Page 1


16

villa mayavee

17

is a 1,100 sq.m., four-bedroom seaside residence in Phuket commissioned by Gabriel Cordona and Paitoon Arunrat, who also acted as interior designers. Completed in 2010, the architecture and landscaping were designed by Tierra Design (Thailand), with structural engineering by Warnes Associates and system engineering by Ove Arup (Thailand).

Photography by Chonnasit Sundaranu (18-19, 24, 26, 27 below, 29 above, 30-32, 34-35) | 4 season (20, 25, 27 above, 28, 29 below, 33)

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 16-17

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


16

villa mayavee

17

is a 1,100 sq.m., four-bedroom seaside residence in Phuket commissioned by Gabriel Cordona and Paitoon Arunrat, who also acted as interior designers. Completed in 2010, the architecture and landscaping were designed by Tierra Design (Thailand), with structural engineering by Warnes Associates and system engineering by Ove Arup (Thailand).

Photography by Chonnasit Sundaranu (18-19, 24, 26, 27 below, 29 above, 30-32, 34-35) | 4 season (20, 25, 27 above, 28, 29 below, 33)

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 16-17

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


18

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 18-19

19

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


18

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 18-19

19

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


N

20

This villa on a rocky perch on Waterfall Bay along Millionnaire’s Mile in Phuket must reconcile two diverging requirements: on the one hand it is a highly social place for entertaining guests, on the other it must provide a secluded getaway for the clients, who are a couple of young retirees. The brief was resolved through the use of a stretched z-shaped plan, separating the owner and guest quarters by placing them in the two outer wings, which are then bridged by a suspended glass volume containing the living and dining areas. The forceful expression of the open-plan glass volume oriented toward the Andaman Sea recalls the Modernist glass houses of Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson, which were also set within beautiful landscapes, using the large areas of glazing to blur the boundary between the interior and the natural surroundings. Villa Mayavee goes one step further by enclosing the space with sliding glass doors, which can be opened to allow for an even closer integration with nature as well as crossventilation, making full use of its location on the mountainside to catch the sea breeze. The approach to the living and dining area, which is also the

main entry into the house, is via a glass-ensconced spiral staircase resting on a stone walkway above a reflecting pond overlooking the sea. Together, they fulfill another, more tacit, demand for a home that would impress. The separation of the wings from the central volume is further reinforced by the insertion of openair terraces at the threshold areas, emphasizing the transition between public and private areas. Such spatial arrangement resembles that of the traditional Thai compound, where a group of separate pavilions, each with a different function, are arranged on a raised deck. The characters of the two self-contained sleeping quarters form a counterpoint to each other. The two-story guest wing, which needed to function as “a private house within a house,” was intentionally denied of panoramic sea views, instead it is oriented toward the surrounding greenery. It makes use of another beautiful natural feature that may get overlooked on an oceanfront site: the tropical forest. The master wing, on the other hand, is totally open to the ocean, with vast panoramas. Its roof deck, in particular, provides an immersion in both sea and sky.

21

While the exterior of the bedroom suite on the top floor is clad in teak, the rest of the three-story master wing is rendered in dark limestone and, as it is adjacent to the swimming pool, it provides a sense of enclosure and privacy for the pool and deck area. Tierra Design was established by Argentinian architect Martin Palleros in Singapore in 1992, and today operates out of offices in Bangkok and Western Australia. Palleros has an educational background in landscape design, and it remains one of the great strengths of the practice. In this project, it is seen in the way the landscaping embraces the building; part of the mountainside hugs the building on the north side, providing support for meandering limestone steps that lead from the living area down to the pool, turning a functional circulation route into an experiential journey. Trees form part of the framing of ocean views and lush vegetation encircles the villa. Most of the interior design was executed by the clients, who are design enthusiasts. They are extremely proud of their home, and in this sense, the design lives up to its name Mayavee, meaning “my life.”

layout

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 20-21

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


N

20

This villa on a rocky perch on Waterfall Bay along Millionnaire’s Mile in Phuket must reconcile two diverging requirements: on the one hand it is a highly social place for entertaining guests, on the other it must provide a secluded getaway for the clients, who are a couple of young retirees. The brief was resolved through the use of a stretched z-shaped plan, separating the owner and guest quarters by placing them in the two outer wings, which are then bridged by a suspended glass volume containing the living and dining areas. The forceful expression of the open-plan glass volume oriented toward the Andaman Sea recalls the Modernist glass houses of Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson, which were also set within beautiful landscapes, using the large areas of glazing to blur the boundary between the interior and the natural surroundings. Villa Mayavee goes one step further by enclosing the space with sliding glass doors, which can be opened to allow for an even closer integration with nature as well as crossventilation, making full use of its location on the mountainside to catch the sea breeze. The approach to the living and dining area, which is also the

main entry into the house, is via a glass-ensconced spiral staircase resting on a stone walkway above a reflecting pond overlooking the sea. Together, they fulfill another, more tacit, demand for a home that would impress. The separation of the wings from the central volume is further reinforced by the insertion of openair terraces at the threshold areas, emphasizing the transition between public and private areas. Such spatial arrangement resembles that of the traditional Thai compound, where a group of separate pavilions, each with a different function, are arranged on a raised deck. The characters of the two self-contained sleeping quarters form a counterpoint to each other. The two-story guest wing, which needed to function as “a private house within a house,” was intentionally denied of panoramic sea views, instead it is oriented toward the surrounding greenery. It makes use of another beautiful natural feature that may get overlooked on an oceanfront site: the tropical forest. The master wing, on the other hand, is totally open to the ocean, with vast panoramas. Its roof deck, in particular, provides an immersion in both sea and sky.

21

While the exterior of the bedroom suite on the top floor is clad in teak, the rest of the three-story master wing is rendered in dark limestone and, as it is adjacent to the swimming pool, it provides a sense of enclosure and privacy for the pool and deck area. Tierra Design was established by Argentinian architect Martin Palleros in Singapore in 1992, and today operates out of offices in Bangkok and Western Australia. Palleros has an educational background in landscape design, and it remains one of the great strengths of the practice. In this project, it is seen in the way the landscaping embraces the building; part of the mountainside hugs the building on the north side, providing support for meandering limestone steps that lead from the living area down to the pool, turning a functional circulation route into an experiential journey. Trees form part of the framing of ocean views and lush vegetation encircles the villa. Most of the interior design was executed by the clients, who are design enthusiasts. They are extremely proud of their home, and in this sense, the design lives up to its name Mayavee, meaning “my life.”

layout

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 20-21

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


spiral stairs at entrance 24

25 master wing

section

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 24-25

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


spiral stairs at entrance 24

25 master wing

section

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 24-25

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


master bedroom

guest bathroom in the guest wing

32

33 kitchen 2

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 32-33

lounge 2

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


master bedroom

guest bathroom in the guest wing

32

33 kitchen 2

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 32-33

lounge 2

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


34

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 34-35

35

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


34

16-35_villa mayavee_03.indd 34-35

35

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


36

the serenity house

37

is a 1,500 sq.m., four-bedroom holiday house in Phuket commissioned by Anthony and Anna Wilkinson. Completed in 2010, the architecture and interior were designed by Duangrit Bunnag Architect (DBALP). With structural and system engineering by EMS Consultant and lighting design by APLD.

Photography by Wison Tungthunya

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 36-37

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


36

the serenity house

37

is a 1,500 sq.m., four-bedroom holiday house in Phuket commissioned by Anthony and Anna Wilkinson. Completed in 2010, the architecture and interior were designed by Duangrit Bunnag Architect (DBALP). With structural and system engineering by EMS Consultant and lighting design by APLD.

Photography by Wison Tungthunya

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 36-37

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


38

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 38-39

39

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


38

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 38-39

39

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


40

41

N initial nine diagrams generated from the site analysis

If the word “serenity” were to be translated into wood and stone, this house might offer a pretty close approximation. Horizontal lines dominate, both in plan and elevation, colors are carefully controlled to conform to a light, warm palette, and any decoration is kept to a bare minimum. What it offers otherwise is plenty of natural scenery and a varied spatial experience. Serenity is an apt word because while there is not a soft corner in this unapologetically modernist design, the attentive placement of natural elements and the choice of materials together with the spatial layout add up to an atmosphere of quiet repose. The plot of land for this four-bedroom holiday home lies on a verdant mountainside that looks out over the sea and is defined by a steep incline and a height limit and setback imposed by planning restrictions set out by the housing estate developer.

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 40-41

By taking the slope analysis as the point of departure for the concept, Duangrit Bunnag Architect generated nine possible volume configurations, selecting the one that best satisfied the programmatic requirements. This was finally formulated into a building with three levels that slotted into the landscape, with the entrance positioned on the topmost story. On the side facing the slope, double-story voids have been carved out to create a private, enclosed courtyard and a fish pond, allowing for natural light, ventilation and prospects at every corner of the house. Lodging the volume onto the slope resulted in a staggered massing, which is reflected in the interior spaces. The architect has developed a layout that played this feature to its advantage, by placing the multimedia room next to the study room, with the first being higher and enclosed and the latter opening

up to the ocean view at a lower level, nevertheless they are connected together through a small gap, which helps to enhance the sense of spatial flow. Having so many levels also created the possibility of delineating different zones for the bedrooms, which are separated not only by horizontal distance but also vertically, giving them the impression of being private enclaves that should prove especially useful when there are guests around. The brief from the client requested panoramic views and integration with nature, with the first requirement satisfied by full-height glass sliding doors that line the façade on the side overlooking the sea. The glazing also acts as a frame for the natural surroundings, from the vast seascape to particular trees to the various bodies of water that surround the house, such as the fish pond, the fountain and

the “waterfall.” Nature is further reinforced in a more tactile way through the selection of materials, which sought to reflect the beauty of natural textures. Another carefully considered aspect is the spatial sequence. The arrival into the house is like a ceremonial proceeding as one first faces a large, open courtyard from which the entry into the house is through an oversized wooden door, behind which the space abruptly shrinks into a narrow, top-lit corridor. After a few steps, one is thrust out into the open air again at the “entrance bridge,” which has a one-story drop on either side – overlooking the fountain and waterfall to one side and fish pond on the other – and where for the first time, the azure of the sea can be glimpsed through the living room. And this is the kind of impression that leaves a mark in one's memories.

the diagrams are whittled down to three, with the final one highlighted

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


40

41

N initial nine diagrams generated from the site analysis

If the word “serenity” were to be translated into wood and stone, this house might offer a pretty close approximation. Horizontal lines dominate, both in plan and elevation, colors are carefully controlled to conform to a light, warm palette, and any decoration is kept to a bare minimum. What it offers otherwise is plenty of natural scenery and a varied spatial experience. Serenity is an apt word because while there is not a soft corner in this unapologetically modernist design, the attentive placement of natural elements and the choice of materials together with the spatial layout add up to an atmosphere of quiet repose. The plot of land for this four-bedroom holiday home lies on a verdant mountainside that looks out over the sea and is defined by a steep incline and a height limit and setback imposed by planning restrictions set out by the housing estate developer.

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 40-41

By taking the slope analysis as the point of departure for the concept, Duangrit Bunnag Architect generated nine possible volume configurations, selecting the one that best satisfied the programmatic requirements. This was finally formulated into a building with three levels that slotted into the landscape, with the entrance positioned on the topmost story. On the side facing the slope, double-story voids have been carved out to create a private, enclosed courtyard and a fish pond, allowing for natural light, ventilation and prospects at every corner of the house. Lodging the volume onto the slope resulted in a staggered massing, which is reflected in the interior spaces. The architect has developed a layout that played this feature to its advantage, by placing the multimedia room next to the study room, with the first being higher and enclosed and the latter opening

up to the ocean view at a lower level, nevertheless they are connected together through a small gap, which helps to enhance the sense of spatial flow. Having so many levels also created the possibility of delineating different zones for the bedrooms, which are separated not only by horizontal distance but also vertically, giving them the impression of being private enclaves that should prove especially useful when there are guests around. The brief from the client requested panoramic views and integration with nature, with the first requirement satisfied by full-height glass sliding doors that line the façade on the side overlooking the sea. The glazing also acts as a frame for the natural surroundings, from the vast seascape to particular trees to the various bodies of water that surround the house, such as the fish pond, the fountain and

the “waterfall.” Nature is further reinforced in a more tactile way through the selection of materials, which sought to reflect the beauty of natural textures. Another carefully considered aspect is the spatial sequence. The arrival into the house is like a ceremonial proceeding as one first faces a large, open courtyard from which the entry into the house is through an oversized wooden door, behind which the space abruptly shrinks into a narrow, top-lit corridor. After a few steps, one is thrust out into the open air again at the “entrance bridge,” which has a one-story drop on either side – overlooking the fountain and waterfall to one side and fish pond on the other – and where for the first time, the azure of the sea can be glimpsed through the living room. And this is the kind of impression that leaves a mark in one's memories.

the diagrams are whittled down to three, with the final one highlighted

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


an ashen limestone floor complements the combination of wooden furniture and white space

the multimedia space requires less natural lighting. it is therefore located next to the study room where the light is needed

52

53 the wooden stairs without any handrails strike the visitor unexpectedly as they walk down to the multimedia room the natural lighting from the ceiling enhances the simple stairs

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 52-53

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


an ashen limestone floor complements the combination of wooden furniture and white space

the multimedia space requires less natural lighting. it is therefore located next to the study room where the light is needed

52

53 the wooden stairs without any handrails strike the visitor unexpectedly as they walk down to the multimedia room the natural lighting from the ceiling enhances the simple stairs

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 52-53

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


56

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 56-57

57

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


56

36-57_serenity house_03.indd 56-57

57

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


58

lenz residence

59

is a 790 sq.m., five-bedroom villa in Phuket commissioned by Christopher Lenz. Completed in 2014, the architecture, interior and landscaping were designed by SODA (Thailand), with structural engineering by Warnes Associates.

Photography by Ketsiree Wongwan (60-69, 72-74, 75 above, 76-77) | Chitsanupong Ploythanachot (70-71, 75)

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 58-59

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


58

lenz residence

59

is a 790 sq.m., five-bedroom villa in Phuket commissioned by Christopher Lenz. Completed in 2014, the architecture, interior and landscaping were designed by SODA (Thailand), with structural engineering by Warnes Associates.

Photography by Ketsiree Wongwan (60-69, 72-74, 75 above, 76-77) | Chitsanupong Ploythanachot (70-71, 75)

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 58-59

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


60

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 60-61

61

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


60

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 60-61

61

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


62

Resting on a site of flat terrain in central Phuket, this residence has a highly distinctive triangulated form composed of two folded planes, equal in ratio in reference to the two main natural elements, that of the earth and lake. The angular form also reflects those of the mountains in the distance. The site itself has an irregular-shaped boundary, which abuts an inland lake on one side, where the design makes use of an infinity-edged swimming pool to effect a seamless transition between architecture and landscape. The structure was fabricated from 150 tons of steel to form four trusses that touch the ground at four points only. The plan is essentially H-shaped, with four triangulated courtyards at the perimeter. A long corridor space marks the boundary where the two volumes meet, with all the rooms branching off from this central circulation route. The wall along the corridor is conceived as a boxed framework clad in timber slats, generating a partition that feels at once solid and porous. The primary living space and bedrooms are located at the corners and appear as projected over the water’s edge or buried within the earth. All internal rooms can open out onto either gardens or the pool terrace. Small flights of stairs interspersed throughout the villa resolve the different height levels as the building gradually descends towards the pool area.

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 62-63

Due to the thrusting form, the building contains two small mezzanine areas housing bedrooms with the ceiling heights in some parts of the villa being higher than normal, resulting in light and airy internal spaces. The living and dining room, in particular, is almost wholly glazed, with sliding and pivoting glass doors that open the space up onto the swimming pool terrace, allowing for a semi-outdoor living style suitable to the tropical climate. The extensive use of glass allows both unimpeded views as well as a large amount of natural light to penetrate into the interior. However, the doors and windows are double glazed, and together with large overhangs and external louvers, they help to shade against unwanted heat gain from direct sunlight. The angular geometry of the roofs engenders dramatic interior spaces, including triangular and asymmetrical window frames and walls. The interior is trimmed in teak paneling and granite stone, while the exterior is clad in kiln fired cement shakes. Lenz Residence has an expressly contemporary form, in line with the design statement of SODA, directed by American-born architect Stephen O’Dell, nevertheless the design has been generated from its context, responding specifically to the landscape and providing spaces that satisfy the lifestyle of its occupants and climate.

63

N

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


62

Resting on a site of flat terrain in central Phuket, this residence has a highly distinctive triangulated form composed of two folded planes, equal in ratio in reference to the two main natural elements, that of the earth and lake. The angular form also reflects those of the mountains in the distance. The site itself has an irregular-shaped boundary, which abuts an inland lake on one side, where the design makes use of an infinity-edged swimming pool to effect a seamless transition between architecture and landscape. The structure was fabricated from 150 tons of steel to form four trusses that touch the ground at four points only. The plan is essentially H-shaped, with four triangulated courtyards at the perimeter. A long corridor space marks the boundary where the two volumes meet, with all the rooms branching off from this central circulation route. The wall along the corridor is conceived as a boxed framework clad in timber slats, generating a partition that feels at once solid and porous. The primary living space and bedrooms are located at the corners and appear as projected over the water’s edge or buried within the earth. All internal rooms can open out onto either gardens or the pool terrace. Small flights of stairs interspersed throughout the villa resolve the different height levels as the building gradually descends towards the pool area.

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 62-63

Due to the thrusting form, the building contains two small mezzanine areas housing bedrooms with the ceiling heights in some parts of the villa being higher than normal, resulting in light and airy internal spaces. The living and dining room, in particular, is almost wholly glazed, with sliding and pivoting glass doors that open the space up onto the swimming pool terrace, allowing for a semi-outdoor living style suitable to the tropical climate. The extensive use of glass allows both unimpeded views as well as a large amount of natural light to penetrate into the interior. However, the doors and windows are double glazed, and together with large overhangs and external louvers, they help to shade against unwanted heat gain from direct sunlight. The angular geometry of the roofs engenders dramatic interior spaces, including triangular and asymmetrical window frames and walls. The interior is trimmed in teak paneling and granite stone, while the exterior is clad in kiln fired cement shakes. Lenz Residence has an expressly contemporary form, in line with the design statement of SODA, directed by American-born architect Stephen O’Dell, nevertheless the design has been generated from its context, responding specifically to the landscape and providing spaces that satisfy the lifestyle of its occupants and climate.

63

N

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


large pivoting doors can be opened to merge the living space with the pool terrace kitchen

the infinityedged swimming pool creates a visual continuity between architecture and lake

74

75 wine cellar master bedroom and bathroom with uninhibited views of the lake

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 74-75

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


large pivoting doors can be opened to merge the living space with the pool terrace kitchen

the infinityedged swimming pool creates a visual continuity between architecture and lake

74

75 wine cellar master bedroom and bathroom with uninhibited views of the lake

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 74-75

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


76

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 76-77

77

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


76

58-77_lenz residence_03.indd 76-77

77

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


78

celadon

79

is a 975 sq.m., four-bedroom holiday residence on Koh Samui in Surat Thani commissioned by Leo and Camilla Riviere. Completed in 2012, the architecture, interior and landscaping were designed by Gfab, with structural and system engineering by PJC Wood.

Photography by Sebastian Therre – Toyko

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 78-79

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


78

celadon

79

is a 975 sq.m., four-bedroom holiday residence on Koh Samui in Surat Thani commissioned by Leo and Camilla Riviere. Completed in 2012, the architecture, interior and landscaping were designed by Gfab, with structural and system engineering by PJC Wood.

Photography by Sebastian Therre – Toyko

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 78-79

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


80

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 80-81

81

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


80

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 80-81

81

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


Faced with a steep sloping hillside on the west coast of Koh Samui, British architect Gary Fell, principal of Bali-based architectural practice Gfab, wanted to create a house that would appear as part of the natural landscape. To achieve this, the building volume carefully follows the contours of the site. The angular plan, green and pebbled roofs, vibrant 82 stone walls and abundant insertion of vegetation and water elements within the design come together to create a whole that feels organic and attuned with its natural surroundings. Celadon offers two quite distinct characteristics. For the third floor, which is the entry level, it is a single open-plan area embraced by water with an unhindered panoramic sweep of the ocean and islands beyond. The free flowing spaces facilitate natural ventilation even as the pool and reflecting pond placed on the perimeter help to cool the villa. The space is also brightly lit by plenty of natural light, not only from the sides of the villa that open out to the sea, but also from skylights and an opening in the main roof, which is made of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) and has timber louvers beneath it to evenly distribute the light. The second and first floors are much more enclosed, though every bedroom is encased in sliding glass doors and has its own semi-outdoor terrace. While all the bedrooms face out to the sea, they are also surrounded by trees and vegetation. Thus while the third floor

focuses on water, the rest of the house takes in the surrounding greenery as well. Equally, the separation between public and private areas parallels the aforementioned divide. The public areas, including the living, dining and swimming pool, are clustered together on the third floor. While rooms that need to be able to be closed off, such as bedrooms, study and AV room, are arranged over the first and second floors. Curtains are employed as space dividers and temporary screens of privacy. The house itself is set lower than the road level, which means that only the roof is visible to passersby. For holiday homes overlooking the sea, views are one of the highest prerogatives. The design intention is therefore for the architecture to act as a framing device, such that the interior decoration is kept to a minimum and the color palette is highly subdued. Having the building at an angle to the hillside also allows for an infinity pool that wraps around the corner, further heightening its effect. Within the villa itself, having the third floor at an angle to the second enables a visual connection between the two. Local common materials have been employed throughout, such as sandwashed floors, polished cement and painted plaster, while the stone excavated during construction was recycled for use as part of the cladding.

83

N

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 82-83

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


Faced with a steep sloping hillside on the west coast of Koh Samui, British architect Gary Fell, principal of Bali-based architectural practice Gfab, wanted to create a house that would appear as part of the natural landscape. To achieve this, the building volume carefully follows the contours of the site. The angular plan, green and pebbled roofs, vibrant 82 stone walls and abundant insertion of vegetation and water elements within the design come together to create a whole that feels organic and attuned with its natural surroundings. Celadon offers two quite distinct characteristics. For the third floor, which is the entry level, it is a single open-plan area embraced by water with an unhindered panoramic sweep of the ocean and islands beyond. The free flowing spaces facilitate natural ventilation even as the pool and reflecting pond placed on the perimeter help to cool the villa. The space is also brightly lit by plenty of natural light, not only from the sides of the villa that open out to the sea, but also from skylights and an opening in the main roof, which is made of PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) and has timber louvers beneath it to evenly distribute the light. The second and first floors are much more enclosed, though every bedroom is encased in sliding glass doors and has its own semi-outdoor terrace. While all the bedrooms face out to the sea, they are also surrounded by trees and vegetation. Thus while the third floor

focuses on water, the rest of the house takes in the surrounding greenery as well. Equally, the separation between public and private areas parallels the aforementioned divide. The public areas, including the living, dining and swimming pool, are clustered together on the third floor. While rooms that need to be able to be closed off, such as bedrooms, study and AV room, are arranged over the first and second floors. Curtains are employed as space dividers and temporary screens of privacy. The house itself is set lower than the road level, which means that only the roof is visible to passersby. For holiday homes overlooking the sea, views are one of the highest prerogatives. The design intention is therefore for the architecture to act as a framing device, such that the interior decoration is kept to a minimum and the color palette is highly subdued. Having the building at an angle to the hillside also allows for an infinity pool that wraps around the corner, further heightening its effect. Within the villa itself, having the third floor at an angle to the second enables a visual connection between the two. Local common materials have been employed throughout, such as sandwashed floors, polished cement and painted plaster, while the stone excavated during construction was recycled for use as part of the cladding.

83

N

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 82-83

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:59 PM


the stone excavated from the site during construction is recycled for use as part of the design sunken area surrounded by water 90

91 at the entrance, residents land in a light-filled space facing water, sky and greenery

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 90-91

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


the stone excavated from the site during construction is recycled for use as part of the design sunken area surrounded by water 90

91 at the entrance, residents land in a light-filled space facing water, sky and greenery

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 90-91

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


98

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 98-99

99

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


98

78-99_celadonindd_03.indd 98-99

99

11/20/57 BE 12:00 AM


100

dama zamya

101

is a 960 sq.m., four-bedroom residence in Phuket commissioned by Gary Dublanko and Dea Zoffman. Completed in 2010, the architecture was designed by John Bulcock of Design Unit, with interior design by John Bulcock, Gary Dublanko and Dea Zoffman.

Photography by Gary Dublanko

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 100-101

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


100

dama zamya

101

is a 960 sq.m., four-bedroom residence in Phuket commissioned by Gary Dublanko and Dea Zoffman. Completed in 2010, the architecture was designed by John Bulcock of Design Unit, with interior design by John Bulcock, Gary Dublanko and Dea Zoffman.

Photography by Gary Dublanko

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 100-101

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


102

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 102-103

103

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


102

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 102-103

103

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


The clients, wildlife and travel photographer Gary Dublanko and his wife Dea Zoffman, had some pretty clear ideas about the requirements for their house and sustainability, in particular, was high up on the agenda. The brief called for a building that was of an open plan, merging indoor and outdoor spaces while being energy sufficient and low on maintenance, letting in plenty of natural light and natural ventilation and having a minimal impact on the landscape. The man for the job was found in British architect John Bulcock of Malaysia-based practice Design Unit, he is recognized for projects that incorporate sustainable and passive design elements and has extensive experience designing in a tropical climate. Certain key elements within this project such as off form concrete and bamboo screens are familiar features within Bulcock’s repertoire. The site covers 3,200 sq.m. on a sloping terrain,

with a drop of 21 meters. Situated on the eastern side of Phuket overlooking Phang Nga Bay to the northeast and bordering Khao Phra Thaeo National Park, it is secluded and remote enough not to be connected to the water main or the sewerage. Their provision was therefore integral to the design, rainwater is harvested and stored in an underground concrete tank, providing up to 8 months’ supply, while a 72-meter well accommodates the rest of the year. All waste water is treated by a septic tank system on site. Local materials predominate, hardwood was taken from a nearby 40-year-old house and recycled for use as flooring, pool deck and doors, while screens of whole bamboo poles provide privacy and security. The principal material, béton brut, is used throughout the house for walls, columns and ceiling, being both expressive as well as easy to maintain.

Passive systems are crucial to sustainable design and dama zAmya incorporates many passive cooling techniques starting with the orientation of the building itself. Aligned on the west-east axis, the design minimizes the façade area in reception of direct sunlight while the integrated landscaping shades the building and acts as a buffer zone. Pockets of greenery inside the house afford a pleasant atmosphere, both physically and visually. And even though there is a lot of glazing, large overhangs compensate by shading against direct sunlight and green and pebbled roofs ensure that the house is well-insulated from above too. The amount of open-air area in this house is also unique, only certain rooms such as the bedrooms and kitchen can be entirely closed off. Elsewhere, such as the living room and even the master bathroom, the interior spaces are open to the outside to various degrees, but the main entrance corridor, in particular,

is wholly open on the east side. This, together with extensive use of glass louvers, greatly facilitates air flow throughout the entire building, while the one-room-deep floor plan enables effective crossventilation and daylight penetration. Beside all its green credentials, the house also presents distinctive spatial experiences. The green roofs double up as elevated grass lawns for entertaining in front of panoramic views. The glazing and screens of bamboo poles afford levels of transparency between the different spaces and volumes to create a layering of space, as well as connecting the indoor and outdoor visually. The open plan, inner courtyards, large overhangs and the abundant provision of terraces and balconies all help to merge the indoor and outdoor spaces together physically, blurring the distinction between house and garden and encouraging outdoor living suitable for the tropical climate.

104

105

07 14

08

12

03

29

22

13

32

02

28

11 02

01

06 04

05

04

09

23

10

04

20

25

33

27 26

21

04

24 17 18

19

31

16 15

N

first floor plan : 01 tv room 02 courtyard 03 living 04 storage 05 powder room 06 lower gallery 07 swimming pool 08 pool deck 09 electrical switch room 10 filtration chamber 11 gym 12 master bathroom 13 dressing room 14 master bedroom

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 104-105

second floor plan : 15 parking 16 laundry 17 bathroom 18 maid room 19 rear entrance 20 terrace 21 kitchen 22 dining terrace 23 upper gallery 24 car porch 25 entrance 26 low pond 27 high pond 28 study / bedroom 1 29 roof garden 1

30

third floor plan : 30 bedroom 2 31 bedroom 3 32 roof garden 2 33 roof garden 3

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


The clients, wildlife and travel photographer Gary Dublanko and his wife Dea Zoffman, had some pretty clear ideas about the requirements for their house and sustainability, in particular, was high up on the agenda. The brief called for a building that was of an open plan, merging indoor and outdoor spaces while being energy sufficient and low on maintenance, letting in plenty of natural light and natural ventilation and having a minimal impact on the landscape. The man for the job was found in British architect John Bulcock of Malaysia-based practice Design Unit, he is recognized for projects that incorporate sustainable and passive design elements and has extensive experience designing in a tropical climate. Certain key elements within this project such as off form concrete and bamboo screens are familiar features within Bulcock’s repertoire. The site covers 3,200 sq.m. on a sloping terrain,

with a drop of 21 meters. Situated on the eastern side of Phuket overlooking Phang Nga Bay to the northeast and bordering Khao Phra Thaeo National Park, it is secluded and remote enough not to be connected to the water main or the sewerage. Their provision was therefore integral to the design, rainwater is harvested and stored in an underground concrete tank, providing up to 8 months’ supply, while a 72-meter well accommodates the rest of the year. All waste water is treated by a septic tank system on site. Local materials predominate, hardwood was taken from a nearby 40-year-old house and recycled for use as flooring, pool deck and doors, while screens of whole bamboo poles provide privacy and security. The principal material, béton brut, is used throughout the house for walls, columns and ceiling, being both expressive as well as easy to maintain.

Passive systems are crucial to sustainable design and dama zAmya incorporates many passive cooling techniques starting with the orientation of the building itself. Aligned on the west-east axis, the design minimizes the façade area in reception of direct sunlight while the integrated landscaping shades the building and acts as a buffer zone. Pockets of greenery inside the house afford a pleasant atmosphere, both physically and visually. And even though there is a lot of glazing, large overhangs compensate by shading against direct sunlight and green and pebbled roofs ensure that the house is well-insulated from above too. The amount of open-air area in this house is also unique, only certain rooms such as the bedrooms and kitchen can be entirely closed off. Elsewhere, such as the living room and even the master bathroom, the interior spaces are open to the outside to various degrees, but the main entrance corridor, in particular,

is wholly open on the east side. This, together with extensive use of glass louvers, greatly facilitates air flow throughout the entire building, while the one-room-deep floor plan enables effective crossventilation and daylight penetration. Beside all its green credentials, the house also presents distinctive spatial experiences. The green roofs double up as elevated grass lawns for entertaining in front of panoramic views. The glazing and screens of bamboo poles afford levels of transparency between the different spaces and volumes to create a layering of space, as well as connecting the indoor and outdoor visually. The open plan, inner courtyards, large overhangs and the abundant provision of terraces and balconies all help to merge the indoor and outdoor spaces together physically, blurring the distinction between house and garden and encouraging outdoor living suitable for the tropical climate.

104

105

07 14

08

12

03

29

22

13

32

02

28

11 02

01

06 04

05

04

09

23

10

04

20

25

33

27 26

21

04

24 17 18

19

31

16 15

N

first floor plan : 01 tv room 02 courtyard 03 living 04 storage 05 powder room 06 lower gallery 07 swimming pool 08 pool deck 09 electrical switch room 10 filtration chamber 11 gym 12 master bathroom 13 dressing room 14 master bedroom

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 104-105

second floor plan : 15 parking 16 laundry 17 bathroom 18 maid room 19 rear entrance 20 terrace 21 kitchen 22 dining terrace 23 upper gallery 24 car porch 25 entrance 26 low pond 27 high pond 28 study / bedroom 1 29 roof garden 1

30

third floor plan : 30 bedroom 2 31 bedroom 3 32 roof garden 2 33 roof garden 3

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


roof garden 1 adjoining the study 108

109 view of the swimming pool and deck surrounded by greenery roof garden 2

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 108-109

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


roof garden 1 adjoining the study 108

109 view of the swimming pool and deck surrounded by greenery roof garden 2

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 108-109

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


extensive use of glass louvers above the living area ensures the space is kept wellventilated the dining terrace suspended above the swimming pool deck enjoys magnificent views 110

111 cantilevered dining terrace the living room viewed from the swimming pool

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 110-111

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


extensive use of glass louvers above the living area ensures the space is kept wellventilated the dining terrace suspended above the swimming pool deck enjoys magnificent views 110

111 cantilevered dining terrace the living room viewed from the swimming pool

100-119_dama zamya_03.indd 110-111

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


118

100-119_dama zamya_04.indd 118-119

119

11/25/57 BE 3:10 AM


118

100-119_dama zamya_04.indd 118-119

119

11/25/57 BE 3:10 AM


120

villa amanzi

121

is a 890 sq.m., six-bedroom holiday villa in Phuket commissioned by Mr and Mrs Plumbridge. Completed in 2009, the architecture and interior were designed by Original Vision, with structural and system engineering by Ove Arup (Thailand).

Photography by Marc Gerritsen & Helicam Asia Aerial Photography

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 120-121

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


120

villa amanzi

121

is a 890 sq.m., six-bedroom holiday villa in Phuket commissioned by Mr and Mrs Plumbridge. Completed in 2009, the architecture and interior were designed by Original Vision, with structural and system engineering by Ove Arup (Thailand).

Photography by Marc Gerritsen & Helicam Asia Aerial Photography

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 120-121

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


122

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 122-123

123

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


122

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 122-123

123

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


124

A book of seaside houses in Thailand is inevitably crammed with jaw-dropping locations, but as far as sites are concerned, Villa Amanzi’s is likely the most dramatic of them all. Hugging the side of a rocky cliff on the west coast of Phuket, the 890 sq.m. villa enjoys a commanding view of sunsets over the Andaman Sea. It has a neighbor in close proximity on the south side, but is shielded by existing dense vegetation. Abutting the rock face on its north side, the design made use of this by literally making the rock a part of the house, forming a wall of the family room on the first floor and protruding out to overwhelm the staircase leading from the second floor down to the first floor. The site of this house is defined by the rock face, which is highlighted by the design and beckons to be interacted with in a tactile way. This begins at the entrance approach, where the steps leading down to the living area swerve slightly to meet the rock. The spatial sequence is choreographed in such a way that occupants are first denied the view of the sea – blocked by the bridge volume of the third story – which only becomes visible once they are inside the house, where the vista opens up. A pond in the form of a narrow strip of water implies a transition from outside to inside. There is another route into the house, tucked discreetly behind the carport; this provides access for the staff and services, which are quartered

on the second floor. It is an interesting configuration where the third story volume, which is at the same level as the carport, is stopped just short of meeting it and a dog-leg stairs is inserted in between them, such that access to the third floor is cut off without the need for an actual wall or physical barrier. Tectonically, Villa Amanzi is composed of two primary structures overlapping at a right angle. While much of the drama is created through the verticality of the site, the design itself is defined by horizontal planes, with no sectional manipulation. The separation between public and private spaces is clearly established for the second and third floors. The latter, enclosed by full-height sliding doors all around to maximize views and allow for cross-ventilation, contains a series of bedrooms, while the second floor caters to communal and recreational functions such as living, dining, kitchen as well as the swimming pool, sundeck and lawn areas. In contrast to these spaces, which have an open-air, outdoor character, the family room on the first floor is much more enclosed and cavern-like, providing a more indoor feel, as well as accommodating two further bedrooms. In trying to maximize ocean views, all the rooms are pushed to the west side of the house, the west elevation is therefore fully glazed and flanked with terraces. Villa Amanzi is designed by Original Vision, a

125

Hong Kong-based architectural practice established in 1993 with an outpost in Phuket, and headed by British architect Adrian McCarroll. The firm specializes in resort and residential projects and their experience of over two decades shows in the understated interior design. There is great restraint in both materials and color palette, where white predominates along with some neutral grey and brown tones. In the bedrooms, steel columns are left exposed, while the selection of furniture and fittings stress minimal, clean lines. The bedrooms are well appointed yet spare, with the exception being the master bedroom, whose opulence is expressed through the increase in area and the inclusion of a study and its own private roof garden. This is consistent with McCarroll’s belief that the future of luxury will be about having space and privacy. Within the construction, there is no recourse to overtly natural materials or rusticity so often employed for holiday homes in this part of the world, nor any vernacular forms such as pitched roofs or timber structures. Instead, the building is strikingly modernist, choosing not to reflect its tropical context through formal elements but through the blurring of boundary between indoor and outdoor via the extensive provision of full-height sliding doors, and the consequent encouragement of an open-air lifestyle fitting to this climate. N

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 124-125

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


124

A book of seaside houses in Thailand is inevitably crammed with jaw-dropping locations, but as far as sites are concerned, Villa Amanzi’s is likely the most dramatic of them all. Hugging the side of a rocky cliff on the west coast of Phuket, the 890 sq.m. villa enjoys a commanding view of sunsets over the Andaman Sea. It has a neighbor in close proximity on the south side, but is shielded by existing dense vegetation. Abutting the rock face on its north side, the design made use of this by literally making the rock a part of the house, forming a wall of the family room on the first floor and protruding out to overwhelm the staircase leading from the second floor down to the first floor. The site of this house is defined by the rock face, which is highlighted by the design and beckons to be interacted with in a tactile way. This begins at the entrance approach, where the steps leading down to the living area swerve slightly to meet the rock. The spatial sequence is choreographed in such a way that occupants are first denied the view of the sea – blocked by the bridge volume of the third story – which only becomes visible once they are inside the house, where the vista opens up. A pond in the form of a narrow strip of water implies a transition from outside to inside. There is another route into the house, tucked discreetly behind the carport; this provides access for the staff and services, which are quartered

on the second floor. It is an interesting configuration where the third story volume, which is at the same level as the carport, is stopped just short of meeting it and a dog-leg stairs is inserted in between them, such that access to the third floor is cut off without the need for an actual wall or physical barrier. Tectonically, Villa Amanzi is composed of two primary structures overlapping at a right angle. While much of the drama is created through the verticality of the site, the design itself is defined by horizontal planes, with no sectional manipulation. The separation between public and private spaces is clearly established for the second and third floors. The latter, enclosed by full-height sliding doors all around to maximize views and allow for cross-ventilation, contains a series of bedrooms, while the second floor caters to communal and recreational functions such as living, dining, kitchen as well as the swimming pool, sundeck and lawn areas. In contrast to these spaces, which have an open-air, outdoor character, the family room on the first floor is much more enclosed and cavern-like, providing a more indoor feel, as well as accommodating two further bedrooms. In trying to maximize ocean views, all the rooms are pushed to the west side of the house, the west elevation is therefore fully glazed and flanked with terraces. Villa Amanzi is designed by Original Vision, a

125

Hong Kong-based architectural practice established in 1993 with an outpost in Phuket, and headed by British architect Adrian McCarroll. The firm specializes in resort and residential projects and their experience of over two decades shows in the understated interior design. There is great restraint in both materials and color palette, where white predominates along with some neutral grey and brown tones. In the bedrooms, steel columns are left exposed, while the selection of furniture and fittings stress minimal, clean lines. The bedrooms are well appointed yet spare, with the exception being the master bedroom, whose opulence is expressed through the increase in area and the inclusion of a study and its own private roof garden. This is consistent with McCarroll’s belief that the future of luxury will be about having space and privacy. Within the construction, there is no recourse to overtly natural materials or rusticity so often employed for holiday homes in this part of the world, nor any vernacular forms such as pitched roofs or timber structures. Instead, the building is strikingly modernist, choosing not to reflect its tropical context through formal elements but through the blurring of boundary between indoor and outdoor via the extensive provision of full-height sliding doors, and the consequent encouragement of an open-air lifestyle fitting to this climate. N

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 124-125

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


typical bathroom on the third floor view from the third floor terrace 136

137 family kitchen northernmost bedroom on the third floor

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 136-137

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


typical bathroom on the third floor view from the third floor terrace 136

137 family kitchen northernmost bedroom on the third floor

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 136-137

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


138

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 138-139

139

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


138

120-139_villa amanzi_03.indd 138-139

139

11/19/57 BE 11:58 PM


140

laemsingh villa

141

is a 923 sq.m., five-bedroom oceanfront villa in Phuket commissioned by Lifestyle & Leisure (Thailand) and owned by Singapore-based art gallerists Julien and Yen Reis. Completed in 2008, the architecture and interior were designed by BEDMaR & SHi and the landscape design was by Tierra Design (Thailand), with structural engineering by Web Structures and system engineering by Engineering & Fire Services Int’l.

Photography by Albert Lim KS

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 140-141

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


140

laemsingh villa

141

is a 923 sq.m., five-bedroom oceanfront villa in Phuket commissioned by Lifestyle & Leisure (Thailand) and owned by Singapore-based art gallerists Julien and Yen Reis. Completed in 2008, the architecture and interior were designed by BEDMaR & SHi and the landscape design was by Tierra Design (Thailand), with structural engineering by Web Structures and system engineering by Engineering & Fire Services Int’l.

Photography by Albert Lim KS

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 140-141

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


142

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 142-143

143

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


142

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 142-143

143

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


144

145

N

BEDMaR & SHi was established in Singapore in 1986 by Argentinian-born architect Ernesto Bedmar and interior designer Patti Shi, the practice has worked extensively in the tropics, with a focus on investigating relationships between building and nature. Bedmar has stated that the Laemsingh Villa on Surin Beach in Phuket is “part of a continuous search for ultimate origins, as well as a room encompassing nature.” Large overhanging pitched roofs are a traditional Thai architectural element and it is taken as the key visual expression for this project. Visible at the entrance to the house is a roofline composed of two large cedar wood pitched roofs and a smaller double-hipped roof, framing fragments of the azure horizon beyond. Nevertheless, they are contemporalized with crisp modern lines and no ornament, and in constrast to the exterior, the underside is

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 144-145

covered up with much more polished rectangular timber panels. The villa’s aesthetic is derived through the use of natural materials such as wood and slate, while a highly choreographed visual experience means that panoramic views are kept in check to build up anticipation. The spatial sequence is particularly articulated at the entrance approach. From the entry pavilion, the occupants are only allowed a teasing glimpse of the sea, so that they must first descend a narrow stairway surrounded by water, and make a sharp right turn to face a pivoting timber door. Behind it, the space opens out, but is still hemmed in by the two main building structures, and a lone frangipani tree obscuring the full view of the ocean. It is only once the occupant has penetrated deeper into the house that the full panorama of the Andaman Sea is revealed.

Another key feature that reflects the building’s locale is the considerable area given over to open-air decks and terraces enclosing the west side of the house, which faces out to the sea. They help to blur the boundary between indoor and outdoor and fulfill the architect’s intention of creating rooms within nature. The incorporation of deck benches into the railings not only adds the function of informal seating, but also delivers a greater degree of enclosure. For the veranda looking out onto the swimming pool, the deck bench provides a threshold that connects the two spaces together. While for the cantilevered terrace on the second floor and the lap pool deck, it helps to heighten the sense of being right at the edge as well as provides a place to enjoy the prospect over the precipitous headland on which the house rests.

Unlike many of the other properties in this volume, there is a more palpable sense of a family retreat to this villa whose client is a couple of Singapore-based art gallerists, due to the design of segregated private zones dispersed into all corners of the building. There are three separate circulation routes to the five bedrooms, two of which contain their own private terraces. In addition, the main communal area on the second floor is composed as a string of connected spaces, whose area and proportion appear to favor a small gathering of people. The priorities at Laemsingh Villa are clear, and they are the qualities increasingly lacking in Asia’s hyperdense cities: privacy and a place among nature.

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


144

145

N

BEDMaR & SHi was established in Singapore in 1986 by Argentinian-born architect Ernesto Bedmar and interior designer Patti Shi, the practice has worked extensively in the tropics, with a focus on investigating relationships between building and nature. Bedmar has stated that the Laemsingh Villa on Surin Beach in Phuket is “part of a continuous search for ultimate origins, as well as a room encompassing nature.” Large overhanging pitched roofs are a traditional Thai architectural element and it is taken as the key visual expression for this project. Visible at the entrance to the house is a roofline composed of two large cedar wood pitched roofs and a smaller double-hipped roof, framing fragments of the azure horizon beyond. Nevertheless, they are contemporalized with crisp modern lines and no ornament, and in constrast to the exterior, the underside is

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 144-145

covered up with much more polished rectangular timber panels. The villa’s aesthetic is derived through the use of natural materials such as wood and slate, while a highly choreographed visual experience means that panoramic views are kept in check to build up anticipation. The spatial sequence is particularly articulated at the entrance approach. From the entry pavilion, the occupants are only allowed a teasing glimpse of the sea, so that they must first descend a narrow stairway surrounded by water, and make a sharp right turn to face a pivoting timber door. Behind it, the space opens out, but is still hemmed in by the two main building structures, and a lone frangipani tree obscuring the full view of the ocean. It is only once the occupant has penetrated deeper into the house that the full panorama of the Andaman Sea is revealed.

Another key feature that reflects the building’s locale is the considerable area given over to open-air decks and terraces enclosing the west side of the house, which faces out to the sea. They help to blur the boundary between indoor and outdoor and fulfill the architect’s intention of creating rooms within nature. The incorporation of deck benches into the railings not only adds the function of informal seating, but also delivers a greater degree of enclosure. For the veranda looking out onto the swimming pool, the deck bench provides a threshold that connects the two spaces together. While for the cantilevered terrace on the second floor and the lap pool deck, it helps to heighten the sense of being right at the edge as well as provides a place to enjoy the prospect over the precipitous headland on which the house rests.

Unlike many of the other properties in this volume, there is a more palpable sense of a family retreat to this villa whose client is a couple of Singapore-based art gallerists, due to the design of segregated private zones dispersed into all corners of the building. There are three separate circulation routes to the five bedrooms, two of which contain their own private terraces. In addition, the main communal area on the second floor is composed as a string of connected spaces, whose area and proportion appear to favor a small gathering of people. The priorities at Laemsingh Villa are clear, and they are the qualities increasingly lacking in Asia’s hyperdense cities: privacy and a place among nature.

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


the villa's expressive roofline glimpses of the ocean from the carport cantilevered terrace adjoining the living room 152

153 terrace next to the lap pool the swimming pool overlooked by the veranda

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 152-153

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


the villa's expressive roofline glimpses of the ocean from the carport cantilevered terrace adjoining the living room 152

153 terrace next to the lap pool the swimming pool overlooked by the veranda

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 152-153

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


158

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 158-159

159

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


158

140-159_laemsingh villa_03.indd 158-159

159

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


160

la colline

161

is a 550 sq.m., four-bedroom villa in Phuket commissioned by Property 55. Completed in 2008, the architecture was designed by Architects 49 (Phuket) and the interior design was by Interior Architects 49, with structural engineering by Architectural Engineering 49 and system engineering by M&E Engineering 49.

Photography by Krisada Boonchaleow

160-179_la colline_03.indd 160-161

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


160

la colline

161

is a 550 sq.m., four-bedroom villa in Phuket commissioned by Property 55. Completed in 2008, the architecture was designed by Architects 49 (Phuket) and the interior design was by Interior Architects 49, with structural engineering by Architectural Engineering 49 and system engineering by M&E Engineering 49.

Photography by Krisada Boonchaleow

160-179_la colline_03.indd 160-161

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


162

160-179_la colline_03.indd 162-163

163

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


162

160-179_la colline_03.indd 162-163

163

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


ROOF PLAN

164

La Colline by architectural firm Architects 49 (Phuket) is made up of 23 villas spread out over an area of 33,000 sq.m. on a lush hillside of Layan Beach in Phuket. Each three-story, four-bedroom villa is enveloped by dense foliage and vegetation. The architectural vocabulary defers to the location’s vernacular resulting in a modern structure adorned with pared-down Thai elements and crowned with hip roofs. The functional organization too, recalls traditional Thai pavilions, where each function is relegated its own structure, yet connected together via a raised deck. Tectonically, the villa has a distinctive three-level arrangement, expressive of the site’s topography and, as each level is one-room-deep and oriented in the same direction, this ensures that all rooms have access to an unobstructed view of the surrounding woodlands and the sea in the distance. The entry approach is through a set of rustic doors following a path that traverses through a pond, to the side of which are strips of horizontal panels studded with verdant foliage, before a right turn and a flight of stairs leads to the entrance. From here, to the right hand side is the main entrance into the living area, but further ahead is an open-air stairway spanning the whole length of one side of the property, descending past the Thai pavilion overlooking the swimming pool on the second floor and the bedrooms on the first floor to terminate in another, smaller pavilion structure acting as the

160-179_la colline_03.indd 164-165

villa’s other access point. The path is lined with greenery, imbuing a functional circulation route with a picturesque experience. Besides this, there is a shaded dog-leg staircase on the opposite side of the villa that also connects all three levels, next to which is an open-air patio garden. There is a clear separation between the public and private zones, with the former grouped into the front half of the site, including the living, dining, kitchen, services and swimming pool area. The four bedrooms are isolated from each other, with the master bedroom on the second floor directly adjoining and looking onto the pool. The rest of the bedrooms are on the first floor and are arrayed along an extended corridor, which connects the villa’s two main stairs. The two bedrooms that are directly adjacent to each other have a green foyer to further isolate their entrances. Each bedroom also contains its own exclusive garden or terrace with views of the mountainous landscape, providing an ever-present connection with the natural environment. The best view of the ocean can be had from the wide terrace of the living room, which is at the highest point of the site. But an equally alluring vantage point is available from the pavilion next to the pool, while the generous pool terrace can be used for entertaining, with the semi-enclosed space underneath the living room’s terrace turned into a bar or a tranquil relaxation area.

165

layout

N

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


ROOF PLAN

164

La Colline by architectural firm Architects 49 (Phuket) is made up of 23 villas spread out over an area of 33,000 sq.m. on a lush hillside of Layan Beach in Phuket. Each three-story, four-bedroom villa is enveloped by dense foliage and vegetation. The architectural vocabulary defers to the location’s vernacular resulting in a modern structure adorned with pared-down Thai elements and crowned with hip roofs. The functional organization too, recalls traditional Thai pavilions, where each function is relegated its own structure, yet connected together via a raised deck. Tectonically, the villa has a distinctive three-level arrangement, expressive of the site’s topography and, as each level is one-room-deep and oriented in the same direction, this ensures that all rooms have access to an unobstructed view of the surrounding woodlands and the sea in the distance. The entry approach is through a set of rustic doors following a path that traverses through a pond, to the side of which are strips of horizontal panels studded with verdant foliage, before a right turn and a flight of stairs leads to the entrance. From here, to the right hand side is the main entrance into the living area, but further ahead is an open-air stairway spanning the whole length of one side of the property, descending past the Thai pavilion overlooking the swimming pool on the second floor and the bedrooms on the first floor to terminate in another, smaller pavilion structure acting as the

160-179_la colline_03.indd 164-165

villa’s other access point. The path is lined with greenery, imbuing a functional circulation route with a picturesque experience. Besides this, there is a shaded dog-leg staircase on the opposite side of the villa that also connects all three levels, next to which is an open-air patio garden. There is a clear separation between the public and private zones, with the former grouped into the front half of the site, including the living, dining, kitchen, services and swimming pool area. The four bedrooms are isolated from each other, with the master bedroom on the second floor directly adjoining and looking onto the pool. The rest of the bedrooms are on the first floor and are arrayed along an extended corridor, which connects the villa’s two main stairs. The two bedrooms that are directly adjacent to each other have a green foyer to further isolate their entrances. Each bedroom also contains its own exclusive garden or terrace with views of the mountainous landscape, providing an ever-present connection with the natural environment. The best view of the ocean can be had from the wide terrace of the living room, which is at the highest point of the site. But an equally alluring vantage point is available from the pavilion next to the pool, while the generous pool terrace can be used for entertaining, with the semi-enclosed space underneath the living room’s terrace turned into a bar or a tranquil relaxation area.

165

layout

N

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


the stairway that runs all the way along one side of the property 172

173 the entrance approach

160-179_la colline_03.indd 172-173

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


the stairway that runs all the way along one side of the property 172

173 the entrance approach

160-179_la colline_03.indd 172-173

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


178

160-179_la colline_03.indd 178-179

179

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


178

160-179_la colline_03.indd 178-179

179

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


villa beige

180

181

is a 500 sq.m. residence on Koh Samui in Surat Thani commissioned by a German couple. Completed in 2006, the architecture and landscaping were designed by Charupan Wiriyawiwatt of Nagaconcepts (Thailand). The interior was designed by Hualei Mackey, with structural engineering by Warnes Associates and system engineering by Engineering & Fire Services Int’l.

Photography by Luca Tettoni (193 below, 194-195) | Marc Schultz (191 below, 192, 196-197) | Mikolaj Krawczunas (189-190, 191 above, 193 above)

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 180-181

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


villa beige

180

181

is a 500 sq.m. residence on Koh Samui in Surat Thani commissioned by a German couple. Completed in 2006, the architecture and landscaping were designed by Charupan Wiriyawiwatt of Nagaconcepts (Thailand). The interior was designed by Hualei Mackey, with structural engineering by Warnes Associates and system engineering by Engineering & Fire Services Int’l.

Photography by Luca Tettoni (193 below, 194-195) | Marc Schultz (191 below, 192, 196-197) | Mikolaj Krawczunas (189-190, 191 above, 193 above)

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 180-181

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


182

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 182-183

183

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


182

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 182-183

183

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


sea cliff

04

184

Located on Taling Ngam Beach in the southwest of Koh Samui, Villa Beige by Charupan Wiriyawiwatt of Nagaconcepts focuses on making the most of the scenery afforded by a site overlooking the Gulf of Thailand. Ocean views are made available to all parts of the villa, culminating in uninhibited prospects from the terraces and roof decks. The bedrooms, bathrooms, study and gym all have glazed façades in the form of sliding glass doors. The centerpiece of the design is the row of imposing double-height pivoting glass doors that line the living and dining area of the main building, giving a sense of monumentality to an otherwise relatively small structure. Broken up into small volumes and distributed across an escarpment, the design made use of the site’s topography to create substantial vertical separations between the different units thereby ensuring some privacy for each one. There is a clear hierarchy to the masterplanning and massing, with the largest building located centrally and housing the best accommodation as well as the communal areas,

185

which include the living, dining, swimming pool, pool terrace and study. Even though the villa is physically integrated with the site, its white rectilinear form provides a striking contrast to the verdant surroundings. The linearity of these minimal, modernist boxes are broken only by two external elliptical staircases. In the interior, however, such strict geometry is offset by visuallyrich materials such as marble for the swimming pool and flooring, colorful fabrics and a profusion of bespoke furniture with distinctive forms, such as the rustic wooden dining table and the futuristic metallic desk in the study. To recreate a warm, domestic atmosphere, the color palette is restricted to cream, white and brown. With a floor area of only 500 sq.m. spread over a site area of 5,920 sq.m., and the rigorous control over form, prospects and imported materials and furnishings, Villa Beige is an exemplary exercise in the creation of a luxurious escape.

02 03

01

N

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 184-185

layout : 01 entrance pavilion 02 main unit 03 service unit 04 sauna pavilion

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


sea cliff

04

184

Located on Taling Ngam Beach in the southwest of Koh Samui, Villa Beige by Charupan Wiriyawiwatt of Nagaconcepts focuses on making the most of the scenery afforded by a site overlooking the Gulf of Thailand. Ocean views are made available to all parts of the villa, culminating in uninhibited prospects from the terraces and roof decks. The bedrooms, bathrooms, study and gym all have glazed façades in the form of sliding glass doors. The centerpiece of the design is the row of imposing double-height pivoting glass doors that line the living and dining area of the main building, giving a sense of monumentality to an otherwise relatively small structure. Broken up into small volumes and distributed across an escarpment, the design made use of the site’s topography to create substantial vertical separations between the different units thereby ensuring some privacy for each one. There is a clear hierarchy to the masterplanning and massing, with the largest building located centrally and housing the best accommodation as well as the communal areas,

185

which include the living, dining, swimming pool, pool terrace and study. Even though the villa is physically integrated with the site, its white rectilinear form provides a striking contrast to the verdant surroundings. The linearity of these minimal, modernist boxes are broken only by two external elliptical staircases. In the interior, however, such strict geometry is offset by visuallyrich materials such as marble for the swimming pool and flooring, colorful fabrics and a profusion of bespoke furniture with distinctive forms, such as the rustic wooden dining table and the futuristic metallic desk in the study. To recreate a warm, domestic atmosphere, the color palette is restricted to cream, white and brown. With a floor area of only 500 sq.m. spread over a site area of 5,920 sq.m., and the rigorous control over form, prospects and imported materials and furnishings, Villa Beige is an exemplary exercise in the creation of a luxurious escape.

02 03

01

N

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 184-185

layout : 01 entrance pavilion 02 main unit 03 service unit 04 sauna pavilion

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


view into the study from the living area living and dining area in the main unit 190

master bedroom 191

guest bathroom

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 190-191

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


view into the study from the living area living and dining area in the main unit 190

master bedroom 191

guest bathroom

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 190-191

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


196

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 196-197

197

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


196

180-197_villa beige_03.indd 196-197

197

11/19/57 BE 11:57 PM


198

the peak

199

is a 1,050 sq.m. vacation residence in Phang Nga. Completed in 2007, the architectural design was by Kiattisak Veteewootacharn, Chana Sumpalung and Rattawut Chansritrakul of Architects 49 House Design, the interior was designed by Deca Atelier and the landscape design was by Scape, with structural engineering and system engineering by Engineering 49 Consultants.

Photography by Krisada Boonchaleow (207-209, 214-219) | Pruek Dejkhamhaeng (200-201, 210-213, 216 above)

198-219_the peak_03.indd 198-199

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


198

the peak

199

is a 1,050 sq.m. vacation residence in Phang Nga. Completed in 2007, the architectural design was by Kiattisak Veteewootacharn, Chana Sumpalung and Rattawut Chansritrakul of Architects 49 House Design, the interior was designed by Deca Atelier and the landscape design was by Scape, with structural engineering and system engineering by Engineering 49 Consultants.

Photography by Krisada Boonchaleow (207-209, 214-219) | Pruek Dejkhamhaeng (200-201, 210-213, 216 above)

198-219_the peak_03.indd 198-199

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


200

198-219_the peak_03.indd 200-201

201

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


200

198-219_the peak_03.indd 200-201

201

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


202

layout

At first glance, this timber-clad villa in Phang Nga looks like it could have been here for a long time, as it is highly integrated with the site. It blends in with the environment through the use of mainly natural materials for external cladding, such as timber walls and wood shingle roofs, giving the image of a rustic vernacular building. On closer inspection, however, it is revealed that The Peak by Kiattisak Veteewootacharn, Chana Sumpalung and Rattawut Chansritrakul of Architects 49 House Design in fact has a strikingly contemporary design language, evidenced by the irregular geometry of its hip roofs, in one instance, even folding down to the ground to act as a wall to screen an external staircase. Various building elements were inspired by the shapes and forms of the surrounding natural environment such as the forest canopy, which was translated into roof form, while the tree trunks provided the rhythm for the structural system. In layout, The Peak recalls traditional Thai compounds with rooms scattered around a single open-air deck. The entrance approach is a bridge set among the trees, acting as a transition space to affect a change of mood among occupants. The communal area is located centrally with bedrooms positioned on opposite sides of it, the master bedroom set on the far end of the property for maximum privacy and the services area relegated to the basement. The brief from the client prioritizes views of Phang Nga Bay, so the plan has been arranged in a linear configuration to maximize views of the ocean, while maintaining privacy for each area. The viewing experience is heightened for two spots in particular;

one being the master bedroom’s outdoor jacuzzi set on a triangular wooden deck, the shape of which was derived from the contour of the site. The master bedroom itself angles out as far as the swimming pool, providing the deck with utmost privacy. The other is the scenic bridge, extending out from the main exterior deck and terminating as a cantilevered walkway with a panoramic outlook over the forest and the Andaman Sea in the distance. In the middle of the bridge is a sala complete with benches. The interior design by Deca Atelier focuses on the use of highly textured natural materials – mainly stone and wood – and the playful cladding of structural elements such as the columns. It emphasizes organic or irregular shapes, as can be seen in the light fittings and railings, as well as the ceilings clad in asymmetrical rattan panels. The color palette follows those of the exterior, but in brighter shades. The Peak integrates contrasts between both open and enclosed and indoor and outdoor, with full-height glazing being used for most of the interior spaces, which can be opened up to the open-air deck. At the same time, they are shielded by large overhanging eaves sloping down at a steep pitch as well as the encircling mature trees, whose canopy provides plenty of shading for the property. The villa is enveloped by the dense vegetation of a rubber tree forest and, as one of the foremost considerations was to minimize the disturbance on the existing natural environment, the existing trees have been woven seamlessly into the design, resulting in the integration between architecture and nature.

203

N

198-219_the peak_03.indd 202-203

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


202

layout

At first glance, this timber-clad villa in Phang Nga looks like it could have been here for a long time, as it is highly integrated with the site. It blends in with the environment through the use of mainly natural materials for external cladding, such as timber walls and wood shingle roofs, giving the image of a rustic vernacular building. On closer inspection, however, it is revealed that The Peak by Kiattisak Veteewootacharn, Chana Sumpalung and Rattawut Chansritrakul of Architects 49 House Design in fact has a strikingly contemporary design language, evidenced by the irregular geometry of its hip roofs, in one instance, even folding down to the ground to act as a wall to screen an external staircase. Various building elements were inspired by the shapes and forms of the surrounding natural environment such as the forest canopy, which was translated into roof form, while the tree trunks provided the rhythm for the structural system. In layout, The Peak recalls traditional Thai compounds with rooms scattered around a single open-air deck. The entrance approach is a bridge set among the trees, acting as a transition space to affect a change of mood among occupants. The communal area is located centrally with bedrooms positioned on opposite sides of it, the master bedroom set on the far end of the property for maximum privacy and the services area relegated to the basement. The brief from the client prioritizes views of Phang Nga Bay, so the plan has been arranged in a linear configuration to maximize views of the ocean, while maintaining privacy for each area. The viewing experience is heightened for two spots in particular;

one being the master bedroom’s outdoor jacuzzi set on a triangular wooden deck, the shape of which was derived from the contour of the site. The master bedroom itself angles out as far as the swimming pool, providing the deck with utmost privacy. The other is the scenic bridge, extending out from the main exterior deck and terminating as a cantilevered walkway with a panoramic outlook over the forest and the Andaman Sea in the distance. In the middle of the bridge is a sala complete with benches. The interior design by Deca Atelier focuses on the use of highly textured natural materials – mainly stone and wood – and the playful cladding of structural elements such as the columns. It emphasizes organic or irregular shapes, as can be seen in the light fittings and railings, as well as the ceilings clad in asymmetrical rattan panels. The color palette follows those of the exterior, but in brighter shades. The Peak integrates contrasts between both open and enclosed and indoor and outdoor, with full-height glazing being used for most of the interior spaces, which can be opened up to the open-air deck. At the same time, they are shielded by large overhanging eaves sloping down at a steep pitch as well as the encircling mature trees, whose canopy provides plenty of shading for the property. The villa is enveloped by the dense vegetation of a rubber tree forest and, as one of the foremost considerations was to minimize the disturbance on the existing natural environment, the existing trees have been woven seamlessly into the design, resulting in the integration between architecture and nature.

203

N

198-219_the peak_03.indd 202-203

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


mezzanine level above living area has a cavernlike atmosphere due to the distinctive ceiling cladding 214

215 master bedroom

guest bedroom master bathroom

198-219_the peak_03.indd 214-215

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


mezzanine level above living area has a cavernlike atmosphere due to the distinctive ceiling cladding 214

215 master bedroom

guest bedroom master bathroom

198-219_the peak_03.indd 214-215

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


218

198-219_the peak_03.indd 218-219

219

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


218

198-219_the peak_03.indd 218-219

219

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


220

residence p

221

is a 1,881 sq.m., five-bedroom weekend house located in Pattaya. Completed in 2012, the architecture and landscape design were by A U N design studio and the interior was designed by Pisanu Tuntisiriwat. The lighting design was by Phanchalath Suriyothin and Veerapong Eawpanich, with structural engineering by Sitichoke Sirivivat and system engineering by Ronnachai Sirithanarattanakul and Ekkasit Ruksakulkiatti.

Photography by Wison Tungthunya

220-239_residence p_03.indd 220-221

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


220

residence p

221

is a 1,881 sq.m., five-bedroom weekend house located in Pattaya. Completed in 2012, the architecture and landscape design were by A U N design studio and the interior was designed by Pisanu Tuntisiriwat. The lighting design was by Phanchalath Suriyothin and Veerapong Eawpanich, with structural engineering by Sitichoke Sirivivat and system engineering by Ronnachai Sirithanarattanakul and Ekkasit Ruksakulkiatti.

Photography by Wison Tungthunya

220-239_residence p_03.indd 220-221

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


222

220-239_residence p_03.indd 222-223

223

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


222

220-239_residence p_03.indd 222-223

223

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


224 view of the northern façade

N

220-239_residence p_03.indd 224-225

The site for this residence in Pattaya in Chonburi province does not border the sea directly. Between them is a stretch of lawn – on which building is prohibited by planning regulation – and a road that parallels the front side of the property. A U N design studio, headed by architect Khetkhun Yodpring, worked around this setback by raising the main entry points and living areas to the second floor, filling up the front third of the site and using the rest of the semi-submerged first floor for parking, services and staff quarters. This design strategy opens up the view toward the beach and resolves issues of privacy as a result of having a thoroughfare at the front of the property at the same time. Having the two main entrances on the second floor means that there is a large height difference between them and the road level. The architect was able to turn this potential issue into a positive aspect of the design by converting this change in level into a part of the experience of the approach to the main entrances. This is achieved by incorporating steps into the landscape design for the west entrance, while for the south entrance, the driveway slopes upward to the landing from where a short flight of stairs leads to a set of double doors, adding a sense of ceremony to the approach from the portecochère. Another feature that reinforces such spatial perception of the entrances is the opening up to create double-story volumes around them. Another space that made use of the double-story volume is the family room, where the flood of natural light creates a brightly lit, high-ceilinged space with a relaxing character. The proportion of the spaces are fitting to their function, so that for the more formal living room, the ceiling is only one-story high, a lower space which makes it more conducive to

conversation. It is also directly adjacent to the dining area, thus separating the visitor areas from the more family-oriented activities of the family and games rooms on the other side of the house. There is a clear separation of public and private areas within Residence P. Dining, living, family and games rooms, as well as a guest room, fill the second floor, while the third floor is kept strictly for the client’s family’s bedrooms. The house is crowned by a vast rooftop terrace, with its own pantry attached, to cater for large, moonlit gatherings. Terraces and balconies are one of the most prominent features of the house, every bedroom has its own – generouslysized – balcony or terrace, which are often enclosed. The west-facing terrace, for example, is protected by the two wings of the house, while the master bedroom balcony is even more enclosed and shaded, with a semi-outdoor character. The clients had wanted a vacation home where they could share quality time with family and friends, somewhere that was nevertheless still in close proximity to Bangkok. Unlike most of the other projects in this volume, the site is not secluded or spectacularly idyllic – with accessibility comes compromise. The design for Residence P therefore embodies this friction between the desire for views and a seaside style of living on the one hand, and the need for 225 privacy on the other, being in a residential area with many other houses in close proximity. The architect resolved this tension by aligning the house on the west-east axis, opening up the façades totally in both directions, overlooking the Gulf of Thailand to the west and a lake to the east, while the north and south elevations are relatively closed off. The extensive use of glass is counterbalanced – both in terms of privacy and shading – by equally large overhangs and deep balconies.

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


224 view of the northern façade

N

220-239_residence p_03.indd 224-225

The site for this residence in Pattaya in Chonburi province does not border the sea directly. Between them is a stretch of lawn – on which building is prohibited by planning regulation – and a road that parallels the front side of the property. A U N design studio, headed by architect Khetkhun Yodpring, worked around this setback by raising the main entry points and living areas to the second floor, filling up the front third of the site and using the rest of the semi-submerged first floor for parking, services and staff quarters. This design strategy opens up the view toward the beach and resolves issues of privacy as a result of having a thoroughfare at the front of the property at the same time. Having the two main entrances on the second floor means that there is a large height difference between them and the road level. The architect was able to turn this potential issue into a positive aspect of the design by converting this change in level into a part of the experience of the approach to the main entrances. This is achieved by incorporating steps into the landscape design for the west entrance, while for the south entrance, the driveway slopes upward to the landing from where a short flight of stairs leads to a set of double doors, adding a sense of ceremony to the approach from the portecochère. Another feature that reinforces such spatial perception of the entrances is the opening up to create double-story volumes around them. Another space that made use of the double-story volume is the family room, where the flood of natural light creates a brightly lit, high-ceilinged space with a relaxing character. The proportion of the spaces are fitting to their function, so that for the more formal living room, the ceiling is only one-story high, a lower space which makes it more conducive to

conversation. It is also directly adjacent to the dining area, thus separating the visitor areas from the more family-oriented activities of the family and games rooms on the other side of the house. There is a clear separation of public and private areas within Residence P. Dining, living, family and games rooms, as well as a guest room, fill the second floor, while the third floor is kept strictly for the client’s family’s bedrooms. The house is crowned by a vast rooftop terrace, with its own pantry attached, to cater for large, moonlit gatherings. Terraces and balconies are one of the most prominent features of the house, every bedroom has its own – generouslysized – balcony or terrace, which are often enclosed. The west-facing terrace, for example, is protected by the two wings of the house, while the master bedroom balcony is even more enclosed and shaded, with a semi-outdoor character. The clients had wanted a vacation home where they could share quality time with family and friends, somewhere that was nevertheless still in close proximity to Bangkok. Unlike most of the other projects in this volume, the site is not secluded or spectacularly idyllic – with accessibility comes compromise. The design for Residence P therefore embodies this friction between the desire for views and a seaside style of living on the one hand, and the need for 225 privacy on the other, being in a residential area with many other houses in close proximity. The architect resolved this tension by aligning the house on the west-east axis, opening up the façades totally in both directions, overlooking the Gulf of Thailand to the west and a lake to the east, while the north and south elevations are relatively closed off. The extensive use of glass is counterbalanced – both in terms of privacy and shading – by equally large overhangs and deep balconies.

layout

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


west entrance the family room enjoys a light-filled doubleheight space 236

237 living room

220-239_residence p_03.indd 236-237

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


west entrance the family room enjoys a light-filled doubleheight space 236

237 living room

220-239_residence p_03.indd 236-237

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


238

220-239_residence p_03.indd 238-239

239

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


238

220-239_residence p_03.indd 238-239

239

11/19/57 BE 11:56 PM


240

villa serendipity

241

is a 800 sq.m., four-bedroom getaway on Koh Samui in Surat Thani. Completed in 2011, the architectural design was by MAP Architecture & Planning, the interior was designed by Robert Powell, who also acted as site architect. The landscape designer was Victor Choong, with structural engineering by Islander Design and Development.

Photography by Jimmy Wilkins (242-243)

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 240-241

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


240

villa serendipity

241

is a 800 sq.m., four-bedroom getaway on Koh Samui in Surat Thani. Completed in 2011, the architectural design was by MAP Architecture & Planning, the interior was designed by Robert Powell, who also acted as site architect. The landscape designer was Victor Choong, with structural engineering by Islander Design and Development.

Photography by Jimmy Wilkins (242-243)

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 240-241

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


242

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 242-243

243

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


242

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 242-243

243

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


02

01

244

layout : 01 sala 02 sauna

The client for this project had seen a villa by Hong Kong-based practice MAP Architecture & Planning in the hills above Bophut and asked them to provide her with a similar concept design for a site with a steep slope on the southeast coast of Koh Samui. The brief was for a private, tranquil residence in a tropical modern Thai style, making full use of light, space and views and seamlessly integrating indoor and outdoor living. On the second floor, the villa is divided into two buildings bridged by a lawn, one housing the bedrooms and the other containing the living, dining and kitchen areas. The isolation of the bedrooms ensures their privacy, especially for the master bedroom on the third floor, with its exclusive stairway. The bedrooms on the lower floor open out onto the deck area encompassing a bean-shaped swimming pool, while the master bedroom is flanked by a terrace that is shaded by the large overhanging eave of the shingled roof. The spatial arrangement recalls traditional Thai compounds, with various pavilions scattered over a large open-air deck. A fourth bedroom and a games room, together with the services area, are grouped together on the first floor. The lounge, dining and living area share an open plan space with double-height ceiling; the space is entirely glazed and lets in plenty of natural light even as it is protected from direct sunlight, especially on the side facing the sea, where the roof

projects out at a shallower pitch to cover the sitting area along the deck. The building is also lined with sliding and folding glass doors, once opened, they allow the interior to merge with the outdoor spaces as well as facilitate cross-ventilation. The spatial separation of the different functions further obliges occupants to wander outdoors, especially as there is no interior stairway connecting the different floor levels. While all the living and sleeping quarters are orientated to catch an unimpeded view of the ocean, it is the yoga sala, positioned at the height of the third floor and ensconced at the back of the site, that has the most commanding vista. From here, the Gulf of Thailand can be seen in the distance framed by the villa’s three pitched roofs. Another carefully orchestrated experience is the entrance approach, where behind a set of rusticated metal doors, a stone walkway set over a shallow pond of pellucid water draws visitors into the villa. Villa Serendipity’s natural surroundings are reflected in the design through the sinuous contour of the first floor structure and the selection of materials such as wood and natural stone, while the colors of the external finishes are kept to a light, neutral palette, not dissimilar to that of the sandy beach nearby. There is also an elaborate landscaped garden by Victor Choong and the interior design is by British architect Robert Powell.

245

N

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 244-245

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


02

01

244

layout : 01 sala 02 sauna

The client for this project had seen a villa by Hong Kong-based practice MAP Architecture & Planning in the hills above Bophut and asked them to provide her with a similar concept design for a site with a steep slope on the southeast coast of Koh Samui. The brief was for a private, tranquil residence in a tropical modern Thai style, making full use of light, space and views and seamlessly integrating indoor and outdoor living. On the second floor, the villa is divided into two buildings bridged by a lawn, one housing the bedrooms and the other containing the living, dining and kitchen areas. The isolation of the bedrooms ensures their privacy, especially for the master bedroom on the third floor, with its exclusive stairway. The bedrooms on the lower floor open out onto the deck area encompassing a bean-shaped swimming pool, while the master bedroom is flanked by a terrace that is shaded by the large overhanging eave of the shingled roof. The spatial arrangement recalls traditional Thai compounds, with various pavilions scattered over a large open-air deck. A fourth bedroom and a games room, together with the services area, are grouped together on the first floor. The lounge, dining and living area share an open plan space with double-height ceiling; the space is entirely glazed and lets in plenty of natural light even as it is protected from direct sunlight, especially on the side facing the sea, where the roof

projects out at a shallower pitch to cover the sitting area along the deck. The building is also lined with sliding and folding glass doors, once opened, they allow the interior to merge with the outdoor spaces as well as facilitate cross-ventilation. The spatial separation of the different functions further obliges occupants to wander outdoors, especially as there is no interior stairway connecting the different floor levels. While all the living and sleeping quarters are orientated to catch an unimpeded view of the ocean, it is the yoga sala, positioned at the height of the third floor and ensconced at the back of the site, that has the most commanding vista. From here, the Gulf of Thailand can be seen in the distance framed by the villa’s three pitched roofs. Another carefully orchestrated experience is the entrance approach, where behind a set of rusticated metal doors, a stone walkway set over a shallow pond of pellucid water draws visitors into the villa. Villa Serendipity’s natural surroundings are reflected in the design through the sinuous contour of the first floor structure and the selection of materials such as wood and natural stone, while the colors of the external finishes are kept to a light, neutral palette, not dissimilar to that of the sandy beach nearby. There is also an elaborate landscaped garden by Victor Choong and the interior design is by British architect Robert Powell.

245

N

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 244-245

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


master study 256

master bedroom 257

outdoor shower connected to the master bathroom

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 256-257

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


master study 256

master bedroom 257

outdoor shower connected to the master bathroom

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 256-257

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


258

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 258-259

259

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM


258

240-259_serendipity villa_03.indd 258-259

259

11/19/57 BE 11:55 PM

Ocean Villas by Li-Zenn Publishing  

Sumptuously illustrated, Ocean Villas is a compilation of exemplary seaside residences designed by an international group of award-winning a...

Ocean Villas by Li-Zenn Publishing  

Sumptuously illustrated, Ocean Villas is a compilation of exemplary seaside residences designed by an international group of award-winning a...

Advertisement