under a small portion of the fabric along trace line and secure with thumb. Using a blind stitch, stitch along folded edge to join piece to background. Stitch is hidden under fabric.

Option 1 Step 1 Position binding away from corner leaving 8” free of stitches and aligning raw edges with the edge of the quilt. Sew using a 4”-wide seam.

Step 2 Stop sewing 4” from quilt top

Blind Stitch

Finishing the Quilt

edge and backstitch. Clip threads and turn quilt. Fold binding up at a 45 degree angle to create the mitered corner as shown.

Diagram 1

Backing fabric and batting should be 4”-8” larger than the quilt top. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads from quilt prior to basting.

Step 1 Lay backing right side down, batting and quilt top (right side up) on top.

Step 2 Backing and batting need to

Step 3 Fold the binding back down aligning top fold with edge of quilt and matching raw edges. Start stitching 4” Diagram 2 for all corners. from quilt edge. Repeat

be taut prior to basting quilt. Start in the center and work out toward edges. You can hand stitch, pin or use a specialty tool to baste quilt together.

Step 3 Check batting instruction for quilting requirements. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Remove basting.

Binding the Quilt Two options are given for binding the quilt. For both options trim batting and backing 4” beyond raw edge of quilt, this will give fullness to the binding. Sew binding stripes end-to-end to make one continuous strip. Fold and press binding strips in half lengthwise with wrong sides together. To reduce bulk when joining strips, cut ends at 450 angle and sew together as shown.

Step 4 Determine length needed for binding strip ends, trim and sew ends together. Stitch binding to quilt. Fold binding to back of quilt, a diagonal fold will form at the corners. Hand-stitch binding to back of quilt.

Option 2 Step 1 Measure quilt through center from side to side. Cut two binding strips to this measurement. Sew to top and bottom of quilt matching raw edges with edge of quilt. Press binding away from quilt top.

Step 2 Measure quilt through center from top to bottom including the binding just added. Cut two strips to this measurement and sew to sides of quilt. Press.

Step 3 Fold top and bottom strips to the back and pin in place. Repeat for sides. Hand-stitch binding to quilt. 2013 ASIAN FABRIC 79


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