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Boston University School of Medicine

School of Medicine

School of Medicine

Calendar 2018

MARCH 16

Match Day

MAY 3

Keefer Society Dinner Metcalf Trustee Ballroom, BU Charles River Campus

MAY 4

Dean’s Advisory Board Meeting

MAY 17

GMS Commencement 9 am MD & PhD Commencement 3 pm Track & Tennis Center, BU Charles River Campus

SEPTEMBER 21 & 22

School of Medicine Alumni Weekend

“ I have never had an uninteresting day nor gone home without having learned something.” Robert Witzburg, Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean, retires after 45 years of learning, teaching, and service.

WINTER 2018 • bumc.bu.edu


Message From The Dean

DEAR ALUMNI, FRIENDS, AND COLLEAGUES,

Our cover story celebrates the exceptional career of Professor of Medicine Bob Witzburg, MD, who will retire at the end of this academic year after teaching and providing patient care for 45 years and serving as associate dean of admissions for 15. We will miss him, but the more than 2,500 physicians admitted under his leadership and the students and residents whom he taught over the decades will be his legacy. We are all thankful for the many contributions Bob made in the various roles in which he served on the Medical Campus over the years, and hope that many of you will join us for our inaugural Black Ties for White Coats Scholarship Gala on April 5 in honor of his career. All contributions will benefit student scholarships. More information will follow on the event, so please save the date. The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences bestowed its first Distinguished Alumni Awards this year when Erika Ebbel Angle, PhD, and Steven Perrin, PhD, were honored for their outstanding contributions to the biomedical sciences. The school also has important pipeline programs for high school and college students featured in this issue. Last summer, BUSM collaborated with the Boston Area Health Education Center’s Youth to Health Careers Summer Enrichment Program, which provided 80 Boston high school students with academic support, college preparation, and internships to help them pursue careers in medicine, health sciences, dentistry, and public health. The Summer Program in Neuroscience (SPIN) offered high-achieving undergraduates

from across the country a head start in neuroscience. Several of our centers received major renewed grant funding. Our Black Women’s Health Study received a five-year, $13.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute and our Alzheimer’s Disease Center a threeyear, $5.4 million award renewal from the National Institutes of Health to continue their respective work. We also highlight a $392,000 grant from the Macy Foundation toward improving medical student curriculum to enhance refugee health. Our Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) received the 2017 Sharing Research Resources Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, which recognizes successful models for sharing biomedical research resources. In addition, CReM’s Gustavo Mostoslavsky was named BU’s Innovator of the Year for developing a process that facilitates stem cell production. This issue also highlights our faculty, staff, alumni, and friends—as well as foundations and corporations—who have supported our work on the front lines of medicine. The Shipley Prostate Cancer Research Center launched its new website, which we hope will become the go-to consumer resource for prostate health and support. The center itself was funded by a very generous $10 million gift from BU Trustee Richard Shipley. We also introduce Drs. Shirley Klein (MED’68), Lou Sullivan (MED’58), and Richard Catrambone (MED’92), who have funded substantial scholarships to help reduce student debt. We greatly appreciate your contributions, highlighted in the donor report, that demonstrate your commitment to making Boston University School of Medicine the best place to learn, teach, and discover. On behalf of our students, faculty, and administration, thank you for your generous support. Happy New Year and Best Regards,

Karen Antman, MD

Boston University School of Medicine

WINTER 2018

Boston University Medicine is published by the Boston University Medical Campus Communications Office on behalf of Boston University School of Medicine.

Maria Ober Assistant Dean, Communications

design & production

Boston University Creative Services

contributing writers

Lisa Brown, Gina DiGravio, Kathryn Mariano, Gillian Smith

photography

Boston University Photography, Frank Curran, Dave Green, David Keough, Justin Knight, Jennifer Pottheiser, Jackie Ricciardi, Cydney Scott

Members of the Class of 2021 participate in the traditional White Coat Ceremony.

Please direct any questions or comments to: Maria Ober Communications Office Boston University Medical Campus 85 East Newton Street, M427 Boston, MA 02118 P 617-638-8496 | F 617-638-8044 | E mpober@bu.edu

3

Contents

Boston University Medicine

FEATURE

16

DEPARTMENTS

45 YEARS OF LEARNING, TEACHING, AND SERVICE:

2 Campus News

22 Giving

12 Faculty News

25 Donor Report

20 Research

36 Alumni News

Robert Witzburg, MD, retires 0118

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

1


Message From The Dean

DEAR ALUMNI, FRIENDS, AND COLLEAGUES,

Our cover story celebrates the exceptional career of Professor of Medicine Bob Witzburg, MD, who will retire at the end of this academic year after teaching and providing patient care for 45 years and serving as associate dean of admissions for 15. We will miss him, but the more than 2,500 physicians admitted under his leadership and the students and residents whom he taught over the decades will be his legacy. We are all thankful for the many contributions Bob made in the various roles in which he served on the Medical Campus over the years, and hope that many of you will join us for our inaugural Black Ties for White Coats Scholarship Gala on April 5 in honor of his career. All contributions will benefit student scholarships. More information will follow on the event, so please save the date. The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences bestowed its first Distinguished Alumni Awards this year when Erika Ebbel Angle, PhD, and Steven Perrin, PhD, were honored for their outstanding contributions to the biomedical sciences. The school also has important pipeline programs for high school and college students featured in this issue. Last summer, BUSM collaborated with the Boston Area Health Education Center’s Youth to Health Careers Summer Enrichment Program, which provided 80 Boston high school students with academic support, college preparation, and internships to help them pursue careers in medicine, health sciences, dentistry, and public health. The Summer Program in Neuroscience (SPIN) offered high-achieving undergraduates

from across the country a head start in neuroscience. Several of our centers received major renewed grant funding. Our Black Women’s Health Study received a five-year, $13.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute and our Alzheimer’s Disease Center a threeyear, $5.4 million award renewal from the National Institutes of Health to continue their respective work. We also highlight a $392,000 grant from the Macy Foundation toward improving medical student curriculum to enhance refugee health. Our Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) received the 2017 Sharing Research Resources Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, which recognizes successful models for sharing biomedical research resources. In addition, CReM’s Gustavo Mostoslavsky was named BU’s Innovator of the Year for developing a process that facilitates stem cell production. This issue also highlights our faculty, staff, alumni, and friends—as well as foundations and corporations—who have supported our work on the front lines of medicine. The Shipley Prostate Cancer Research Center launched its new website, which we hope will become the go-to consumer resource for prostate health and support. The center itself was funded by a very generous $10 million gift from BU Trustee Richard Shipley. We also introduce Drs. Shirley Klein (MED’68), Lou Sullivan (MED’58), and Richard Catrambone (MED’92), who have funded substantial scholarships to help reduce student debt. We greatly appreciate your contributions, highlighted in the donor report, that demonstrate your commitment to making Boston University School of Medicine the best place to learn, teach, and discover. On behalf of our students, faculty, and administration, thank you for your generous support. Happy New Year and Best Regards,

Karen Antman, MD

Boston University School of Medicine

WINTER 2018

Boston University Medicine is published by the Boston University Medical Campus Communications Office on behalf of Boston University School of Medicine.

Maria Ober Assistant Dean, Communications

design & production

Boston University Creative Services

contributing writers

Lisa Brown, Gina DiGravio, Kathryn Mariano, Gillian Smith

photography

Boston University Photography, Frank Curran, Dave Green, David Keough, Justin Knight, Jennifer Pottheiser, Jackie Ricciardi, Cydney Scott

Members of the Class of 2021 participate in the traditional White Coat Ceremony.

Please direct any questions or comments to: Maria Ober Communications Office Boston University Medical Campus 85 East Newton Street, M427 Boston, MA 02118 P 617-638-8496 | F 617-638-8044 | E mpober@bu.edu

3

Contents

Boston University Medicine

FEATURE

16

DEPARTMENTS

45 YEARS OF LEARNING, TEACHING, AND SERVICE:

2 Campus News

22 Giving

12 Faculty News

25 Donor Report

20 Research

36 Alumni News

Robert Witzburg, MD, retires 0118

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

1


CAMPUS

News

Facebook “f ” Logo

BUSM ON THE WEB

speaker James O’Connell, MD, president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), followed Dean Antman. Started by O’Connell in 1985, BHCHP now serves more than 12,000 homeless people annually through two hospital-based clinics and more than 60 shelters and outreach sites in Boston. “Medicine is all about the relationships you have with the people you are taking care of and the relationships you have with your colleagues,” O’Connell said. “As you put on your white coat I hope you’ll see it as a sacred symbol of both humility and learning and searching. We are in the business of taking care of people but we have to learn and search and be kind and be humble. “Be sure you take the time to listen to the people you are trying to care for. Don’t lose your sense of wonder, because once you lose your sense of wonder, the white coat will

facebook.com/ BUMedicine

mean nothing. We’re here to help, to learn, and to serve. Take these next four years and your career and help us change this world. It really needs it and we need you.” An international expert on homeless medicine, O’Connell authored Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor, which he signed for students during the reception. As Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Douglas Hughes, MD, read their names, class members ascended the stage, where the following faculty members coated them: David L. Coleman, MD, chair of medicine; Ricardo Cruz, MD, MPH (MED’11, SPH‘03), instructor of medicine; Priya Garg, MD, assistant dean, academic affairs; Allison R. Larson, MD, assistant dean, academic affairs; Julio M. Mazul, MD, instructor of obstetrics & gynecology; Jolion McGreevy, MD, instructor of emergency medicine; Craig F.

CMYK / .eps

Facebook “f ” Logo

CMYK / .eps

twitter.com/ BUMedicine

www.youtube.com/ BUMedicine

Noronha, MD (MED’03), assistant professor of medicine; Daniel G. Remick, MD, chair of pathology & laboratory medicine; Lorraine D. Stanfield, MD, assistant professor of medicine; and Jennifer F. Tseng, MD, MPH, chair of surgery. Led by Associate Dean for Alumni Affairs Jean Ramsey (MED’90, MPH’08), the class then recited the Hippocratic Oath for the first time. “The differences you bring in gender, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, philosophy, and life experiences are our strength. Beneath that white coat, carry your uniqueness proudly, and with great self-awareness of the contributions each one of you can make in the unquestionably open environment we have created for your education and professional development,” Associate Dean for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs Rafael Ortega, MD, said in closing. n

Students don their white coats for the first time. 1

Class of 2021 Urged to Help Change the World

O

n August 2nd, 173 first-year medical students received their white coats, the first step on their journey to becoming physicians. Associate Dean for Student Affairs Angela H. Jackson, MD, welcomed all assembled and Associate Dean and Director of Admissions Robert A. Witzburg, MD (MED’77), officially presented the Class of 2021. “You have met academic and personal challenges, sacrificed much, and accomplished a great deal to reach this moment,” Witzburg said.

2

Boston University School of Medicine

Since 1994, BUSM medical students have gathered before family and friends to don, for the first time, the white lab coats that symbolize their commitment to the medical profession. This class is exceptional in many ways; members come from 26 US states, were born in 16 countries, and speak 28 different languages as a group. Eighty-two percent speak more than one language. “In cultural, social, economic, racial, ethnic, gender identity, educational and linguistic terms, and in your life experiences, you define the pluralism that we so value in our society,” Witzburg told them. BUSM Dean and BUMC Provost Karen H. Antman, MD, shared her insight as to the challenges that new students may face; guest

2

1 1. Students process into the White Coat Ceremony. 2. Associate Dean and Director of Admissions Robert Witzburg, MD, addresses the Class of 2021 and their guests. 3. Many family members and friends attended the ceremony in support of the graduates.

3

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

3


CAMPUS

News

Facebook “f ” Logo

BUSM ON THE WEB

speaker James O’Connell, MD, president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), followed Dean Antman. Started by O’Connell in 1985, BHCHP now serves more than 12,000 homeless people annually through two hospital-based clinics and more than 60 shelters and outreach sites in Boston. “Medicine is all about the relationships you have with the people you are taking care of and the relationships you have with your colleagues,” O’Connell said. “As you put on your white coat I hope you’ll see it as a sacred symbol of both humility and learning and searching. We are in the business of taking care of people but we have to learn and search and be kind and be humble. “Be sure you take the time to listen to the people you are trying to care for. Don’t lose your sense of wonder, because once you lose your sense of wonder, the white coat will

facebook.com/ BUMedicine

mean nothing. We’re here to help, to learn, and to serve. Take these next four years and your career and help us change this world. It really needs it and we need you.” An international expert on homeless medicine, O’Connell authored Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor, which he signed for students during the reception. As Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Douglas Hughes, MD, read their names, class members ascended the stage, where the following faculty members coated them: David L. Coleman, MD, chair of medicine; Ricardo Cruz, MD, MPH (MED’11, SPH‘03), instructor of medicine; Priya Garg, MD, assistant dean, academic affairs; Allison R. Larson, MD, assistant dean, academic affairs; Julio M. Mazul, MD, instructor of obstetrics & gynecology; Jolion McGreevy, MD, instructor of emergency medicine; Craig F.

CMYK / .eps

Facebook “f ” Logo

CMYK / .eps

twitter.com/ BUMedicine

www.youtube.com/ BUMedicine

Noronha, MD (MED’03), assistant professor of medicine; Daniel G. Remick, MD, chair of pathology & laboratory medicine; Lorraine D. Stanfield, MD, assistant professor of medicine; and Jennifer F. Tseng, MD, MPH, chair of surgery. Led by Associate Dean for Alumni Affairs Jean Ramsey (MED’90, MPH’08), the class then recited the Hippocratic Oath for the first time. “The differences you bring in gender, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, philosophy, and life experiences are our strength. Beneath that white coat, carry your uniqueness proudly, and with great self-awareness of the contributions each one of you can make in the unquestionably open environment we have created for your education and professional development,” Associate Dean for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs Rafael Ortega, MD, said in closing. n

Students don their white coats for the first time. 1

Class of 2021 Urged to Help Change the World

O

n August 2nd, 173 first-year medical students received their white coats, the first step on their journey to becoming physicians. Associate Dean for Student Affairs Angela H. Jackson, MD, welcomed all assembled and Associate Dean and Director of Admissions Robert A. Witzburg, MD (MED’77), officially presented the Class of 2021. “You have met academic and personal challenges, sacrificed much, and accomplished a great deal to reach this moment,” Witzburg said.

2

Boston University School of Medicine

Since 1994, BUSM medical students have gathered before family and friends to don, for the first time, the white lab coats that symbolize their commitment to the medical profession. This class is exceptional in many ways; members come from 26 US states, were born in 16 countries, and speak 28 different languages as a group. Eighty-two percent speak more than one language. “In cultural, social, economic, racial, ethnic, gender identity, educational and linguistic terms, and in your life experiences, you define the pluralism that we so value in our society,” Witzburg told them. BUSM Dean and BUMC Provost Karen H. Antman, MD, shared her insight as to the challenges that new students may face; guest

2

1 1. Students process into the White Coat Ceremony. 2. Associate Dean and Director of Admissions Robert Witzburg, MD, addresses the Class of 2021 and their guests. 3. Many family members and friends attended the ceremony in support of the graduates.

3

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

3


CAMPUS NEWS

Teamwork, Harmony, and Remembering to Take It “One Patient at a Time” On Thursday, August 17, Boston University School of Medicine conferred 32 students with Master of Science degrees, the School’s second class of Physician Assistants. “Today we celebrate personal growth and accomplishment,” said founding Program Director Mary L. Warner, MMSc, PA-C, who opened commencement exercises in the 670 Albany Street auditorium. The Class of 2017 joined the 115,000 practicing physician assistants across the United States. A brass quartet’s rendition of “Pomp and Circumstance” signaled the degree candidates to process in among 150 family and friends in attendance. Connor Verbruggen, degree candidate and president of the Carl Toney Society, introduced commencement speaker Michael Milner, DHSc, DHL, PA-C, DFAAPA. Milner, a retired rear admiral and Assistant Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, has been a practicing PA for more than 20 years and was appointed to many leadership roles within the profession, including Regional Senior Health Administrator, the senior-ranking public health officer in the northeast. Milner emphasized teamwork throughout his remarks. “We’re part of an interprofessional team. Take the opportunity to be a

4

Boston University School of Medicine

part of that bigger team. Volunteer when you can, because it can help you grow as an individual.” He also reminded the class, “It is a helping and a healing profession but it is still one patient at a time,” and reflected on his experience in the health service working with Native Americans: “You have to have harmony between what your head’s thinking, what your heart’s thinking, and what your mouth is saying…and if you don’t have that,

pa students nominated the following for awards: • Didactic Instructor of the Year: Stephanie Oberhaus, PhD • Clinical Site of the Year: Department of Internal Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance • Carl M. Toney Student Society Award: Angela Reffel, MHP, PA-C

student award winners included: • Outstanding Academic Achievement: Carolyn Kussmaul • Outstanding Clinical Achievement: Marion Tilearcio • Humanitarian Award: Danielle Murray

you have disease, distress, and anxiety. Work toward that harmony.” For students, the ceremony marks the end of a two-and-a-half-year journey through an intensive course of study, including an integrated pathophysiology and pharmacology course alongside second-year medical students. Praising his classmates as his major source of support and motivation, Ryan Fox of Colorado (who plans to pursue a career in orthopedics) said he was especially proud of making it through the first semester. “We start things off very quickly, getting thrown into the flames. There’s a lot of catching up to do to get on the same pace as the medical students, so getting through that first semester was a very rewarding time.” In addition to classroom work, students also complete 14 months of clinical rotations as well as a thesis project. “Developing relationships with classmates and sharing funny stories both at work and outside of work was definitely my favorite experience,” Kelsey Mazur reflected. “Being in rotations with other PAs from different schools, I feel like we were very well prepared. A unique thing about the BU program is being with the medical students during our first year. It was great to be with our fellow physicians who will be working with us in practice in several years.” A former gymnast, she is excited to explore career opportunities in orthopedic surgery. In closing, Oren Berkowitz, PhD, MSPH, PA-C, led the students in reading the PA Oath. n

PA Class Celebrates at White Coat Ceremony

T

he Class of 2019 celebrated the beginning of their journey through the Boston University School of Medicine Physician Assistant (PA) program at the annual White Coat Ceremony on July 18. The program received 1,950 applications for 2019 and accepted just 45 students, 31 of whom matriculated at the ceremony. Surrounded by family, faculty, and friends, they became the fourth class of PA students to don their white coats—symbolic of their progression to the clinical phase of their education—at BUSM. Mary Warner, MMSc, PA-C, founding program director, and Wade Professor and Chair of Medicine David Coleman, MD, addressed the students, who learned how to complete a history and physical exam in their first semester. Coleman spoke of their “enormous capacity and

1. Our second class of Physician Assistant graduates joined the 115,000 practicing PAs across the country.

1. Welcome to the Physician Assistant program, Class of 2019!

2. Commencement speaker Michael Milner.

3. Kelly Danek, PA-S1, is cloaked by her advisor, Angela Reffel, MHP, PA-C.

ability,” and urged them to embrace their roles as “learners, teachers, and discoverers.” Kirsten Thomsen, PA, who practices in Portland, Maine, and is a board member of the Association of Clinicians for the Underserved, was the keynote speaker. She reminded students to have attentive and respectful interaction with patients and cautioned them to always recognize the common humanity of patient and caregiver. Following the speakers, students were called up one by one to be cloaked in their white coats, after which they recited the Physician Assistant Professional Oath, a summary statement of their professional duties and obligations. They then processed out of the room, greeted along the way by the smiles and clicking cameras of their families and loved ones.  n

2. PA student Thomas Tran, PA-S1, and his family.

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

5


CAMPUS NEWS

Teamwork, Harmony, and Remembering to Take It “One Patient at a Time” On Thursday, August 17, Boston University School of Medicine conferred 32 students with Master of Science degrees, the School’s second class of Physician Assistants. “Today we celebrate personal growth and accomplishment,” said founding Program Director Mary L. Warner, MMSc, PA-C, who opened commencement exercises in the 670 Albany Street auditorium. The Class of 2017 joined the 115,000 practicing physician assistants across the United States. A brass quartet’s rendition of “Pomp and Circumstance” signaled the degree candidates to process in among 150 family and friends in attendance. Connor Verbruggen, degree candidate and president of the Carl Toney Society, introduced commencement speaker Michael Milner, DHSc, DHL, PA-C, DFAAPA. Milner, a retired rear admiral and Assistant Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service, has been a practicing PA for more than 20 years and was appointed to many leadership roles within the profession, including Regional Senior Health Administrator, the senior-ranking public health officer in the northeast. Milner emphasized teamwork throughout his remarks. “We’re part of an interprofessional team. Take the opportunity to be a

4

Boston University School of Medicine

part of that bigger team. Volunteer when you can, because it can help you grow as an individual.” He also reminded the class, “It is a helping and a healing profession but it is still one patient at a time,” and reflected on his experience in the health service working with Native Americans: “You have to have harmony between what your head’s thinking, what your heart’s thinking, and what your mouth is saying…and if you don’t have that,

pa students nominated the following for awards: • Didactic Instructor of the Year: Stephanie Oberhaus, PhD • Clinical Site of the Year: Department of Internal Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance • Carl M. Toney Student Society Award: Angela Reffel, MHP, PA-C

student award winners included: • Outstanding Academic Achievement: Carolyn Kussmaul • Outstanding Clinical Achievement: Marion Tilearcio • Humanitarian Award: Danielle Murray

you have disease, distress, and anxiety. Work toward that harmony.” For students, the ceremony marks the end of a two-and-a-half-year journey through an intensive course of study, including an integrated pathophysiology and pharmacology course alongside second-year medical students. Praising his classmates as his major source of support and motivation, Ryan Fox of Colorado (who plans to pursue a career in orthopedics) said he was especially proud of making it through the first semester. “We start things off very quickly, getting thrown into the flames. There’s a lot of catching up to do to get on the same pace as the medical students, so getting through that first semester was a very rewarding time.” In addition to classroom work, students also complete 14 months of clinical rotations as well as a thesis project. “Developing relationships with classmates and sharing funny stories both at work and outside of work was definitely my favorite experience,” Kelsey Mazur reflected. “Being in rotations with other PAs from different schools, I feel like we were very well prepared. A unique thing about the BU program is being with the medical students during our first year. It was great to be with our fellow physicians who will be working with us in practice in several years.” A former gymnast, she is excited to explore career opportunities in orthopedic surgery. In closing, Oren Berkowitz, PhD, MSPH, PA-C, led the students in reading the PA Oath. n

PA Class Celebrates at White Coat Ceremony

T

he Class of 2019 celebrated the beginning of their journey through the Boston University School of Medicine Physician Assistant (PA) program at the annual White Coat Ceremony on July 18. The program received 1,950 applications for 2019 and accepted just 45 students, 31 of whom matriculated at the ceremony. Surrounded by family, faculty, and friends, they became the fourth class of PA students to don their white coats—symbolic of their progression to the clinical phase of their education—at BUSM. Mary Warner, MMSc, PA-C, founding program director, and Wade Professor and Chair of Medicine David Coleman, MD, addressed the students, who learned how to complete a history and physical exam in their first semester. Coleman spoke of their “enormous capacity and

1. Our second class of Physician Assistant graduates joined the 115,000 practicing PAs across the country.

1. Welcome to the Physician Assistant program, Class of 2019!

2. Commencement speaker Michael Milner.

3. Kelly Danek, PA-S1, is cloaked by her advisor, Angela Reffel, MHP, PA-C.

ability,” and urged them to embrace their roles as “learners, teachers, and discoverers.” Kirsten Thomsen, PA, who practices in Portland, Maine, and is a board member of the Association of Clinicians for the Underserved, was the keynote speaker. She reminded students to have attentive and respectful interaction with patients and cautioned them to always recognize the common humanity of patient and caregiver. Following the speakers, students were called up one by one to be cloaked in their white coats, after which they recited the Physician Assistant Professional Oath, a summary statement of their professional duties and obligations. They then processed out of the room, greeted along the way by the smiles and clicking cameras of their families and loved ones.  n

2. PA student Thomas Tran, PA-S1, and his family.

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

5


CAMPUS NEWS

BU Alzheimer’s Disease Center Wins $5.4 Million NIH Grant Renewal Will fund research on early diagnostics, genetic risk factors, interventions BY SARA RIMER

T

he National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded Boston University’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center a three-year, $5.4 million grant to continue its research into interventions that will reduce the human and economic costs of Alzheimer’s disease and its related conditions, which includes chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Dozens of researchers at the Alzheimer’s Disease Center (ADC) are running clinical trials that may lead to treatments and a cure for the disease. They are looking for tests that could lead to early diagnosis and interventions to prevent or delay the disease, working to understand genetic risk factors, and studying the effect of the disease on caregivers. The center recently identified two genes responsible for Alzheimer’s disease in African Americans. Located on the BU Medical Campus and at the VA Boston Healthcare System in Massachusetts, the ADC is one of 32 NIH-funded Alzheimer’s centers in the United States. The NIH’s support “has helped our researchers and clinicians undertake and further their research and educational mission by taking crucial steps forward to combat this disease,” says ADC director Neil Kowall, a School of Medicine professor of neurology and pathology. Kowall is also chief of neurology at the VA Boston Healthcare System. Alzheimer’s is a progressive and ultimately fatal disease that attacks brain cells, causing memory loss, behavioral changes, confusion, and severe deterioration of language skills. Associated with advancing age, the disease afflicts more than 5 million Americans 65 and older, and the National Institute on Aging projects that number could reach 16 million by 2050 unless effective interventions are found. 6

Boston University School of Medicine

and related disorders, as well as to encourage people to participate in research. The latest NIH funding is a renewal of a research grant it has been awarding to the ADC since it was established in 1996, says Budson, ADC associate director of research and VA Boston associate chief of staff for education. In addition to research on Alzheimer’s disease, NIH funding to BU has made possible the center’s research into chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which has led to discoveries on repetitive brain trauma in athletes and military personnel.

PhD Alumni Recognized for Distinguished Careers at Inaugural Ceremony

This is a disease that affects people from all walks of life, every race, both genders. It doesn’t matter what your socioeconomic status is, or how much or how little money you have. It affects everyone.

— david greer, MD, BUSM PROFESSOR AND CHAIR OF NEUROLOGY AND BMC CHIEF OF NEUROLOGY

Andrew Budson is part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center’s National Institutes of Health–funded efforts to help clinicians and the public better understand the disease and related disorders, and encourage people to participate in research.

Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia are projected to cost the nation $259 billion this year and the figure could reach $1.1 trillion by 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. The NIH grant, and the research it enables through the ADC, “is extremely important from a public health standpoint,” says David Greer, a MED professor and chair of the neurology department, which includes the ADC. “This is a disease that affects people from all walks of life, every race, both genders. It doesn’t matter what your socioeconomic status is, or how much or how little money you have. It affects everyone.” Research, says Greer, is crucial for “improving the quality of life for people

with the disease, and, hopefully, developing some type of cure or treatment.” Greer lists some of the many questions around potential treatment that researchers at the ADC and other centers around the country are pursuing: “What are the targets? Where should we be looking? Are there vaccines that can be further developed? Are there certain enzyme inhibitors that can be tried? Are there vitamins that can be used? What are the underpinnings of the syndrome?” As director of the ADC’s Education Core, Andrew Budson, also a MED professor of neurology, leads the center’s NIH-funded efforts to educate both clinicians and the public in better understanding the disease

“These centers across the United States are here to facilitate research in Alzheimer’s both in collaborating in big, national initiatives,” he says, “and in helping local investigators to conduct their own innovative research projects.” Budson, for example, is working on interventions that won’t prevent, cure, or slow the disease progression, but will nonetheless improve the lives of patients and their families. “Our work has shown that individuals with mild cognitive impairment can use different strategies to improve their memory—strategies that can be applied to their day-to-day lives,” says Budson. The goal of this work, he adds, is to allow people to stay at home and remain independent as long as possible. Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the only one among the top 10 without a way to prevent, slow, or stop its progression, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. n

Erika Ebbel Angle, PhD

Steven Perrin, PhD

The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences (GMS) held its inaugural PhD Distinguished Alumni Awards on Thursday, September 14. Faculty, staff, current students, and alumni gathered in Hiebert Lounge for afternoon and evening celebrations in honor of two graduates who have made outstanding contributions to the fields of medicine and science. Sponsored by BU’s BEST Program, the events also allowed current students to network with alumni and faculty. Associate Provost Lynda Hyman, PhD, is eager to hear from more of the division’s nearly 1,200 alumni. “We are delighted to learn from our alumni and are always looking to recognize their accomplishments,” she said. This year’s Distinguished Alumni are Erika Ebbel Angle, PhD, and Steven Perrin, PhD. A 2012 graduate of the Department of Biochemistry, Angle founded and is executive director of Science from Scientists, an organization that teaches and inspires the next generation to identify and solve real-world problems by improving STEM literacy. Angle also co-founded and is CEO of Ixcela, a health and wellness company that helps individuals improve their internal well-being. Angle was introduced by her BUSM mentor, Catherine Costello, MS, PhD, and told a series of stories about her life experiences, from her days of volunteering at the VA as Miss Massachusetts to the beginning stages of starting her own company. She advised students to keep their minds open, think outside the box, and recognize the importance of serendipity. A 1995 graduate of the Department of Biochemistry and the CEO and CSO of the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) in Cambridge, Perrin serves on the Advisory Council for the NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Theo Hatzipetros (MED’07), a senior scientist at ALS TDI, nominated Perrin for the award. He advised students, “Be creative and take chances. There are no boundaries,” and stressed that graduates have to wear multiple hats (especially at smaller or medium-size firms) and must stay on the cutting edge of science and medicine to help prevent diseases. He also shared some of the complexities of endeavoring to cure ALS. n Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

7


CAMPUS NEWS

BU Alzheimer’s Disease Center Wins $5.4 Million NIH Grant Renewal Will fund research on early diagnostics, genetic risk factors, interventions BY SARA RIMER

T

he National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded Boston University’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center a three-year, $5.4 million grant to continue its research into interventions that will reduce the human and economic costs of Alzheimer’s disease and its related conditions, which includes chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Dozens of researchers at the Alzheimer’s Disease Center (ADC) are running clinical trials that may lead to treatments and a cure for the disease. They are looking for tests that could lead to early diagnosis and interventions to prevent or delay the disease, working to understand genetic risk factors, and studying the effect of the disease on caregivers. The center recently identified two genes responsible for Alzheimer’s disease in African Americans. Located on the BU Medical Campus and at the VA Boston Healthcare System in Massachusetts, the ADC is one of 32 NIH-funded Alzheimer’s centers in the United States. The NIH’s support “has helped our researchers and clinicians undertake and further their research and educational mission by taking crucial steps forward to combat this disease,” says ADC director Neil Kowall, a School of Medicine professor of neurology and pathology. Kowall is also chief of neurology at the VA Boston Healthcare System. Alzheimer’s is a progressive and ultimately fatal disease that attacks brain cells, causing memory loss, behavioral changes, confusion, and severe deterioration of language skills. Associated with advancing age, the disease afflicts more than 5 million Americans 65 and older, and the National Institute on Aging projects that number could reach 16 million by 2050 unless effective interventions are found. 6

Boston University School of Medicine

and related disorders, as well as to encourage people to participate in research. The latest NIH funding is a renewal of a research grant it has been awarding to the ADC since it was established in 1996, says Budson, ADC associate director of research and VA Boston associate chief of staff for education. In addition to research on Alzheimer’s disease, NIH funding to BU has made possible the center’s research into chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which has led to discoveries on repetitive brain trauma in athletes and military personnel.

PhD Alumni Recognized for Distinguished Careers at Inaugural Ceremony

This is a disease that affects people from all walks of life, every race, both genders. It doesn’t matter what your socioeconomic status is, or how much or how little money you have. It affects everyone.

— david greer, MD, BUSM PROFESSOR AND CHAIR OF NEUROLOGY AND BMC CHIEF OF NEUROLOGY

Andrew Budson is part of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center’s National Institutes of Health–funded efforts to help clinicians and the public better understand the disease and related disorders, and encourage people to participate in research.

Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia are projected to cost the nation $259 billion this year and the figure could reach $1.1 trillion by 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. The NIH grant, and the research it enables through the ADC, “is extremely important from a public health standpoint,” says David Greer, a MED professor and chair of the neurology department, which includes the ADC. “This is a disease that affects people from all walks of life, every race, both genders. It doesn’t matter what your socioeconomic status is, or how much or how little money you have. It affects everyone.” Research, says Greer, is crucial for “improving the quality of life for people

with the disease, and, hopefully, developing some type of cure or treatment.” Greer lists some of the many questions around potential treatment that researchers at the ADC and other centers around the country are pursuing: “What are the targets? Where should we be looking? Are there vaccines that can be further developed? Are there certain enzyme inhibitors that can be tried? Are there vitamins that can be used? What are the underpinnings of the syndrome?” As director of the ADC’s Education Core, Andrew Budson, also a MED professor of neurology, leads the center’s NIH-funded efforts to educate both clinicians and the public in better understanding the disease

“These centers across the United States are here to facilitate research in Alzheimer’s both in collaborating in big, national initiatives,” he says, “and in helping local investigators to conduct their own innovative research projects.” Budson, for example, is working on interventions that won’t prevent, cure, or slow the disease progression, but will nonetheless improve the lives of patients and their families. “Our work has shown that individuals with mild cognitive impairment can use different strategies to improve their memory—strategies that can be applied to their day-to-day lives,” says Budson. The goal of this work, he adds, is to allow people to stay at home and remain independent as long as possible. Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the only one among the top 10 without a way to prevent, slow, or stop its progression, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. n

Erika Ebbel Angle, PhD

Steven Perrin, PhD

The Division of Graduate Medical Sciences (GMS) held its inaugural PhD Distinguished Alumni Awards on Thursday, September 14. Faculty, staff, current students, and alumni gathered in Hiebert Lounge for afternoon and evening celebrations in honor of two graduates who have made outstanding contributions to the fields of medicine and science. Sponsored by BU’s BEST Program, the events also allowed current students to network with alumni and faculty. Associate Provost Lynda Hyman, PhD, is eager to hear from more of the division’s nearly 1,200 alumni. “We are delighted to learn from our alumni and are always looking to recognize their accomplishments,” she said. This year’s Distinguished Alumni are Erika Ebbel Angle, PhD, and Steven Perrin, PhD. A 2012 graduate of the Department of Biochemistry, Angle founded and is executive director of Science from Scientists, an organization that teaches and inspires the next generation to identify and solve real-world problems by improving STEM literacy. Angle also co-founded and is CEO of Ixcela, a health and wellness company that helps individuals improve their internal well-being. Angle was introduced by her BUSM mentor, Catherine Costello, MS, PhD, and told a series of stories about her life experiences, from her days of volunteering at the VA as Miss Massachusetts to the beginning stages of starting her own company. She advised students to keep their minds open, think outside the box, and recognize the importance of serendipity. A 1995 graduate of the Department of Biochemistry and the CEO and CSO of the ALS Therapy Development Institute (ALS TDI) in Cambridge, Perrin serves on the Advisory Council for the NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Theo Hatzipetros (MED’07), a senior scientist at ALS TDI, nominated Perrin for the award. He advised students, “Be creative and take chances. There are no boundaries,” and stressed that graduates have to wear multiple hats (especially at smaller or medium-size firms) and must stay on the cutting edge of science and medicine to help prevent diseases. He also shared some of the complexities of endeavoring to cure ALS. n Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

7


CAMPUS NEWS

Neuroscience Program Gives Undergrads Experience, Insight

BUSM Gives High Schoolers a Jump on Health Careers

Integrates research, hands-on neuroanatomy, and neurosurgery

BY JOEL BROWN

Enrichment program offers Boston’s underrepresented minorities internships and more

BY JOEL BROWN From their looks of cheerful expectation, you might think the eight undergraduates gathered around a U-shaped table in the BU School of Medicine anatomy lab are waiting to see a movie or a band. Except the next thing they do is don lab aprons, gloves, and safety glasses. Then neuroanatomy instructor Joseph Goodliffe, a BUSM postdoctoral researcher, brings out the brains. “Try to identify some of those structures we were discussing in class earlier,” says Goodliffe (MED’16) as he lifts several white plastic buckets onto the table. Inside, floating in a preservative solution, are cadaver brains that have been donated to the anatomy lab, most of them already cut in half along the median, providing a nice clear cross section for the students searching out structures such as the corpus callosum, hypothalamus, and caudate. The students speak with a mix of awe and seriousness, but no one seems intimidated. It’s not their first time, after all. “That one still has the spinal cord attached,” one says, nodding toward a nearby bucket. “That’s pretty intense.” Welcome to the new Summer Program in Neuroscience (SPIN), which gives highachieving undergraduates from colleges and universities around the country a head start in the subject, offering experiences that they wouldn’t normally get until grad school. “They’re a joy to work with. They’re really, really interested in learning,” says James Holsapple, associate professor and chair of neurosurgery and an associate professor of pediatrics, who began the program last year. 8

Boston University School of Medicine

University of Michigan senior Rachel Feltman (from left), Colgate senior Courtney Dunphy, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign junior Madeline McDevitt with the cadaver brains that have been donated to BUSM.

Holsapple aimed SPIN at undergrads who are studying neuroscience or who are on a premed track, and at biology and computer science students. “There’s a lot of crossover between neuroscience and computer science now,” he says, from computational neuroscience to artificial intelligence. The program has three components: • Lab: The students are assigned to a neuroscience lab, where they assist in ongoing research, from benchwork to behavioral experiments to numerical simulations. • Didactic: Students attend rounds and participate in subsequent sessions where the whole neurosurgery department meets to review cases, hear lectures from staff, and ask questions. They also have their own neuroanatomy class with Goodliffe, “so they get a taste of what medical school looks like,” Holsapple says. • Clinical: Students see patients with Holsapple in clinical settings, and they observe neurosurgery right in the operating room. “They’re wearing scrubs, roaming the hospital with us, and watching surgery being done,” he says. There were more than 100 applications for eight slots, the small number constrained by the need to find a lab mentor for each student and to fit them all into clinical and operating rooms.

Holsapple says SPIN benefits BUSM as well as the students. “As far as we know, this is the only program of its type,” he says. “It brings attention to BU as being innovative in the educational space, and it brings great students from all over the country to work in BU labs. It’s a good recruitment tool.” Some SPIN students have already expressed interest in returning to BU for graduate studies or for medical school. And the program’s informal lunch speakers have included faculty offering advice about the medical school application process. As Holsapple sees it, the neuroscience program could be just a beginning. “The SPIN framework could be adapted to other clinical specialties. You could do the summer program in nephrology, the summer program in psychiatry, the summer program in internal medicine.” At the beginning of the eight weeks, he gave each student a blank lab notebook and told them they should write down anything they see or hear that they don’t understand. During the Tuesday morning didactic sessions with staff, time is always set aside for them to ask questions about those things. “That inculcates a culture of inquiry and openness about questions,” Holsapple says, “of not being embarrassed to admit you don’t know something, which is the first step to knowing something.” n

A

lthough he is more cheerful and less intimidating, Donald DeRosa invokes the curmudgeonly TV doctor Gregory House to challenge the high school students facing him in a School of Medicine classroom on a recent afternoon. Like House, “We’re going to give you a medical mystery and ask you to solve it,” says DeRosa (SED’91,’01), a School of Education clinical associate professor of curriculum and teaching, BUSM research assistant professor, and director of CityLab, a biotechnology learning laboratory housed at BUSM. “What’s the mechanism of the disease— what’s going on inside that person’s body?” He shows them a video of an actual patient talking about her unpredictable, all-over body pain and how it interferes with her life. The students are quick to suggest diagnoses: “migraines” doesn’t quite work, but DeRosa nods at “a nerve disease” or “a circulatory disease.” He asks, “Do you have enough information to answer this question?” The students’ answer: “No.” The students, all Boston residents, attend schools throughout the area and are enrolled in the Youth to Health Careers (Y2HC) Summer Enrichment Program, administered by the Boston Public Health Commission’s Boston Area Health Education Center (BAHEC). The mission of the Y2HC program is to increase diversity among the city’s healthcare workforce by helping youth from underserved populations pursue careers in health and public health. The intensive six-week program provides more than 80 students with academic enrichment, college preparation, and internships, with help from healthcare partners around Boston, among them BUSM, Boston Medical Center, the BU School of Public Health, the Tufts University School of Dentistry, the Harvard School of Public Health, and Boston Children’s Hospital. The school has long offered the use of its facilities for the program, so when BAHEC administrators approached Dean Karen Antman earlier this year seeking a closer partnership, the response was overwhelmingly positive. BUSM provided not only classrooms and labs, faculty, and internships, but also created educational programs. “It was an incredible collaborative effort across the Charles River and Medical Campuses, including the hospital,” says Hee-Young Park, professor and chair of medical sciences and education and assistant dean of the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences, who chaired a committee to shape the new program. “Faculty, staff, students, and clinicians donated their time to make this happen within the course of a month. Everyone was so committed to providing educational oppor-

Danny Truong (left), a British International School of Boston senior, and Brandon Hector, a Boston Latin Academy senior, work on a sickle cell experiment as part of the Youth to Health Careers (Y2HC) program at the School of Medicine.

tunities in health sciences for these students. Not a single person I approached said no.”

Back to the medical mystery After DeRosa finishes showing the video to his Y2HC students, they set to work in teams. They quickly identify the anomalies in images of the patient’s blood—fewer red blood cells than a normal image, many of them shaped abnormally, like crescent moons. And the patient’s family tree, with those who had the same illness marked, suggests a recessive genetic disorder. One student thinks it’s sickle cell disease, an inherited blood disorder that disproportionately affects African Americans. “But there is a difference between the facts and an inference,” DeRosa cautions. An experiment is necessary to confirm the diagnosis: two sets of (simulated) hemoglobin samples are subjected to an electrical charge; the one with sickle cell will move more quickly toward the charge. The students have to measure precise amounts of hemoglobin as well as make the gelatin for the “racetrack” the samples will run. As the students don lab coats and safety glasses a lot of selfies are snapped, but they quickly turn serious as they launch the experiment. When it’s over, sickle cell has been confirmed. “We saved him,” one student hoots, and there are high fives all around. “Our school is all focused on academics in math and science; it’s all about books, not the experience you’re getting,” says Mahogany Black, a rising senior at Boston Latin School. “They have labs, but definitely not like this.” The Y2HC students tend to be highly motivated classroom achievers. They spend their mornings delving into math and science and labs in topics like brain anatomy and dissection. Afternoons are for electives, tours, and demonstrations at such places as the College of Engineering’s Engineering Product Innovation Center (EPIC) and the Photonics Center on the Charles River Campus. College prep is also on the syllabus. In addition, the students have internships across the Medical Campus. Some students enter the program already interested in public health or health-system careers, while others are just learning what’s out there, says Anthony Crosson, BAHEC director. The goal is that by the time they’ve completed the program, students have gained the knowledge and confidence to pursue these careers. n Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

9


CAMPUS NEWS

Neuroscience Program Gives Undergrads Experience, Insight

BUSM Gives High Schoolers a Jump on Health Careers

Integrates research, hands-on neuroanatomy, and neurosurgery

BY JOEL BROWN

Enrichment program offers Boston’s underrepresented minorities internships and more

BY JOEL BROWN From their looks of cheerful expectation, you might think the eight undergraduates gathered around a U-shaped table in the BU School of Medicine anatomy lab are waiting to see a movie or a band. Except the next thing they do is don lab aprons, gloves, and safety glasses. Then neuroanatomy instructor Joseph Goodliffe, a BUSM postdoctoral researcher, brings out the brains. “Try to identify some of those structures we were discussing in class earlier,” says Goodliffe (MED’16) as he lifts several white plastic buckets onto the table. Inside, floating in a preservative solution, are cadaver brains that have been donated to the anatomy lab, most of them already cut in half along the median, providing a nice clear cross section for the students searching out structures such as the corpus callosum, hypothalamus, and caudate. The students speak with a mix of awe and seriousness, but no one seems intimidated. It’s not their first time, after all. “That one still has the spinal cord attached,” one says, nodding toward a nearby bucket. “That’s pretty intense.” Welcome to the new Summer Program in Neuroscience (SPIN), which gives highachieving undergraduates from colleges and universities around the country a head start in the subject, offering experiences that they wouldn’t normally get until grad school. “They’re a joy to work with. They’re really, really interested in learning,” says James Holsapple, associate professor and chair of neurosurgery and an associate professor of pediatrics, who began the program last year. 8

Boston University School of Medicine

University of Michigan senior Rachel Feltman (from left), Colgate senior Courtney Dunphy, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign junior Madeline McDevitt with the cadaver brains that have been donated to BUSM.

Holsapple aimed SPIN at undergrads who are studying neuroscience or who are on a premed track, and at biology and computer science students. “There’s a lot of crossover between neuroscience and computer science now,” he says, from computational neuroscience to artificial intelligence. The program has three components: • Lab: The students are assigned to a neuroscience lab, where they assist in ongoing research, from benchwork to behavioral experiments to numerical simulations. • Didactic: Students attend rounds and participate in subsequent sessions where the whole neurosurgery department meets to review cases, hear lectures from staff, and ask questions. They also have their own neuroanatomy class with Goodliffe, “so they get a taste of what medical school looks like,” Holsapple says. • Clinical: Students see patients with Holsapple in clinical settings, and they observe neurosurgery right in the operating room. “They’re wearing scrubs, roaming the hospital with us, and watching surgery being done,” he says. There were more than 100 applications for eight slots, the small number constrained by the need to find a lab mentor for each student and to fit them all into clinical and operating rooms.

Holsapple says SPIN benefits BUSM as well as the students. “As far as we know, this is the only program of its type,” he says. “It brings attention to BU as being innovative in the educational space, and it brings great students from all over the country to work in BU labs. It’s a good recruitment tool.” Some SPIN students have already expressed interest in returning to BU for graduate studies or for medical school. And the program’s informal lunch speakers have included faculty offering advice about the medical school application process. As Holsapple sees it, the neuroscience program could be just a beginning. “The SPIN framework could be adapted to other clinical specialties. You could do the summer program in nephrology, the summer program in psychiatry, the summer program in internal medicine.” At the beginning of the eight weeks, he gave each student a blank lab notebook and told them they should write down anything they see or hear that they don’t understand. During the Tuesday morning didactic sessions with staff, time is always set aside for them to ask questions about those things. “That inculcates a culture of inquiry and openness about questions,” Holsapple says, “of not being embarrassed to admit you don’t know something, which is the first step to knowing something.” n

A

lthough he is more cheerful and less intimidating, Donald DeRosa invokes the curmudgeonly TV doctor Gregory House to challenge the high school students facing him in a School of Medicine classroom on a recent afternoon. Like House, “We’re going to give you a medical mystery and ask you to solve it,” says DeRosa (SED’91,’01), a School of Education clinical associate professor of curriculum and teaching, BUSM research assistant professor, and director of CityLab, a biotechnology learning laboratory housed at BUSM. “What’s the mechanism of the disease— what’s going on inside that person’s body?” He shows them a video of an actual patient talking about her unpredictable, all-over body pain and how it interferes with her life. The students are quick to suggest diagnoses: “migraines” doesn’t quite work, but DeRosa nods at “a nerve disease” or “a circulatory disease.” He asks, “Do you have enough information to answer this question?” The students’ answer: “No.” The students, all Boston residents, attend schools throughout the area and are enrolled in the Youth to Health Careers (Y2HC) Summer Enrichment Program, administered by the Boston Public Health Commission’s Boston Area Health Education Center (BAHEC). The mission of the Y2HC program is to increase diversity among the city’s healthcare workforce by helping youth from underserved populations pursue careers in health and public health. The intensive six-week program provides more than 80 students with academic enrichment, college preparation, and internships, with help from healthcare partners around Boston, among them BUSM, Boston Medical Center, the BU School of Public Health, the Tufts University School of Dentistry, the Harvard School of Public Health, and Boston Children’s Hospital. The school has long offered the use of its facilities for the program, so when BAHEC administrators approached Dean Karen Antman earlier this year seeking a closer partnership, the response was overwhelmingly positive. BUSM provided not only classrooms and labs, faculty, and internships, but also created educational programs. “It was an incredible collaborative effort across the Charles River and Medical Campuses, including the hospital,” says Hee-Young Park, professor and chair of medical sciences and education and assistant dean of the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences, who chaired a committee to shape the new program. “Faculty, staff, students, and clinicians donated their time to make this happen within the course of a month. Everyone was so committed to providing educational oppor-

Danny Truong (left), a British International School of Boston senior, and Brandon Hector, a Boston Latin Academy senior, work on a sickle cell experiment as part of the Youth to Health Careers (Y2HC) program at the School of Medicine.

tunities in health sciences for these students. Not a single person I approached said no.”

Back to the medical mystery After DeRosa finishes showing the video to his Y2HC students, they set to work in teams. They quickly identify the anomalies in images of the patient’s blood—fewer red blood cells than a normal image, many of them shaped abnormally, like crescent moons. And the patient’s family tree, with those who had the same illness marked, suggests a recessive genetic disorder. One student thinks it’s sickle cell disease, an inherited blood disorder that disproportionately affects African Americans. “But there is a difference between the facts and an inference,” DeRosa cautions. An experiment is necessary to confirm the diagnosis: two sets of (simulated) hemoglobin samples are subjected to an electrical charge; the one with sickle cell will move more quickly toward the charge. The students have to measure precise amounts of hemoglobin as well as make the gelatin for the “racetrack” the samples will run. As the students don lab coats and safety glasses a lot of selfies are snapped, but they quickly turn serious as they launch the experiment. When it’s over, sickle cell has been confirmed. “We saved him,” one student hoots, and there are high fives all around. “Our school is all focused on academics in math and science; it’s all about books, not the experience you’re getting,” says Mahogany Black, a rising senior at Boston Latin School. “They have labs, but definitely not like this.” The Y2HC students tend to be highly motivated classroom achievers. They spend their mornings delving into math and science and labs in topics like brain anatomy and dissection. Afternoons are for electives, tours, and demonstrations at such places as the College of Engineering’s Engineering Product Innovation Center (EPIC) and the Photonics Center on the Charles River Campus. College prep is also on the syllabus. In addition, the students have internships across the Medical Campus. Some students enter the program already interested in public health or health-system careers, while others are just learning what’s out there, says Anthony Crosson, BAHEC director. The goal is that by the time they’ve completed the program, students have gained the knowledge and confidence to pursue these careers. n Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

9


CAMPUS NEWS

CReM Honored for Sharing Stem Cell Lines Team wins award from Association of American Medical Colleges BY BARBARA MORAN

D

arrell Kotton, Gustavo Mostoslavsky, and George Murphy began the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) in 2008 with a mission. It was not to win a Nobel Prize, launch more spin-offs than their peers, or make megabucks and retire at 35. Rather, their mantra was both humbler and grander: “decrease the burden of human suffering on the planet, help patients, and advance new knowledge.” Since then, the lab has made a name for itself not only through its top-notch research on stem cells and lung disease but also because of its willingness to share the resources they create—for free, to anyone. CReM’s philosophy of openness challenges the cutthroat, hypersecret culture that dominates many other life science labs. And now the lab’s commitment to open-source biology, as it is known, has earned it the 2017 Sharing Research Resources Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), established “to recognize successful models for sharing biomedical research resources.” “There was a lot of skepticism at first that this plan could succeed,” says Kotton, director of CReM, who says his team is “humbled and honored” to receive the award. “But sharing reagents and expertise, without expectation of return, creates a culture of openness that has proven very successful for us.” “We are very proud that CReM has been recognized both for the quality of their research and for setting a shining example of how science can advance through information sharing,” says Robert A. Brown, president of BU. CReM scientists work with induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs, which were discovered by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. Yamanaka figured out how to take an adult human cell and reprogram it into a stem cell with the ability—theoretically—to grow into any organ. CReM researchers created an 10

Boston University School of Medicine

Shipley Center Website Offers Prostate Cancer Facts for Patients

For its founding donor, the center is as much a beacon of information to patients as an incubator for medical research. Shipley was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2014 and chose focal laser ablation, a new and less invasive treatment than surgery and other therapies. “The website will be unique in that it will provide up-to-date information, both on diagnostic and treatment options, in a form Gift from alum and trustee funds the layman can easily understand,” Shipley says. research and information warehouse That the information is unbiased “is huge,” he adds. “What usually gets recommended to a patient is based on the docBY RICH BARLOW tor’s specialty.” Anticipated monthly articles on the site will cover new developments, including controversial diagnostic approaches and treatments, intended to “stimulate people ne in every seven men in the United States will get to think.” prostate cancer, making it the second most comThe government projects that prostate cancer will kill almost mon type, after skin cancer, for American men. It 27,000 Americans this year. tends to be a slow-growing disease, but can sprint to The more than 100,000 patients who elect a prostatectomy annulife-threatening severity if detected too late. Screenally to beat the disease often ing for prostate cancer can yield suffer erectile dysfunction and false-positive findings, but those incontinence. Every decision, from most at risk for the disease—men whether to be screened at all for whose father or a brother had the disease to which treatment is prostate cancer, African American best (many patients who forego men, overweight men, and those a prostatectomy opt instead for in their 60s and 70s who are in radiation), “may be very confusing good health and could expect to patients and their caregivers,” years more of life—still should ask Gignac says. “There are many their doctors whether screening controversies in the prostate canmakes sense for them. cer field,” such as whether to be That information comes from screened, “and every patient is the just-launched website of the different…. It can be very overShipley Prostate Cancer Research whelming and challenging to Center at the School of Medicine. navigate all the options.” Created with a $10.5 million gift So the Shipley prostate site from BU Trustee Richard Shipley is crafted in jargon-free English, (Questrom’68,’72), the center’s “with the hope that the informalabs will be in the Conte Building The website for the Shipley Prostate Cancer Research tion helps patients have a better on the Medical Campus when it Center provides basic information about the prostate gland understanding of their situation opens. The center’s research will and how disease affects it. Visit bu.edu/shipley for more information. and options for the next step in be focused on finding genomic their care, and are more comfortapproaches to determine which able communicating with the prostate cancers are aggressive teams of doctors and other medical staff helping them through the and need treatment, and which can simply be monitored. process,” says Gignac, who also heads ambulatory medical care The center’s website and its Facebook page and Twitter account for hematology and oncology at Boston Medical Center, BUSM’s are up and running now, offering easy-to-follow, impartial informateaching hospital. tion on practically everything anyone needs to know about prostate “This site discusses testing and treatment therapies that are cancer. There’s “Prostate 101,” an overview about the prostate, inforevolving or are up-and-coming,” she says, ones that “may not yet mation about prostate cancer and getting a second opinion, and a be part of the standard treatment plan, but may be available in checklist of symptoms; information on screening; treatment options; specialized institutions or as part of a clinical trial.” and the state of research. “We are excited as we implement the plans for the new center This knowledge is available to patients everywhere, “irrespective and thank Dick Shipley for his generosity and vision,” says Karen of where they choose to get their medical care or where they are in Antman, dean of MED and provost of the Medical Campus. “We terms of testing, diagnosis, or treatment,” says site editor Gretchen want this website to be a go-to consumer resource for prostate Gignac, a School of Medicine associate professor of hematology health and support for patients and their families.” n and medical oncology.

O

From left, Gustavo Mostoslavsky, Darrell Kotton, and George Murphy, founders of BU’s Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM). CReM researchers won the 2017 AAMC Sharing Research Resources Award for their commitment to open-source biology.

efficient technique for reprogramming adult human blood and skin cells into iPSCs, and in 2009 they began sharing their technology, and the resulting cell lines, free of charge with the research community. By 2010, the CReM investigators, whose work is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, and others, had published a large number of patient-specific iPSC lines, including the first 100 distinctive to lung disease. CReM’s sharing of unpublished stem cell lines has broadly impacted the lung research community, resulting in collaborations and publications with groups formerly consid-

ered CReM competitors, and CReM recently became sole iPSC repository for the 7,000 participants of the long-running Framingham Heart Study, the nation’s longest-running epidemiological study, which began in 1948 and has been run by BU since 1971, with support from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Kotton says that the award acknowledges not only the work of CReM, but of all the other labs and institutions that have joined in this venture into scientific sharing. “Just the fact that an award like this exists,” he says, “shows that this way of doing research has value.” n

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

11


CAMPUS NEWS

CReM Honored for Sharing Stem Cell Lines Team wins award from Association of American Medical Colleges BY BARBARA MORAN

D

arrell Kotton, Gustavo Mostoslavsky, and George Murphy began the Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) in 2008 with a mission. It was not to win a Nobel Prize, launch more spin-offs than their peers, or make megabucks and retire at 35. Rather, their mantra was both humbler and grander: “decrease the burden of human suffering on the planet, help patients, and advance new knowledge.” Since then, the lab has made a name for itself not only through its top-notch research on stem cells and lung disease but also because of its willingness to share the resources they create—for free, to anyone. CReM’s philosophy of openness challenges the cutthroat, hypersecret culture that dominates many other life science labs. And now the lab’s commitment to open-source biology, as it is known, has earned it the 2017 Sharing Research Resources Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), established “to recognize successful models for sharing biomedical research resources.” “There was a lot of skepticism at first that this plan could succeed,” says Kotton, director of CReM, who says his team is “humbled and honored” to receive the award. “But sharing reagents and expertise, without expectation of return, creates a culture of openness that has proven very successful for us.” “We are very proud that CReM has been recognized both for the quality of their research and for setting a shining example of how science can advance through information sharing,” says Robert A. Brown, president of BU. CReM scientists work with induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPSCs, which were discovered by Shinya Yamanaka in 2006. Yamanaka figured out how to take an adult human cell and reprogram it into a stem cell with the ability—theoretically—to grow into any organ. CReM researchers created an 10

Boston University School of Medicine

Shipley Center Website Offers Prostate Cancer Facts for Patients

For its founding donor, the center is as much a beacon of information to patients as an incubator for medical research. Shipley was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2014 and chose focal laser ablation, a new and less invasive treatment than surgery and other therapies. “The website will be unique in that it will provide up-to-date information, both on diagnostic and treatment options, in a form Gift from alum and trustee funds the layman can easily understand,” Shipley says. research and information warehouse That the information is unbiased “is huge,” he adds. “What usually gets recommended to a patient is based on the docBY RICH BARLOW tor’s specialty.” Anticipated monthly articles on the site will cover new developments, including controversial diagnostic approaches and treatments, intended to “stimulate people ne in every seven men in the United States will get to think.” prostate cancer, making it the second most comThe government projects that prostate cancer will kill almost mon type, after skin cancer, for American men. It 27,000 Americans this year. tends to be a slow-growing disease, but can sprint to The more than 100,000 patients who elect a prostatectomy annulife-threatening severity if detected too late. Screenally to beat the disease often ing for prostate cancer can yield suffer erectile dysfunction and false-positive findings, but those incontinence. Every decision, from most at risk for the disease—men whether to be screened at all for whose father or a brother had the disease to which treatment is prostate cancer, African American best (many patients who forego men, overweight men, and those a prostatectomy opt instead for in their 60s and 70s who are in radiation), “may be very confusing good health and could expect to patients and their caregivers,” years more of life—still should ask Gignac says. “There are many their doctors whether screening controversies in the prostate canmakes sense for them. cer field,” such as whether to be That information comes from screened, “and every patient is the just-launched website of the different…. It can be very overShipley Prostate Cancer Research whelming and challenging to Center at the School of Medicine. navigate all the options.” Created with a $10.5 million gift So the Shipley prostate site from BU Trustee Richard Shipley is crafted in jargon-free English, (Questrom’68,’72), the center’s “with the hope that the informalabs will be in the Conte Building The website for the Shipley Prostate Cancer Research tion helps patients have a better on the Medical Campus when it Center provides basic information about the prostate gland understanding of their situation opens. The center’s research will and how disease affects it. Visit bu.edu/shipley for more information. and options for the next step in be focused on finding genomic their care, and are more comfortapproaches to determine which able communicating with the prostate cancers are aggressive teams of doctors and other medical staff helping them through the and need treatment, and which can simply be monitored. process,” says Gignac, who also heads ambulatory medical care The center’s website and its Facebook page and Twitter account for hematology and oncology at Boston Medical Center, BUSM’s are up and running now, offering easy-to-follow, impartial informateaching hospital. tion on practically everything anyone needs to know about prostate “This site discusses testing and treatment therapies that are cancer. There’s “Prostate 101,” an overview about the prostate, inforevolving or are up-and-coming,” she says, ones that “may not yet mation about prostate cancer and getting a second opinion, and a be part of the standard treatment plan, but may be available in checklist of symptoms; information on screening; treatment options; specialized institutions or as part of a clinical trial.” and the state of research. “We are excited as we implement the plans for the new center This knowledge is available to patients everywhere, “irrespective and thank Dick Shipley for his generosity and vision,” says Karen of where they choose to get their medical care or where they are in Antman, dean of MED and provost of the Medical Campus. “We terms of testing, diagnosis, or treatment,” says site editor Gretchen want this website to be a go-to consumer resource for prostate Gignac, a School of Medicine associate professor of hematology health and support for patients and their families.” n and medical oncology.

O

From left, Gustavo Mostoslavsky, Darrell Kotton, and George Murphy, founders of BU’s Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM). CReM researchers won the 2017 AAMC Sharing Research Resources Award for their commitment to open-source biology.

efficient technique for reprogramming adult human blood and skin cells into iPSCs, and in 2009 they began sharing their technology, and the resulting cell lines, free of charge with the research community. By 2010, the CReM investigators, whose work is funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, and others, had published a large number of patient-specific iPSC lines, including the first 100 distinctive to lung disease. CReM’s sharing of unpublished stem cell lines has broadly impacted the lung research community, resulting in collaborations and publications with groups formerly consid-

ered CReM competitors, and CReM recently became sole iPSC repository for the 7,000 participants of the long-running Framingham Heart Study, the nation’s longest-running epidemiological study, which began in 1948 and has been run by BU since 1971, with support from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Kotton says that the award acknowledges not only the work of CReM, but of all the other labs and institutions that have joined in this venture into scientific sharing. “Just the fact that an award like this exists,” he says, “shows that this way of doing research has value.” n

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

11


FACULTY

News

Gustavo Mostoslavsky’s lab invented a tool that improved the process of creating cells that might help heal patients with damaged tissues.

CReM Stem Cell Researcher Is Innovator of the Year MED’s Gustavo Mostoslavsky invented tool facilitating cell production BY RICH BARLOW

T

hose who know ancient history—the first decade of the 21st century—recall that embryonic stem cell research was a combustible issue, with supporters cheering the potential to create new tissues from stem cells and opponents decrying the destruction of human embryos that it required. A breakthrough arrived in 2006, when a Japanese researcher devel12

Boston University School of Medicine

oped induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), adult cells that behaved like embryonic stem cells and had an amazing ability to develop into muscles, skin, nerves, and almost any other cell type. Two years later, a second breakthrough, this one by Gustavo Mostoslavsky, a School of Medicine associate professor of gastroenterology, produced a tool that made it simpler and more efficient to generate iPSCs. BU patented his tool,

called STEMCCA, and he says that it’s been adopted by more than 700 laboratories worldwide for making iPSCs. That contribution to the field has earned Mostoslavsky this year’s University Innovator of the Year Award. The Technology Development office presents the award to a faculty member whose research yields inventions or innovations benefiting society. Mostoslavsky received the award in July at BU’s annual Tech, Drugs, and Rock ’n’ Roll networking event connecting BU researchers and Boston entrepreneurs. “I was humbly surprised and happy,” he says, when Gloria Waters, vice president and associate provost for research, emailed him the news. “Sometimes it is easy to lose perspective when we get busy on the many tasks of running a lab—grant writing, mentoring, budget, and so forth—so I guess it is nice, once in a while, to just stop and enjoy the moment, enjoy what we have done so far, and even better, if on the way we have helped many others succeed.” One way Mostoslavsky has helped others succeed—the way that makes him most proud, he says—is to have cofounded, in 2008, BU’s Center for Regenerative Medicine, which he codirects. The center, which pursues stem cell research with an emphasis on lung, blood, and gastrointestinal tract diseases, practices open-source biology: sharing its discoveries with scientists around the world for free rather than patenting them. In 2013, CReM moved into its own physical quarters on Albany Street on the Medical Campus. “I am delighted to see Dr. Mostoslavsky’s colleagues choose him for this award,” says Waters. “STEMCCA has dramatically improved the efficiency with which new stem cells can be generated to treat disease. His success in patenting a tool that has become industry-standard, at the same time as he and the codirectors of the CReM have become renowned for their open-source biology, serves as a model to students and other researchers of how to advance science through sharing, at the same time protecting important intellectual property.” n

Appointments and Honors Gregory A. Grillone, MD, FACS, has been named the M. Stuart Strong and Charles W. Vaughan Professor and chair of the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at BU School of Medicine and chief of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Boston Medical Center. Dr. Kenneth Grundfast, chair for the last 17 years, announced his plans to retire last year upon a successor being named. Currently professor and vice chair of the department, Dr. Grillone joined the BUMC community as a resident in 1988. An accomplished leader, highly skilled clinician, and mentor to many medical students, residents, and fellows, he has served in a variety of roles for BMC, including interim chief medical officer, board of trustees member, associate chief medical officer, president of the medical-dental staff, and graduate medical education committee chair. As vice chair since 1999, he has helped build the department into a thriving practice with 12 full-time clinical faculty members, several PhD research faculty members, and robust audiology and speech-language pathology services. He served as the residency program director for 17 years and helped establish it as one of the best otolaryngology training programs in the eastern US. During his tenure as director, he expanded the program from 10 to 15 residents; its current complement includes eight women and one underrepresented minority. Dr. Grillone received his bachelor’s degree in biology from New York University and his MD from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. He completed his residency in otolaryngologyhead and neck surgery at the Boston University-Tufts University Combined Residency Program.

His research interests include the use of spectroscopy for the early detection of dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity and larynx, and the study of dietary and lifestyle risk factors in the development of squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. His clinical interests include the development of minihole laryngoplasty for vocal fold augmentation and the use of robotic instruments in microlaryngeal surgery. He has authored more than 85 publications, reviews, proceedings, and abstracts, lectured worldwide, and received numerous honors and awards, including the 2016 Edmund Prince Fowler Award from the Triological Society for the most outstanding research thesis; the BUSM Charles W. Vaughan Excellence in Teaching Award (2015 and 2006); the Distinguished Service Award from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (2014); and the Triological Society’s Vice-Presidential Citation (2011). Dr. Grillone has also been named one of America’s Top Doctors and Best Doctors in America every year since 2005, and one of Boston’s Top Docs since 2006. n Kristen H. Goodell, MD, has been appointed assistant dean for admissions effective September 5, 2017. On June 30, 2018, Dr. Goodell will become associate dean of admissions upon Dr. Robert Witzburg’s retirement after 16 years in that role. In addition to her new position, Dr. Goodell also is an assistant professor of family medicine and an attending physician in family medicine at Boston Medical Center. A member of Harvard Medical School’s admissions committee since 2014, she also serves as director of medical education and co-director of the Harvard Home

for Family Medicine in Harvard Medical School’s Center for Primary Care. In this role, she developed and implemented educational programs in primary care and family medicine, including new courses at all levels of medical education focused on clinical skills, information mastery, and interprofessional education. Throughout her career, Dr. Goodell has mentored medical students—particularly those in career transition—and served as faculty advisor for student organizations and committees. Dr. Goodell received her bachelor’s degree from Colby College and her MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. She completed a residency in family medicine through the Tufts University Family Medicine Residency Program and a Tufts Master Teacher Fellowship from Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Goodell chairs the national Council on Graduate Medical Education and cochairs the Leadership Development Task Force of the Council on Academic Family Medicine. She is an ad hoc reviewer for the journals Academic Medicine, Family Medicine, and Annals of Family Medicine. She also has served as a faculty consultant on medical education for the USAIDfunded Health Advancement in Vietnam, and worked to address the oral health competency gap in primary care training with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. n Paul Tornetta III, MD, has been appointed chief and chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Boston Medical Center and BU School of Medicine. Dr. Tornetta has been a member of the BUMC community since 1998, most recently Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

13


FACULTY

News

Gustavo Mostoslavsky’s lab invented a tool that improved the process of creating cells that might help heal patients with damaged tissues.

CReM Stem Cell Researcher Is Innovator of the Year MED’s Gustavo Mostoslavsky invented tool facilitating cell production BY RICH BARLOW

T

hose who know ancient history—the first decade of the 21st century—recall that embryonic stem cell research was a combustible issue, with supporters cheering the potential to create new tissues from stem cells and opponents decrying the destruction of human embryos that it required. A breakthrough arrived in 2006, when a Japanese researcher devel12

Boston University School of Medicine

oped induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), adult cells that behaved like embryonic stem cells and had an amazing ability to develop into muscles, skin, nerves, and almost any other cell type. Two years later, a second breakthrough, this one by Gustavo Mostoslavsky, a School of Medicine associate professor of gastroenterology, produced a tool that made it simpler and more efficient to generate iPSCs. BU patented his tool,

called STEMCCA, and he says that it’s been adopted by more than 700 laboratories worldwide for making iPSCs. That contribution to the field has earned Mostoslavsky this year’s University Innovator of the Year Award. The Technology Development office presents the award to a faculty member whose research yields inventions or innovations benefiting society. Mostoslavsky received the award in July at BU’s annual Tech, Drugs, and Rock ’n’ Roll networking event connecting BU researchers and Boston entrepreneurs. “I was humbly surprised and happy,” he says, when Gloria Waters, vice president and associate provost for research, emailed him the news. “Sometimes it is easy to lose perspective when we get busy on the many tasks of running a lab—grant writing, mentoring, budget, and so forth—so I guess it is nice, once in a while, to just stop and enjoy the moment, enjoy what we have done so far, and even better, if on the way we have helped many others succeed.” One way Mostoslavsky has helped others succeed—the way that makes him most proud, he says—is to have cofounded, in 2008, BU’s Center for Regenerative Medicine, which he codirects. The center, which pursues stem cell research with an emphasis on lung, blood, and gastrointestinal tract diseases, practices open-source biology: sharing its discoveries with scientists around the world for free rather than patenting them. In 2013, CReM moved into its own physical quarters on Albany Street on the Medical Campus. “I am delighted to see Dr. Mostoslavsky’s colleagues choose him for this award,” says Waters. “STEMCCA has dramatically improved the efficiency with which new stem cells can be generated to treat disease. His success in patenting a tool that has become industry-standard, at the same time as he and the codirectors of the CReM have become renowned for their open-source biology, serves as a model to students and other researchers of how to advance science through sharing, at the same time protecting important intellectual property.” n

Appointments and Honors Gregory A. Grillone, MD, FACS, has been named the M. Stuart Strong and Charles W. Vaughan Professor and chair of the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at BU School of Medicine and chief of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Boston Medical Center. Dr. Kenneth Grundfast, chair for the last 17 years, announced his plans to retire last year upon a successor being named. Currently professor and vice chair of the department, Dr. Grillone joined the BUMC community as a resident in 1988. An accomplished leader, highly skilled clinician, and mentor to many medical students, residents, and fellows, he has served in a variety of roles for BMC, including interim chief medical officer, board of trustees member, associate chief medical officer, president of the medical-dental staff, and graduate medical education committee chair. As vice chair since 1999, he has helped build the department into a thriving practice with 12 full-time clinical faculty members, several PhD research faculty members, and robust audiology and speech-language pathology services. He served as the residency program director for 17 years and helped establish it as one of the best otolaryngology training programs in the eastern US. During his tenure as director, he expanded the program from 10 to 15 residents; its current complement includes eight women and one underrepresented minority. Dr. Grillone received his bachelor’s degree in biology from New York University and his MD from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. He completed his residency in otolaryngologyhead and neck surgery at the Boston University-Tufts University Combined Residency Program.

His research interests include the use of spectroscopy for the early detection of dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma in the oral cavity and larynx, and the study of dietary and lifestyle risk factors in the development of squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. His clinical interests include the development of minihole laryngoplasty for vocal fold augmentation and the use of robotic instruments in microlaryngeal surgery. He has authored more than 85 publications, reviews, proceedings, and abstracts, lectured worldwide, and received numerous honors and awards, including the 2016 Edmund Prince Fowler Award from the Triological Society for the most outstanding research thesis; the BUSM Charles W. Vaughan Excellence in Teaching Award (2015 and 2006); the Distinguished Service Award from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (2014); and the Triological Society’s Vice-Presidential Citation (2011). Dr. Grillone has also been named one of America’s Top Doctors and Best Doctors in America every year since 2005, and one of Boston’s Top Docs since 2006. n Kristen H. Goodell, MD, has been appointed assistant dean for admissions effective September 5, 2017. On June 30, 2018, Dr. Goodell will become associate dean of admissions upon Dr. Robert Witzburg’s retirement after 16 years in that role. In addition to her new position, Dr. Goodell also is an assistant professor of family medicine and an attending physician in family medicine at Boston Medical Center. A member of Harvard Medical School’s admissions committee since 2014, she also serves as director of medical education and co-director of the Harvard Home

for Family Medicine in Harvard Medical School’s Center for Primary Care. In this role, she developed and implemented educational programs in primary care and family medicine, including new courses at all levels of medical education focused on clinical skills, information mastery, and interprofessional education. Throughout her career, Dr. Goodell has mentored medical students—particularly those in career transition—and served as faculty advisor for student organizations and committees. Dr. Goodell received her bachelor’s degree from Colby College and her MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. She completed a residency in family medicine through the Tufts University Family Medicine Residency Program and a Tufts Master Teacher Fellowship from Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Goodell chairs the national Council on Graduate Medical Education and cochairs the Leadership Development Task Force of the Council on Academic Family Medicine. She is an ad hoc reviewer for the journals Academic Medicine, Family Medicine, and Annals of Family Medicine. She also has served as a faculty consultant on medical education for the USAIDfunded Health Advancement in Vietnam, and worked to address the oral health competency gap in primary care training with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. n Paul Tornetta III, MD, has been appointed chief and chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Boston Medical Center and BU School of Medicine. Dr. Tornetta has been a member of the BUMC community since 1998, most recently Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

13


FACULTY NEWS

serving as professor and vice chair of the department as well as director of orthopaedic trauma. Since 2006, he has served as the director of the Orthopaedic Residency Program. A highly skilled clinician, mentor, and teacher, his clinical and research interests surround orthopaedic trauma and fractures, specifically the treatment and outcomes of pelvis and acetabular fractures, long bone fractures and nonunions, and periarticular fractures. Dr. Tornetta earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and mathematics from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and his medical degree from SUNY-Health Science Center at Brooklyn (New York), where he also completed his internship and residency in orthopaedic surgery. Shortly thereafter, he had a fellowship in Acetabular/Pelvic Fractures at the Hospital of the Good Samaritan in Los Angeles under Joel Matta, MD. An expert in multicenter trials and trial methodology, Dr. Tornetta serves on the executive committees of the SPRINT, FAITH, TRUST, and FLOW trials. He leads the Orthopaedic Trauma Research Consortium and served on the executive committee of the Department of Defense–funded METRC consortium. He has lectured extensively worldwide on orthopaedic trauma, evidence-based literature applica-

tion, and education and has served on the faculty of more than 250 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery (AAOS) CME, Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA), and international symposia and skills courses, as well as developing new educational programs for these organizations. He has authored more than 250 peerreviewed publications and is a lead editor for Rockwood and Green’s textbook on fracture care (an industry standard) and an editor of multiple other textbooks and textbook series. He has also contributed to the field through the development of new surgical techniques as well as implants. Dr. Tornetta has held many positions in national and international orthopaedic associations, including board member, chair of multiple committees, and incoming chair of the Council on Education for the AAOS. He is a past president of the OTA and was an American British Canadian (ABC) traveling fellow. The Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation clinical research award, several BUSM Robert E. Leach Resident Teaching Awards, and OTA Bovill Awards are among the many accolades and honors he has received. Dr. Tornetta has been named a Castle Connolly Top Doctor every year since 1999 and a Boston Magazine Top Doc since 2006. n

In Memoriam

A highly skilled clinician, mentor, and teacher, his clinical and research interests surround orthopaedic trauma and fractures, specifically the treatment and outcomes of pelvis and acetabular fractures, long bone fractures and nonunions, and peri-articular fractures.

Faculty in Print Information and recommendations on the range of current treatment strategies for menopause and its symptoms

14

Boston University School of Medicine

Essentials of Menopause Management Raja A. Sayegh, MD associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology Developed as a multidisciplinary collaboration and addressing the needs of practicing reproductive medicine clinicians and researchers providing care to an aging female population, Essentials of Menopause Management offers clear, up-to-date information and recommendations on the range of current treatment strategies for menopause and its symptoms.

Lorraine Stanfield, MD the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Lorraine D. Stanfield, MD, assistant profesGabon. After completing an internal medisor of medicine, director of the Introduction cine residency at Brown University’s Rhode to Clinical Medicine 2 (ICM-2) course, direcIsland Hospital, she became a primary care tor of our Clinical Skills and Simulation Cenprovider at Dorchester House in 1991. When ter, student advisor, and CCHERs instructor a program to teach medical students in comfor more than 20 years, died on September munity health centers sparked her interest, 13 from breast cancer. She was 56. she volunteered at BU School of Medicine. A beloved member of the BUMC commuA natural teacher, by 1993 she became the nity since 1991, Dr. Stanfield was admired and director of ICM-2 and also served as an advirespected by students, faculty, and staff alike. sor and mentor in what was then called our In 2013 she received the Committee on Academies program. Faculty Affairs Educator of the Year Award Throughout her illness, she continued in Preclinical Sciences as well as the LeonLorraine D. Stanfield, MD to see patients at Dot House and work at ard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award for BUSM. Dr. Stanfield’s patients never experienced anything less her clinical excellence, compassionate delivery of care, and than the best care, even when she was receiving treatment respect for her patients, their families, and her healthcare colherself. Words cannot accurately describe her strength and leagues. In 2015 she received the Stanley L. Robbins Award for character. Excellence in Teaching, our highest teaching honor. Lorraine is survived by her husband Burns and their three A graduate of Princeton University with a BA in biochemischildren Liz, Nathan, and Grace; her mother Ruth Bowie Dudtry, Dr. Stanfield received her MD from Harvard Medical School ley; and her sisters Susan Dudley (Brian Mannix) and Jeanne in 1988. During her third year of medical school, she was White (Geoffrey White). n named an Albert Schweitzer Fellow and spent three months at

Anna Fitzgerald, MD compassion in the delivery of care, and Anna Fitzgerald, MD, assistant professor respect for patients, their families, and of psychiatry and medical director of Boston for colleagues. Medical Center’s Psychiatric Emergency In nominating Dr. Fitzgerald for Service, and medical director of BMC’s Bosthe Tow award, one co-worker shared, ton and Cambridge/Somerville Community “Anna is not only a role model for stuCrisis Stabilization programs, died on dents, residents, and colleagues, but for October 20 from colon cancer. She was 56. all of us, in her ability to place herself in A graduate of Harvard University with an other’s shoes and empathize with them. AB in anthropology, Dr. Fitzgerald received A lot of people talk about being culturher MD from BUSM in 1992, trained at the ally sensitive and respectful, but Anna former Boston City Hospital (now BMC) and embodies these ideals.” in the Boston University Affiliated Hospitals Dr. Fitzgerald received a BMC Be program, and joined BU’s faculty in 1996. She Anna Fitzgerald, MD Exceptional Award in 2015 and was was an outstanding and empathetic physidescribed as “compassionate in all her cian, an inspiring teacher, and a thoughtful actions... a role model of respect, and a wonderful individual and personable colleague who will be dearly missed by all. who is humble, caring, dedicated, and open to everyone She received the 2016 Leonard Tow Humanism in Medishe meets.” cine Award, a distinction supported by the Arnold P. Gold Anna is survived by her wife Marice Nichols and their Foundation and presented to faculty members who best two children, her mother, and her brother. n demonstrate the foundation’s ideals of clinical excellence,

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

15


FACULTY NEWS

serving as professor and vice chair of the department as well as director of orthopaedic trauma. Since 2006, he has served as the director of the Orthopaedic Residency Program. A highly skilled clinician, mentor, and teacher, his clinical and research interests surround orthopaedic trauma and fractures, specifically the treatment and outcomes of pelvis and acetabular fractures, long bone fractures and nonunions, and periarticular fractures. Dr. Tornetta earned his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and mathematics from Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and his medical degree from SUNY-Health Science Center at Brooklyn (New York), where he also completed his internship and residency in orthopaedic surgery. Shortly thereafter, he had a fellowship in Acetabular/Pelvic Fractures at the Hospital of the Good Samaritan in Los Angeles under Joel Matta, MD. An expert in multicenter trials and trial methodology, Dr. Tornetta serves on the executive committees of the SPRINT, FAITH, TRUST, and FLOW trials. He leads the Orthopaedic Trauma Research Consortium and served on the executive committee of the Department of Defense–funded METRC consortium. He has lectured extensively worldwide on orthopaedic trauma, evidence-based literature applica-

tion, and education and has served on the faculty of more than 250 American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery (AAOS) CME, Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA), and international symposia and skills courses, as well as developing new educational programs for these organizations. He has authored more than 250 peerreviewed publications and is a lead editor for Rockwood and Green’s textbook on fracture care (an industry standard) and an editor of multiple other textbooks and textbook series. He has also contributed to the field through the development of new surgical techniques as well as implants. Dr. Tornetta has held many positions in national and international orthopaedic associations, including board member, chair of multiple committees, and incoming chair of the Council on Education for the AAOS. He is a past president of the OTA and was an American British Canadian (ABC) traveling fellow. The Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation clinical research award, several BUSM Robert E. Leach Resident Teaching Awards, and OTA Bovill Awards are among the many accolades and honors he has received. Dr. Tornetta has been named a Castle Connolly Top Doctor every year since 1999 and a Boston Magazine Top Doc since 2006. n

In Memoriam

A highly skilled clinician, mentor, and teacher, his clinical and research interests surround orthopaedic trauma and fractures, specifically the treatment and outcomes of pelvis and acetabular fractures, long bone fractures and nonunions, and peri-articular fractures.

Faculty in Print Information and recommendations on the range of current treatment strategies for menopause and its symptoms

14

Boston University School of Medicine

Essentials of Menopause Management Raja A. Sayegh, MD associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology Developed as a multidisciplinary collaboration and addressing the needs of practicing reproductive medicine clinicians and researchers providing care to an aging female population, Essentials of Menopause Management offers clear, up-to-date information and recommendations on the range of current treatment strategies for menopause and its symptoms.

Lorraine Stanfield, MD the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Lorraine D. Stanfield, MD, assistant profesGabon. After completing an internal medisor of medicine, director of the Introduction cine residency at Brown University’s Rhode to Clinical Medicine 2 (ICM-2) course, direcIsland Hospital, she became a primary care tor of our Clinical Skills and Simulation Cenprovider at Dorchester House in 1991. When ter, student advisor, and CCHERs instructor a program to teach medical students in comfor more than 20 years, died on September munity health centers sparked her interest, 13 from breast cancer. She was 56. she volunteered at BU School of Medicine. A beloved member of the BUMC commuA natural teacher, by 1993 she became the nity since 1991, Dr. Stanfield was admired and director of ICM-2 and also served as an advirespected by students, faculty, and staff alike. sor and mentor in what was then called our In 2013 she received the Committee on Academies program. Faculty Affairs Educator of the Year Award Throughout her illness, she continued in Preclinical Sciences as well as the LeonLorraine D. Stanfield, MD to see patients at Dot House and work at ard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award for BUSM. Dr. Stanfield’s patients never experienced anything less her clinical excellence, compassionate delivery of care, and than the best care, even when she was receiving treatment respect for her patients, their families, and her healthcare colherself. Words cannot accurately describe her strength and leagues. In 2015 she received the Stanley L. Robbins Award for character. Excellence in Teaching, our highest teaching honor. Lorraine is survived by her husband Burns and their three A graduate of Princeton University with a BA in biochemischildren Liz, Nathan, and Grace; her mother Ruth Bowie Dudtry, Dr. Stanfield received her MD from Harvard Medical School ley; and her sisters Susan Dudley (Brian Mannix) and Jeanne in 1988. During her third year of medical school, she was White (Geoffrey White). n named an Albert Schweitzer Fellow and spent three months at

Anna Fitzgerald, MD compassion in the delivery of care, and Anna Fitzgerald, MD, assistant professor respect for patients, their families, and of psychiatry and medical director of Boston for colleagues. Medical Center’s Psychiatric Emergency In nominating Dr. Fitzgerald for Service, and medical director of BMC’s Bosthe Tow award, one co-worker shared, ton and Cambridge/Somerville Community “Anna is not only a role model for stuCrisis Stabilization programs, died on dents, residents, and colleagues, but for October 20 from colon cancer. She was 56. all of us, in her ability to place herself in A graduate of Harvard University with an other’s shoes and empathize with them. AB in anthropology, Dr. Fitzgerald received A lot of people talk about being culturher MD from BUSM in 1992, trained at the ally sensitive and respectful, but Anna former Boston City Hospital (now BMC) and embodies these ideals.” in the Boston University Affiliated Hospitals Dr. Fitzgerald received a BMC Be program, and joined BU’s faculty in 1996. She Anna Fitzgerald, MD Exceptional Award in 2015 and was was an outstanding and empathetic physidescribed as “compassionate in all her cian, an inspiring teacher, and a thoughtful actions... a role model of respect, and a wonderful individual and personable colleague who will be dearly missed by all. who is humble, caring, dedicated, and open to everyone She received the 2016 Leonard Tow Humanism in Medishe meets.” cine Award, a distinction supported by the Arnold P. Gold Anna is survived by her wife Marice Nichols and their Foundation and presented to faculty members who best two children, her mother, and her brother. n demonstrate the foundation’s ideals of clinical excellence,

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

15


COVER STORY | LOREM IPSUM

45

years

of learning, teaching, and service: Robert Witzburg, Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean, retires

“When I was looking at medical schools, this place spoke to me in a very direct way, and it became my first choice by virtue of the mission, vision, and values. It has remained my first choice.” —Robert Witzburg

BY MARY HOPKINS

D

r. Robert Witzburg’s last academic year working on the Medical Campus concludes

in 2018, when he will relinquish his roles as professor of medicine and associate dean and director of admissions at the School of Medicine, and professor of health policy and management at the School of Public Health (SPH). He is leaving his campus practice as a general internist as well.

“After 45 years, I think it’s time,” Witzburg says. “It’s time for somebody with new and fresh ideas, less committed to defending what we have done and more committed to trying something different and innovative. I’m not saying I’m stuck in the mud, but it’s time to pass the torch.” His formative years encompassed the growing civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and anti-war protests of the 1960s. By the time he arrived on campus as a medical student in 1973, he already had a strong set of values and wanted to combine his interest in the medical profession with community service. “It was that value-driven perspective that led me to this school,” he notes. “When I was looking at medical schools, this place spoke to me in a very direct way, and it became my first choice by virtue of the mission, vision, and values. It has remained my first choice.”

16

Boston University School of Medicine

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

17


COVER STORY | LOREM IPSUM

45

years

of learning, teaching, and service: Robert Witzburg, Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean, retires

“When I was looking at medical schools, this place spoke to me in a very direct way, and it became my first choice by virtue of the mission, vision, and values. It has remained my first choice.” —Robert Witzburg

BY MARY HOPKINS

D

r. Robert Witzburg’s last academic year working on the Medical Campus concludes

in 2018, when he will relinquish his roles as professor of medicine and associate dean and director of admissions at the School of Medicine, and professor of health policy and management at the School of Public Health (SPH). He is leaving his campus practice as a general internist as well.

“After 45 years, I think it’s time,” Witzburg says. “It’s time for somebody with new and fresh ideas, less committed to defending what we have done and more committed to trying something different and innovative. I’m not saying I’m stuck in the mud, but it’s time to pass the torch.” His formative years encompassed the growing civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and anti-war protests of the 1960s. By the time he arrived on campus as a medical student in 1973, he already had a strong set of values and wanted to combine his interest in the medical profession with community service. “It was that value-driven perspective that led me to this school,” he notes. “When I was looking at medical schools, this place spoke to me in a very direct way, and it became my first choice by virtue of the mission, vision, and values. It has remained my first choice.”

16

Boston University School of Medicine

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

17


COVER STORY | DR. ROBERT WITZBURG

After graduating from BUSM in 1977, Witzburg completed his residency and chief residency in medicine at Boston City Hospital, then served as training program director and associate chief of medicine at Boston City Hospital for 12 years and as associate chief medical officer at Boston Medical Center (BMC). He was the first medical director of the Boston Medical Center HealthNet Plan, and first chief of the section of community medicine at BMC and BUSM. He was also a founder, president, and medical director of the Neighborhood Health Plan, a community health center–based HMO that enhances the quality and scope of healthcare services for vulnerable populations. Recalls Ravin Davidoff, MBBCh, BUSM professor of medicine and BMC senior vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer, “One of my first memories at Boston City Hospital in 1981 was Bob Witzburg. He had just completed his chief resident year and was a clinical giant. He epitomized what we all wanted to be: a great clinician, a superb teacher, and a skilled administrator with a

1

deep commitment to academic medicine and amazing passion and empathy for our patients. His integrity, honesty, and ethical standards are exemplary. I have watched with deep admiration as he has expanded the diversity of the School of Medicine classes.” “Bob is the consummate general internist, and others look to him for perspective when new therapies emerge or different approaches become the treatment du jour,” says Jeffrey Samet, MD, the John Noble, MD, BUSM professor of general internal medicine; SPH professor of public health; and chief, general internal medicine, BMC. Editor in the mid-1980s of the first clinical manual on HIV disease in primary care practice, he has published in numerous journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, on healthcare systems development, topics in acute care medicine, and the selec18

Boston University School of Medicine

tion of applicants for medical school. His role directing residency training led him to join the admissions process at BUSM. “Recruiting for the Department of Medicine while also interviewing applicants for the medical school highlighted the difference between the two,” he reflects. “Out of that contrast, I got more and more interested in catching people earlier in their medical careers, where some of the work I wanted to do might have a greater impact.” A leader in medical school admissions transitioning to holistic review in order to enhance the diversity of the physician workforce, he established BUSM as a model program. Along with the Medical Campus information technology team, he created the Admissions Information Management System (AIMS) to manage applicant data and support holistic review. “We learn every day how to more effectively evaluate applicants and to choose those who will challenge our assumptions, who will thrive and prosper here, and who will look back on their time at BU and say that was a good choice for me,” he says. “We have much to be thankful to Bob for, including his many contributions in the various roles he has served in during his extraordinary career on our Medical Campus,” Aram Chobanian, MD, BU president emeritus and BUSM dean emeritus, says. “He has always been committed to and passionate about improving the care of the underserved. He played a major role at Boston City Hospital and associated community health centers in developing clinical programs for AIDS patients during that epidemic and for founding and leading the innovative Neighborhood Health Plan for insuring the poor. “He has excelled as an educator and role model, both in leading the residency training programs in the Department of Medicine and in teaching our medical students, as evidenced by the many teaching awards he has obtained. Bob has been an outstanding dean of admissions since I first appointed him and brought many innovations to the selection of students, which have contributed to the quality of a whole generation of students coming through the school.” “Bob sees the potential in applicants; he has a very good eye,” says Angela Jackson, MD, professor of medicine and associate dean for student affairs. “I get to work with and participate in the fruits of his judgment in my role in student affairs.” Dedicated to helping future medical professionals make the right decisions for themselves and for the school, Witzburg emphasizes that BUSM is both a challenging, diverse environment where one is pushed to grow but also an open, supportive, and collaborative one.

A leader in medical school admissions transitioning to holistic review in order to enhance the diversity of the physician workforce, he established BUSM as a model program.

2

3

4

1.  Bob in his Boston City Hospital Residency Program office, early 1980s. 2. B  ob’s application to medical school photograph, June 1972. 3. With his father at Bob’s BUSM graduation, May 1977. 4. B  ob and his wife Lorraine around the time he became vice chair of medicine at Boston Medical Center, 1997. 5. A  photograph from the Boston Herald American in October 1976 shows fourth-year med student Bob during a home visit with Dr. George Rosenthal from the BU Home Medical Service.

“Dr. Witzburg initially denied my application to BUSM,” says Mary Ann Wilbur, MD (MED’11, MPH’11), clinical fellow, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins Hospital. “He said he believed I had the potential to be a fantastic physician and provided me with clear instructions on how to be a stronger applicant and student. I owe all of my success to his wisdom. He remains one of my greatest mentors and strongest advocates.” “Dr. Witzburg has had a remarkable and enduring impact on the faculty and trainees of the Department of Medicine,” says David Coleman, MD, Wade Professor and chair, BUSM Department of Medicine, and chair, Boston Medical Center Department of Medicine. “Dedicated to organizational success, he has worked tirelessly on behalf of BUSM, BMC, the Department of Medicine, our students/trainees, and ultimately, our patients. Perhaps his most important roles, however, have been as mentor, role model, and advocate for excellence in all of our missions. His legacy will be an ongoing gift to our community.” “I have treasured the relationships I have built here and the people I have learned from and worked with,” Dr. Witzburg says.

5

“We face enormous challenges on this campus, some related to the very reasons we choose to be here, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. We have to be, and are prepared to be, challenged, questioned, and forced to justify and improve. There is no standing still. That is fundamental to the profession and to this community. I have spent 45 years doing my best to keep up.” In a fond farewell, Karen Antman, MD, BUSM dean and associate provost of the Medical Campus, says, “The School of Medicine is grateful for the many years of Dr. Witzburg’s service and wise counsel as a primary care physician, teacher and mentor, administrator, and associate dean of admissions.” Dr. Witzburg plans to spend more time with his wife Lorraine— with whom he fell in love when he was 12—and his four grandchildren. He’s also contemplating a book he hopes will tell an important story about medical care and medical education in a complex urban environment. “I have been excited by everything I have done. I have never had an uninteresting day nor gone home without having learned something,” he says. And so, a new chapter begins for Dr. Witzburg and the school. n Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

19


COVER STORY | DR. ROBERT WITZBURG

After graduating from BUSM in 1977, Witzburg completed his residency and chief residency in medicine at Boston City Hospital, then served as training program director and associate chief of medicine at Boston City Hospital for 12 years and as associate chief medical officer at Boston Medical Center (BMC). He was the first medical director of the Boston Medical Center HealthNet Plan, and first chief of the section of community medicine at BMC and BUSM. He was also a founder, president, and medical director of the Neighborhood Health Plan, a community health center–based HMO that enhances the quality and scope of healthcare services for vulnerable populations. Recalls Ravin Davidoff, MBBCh, BUSM professor of medicine and BMC senior vice president of medical affairs and chief medical officer, “One of my first memories at Boston City Hospital in 1981 was Bob Witzburg. He had just completed his chief resident year and was a clinical giant. He epitomized what we all wanted to be: a great clinician, a superb teacher, and a skilled administrator with a

1

deep commitment to academic medicine and amazing passion and empathy for our patients. His integrity, honesty, and ethical standards are exemplary. I have watched with deep admiration as he has expanded the diversity of the School of Medicine classes.” “Bob is the consummate general internist, and others look to him for perspective when new therapies emerge or different approaches become the treatment du jour,” says Jeffrey Samet, MD, the John Noble, MD, BUSM professor of general internal medicine; SPH professor of public health; and chief, general internal medicine, BMC. Editor in the mid-1980s of the first clinical manual on HIV disease in primary care practice, he has published in numerous journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, on healthcare systems development, topics in acute care medicine, and the selec18

Boston University School of Medicine

tion of applicants for medical school. His role directing residency training led him to join the admissions process at BUSM. “Recruiting for the Department of Medicine while also interviewing applicants for the medical school highlighted the difference between the two,” he reflects. “Out of that contrast, I got more and more interested in catching people earlier in their medical careers, where some of the work I wanted to do might have a greater impact.” A leader in medical school admissions transitioning to holistic review in order to enhance the diversity of the physician workforce, he established BUSM as a model program. Along with the Medical Campus information technology team, he created the Admissions Information Management System (AIMS) to manage applicant data and support holistic review. “We learn every day how to more effectively evaluate applicants and to choose those who will challenge our assumptions, who will thrive and prosper here, and who will look back on their time at BU and say that was a good choice for me,” he says. “We have much to be thankful to Bob for, including his many contributions in the various roles he has served in during his extraordinary career on our Medical Campus,” Aram Chobanian, MD, BU president emeritus and BUSM dean emeritus, says. “He has always been committed to and passionate about improving the care of the underserved. He played a major role at Boston City Hospital and associated community health centers in developing clinical programs for AIDS patients during that epidemic and for founding and leading the innovative Neighborhood Health Plan for insuring the poor. “He has excelled as an educator and role model, both in leading the residency training programs in the Department of Medicine and in teaching our medical students, as evidenced by the many teaching awards he has obtained. Bob has been an outstanding dean of admissions since I first appointed him and brought many innovations to the selection of students, which have contributed to the quality of a whole generation of students coming through the school.” “Bob sees the potential in applicants; he has a very good eye,” says Angela Jackson, MD, professor of medicine and associate dean for student affairs. “I get to work with and participate in the fruits of his judgment in my role in student affairs.” Dedicated to helping future medical professionals make the right decisions for themselves and for the school, Witzburg emphasizes that BUSM is both a challenging, diverse environment where one is pushed to grow but also an open, supportive, and collaborative one.

A leader in medical school admissions transitioning to holistic review in order to enhance the diversity of the physician workforce, he established BUSM as a model program.

2

3

4

1.  Bob in his Boston City Hospital Residency Program office, early 1980s. 2. B  ob’s application to medical school photograph, June 1972. 3. With his father at Bob’s BUSM graduation, May 1977. 4. B  ob and his wife Lorraine around the time he became vice chair of medicine at Boston Medical Center, 1997. 5. A  photograph from the Boston Herald American in October 1976 shows fourth-year med student Bob during a home visit with Dr. George Rosenthal from the BU Home Medical Service.

“Dr. Witzburg initially denied my application to BUSM,” says Mary Ann Wilbur, MD (MED’11, MPH’11), clinical fellow, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins Hospital. “He said he believed I had the potential to be a fantastic physician and provided me with clear instructions on how to be a stronger applicant and student. I owe all of my success to his wisdom. He remains one of my greatest mentors and strongest advocates.” “Dr. Witzburg has had a remarkable and enduring impact on the faculty and trainees of the Department of Medicine,” says David Coleman, MD, Wade Professor and chair, BUSM Department of Medicine, and chair, Boston Medical Center Department of Medicine. “Dedicated to organizational success, he has worked tirelessly on behalf of BUSM, BMC, the Department of Medicine, our students/trainees, and ultimately, our patients. Perhaps his most important roles, however, have been as mentor, role model, and advocate for excellence in all of our missions. His legacy will be an ongoing gift to our community.” “I have treasured the relationships I have built here and the people I have learned from and worked with,” Dr. Witzburg says.

5

“We face enormous challenges on this campus, some related to the very reasons we choose to be here, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. We have to be, and are prepared to be, challenged, questioned, and forced to justify and improve. There is no standing still. That is fundamental to the profession and to this community. I have spent 45 years doing my best to keep up.” In a fond farewell, Karen Antman, MD, BUSM dean and associate provost of the Medical Campus, says, “The School of Medicine is grateful for the many years of Dr. Witzburg’s service and wise counsel as a primary care physician, teacher and mentor, administrator, and associate dean of admissions.” Dr. Witzburg plans to spend more time with his wife Lorraine— with whom he fell in love when he was 12—and his four grandchildren. He’s also contemplating a book he hopes will tell an important story about medical care and medical education in a complex urban environment. “I have been excited by everything I have done. I have never had an uninteresting day nor gone home without having learned something,” he says. And so, a new chapter begins for Dr. Witzburg and the school. n Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

19


BUSM

Research

■ Lack of REM Sleep May Lead to Higher Risk for Dementia

Findings that appeared in the journal Neurology and were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in London reveal that spending less time in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep and taking longer to enter it are separately associated with a higher risk of developing dementia. Using data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), BUSM researchers studied 321 participants over the age of 60 who underwent an overnight sleep study between 1995 and 1998 and were then followed for an average of 12 years to determine their risk of developing dementia. Upon follow-up, researchers found that

Upon follow-up, researchers found that each percentage reduction in REM sleep was associated with a 9 percent increase in the risk of all-cause dementia.

be related to prior participation in football and that a long duration of play may be related to substantial disease burden. “The finding of early CTE pathology in high school and young collegiate players emphasizes the urgent need for longitudinal, prospective, multicenter studies to identify young players at risk for CTE as well as treatment strategies and comprehensive care for players who are suspected to have CTE during life. It is no longer debatable whether there is a problem in football; there is a problem. Through this study, we have identified meaningful opportunities for detection, prevention, and multiple targets to slow or stop CTE, and it is time to come together to find solutions,” said corresponding author Ann McKee, MD, director of BU’s CTE Center and chief of neuropathology at VA Boston Healthcare System.

“Our findings indicate an association between higher sugary beverage intake and brain atrophy, including lower brain volume and poorer memory,” said corresponding author Matthew Pase, PhD, a BUSM neurology fellow and FHS investigator. “We also found that people drinking diet soda daily were almost three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia.” The researchers point out that preexisting conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and

Researchers used FHS data to study several decades’ worth of blood pressure readings collected over multiple generations.

■ Study Suggests Link Between Youth Football and Later-Life Mood and Behavioral Impairments

each percentage reduction in REM sleep was associated with a 9 percent increase in the risk of all-cause dementia and an 8 percent increase in the risk of Alzheimer’s disease dementia. “Different stages of sleep may differentially affect key features of Alzheimer’s disease. Our findings implicate REM sleep mechanisms as predictors of dementia,” explained corresponding author Matthew Pase, PhD, a fellow in the Department of Neurology at BUSM and an FHS investigator.

■ 110 of 111 Deceased Former NFL Players Had CTE

Nearly every former National Football League (NFL) player who played at least one regular season game, and whose brain subsequently was donated for research, was diagnosed postmortem with the progressive degenerative disease Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). The findings of the largest CTE case series ever published—which appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)—suggest that CTE may 20

Boston University School of Medicine

Those who participate in tackle football before age 12 are twice as likely to have problems with behavior regulation.

According to a BU CTE Center study published in Springer Nature’s Translational Psychiatry, those who participate in tackle football before age 12 are twice as likely to have problems with behavior regulation, apathy, and executive functioning when they get older, and three times as likely to experience symptoms of depression. Researchers studied 214 former American football players, including 43 who played only through high school and 103 who played only through college. Results from former players who started playing tackle football before the age of 12 were compared against those of participants who started playing at age 12 or older. “The brain is going through this incredible time of growth between the years of 10 and 12, and if you subject that developing brain to repetitive head impacts, it may cause problems later in life,” said co-author Robert Stern, PhD, director of clinical research at the BU CTE Center.

■ Daily Consumption of Sodas, Artificially Sweetened Sodas, Fruit Juices Affects Brain

People who more frequently consume sugary beverages such as sodas and fruit juices are more likely to have poorer memory, smaller overall brain volumes, and smaller hippocampal volumes, an area of the brain important for memory. Using FHS data, researchers also found that people who drank diet soda daily were almost three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia when compared to those who did not consume diet soda. These findings appeared separately in the journals Alzheimer’s & Dementia and Stroke.

high blood pressure did not completely explain their findings. For example, people who more frequently consumed diet soda were also more likely to be diabetic, which is thought to increase the risk of dementia. However, even after excluding diabetics from the study, diet soda consumption was still associated with the risk of dementia.

■ Hypertension before Age 55 Increases Risk of Cardiovascular Death

Whether someone is diagnosed with hypertension— either early (before the age of 55) or later in life—can have important health ramifications. According to a study in the British Medical Journal, diagnosis of high blood pressure at an earlier age is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular death and signifies an inherited predisposition for the disease. These findings offer important prognostic information in assessing an individual’s cardiovascular risk. BUSM researchers used FHS data to study several decades’ worth of blood pressure readings collected over multiple generations. They tracked which individuals developed high blood pressure earlier or later in life, identified patterns of earlier versus later onset hypertension among families, and compared the lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease in people with earlier versus later onset hypertension.

These findings will make it easier to study lung diseases like neonatal respiratory distress, COPD, and interstitial lung diseases.

According to corresponding author Teemu J. Niiranen, MD, research fellow at BUSM and the FHS, “We now know that there are at least two types of high blood pressure of which patients and providers should be aware: one type that develops earlier in life, which likely represents an inherited trait; and another that develops later in life that could possibly have more to do with lifestyle factors. Most importantly, the type that develops earlier in life is related to greater lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease.”

■ Correction of Genetic Mutation in Stem Cells Offers Hope for Treatment of Lung Diseases

For the first time, researchers have developed a way to coax pluripotent stem cells into a specific type of mature lung cell called “alveolar epithelial type II cells” (AEC2s), and to correct a mutant gene whose dysfunction in these cells is known to cause respiratory distress in infants. Published in Cell Stem Cell, these findings will make it easier to study lung diseases like neonatal respiratory distress, COPD, and interstitial lung diseases caused by dysfunctional AEC2s, which until now were unable to survive and multiply long enough in cell culture to be studied or genetically corrected. This discovery allows scientists to isolate AEC2s from pluripotent stem cells that can be engineered from any patient. The stability of these cells in culture also enables scientists to create models for understanding the diseases they underlie and to develop new gene, cell, and drug therapies for those diseases. “Now that we have generated a source of these cells and shown that they can model alveolar diseases in culture, this should make it much easier to study a variety of related diseases, possibly leading to a better understanding of them and hopefully to more mechanism-specific therapies for otherwise incurable diseases,” said corresponding author Darrell Kotton, MD, director of the BU/ BMC Center for Regenerative Medicine.

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

21


BUSM

Research

■ Lack of REM Sleep May Lead to Higher Risk for Dementia

Findings that appeared in the journal Neurology and were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in London reveal that spending less time in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep and taking longer to enter it are separately associated with a higher risk of developing dementia. Using data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), BUSM researchers studied 321 participants over the age of 60 who underwent an overnight sleep study between 1995 and 1998 and were then followed for an average of 12 years to determine their risk of developing dementia. Upon follow-up, researchers found that

Upon follow-up, researchers found that each percentage reduction in REM sleep was associated with a 9 percent increase in the risk of all-cause dementia.

be related to prior participation in football and that a long duration of play may be related to substantial disease burden. “The finding of early CTE pathology in high school and young collegiate players emphasizes the urgent need for longitudinal, prospective, multicenter studies to identify young players at risk for CTE as well as treatment strategies and comprehensive care for players who are suspected to have CTE during life. It is no longer debatable whether there is a problem in football; there is a problem. Through this study, we have identified meaningful opportunities for detection, prevention, and multiple targets to slow or stop CTE, and it is time to come together to find solutions,” said corresponding author Ann McKee, MD, director of BU’s CTE Center and chief of neuropathology at VA Boston Healthcare System.

“Our findings indicate an association between higher sugary beverage intake and brain atrophy, including lower brain volume and poorer memory,” said corresponding author Matthew Pase, PhD, a BUSM neurology fellow and FHS investigator. “We also found that people drinking diet soda daily were almost three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia.” The researchers point out that preexisting conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and

Researchers used FHS data to study several decades’ worth of blood pressure readings collected over multiple generations.

■ Study Suggests Link Between Youth Football and Later-Life Mood and Behavioral Impairments

each percentage reduction in REM sleep was associated with a 9 percent increase in the risk of all-cause dementia and an 8 percent increase in the risk of Alzheimer’s disease dementia. “Different stages of sleep may differentially affect key features of Alzheimer’s disease. Our findings implicate REM sleep mechanisms as predictors of dementia,” explained corresponding author Matthew Pase, PhD, a fellow in the Department of Neurology at BUSM and an FHS investigator.

■ 110 of 111 Deceased Former NFL Players Had CTE

Nearly every former National Football League (NFL) player who played at least one regular season game, and whose brain subsequently was donated for research, was diagnosed postmortem with the progressive degenerative disease Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). The findings of the largest CTE case series ever published—which appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)—suggest that CTE may 20

Boston University School of Medicine

Those who participate in tackle football before age 12 are twice as likely to have problems with behavior regulation.

According to a BU CTE Center study published in Springer Nature’s Translational Psychiatry, those who participate in tackle football before age 12 are twice as likely to have problems with behavior regulation, apathy, and executive functioning when they get older, and three times as likely to experience symptoms of depression. Researchers studied 214 former American football players, including 43 who played only through high school and 103 who played only through college. Results from former players who started playing tackle football before the age of 12 were compared against those of participants who started playing at age 12 or older. “The brain is going through this incredible time of growth between the years of 10 and 12, and if you subject that developing brain to repetitive head impacts, it may cause problems later in life,” said co-author Robert Stern, PhD, director of clinical research at the BU CTE Center.

■ Daily Consumption of Sodas, Artificially Sweetened Sodas, Fruit Juices Affects Brain

People who more frequently consume sugary beverages such as sodas and fruit juices are more likely to have poorer memory, smaller overall brain volumes, and smaller hippocampal volumes, an area of the brain important for memory. Using FHS data, researchers also found that people who drank diet soda daily were almost three times as likely to develop stroke and dementia when compared to those who did not consume diet soda. These findings appeared separately in the journals Alzheimer’s & Dementia and Stroke.

high blood pressure did not completely explain their findings. For example, people who more frequently consumed diet soda were also more likely to be diabetic, which is thought to increase the risk of dementia. However, even after excluding diabetics from the study, diet soda consumption was still associated with the risk of dementia.

■ Hypertension before Age 55 Increases Risk of Cardiovascular Death

Whether someone is diagnosed with hypertension— either early (before the age of 55) or later in life—can have important health ramifications. According to a study in the British Medical Journal, diagnosis of high blood pressure at an earlier age is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular death and signifies an inherited predisposition for the disease. These findings offer important prognostic information in assessing an individual’s cardiovascular risk. BUSM researchers used FHS data to study several decades’ worth of blood pressure readings collected over multiple generations. They tracked which individuals developed high blood pressure earlier or later in life, identified patterns of earlier versus later onset hypertension among families, and compared the lifetime risks of cardiovascular disease in people with earlier versus later onset hypertension.

These findings will make it easier to study lung diseases like neonatal respiratory distress, COPD, and interstitial lung diseases.

According to corresponding author Teemu J. Niiranen, MD, research fellow at BUSM and the FHS, “We now know that there are at least two types of high blood pressure of which patients and providers should be aware: one type that develops earlier in life, which likely represents an inherited trait; and another that develops later in life that could possibly have more to do with lifestyle factors. Most importantly, the type that develops earlier in life is related to greater lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease.”

■ Correction of Genetic Mutation in Stem Cells Offers Hope for Treatment of Lung Diseases

For the first time, researchers have developed a way to coax pluripotent stem cells into a specific type of mature lung cell called “alveolar epithelial type II cells” (AEC2s), and to correct a mutant gene whose dysfunction in these cells is known to cause respiratory distress in infants. Published in Cell Stem Cell, these findings will make it easier to study lung diseases like neonatal respiratory distress, COPD, and interstitial lung diseases caused by dysfunctional AEC2s, which until now were unable to survive and multiply long enough in cell culture to be studied or genetically corrected. This discovery allows scientists to isolate AEC2s from pluripotent stem cells that can be engineered from any patient. The stability of these cells in culture also enables scientists to create models for understanding the diseases they underlie and to develop new gene, cell, and drug therapies for those diseases. “Now that we have generated a source of these cells and shown that they can model alveolar diseases in culture, this should make it much easier to study a variety of related diseases, possibly leading to a better understanding of them and hopefully to more mechanism-specific therapies for otherwise incurable diseases,” said corresponding author Darrell Kotton, MD, director of the BU/ BMC Center for Regenerative Medicine.

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

21


BUSM

Giving

bu.edu/supportingbusm

Staying Involved and Paying It Forward

W

maxillofacial surgery at Tufts, completed a fellowship in anesthesiology at Boston City Hospital, finished his studies at BUSM, and completed a PGY-2 year of general surgery at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. Sophia, who lived under Richard (MED’92) and Sophia Catrambone communist rule in Vietnam for five years before immigrating to the United States, oversaw their family life throughout Richard’s dental and medical training. BUSM’s mission of compassion and inclusion inspired him. “Without a doubt, my fondest memory of my time at BUSM was doing house calls. I really enjoyed going to the different neighborhoods, meeting people from Warren Society Welcomes New Members different cultures and backgrounds, and providing personalized medical care.” Like many who come to study at BUSM, he was drawn to the hands-on community outreach and is happy that the school continues this mission. Today, Dr. Catrambone is the immediate past president of the Alumni Association and a member of the BUSM Dean’s Advisory Board. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Chairman of the Department of Oral Health at the Steward Good Samaritan Medical Center in Brockton, Mass., an assistant clinical professor at Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and a visiting oral surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital. In his spare time, he enjoys the company of his family, especially when they are together outdoors. In September 2017, he and his son Christopher, an From left, Mary D. Olsson, Carl A. Olsson (MED’63), Dean Karen Antman, MD, Jane R. Clark, estate planning attorney, and daughter MD, and Jonathan P. Gertler, MD, gather at the William Fairfield Warren Society induction ceremony during the BU gala last October in New York City. The Warren Society recognizes Karina, a third-year dental student at donors who contribute $1M or more to the University. Tufts, climbed to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. n

hen Richard J. Catrambone, MD, DMD (MED’92), received a call about his 25th reunion, he knew he wanted to get involved. A phone conversation with Associate Director of Alumni Relations Tim Fitzgerald sparked his interest. He and his wife Sophia had been returning once a year for the various alumni events, but he wanted to give more to the community he’d once called home. In support of the Campaign for Boston University, the Catrambones have established the Richard J. Catrambone and Sophia Catrambone Scholarship Fund, generously donating $100,000 to provide annual scholarship awards based on financial need to one or more medical students in good academic standing at BUSM. “I came from a modest background and received financial help to fund my education, so I want to pay it forward,” Catrambone explains. Dr. Catrambone did not take the typical pathway in becoming a physician. He studied dental medicine and trained in oral and

22

Boston University School of Medicine

A Pediatrician Helping Future Ones Cope with Medical School Debt Overwhelming student debt can have a significant influence on the medical specialties that BUSM students choose to pursue. Physicians specializing in anesthesiology, surgery, and dermatology often earn larger salaries than those entering primary care specialties. In 2016, one-third of medical students graduated with debt between $100,000 and $200,000, and one-quarter had debt of more than $200,000. Recognizing that this issue can be particularly worrisome for students specializing in pediatrics, pediatrician Shirley Klein, MD (MED’68), is doing something about it. Dr. Klein established the Shirley P. Klein, MD Scholarship

Fund, a permanently endowed fund that provides annual scholarship awards based on financial need to one or more deserving students going into pediatrics. “I worked with medical students and residents for many years, always encouraging them to pursue a career in general pediatrics without worrying about the financial implications of this choice. I had a small scholarship when I attended BU, and I wanted to give back in a meaningful way,” Dr. Klein explained. Long involved with the University, she completed the six-year Liberal Arts/Medical Education Program offered through CAS and BUSM, plans to attend her 50th reunion in fall 2018, and serves as a member of the Class of 1968 reunion team.

Shirley Klein, MD (MED’68), with Anthony Fauci, MD, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, prior to last year’s MD/PhD commencement ceremony.

“Dr. Klein is enthusiastic about Class of 1968 Reunions. She might be the perfect volunteer; she not only attends, but steps up to support the class gift program,” Associate Director of Development and Alumni Relations Tim Fitzgerald said. A pediatrician in the Wilmington, Delaware, metropolitan area for 32 years, Dr. Klein served as an attending

physician in the pediatric practice program at the Rocco A. Abessinio Family Wilmington Health Center and worked for Christiana Care, mostly in outpatient pediatrics, before retiring in July 2015. Named Delaware’s CDC Childhood Immunization Champion in 2015, she is a leading advocate for childhood immunizations and is currently a member of the Immunization Coalition of Delaware. n

Alumnus Provides Lead Gift for Underrepresented Minority Professorship

I

Louis W. Sullivan, MD (MED‘58)

magine starting medical school as the only minority student in your class at Boston University. Your experience is positive and faculty members are very supportive, despite the fact that they don’t look like you or know your life growing up in the segregated south. You complete medical school, become chief of hematology on the BU Medical Campus, serve as founding dean and then president of Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, and are eventually

named US Secretary of Health & Human Services. This is the amazing story of Louis W. Sullivan, MD (MED’58), Dean’s Advisory Board member and author of two books, Becoming a Doctor at the Nation’s Newest African American Medical School and, more recently, his autobiography, Breaking Ground: My Life in Medicine. A longtime donor to BUSM who cares deeply about supporting underrepresented minority students and faculty, Dr. Sullivan has contributed to the

Adopt-A-Student Scholarship Fund, the Kenneth C. Edelin Scholarship Fund, and the Early Medical School Selection Program Fund. Now in his 60th reunion year, Dr. Sullivan is giving back to BUSM with a highly personal and meaningful contribution—the lead gift to establish the Louis W. Sullivan, MD, Professorship for an underrepresented minority faculty member in the Department of Medicine. “My four years at BUSM were really great years; it was the nature of the environment. I want continued on page 24

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

23


BUSM

Giving

bu.edu/supportingbusm

Staying Involved and Paying It Forward

W

maxillofacial surgery at Tufts, completed a fellowship in anesthesiology at Boston City Hospital, finished his studies at BUSM, and completed a PGY-2 year of general surgery at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. Sophia, who lived under Richard (MED’92) and Sophia Catrambone communist rule in Vietnam for five years before immigrating to the United States, oversaw their family life throughout Richard’s dental and medical training. BUSM’s mission of compassion and inclusion inspired him. “Without a doubt, my fondest memory of my time at BUSM was doing house calls. I really enjoyed going to the different neighborhoods, meeting people from Warren Society Welcomes New Members different cultures and backgrounds, and providing personalized medical care.” Like many who come to study at BUSM, he was drawn to the hands-on community outreach and is happy that the school continues this mission. Today, Dr. Catrambone is the immediate past president of the Alumni Association and a member of the BUSM Dean’s Advisory Board. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Chairman of the Department of Oral Health at the Steward Good Samaritan Medical Center in Brockton, Mass., an assistant clinical professor at Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and a visiting oral surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital. In his spare time, he enjoys the company of his family, especially when they are together outdoors. In September 2017, he and his son Christopher, an From left, Mary D. Olsson, Carl A. Olsson (MED’63), Dean Karen Antman, MD, Jane R. Clark, estate planning attorney, and daughter MD, and Jonathan P. Gertler, MD, gather at the William Fairfield Warren Society induction ceremony during the BU gala last October in New York City. The Warren Society recognizes Karina, a third-year dental student at donors who contribute $1M or more to the University. Tufts, climbed to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. n

hen Richard J. Catrambone, MD, DMD (MED’92), received a call about his 25th reunion, he knew he wanted to get involved. A phone conversation with Associate Director of Alumni Relations Tim Fitzgerald sparked his interest. He and his wife Sophia had been returning once a year for the various alumni events, but he wanted to give more to the community he’d once called home. In support of the Campaign for Boston University, the Catrambones have established the Richard J. Catrambone and Sophia Catrambone Scholarship Fund, generously donating $100,000 to provide annual scholarship awards based on financial need to one or more medical students in good academic standing at BUSM. “I came from a modest background and received financial help to fund my education, so I want to pay it forward,” Catrambone explains. Dr. Catrambone did not take the typical pathway in becoming a physician. He studied dental medicine and trained in oral and

22

Boston University School of Medicine

A Pediatrician Helping Future Ones Cope with Medical School Debt Overwhelming student debt can have a significant influence on the medical specialties that BUSM students choose to pursue. Physicians specializing in anesthesiology, surgery, and dermatology often earn larger salaries than those entering primary care specialties. In 2016, one-third of medical students graduated with debt between $100,000 and $200,000, and one-quarter had debt of more than $200,000. Recognizing that this issue can be particularly worrisome for students specializing in pediatrics, pediatrician Shirley Klein, MD (MED’68), is doing something about it. Dr. Klein established the Shirley P. Klein, MD Scholarship

Fund, a permanently endowed fund that provides annual scholarship awards based on financial need to one or more deserving students going into pediatrics. “I worked with medical students and residents for many years, always encouraging them to pursue a career in general pediatrics without worrying about the financial implications of this choice. I had a small scholarship when I attended BU, and I wanted to give back in a meaningful way,” Dr. Klein explained. Long involved with the University, she completed the six-year Liberal Arts/Medical Education Program offered through CAS and BUSM, plans to attend her 50th reunion in fall 2018, and serves as a member of the Class of 1968 reunion team.

Shirley Klein, MD (MED’68), with Anthony Fauci, MD, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, prior to last year’s MD/PhD commencement ceremony.

“Dr. Klein is enthusiastic about Class of 1968 Reunions. She might be the perfect volunteer; she not only attends, but steps up to support the class gift program,” Associate Director of Development and Alumni Relations Tim Fitzgerald said. A pediatrician in the Wilmington, Delaware, metropolitan area for 32 years, Dr. Klein served as an attending

physician in the pediatric practice program at the Rocco A. Abessinio Family Wilmington Health Center and worked for Christiana Care, mostly in outpatient pediatrics, before retiring in July 2015. Named Delaware’s CDC Childhood Immunization Champion in 2015, she is a leading advocate for childhood immunizations and is currently a member of the Immunization Coalition of Delaware. n

Alumnus Provides Lead Gift for Underrepresented Minority Professorship

I

Louis W. Sullivan, MD (MED‘58)

magine starting medical school as the only minority student in your class at Boston University. Your experience is positive and faculty members are very supportive, despite the fact that they don’t look like you or know your life growing up in the segregated south. You complete medical school, become chief of hematology on the BU Medical Campus, serve as founding dean and then president of Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, and are eventually

named US Secretary of Health & Human Services. This is the amazing story of Louis W. Sullivan, MD (MED’58), Dean’s Advisory Board member and author of two books, Becoming a Doctor at the Nation’s Newest African American Medical School and, more recently, his autobiography, Breaking Ground: My Life in Medicine. A longtime donor to BUSM who cares deeply about supporting underrepresented minority students and faculty, Dr. Sullivan has contributed to the

Adopt-A-Student Scholarship Fund, the Kenneth C. Edelin Scholarship Fund, and the Early Medical School Selection Program Fund. Now in his 60th reunion year, Dr. Sullivan is giving back to BUSM with a highly personal and meaningful contribution—the lead gift to establish the Louis W. Sullivan, MD, Professorship for an underrepresented minority faculty member in the Department of Medicine. “My four years at BUSM were really great years; it was the nature of the environment. I want continued on page 24

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

23


Giving

DONOR REPORT

DONOR REPORT

continued from page 23

to help underrepresented faculty and students have a similar experience,” he said. In his autobiography, Dr. Sullivan writes, “I had no idea what to expect from people at medical school. From an allblack environment, I was going into an all-white one. And I was going to be the integrator…but whatever fears I might have had along those lines evaporated almost as soon as I showed up for

orientation. I was the only black student in my class of 76, which I more or less had expected…but my reception couldn’t have been friendlier, by the professors as well as the students. My antennae were up, but I didn’t catch a single hint that I didn’t belong. It was remarkable.” Dr. Sullivan met his wife Eva, an attorney, within weeks of coming to Boston in September of 1954. She had arrived from Pittsfield, Massachusetts, at the same time, and stayed at the Franklin

Square House, a dormitory for women around the corner from BUSM. They married in 1956 and have three grown children: Paul, a radiologist at Southwestern Medical School in Dallas; Shanta, an actress in Los Angeles; and Halsted, a comedy writer for television and movies also in LA. “We are extraordinarily grateful for both Dr. Sullivan’s generous donation to establish this professorship as well as his inspiring leadership in medicine,” said David L. Coleman,

MD, John Wade Professor and chair, Department of Medicine. “The professorship will allow the Department of Medicine to support and recognize a faculty member from a group under-represented in medicine. As we work tirelessly to achieve great diversity in our community, we are honored to be able to acknowledge Dr. Sullivan’s connection to Boston University School of Medicine and his pioneering commitment to inclusiveness, excellence, and service.” n

Boston University Receives Macy Grant to Improve Refugee Health Education

A

three-year, $392,000 grant from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation will prepare BUSM students at the earliest stages of their medical training to better serve refugee and immigrant populations. Given the unprecedented refugee crisis and the current political and social climate today’s immigrants face, training the next generation of health professionals to be outstanding global healers and leaders is imperative. The initiative, A Longitudinal Educational Program to Advance the Health and Health Care of Refugees, will be more comprehensive than any existing program in the country offered to medical students. Over the course of the three-year project period, faculty leaders will develop and implement a multidimensional educational program to provide diverse opportunities for students to learn about, practice, and research refugee health. Most medical education focused on this patient population currently addresses issues like immunizations and infectious diseases from countries of origin, but does not teach about the physical, emotional, and social manifestations of trauma. The majority of medical students and physicians have a limited understanding of their patients’ cultural and trauma histories and how they impact illness and healing, and limited skills to intervene in a culturally sensitive, patient-centered approach. “Physicians who care for refugees are often unprepared to address the serious and complex needs of those who seek their assistance because of lack of experience, training, and mentorship in their medical education curriculum. This initiative will begin to fill that void, and also prepare students to deal with other patients who have been traumatized and increase their cultural competence,” said George E. Thibault, MD, president of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation. The program will be integrated across several health professional programs at BU, including medicine, dental medicine, physician assistant, public health, and social work. Faculty members from each of 24

Boston University School of Medicine

these programs will collaborate closely to develop, evaluate, and disseminate course content. The new curriculum will include both didactic and interactive learning modules that will be required of all first- and second-year students, who will have the option to participate in research and service learning opportunities. A refugee health clerkship and an inter-professional refugee health selective will be optional for students during each of their four years. “This project builds on longstanding efforts on the Boston University Medical Campus to train students and providers in the care of underserved individuals and communities, including immigrants and refugees,” said Douglas Hughes, MD, BUSM’s associate dean for academic affairs. After developing, implementing, and evaluating the BUSM program, project leaders plan to disseminate the content to other health professional schools. “While our immediate goal is to advance medical education, our ultimate goal is to improve the health, well-being, and long-term adjustment of refugees.” Sondra Crosby, MD, associate professor of medicine, health law, bioethics, and human rights at BUSM and BU School of Public Health, and Suzanne Sarfaty, MD, associate professor of medicine and assistant dean for academic affairs, are co-principal investigators on this project. Both have established a record of leadership and caring for refugee and immigrant patients. For the past 17 years, Dr. Crosby has focused her practice on refugee care and asylum seekers. She is director and co-founder of the Immigrant & Refugee Health Program at Boston Medical Center and has participated in the Massachusetts Refugee Health Assessment Program for more than a decade. As director of the Enrichment office at BUSM, Dr. Sarfaty has more than a decade of experience in developing student educational programs that address urban and global health, research, service learning, and advanced communication skills. n

Thank you, donors.

The Chester S. Keefer, MD Society • The Chester S. Keefer, MD Society was established as a means of recognizing individuals whose personal philanthropy has helped advance the dual research and education missions of Boston University School of Medicine. The society is named in honor of Dr. Chester S. Keefer, whose foresight and determination in roles as chairman of the Department of Medicine, dean of Boston University School of Medicine, and director of the Medical Center, were responsible for laying the foundation for the Boston University Medical Center. In memory of his spirit, we honor those donors whose total contributions have reached $50,000 or more at the School of Medicine. Names in bold are new members. PL ATI N UM Joel J. Alpert, MD ■ and Barbara W. Alpert (SPH’79) ■ Merwyn Bagan, MD, MPH (MED’62, SPH’95) and Carol J. Bagan ■ Nancy L. R. Bucher, MD ■ Howard D. Buzzee ■ Shamim A. Dahod, MD (MED’87, CGS’76, CAS’78) and Ashraf M. Dahod ■ Richard H. Egdahl, MD ■ and Cynthia Egdahl (GRS’77) Alan Gerry and Sandra Gerry

GIVING LEVELS: $50,000–$99,999 Mercury members • Invitation to the spring Chester S. Keefer, MD Society Dinner • Honorary plaque $100,000–$249,999 Bronze members • All of the previously listed benefits • Invitation to and preferred seating, when available, at select BU/BUSM events throughout the year $250,000–$499,999 Silver members • All of the previously listed benefits • Personalized tour of research/ clinical area of your choice at BU Medical Campus $500,000–$999,999 Gold members • All of the previously listed benefits • Direct communication with the recipients of your generosity (students, faculty, researchers) $1,000,000+ Platinum members • All of the previously listed benefits • Private lunch with the Dean and other leadership of the School of Medicine ■ FY17 Donor ■ Deceased

Bold—New Member

Albert M. Ghassemian, MD ■ Audrey & Martin Gruss Foundation Lewis Heafitz and Ina B. Heafitz ■ Stephen R. Karp (CAS’63) ■ Sarkis J. Kechejian, MD (MED’63) ■ Sherry M. Leventhal and Alan M. Leventhal ■ Inez Lopez ■ Frank J. Miselis, MD (MED’45) ■ and Theodora T. Miselis ■ Jerome S. Serchuck and Joan S. Serchuck ■ Richard C. Shipley (Questrom’68,’72) ■ Wesley R. Skinner ■ and Charlotte A. Skinner ■ Jack N. Spivack ■ Helen L. Tarlow ■ and Sherwood J. Tarlow (LAW’47) ■ Diane Tauber and Laszlo N. Tauber, MD ■

Barry M. Manuel, MD (MED’58, CAS’54) and Patricia D. Manuel, PhD (SON’78, SED’86) ■ Rita Z. Mehos ■ Joseph B. Mizgerd, MD and Ann F. Mizgerd, MD ■ John H. Nichols, Jr. ■ Peter E. Pochi, MD (MED’55) ■ Alexander M. Rodger ■ Joelyn Rohman and Michael Rohman, MD (MED’50) ■ ■ Lee B. Silver, MD (MED’82, CAS’82) and Rachelle L. Silver ■ Mary U. Taylor ■ A. Raymond Tye (Questrom’47) ■ Joseph M. Wikler ■ and Madeline Wikler Amber Wong Arnold Wong, Jr.

GOLD Anita B. Barkan (CAS’46) ■ and Donald B. Barkan, MD (CAS’43, MED’45) ■ George A. Finley III and Phyllis A. Finley John L. Hall II (CAS’65) and Ann T. Hall Paul F. Nace, Jr. Carl A. Olsson, MD (MED’63) and Mary D. Olsson ■ Paul Rothbaum and Jean Rothbaum ■ ■ Elayne Russek Thomas J. Ryan, MD and Nancy T. Ryan

B RO N Z E Anonymous (3) ■ Carmela R. Abraham, PhD and Menachem E. Abraham Gerhard R. Andlinger and Jeanne D. Andlinger John T. Avellino and R. Ellen Avellino ■ Ruth M. Batson (SED’76) ■ Melvin R. Berlin and Randy L. Berlin Jag Bhawan, MD and Pratibha G. Bhawan, MD David G. Bradley and Katherine B. Bradley Elizabeth R. Brown, MD ■ Paul C. Burke and Gloria Burke ■ David J. Caron and Susan M. Caron Richard J. Cavell, MD (MED’61) and Bonnie Cavell ■ Hsi Pin Chen, MD (MED’96, CAS’89, SPH’91) and Kenneth E. Hancock, PhD (ENG’92,’01) Yi-Chuan Ching, MD (MED’58) and Helen Yu-Ching ■ ■ Michael J. Critelli and Joyce M. Critelli ■ Elizabeth C. Dooling, MD (MED’65) ■ Paul R. Dooling and Sandra A. Danussi E. Elaine Erbey Joseph S. Fastow, MD (MED’70) and Ellen K. Fastow ■ Joseph T. Ferrucci, MD and Brenda Ferrucci Samuel Finkielsztein and Gala Finkielsztein ■ Charlotte K. Forster and Philip Forster Frederick L. Fox, MD (MED’68) and Gail P. Fox ■ Charles N. Freed and Marlene Freed Patricia L. Freysinger (SON’82) ■ Shahram S. Gholami, MD (MED’96) and Neda Gholami ■ Godley Family Foundation ■ Burton P. Golub, MD (MED’65) and Lee Golub ■

S I LV ER Norman W. Alpert and Jane Alpert ■ Dean Karen Antman, MD and Elliott Antman, MD ■ William Y. W. Au, MD (MED’55, CAS’51) and Beverly N. Au ■ ■ Douglas E. Barnard, MD (MED’65) and Donna R. Barnard, MD (MED’65) ■ Gerald Besson, MD (MED’50) ■ and Eleanore S. Besson ■ Helen L. Burr ■ and George Burr ■ Lin Castre and Abraham D. Gosman ■ Ann C. Cea, MD (MED’67) and Anthony Tedeschi ■ Aram V. Chobanian, MD and Jasmine Chobanian ■ ■ Mary Lou Cohn and Arthur B. Wein, MD (MED’39) ■ Andrew B. Crummy, Jr., MD (MED’55) and Elsa E. Crummy ■ ■ Jonathan P. Gertler, MD (Questrom’99) and Jane Rogers Clark, MD Robert C. Green, MD and Sally E. McNagny, MD Hideo H. Itabashi, MD (MED’54, CAS’49) ■ and Yoko O. Itabashi ■ Stanley H. Konefal, MD (MED’47) ■ and Elaine Foster Lenore Larkin and Harold S. Larkin ■ Susan E. Leeman, PhD ■ Douglas N. MacInnis, MD (MED’46) ■

Jack C. Guden ■ Ian Highet and Lea Highet ■ Michael F. Holick, MD, PhD and Sally A. Holick Jeffrey R. Jay, MD (MED’83, CAS’83) and Mary Ellen A. Jay ■ Donald M. Kaplan, MD (MED’73) and Edna E. Kaplan (COM’88) ■ Earl G. Kendrick, Jr. and Randy Kendrick The Kessler Family Nasir A. Khan, MD ■ and Kay S. Khan (SON’65,’81) ■ Elaine B. Kirshenbaum (CAS’71, SED’72, SPH’79) ■ and Howard D. Kirshenbaum, MD ■ Lewis F. Kornfeld, Jr. ■ and Rose Ann Kornfeld Lawrence E. Langsam (Questrom’57) and Hannah S. Langsam Estella I. Leach ■ Patricia McLellan Leavitt, MD (MED’58, CAS’54) ■ Richard S. Leghorn Ruth R. Levine, PhD ■ and Martin Levine (DGE’49) ■ Henry Lew, MD (MED’62) and Winifred Lew ■ James H. Lowell II and Susan W. Lowell ■ Jules N. Manger, MD (CGS’66) and Janis G. Manger ■ ■ Rocco S. Marino, MD (MED’42) ■ Allan P. Markin and Patricia Markin ■ JoAnn McGrath Robert B. Melikian (CGS’60, CAS’62) Steven A. Miller, MD (MED’70, CAS’70) and Jacqueline H. Miller, PhD (CAS’70) ■ Charles Mosesian ■ Peter J. Mozden, MD (MED’53) ■ Carolann S. Najarian, MD (MED’80) and George Najarian Wilson Nolen Paul I. Ossen, MD (MED’43) ■ Simon C. Parisier, MD (MED’61) and Elaine Parisier ■ William Patty and Eliot Patty ■ Louise E. Penta and P. A. Penta, MD (MED’51) ■ M. Douglass Poirier, MD (MED’76, CAS’73) and Jeffrey D. Tripp ■ Theodore Polos, MD (MED’47) and Jean Polos Ronald L. Ragland, MD (MED’82) Elihu Rose, PhD and Susan W. Rose Doris M. Russell and Robert F. Russell, MD (MED’46) ■ Robert E. Schiesske (MET’78, Questrom’82) ■ Charles L. Schwager (Questrom’66) and Evelyn C. Schwager (Questrom’66) Richard D. Scott, MD and Mary D. Scott, MD ■

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

25


Giving

DONOR REPORT

DONOR REPORT

continued from page 23

to help underrepresented faculty and students have a similar experience,” he said. In his autobiography, Dr. Sullivan writes, “I had no idea what to expect from people at medical school. From an allblack environment, I was going into an all-white one. And I was going to be the integrator…but whatever fears I might have had along those lines evaporated almost as soon as I showed up for

orientation. I was the only black student in my class of 76, which I more or less had expected…but my reception couldn’t have been friendlier, by the professors as well as the students. My antennae were up, but I didn’t catch a single hint that I didn’t belong. It was remarkable.” Dr. Sullivan met his wife Eva, an attorney, within weeks of coming to Boston in September of 1954. She had arrived from Pittsfield, Massachusetts, at the same time, and stayed at the Franklin

Square House, a dormitory for women around the corner from BUSM. They married in 1956 and have three grown children: Paul, a radiologist at Southwestern Medical School in Dallas; Shanta, an actress in Los Angeles; and Halsted, a comedy writer for television and movies also in LA. “We are extraordinarily grateful for both Dr. Sullivan’s generous donation to establish this professorship as well as his inspiring leadership in medicine,” said David L. Coleman,

MD, John Wade Professor and chair, Department of Medicine. “The professorship will allow the Department of Medicine to support and recognize a faculty member from a group under-represented in medicine. As we work tirelessly to achieve great diversity in our community, we are honored to be able to acknowledge Dr. Sullivan’s connection to Boston University School of Medicine and his pioneering commitment to inclusiveness, excellence, and service.” n

Boston University Receives Macy Grant to Improve Refugee Health Education

A

three-year, $392,000 grant from the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation will prepare BUSM students at the earliest stages of their medical training to better serve refugee and immigrant populations. Given the unprecedented refugee crisis and the current political and social climate today’s immigrants face, training the next generation of health professionals to be outstanding global healers and leaders is imperative. The initiative, A Longitudinal Educational Program to Advance the Health and Health Care of Refugees, will be more comprehensive than any existing program in the country offered to medical students. Over the course of the three-year project period, faculty leaders will develop and implement a multidimensional educational program to provide diverse opportunities for students to learn about, practice, and research refugee health. Most medical education focused on this patient population currently addresses issues like immunizations and infectious diseases from countries of origin, but does not teach about the physical, emotional, and social manifestations of trauma. The majority of medical students and physicians have a limited understanding of their patients’ cultural and trauma histories and how they impact illness and healing, and limited skills to intervene in a culturally sensitive, patient-centered approach. “Physicians who care for refugees are often unprepared to address the serious and complex needs of those who seek their assistance because of lack of experience, training, and mentorship in their medical education curriculum. This initiative will begin to fill that void, and also prepare students to deal with other patients who have been traumatized and increase their cultural competence,” said George E. Thibault, MD, president of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation. The program will be integrated across several health professional programs at BU, including medicine, dental medicine, physician assistant, public health, and social work. Faculty members from each of 24

Boston University School of Medicine

these programs will collaborate closely to develop, evaluate, and disseminate course content. The new curriculum will include both didactic and interactive learning modules that will be required of all first- and second-year students, who will have the option to participate in research and service learning opportunities. A refugee health clerkship and an inter-professional refugee health selective will be optional for students during each of their four years. “This project builds on longstanding efforts on the Boston University Medical Campus to train students and providers in the care of underserved individuals and communities, including immigrants and refugees,” said Douglas Hughes, MD, BUSM’s associate dean for academic affairs. After developing, implementing, and evaluating the BUSM program, project leaders plan to disseminate the content to other health professional schools. “While our immediate goal is to advance medical education, our ultimate goal is to improve the health, well-being, and long-term adjustment of refugees.” Sondra Crosby, MD, associate professor of medicine, health law, bioethics, and human rights at BUSM and BU School of Public Health, and Suzanne Sarfaty, MD, associate professor of medicine and assistant dean for academic affairs, are co-principal investigators on this project. Both have established a record of leadership and caring for refugee and immigrant patients. For the past 17 years, Dr. Crosby has focused her practice on refugee care and asylum seekers. She is director and co-founder of the Immigrant & Refugee Health Program at Boston Medical Center and has participated in the Massachusetts Refugee Health Assessment Program for more than a decade. As director of the Enrichment office at BUSM, Dr. Sarfaty has more than a decade of experience in developing student educational programs that address urban and global health, research, service learning, and advanced communication skills. n

Thank you, donors.

The Chester S. Keefer, MD Society • The Chester S. Keefer, MD Society was established as a means of recognizing individuals whose personal philanthropy has helped advance the dual research and education missions of Boston University School of Medicine. The society is named in honor of Dr. Chester S. Keefer, whose foresight and determination in roles as chairman of the Department of Medicine, dean of Boston University School of Medicine, and director of the Medical Center, were responsible for laying the foundation for the Boston University Medical Center. In memory of his spirit, we honor those donors whose total contributions have reached $50,000 or more at the School of Medicine. Names in bold are new members. PL ATI N UM Joel J. Alpert, MD ■ and Barbara W. Alpert (SPH’79) ■ Merwyn Bagan, MD, MPH (MED’62, SPH’95) and Carol J. Bagan ■ Nancy L. R. Bucher, MD ■ Howard D. Buzzee ■ Shamim A. Dahod, MD (MED’87, CGS’76, CAS’78) and Ashraf M. Dahod ■ Richard H. Egdahl, MD ■ and Cynthia Egdahl (GRS’77) Alan Gerry and Sandra Gerry

GIVING LEVELS: $50,000–$99,999 Mercury members • Invitation to the spring Chester S. Keefer, MD Society Dinner • Honorary plaque $100,000–$249,999 Bronze members • All of the previously listed benefits • Invitation to and preferred seating, when available, at select BU/BUSM events throughout the year $250,000–$499,999 Silver members • All of the previously listed benefits • Personalized tour of research/ clinical area of your choice at BU Medical Campus $500,000–$999,999 Gold members • All of the previously listed benefits • Direct communication with the recipients of your generosity (students, faculty, researchers) $1,000,000+ Platinum members • All of the previously listed benefits • Private lunch with the Dean and other leadership of the School of Medicine ■ FY17 Donor ■ Deceased

Bold—New Member

Albert M. Ghassemian, MD ■ Audrey & Martin Gruss Foundation Lewis Heafitz and Ina B. Heafitz ■ Stephen R. Karp (CAS’63) ■ Sarkis J. Kechejian, MD (MED’63) ■ Sherry M. Leventhal and Alan M. Leventhal ■ Inez Lopez ■ Frank J. Miselis, MD (MED’45) ■ and Theodora T. Miselis ■ Jerome S. Serchuck and Joan S. Serchuck ■ Richard C. Shipley (Questrom’68,’72) ■ Wesley R. Skinner ■ and Charlotte A. Skinner ■ Jack N. Spivack ■ Helen L. Tarlow ■ and Sherwood J. Tarlow (LAW’47) ■ Diane Tauber and Laszlo N. Tauber, MD ■

Barry M. Manuel, MD (MED’58, CAS’54) and Patricia D. Manuel, PhD (SON’78, SED’86) ■ Rita Z. Mehos ■ Joseph B. Mizgerd, MD and Ann F. Mizgerd, MD ■ John H. Nichols, Jr. ■ Peter E. Pochi, MD (MED’55) ■ Alexander M. Rodger ■ Joelyn Rohman and Michael Rohman, MD (MED’50) ■ ■ Lee B. Silver, MD (MED’82, CAS’82) and Rachelle L. Silver ■ Mary U. Taylor ■ A. Raymond Tye (Questrom’47) ■ Joseph M. Wikler ■ and Madeline Wikler Amber Wong Arnold Wong, Jr.

GOLD Anita B. Barkan (CAS’46) ■ and Donald B. Barkan, MD (CAS’43, MED’45) ■ George A. Finley III and Phyllis A. Finley John L. Hall II (CAS’65) and Ann T. Hall Paul F. Nace, Jr. Carl A. Olsson, MD (MED’63) and Mary D. Olsson ■ Paul Rothbaum and Jean Rothbaum ■ ■ Elayne Russek Thomas J. Ryan, MD and Nancy T. Ryan

B RO N Z E Anonymous (3) ■ Carmela R. Abraham, PhD and Menachem E. Abraham Gerhard R. Andlinger and Jeanne D. Andlinger John T. Avellino and R. Ellen Avellino ■ Ruth M. Batson (SED’76) ■ Melvin R. Berlin and Randy L. Berlin Jag Bhawan, MD and Pratibha G. Bhawan, MD David G. Bradley and Katherine B. Bradley Elizabeth R. Brown, MD ■ Paul C. Burke and Gloria Burke ■ David J. Caron and Susan M. Caron Richard J. Cavell, MD (MED’61) and Bonnie Cavell ■ Hsi Pin Chen, MD (MED’96, CAS’89, SPH’91) and Kenneth E. Hancock, PhD (ENG’92,’01) Yi-Chuan Ching, MD (MED’58) and Helen Yu-Ching ■ ■ Michael J. Critelli and Joyce M. Critelli ■ Elizabeth C. Dooling, MD (MED’65) ■ Paul R. Dooling and Sandra A. Danussi E. Elaine Erbey Joseph S. Fastow, MD (MED’70) and Ellen K. Fastow ■ Joseph T. Ferrucci, MD and Brenda Ferrucci Samuel Finkielsztein and Gala Finkielsztein ■ Charlotte K. Forster and Philip Forster Frederick L. Fox, MD (MED’68) and Gail P. Fox ■ Charles N. Freed and Marlene Freed Patricia L. Freysinger (SON’82) ■ Shahram S. Gholami, MD (MED’96) and Neda Gholami ■ Godley Family Foundation ■ Burton P. Golub, MD (MED’65) and Lee Golub ■

S I LV ER Norman W. Alpert and Jane Alpert ■ Dean Karen Antman, MD and Elliott Antman, MD ■ William Y. W. Au, MD (MED’55, CAS’51) and Beverly N. Au ■ ■ Douglas E. Barnard, MD (MED’65) and Donna R. Barnard, MD (MED’65) ■ Gerald Besson, MD (MED’50) ■ and Eleanore S. Besson ■ Helen L. Burr ■ and George Burr ■ Lin Castre and Abraham D. Gosman ■ Ann C. Cea, MD (MED’67) and Anthony Tedeschi ■ Aram V. Chobanian, MD and Jasmine Chobanian ■ ■ Mary Lou Cohn and Arthur B. Wein, MD (MED’39) ■ Andrew B. Crummy, Jr., MD (MED’55) and Elsa E. Crummy ■ ■ Jonathan P. Gertler, MD (Questrom’99) and Jane Rogers Clark, MD Robert C. Green, MD and Sally E. McNagny, MD Hideo H. Itabashi, MD (MED’54, CAS’49) ■ and Yoko O. Itabashi ■ Stanley H. Konefal, MD (MED’47) ■ and Elaine Foster Lenore Larkin and Harold S. Larkin ■ Susan E. Leeman, PhD ■ Douglas N. MacInnis, MD (MED’46) ■

Jack C. Guden ■ Ian Highet and Lea Highet ■ Michael F. Holick, MD, PhD and Sally A. Holick Jeffrey R. Jay, MD (MED’83, CAS’83) and Mary Ellen A. Jay ■ Donald M. Kaplan, MD (MED’73) and Edna E. Kaplan (COM’88) ■ Earl G. Kendrick, Jr. and Randy Kendrick The Kessler Family Nasir A. Khan, MD ■ and Kay S. Khan (SON’65,’81) ■ Elaine B. Kirshenbaum (CAS’71, SED’72, SPH’79) ■ and Howard D. Kirshenbaum, MD ■ Lewis F. Kornfeld, Jr. ■ and Rose Ann Kornfeld Lawrence E. Langsam (Questrom’57) and Hannah S. Langsam Estella I. Leach ■ Patricia McLellan Leavitt, MD (MED’58, CAS’54) ■ Richard S. Leghorn Ruth R. Levine, PhD ■ and Martin Levine (DGE’49) ■ Henry Lew, MD (MED’62) and Winifred Lew ■ James H. Lowell II and Susan W. Lowell ■ Jules N. Manger, MD (CGS’66) and Janis G. Manger ■ ■ Rocco S. Marino, MD (MED’42) ■ Allan P. Markin and Patricia Markin ■ JoAnn McGrath Robert B. Melikian (CGS’60, CAS’62) Steven A. Miller, MD (MED’70, CAS’70) and Jacqueline H. Miller, PhD (CAS’70) ■ Charles Mosesian ■ Peter J. Mozden, MD (MED’53) ■ Carolann S. Najarian, MD (MED’80) and George Najarian Wilson Nolen Paul I. Ossen, MD (MED’43) ■ Simon C. Parisier, MD (MED’61) and Elaine Parisier ■ William Patty and Eliot Patty ■ Louise E. Penta and P. A. Penta, MD (MED’51) ■ M. Douglass Poirier, MD (MED’76, CAS’73) and Jeffrey D. Tripp ■ Theodore Polos, MD (MED’47) and Jean Polos Ronald L. Ragland, MD (MED’82) Elihu Rose, PhD and Susan W. Rose Doris M. Russell and Robert F. Russell, MD (MED’46) ■ Robert E. Schiesske (MET’78, Questrom’82) ■ Charles L. Schwager (Questrom’66) and Evelyn C. Schwager (Questrom’66) Richard D. Scott, MD and Mary D. Scott, MD ■

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

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Giving

DONOR REPORT

Ira L. Seldin and Florence Seldin ■ Muriel Shapiro and Arnold Shapiro ■ Stuart E. Siegel, MD (MED’67, CAS’67) ■ John R. Silber, PhD ■ and Kathryn U. Silber ■ Charles W. Smith and Hazel Smith (MET’83) Gordon L. Snider, MD ■ Edward Spindell, MD (MED’53) ■ and Judith K. Spindell Eliot Stewart and John M. Stewart ■ ■ Christine E. Stiefel Louis W. Sullivan, MD (MED’58) and Eva G. Sullivan ■ Elliott H. Sweetser, MD (MED’43) ■ and Aileen B. Sweetser ■ Nevart Talanian Gloria P. Talis and George J. Talis, MD (MED’50) ■ Alfred I. Tauber, MD and Paula Fredriksen, PhD Yolande Tsampalieros and Gabriel Tsampalieros ■ Deborah W. Vaughan, PhD (GRS’72) ■ Martin L. Vogel, MD (MED’53) and Phyllis M. Vogel ■ Henry R. Wolfe, MD (MED’45) and Grace A. Wolfe ■ ■ Herbert H. Wotiz, PhD ■ Lawrence A. Yannuzzi, MD (MED’64) and Julie Yannuzzi Jeremiah O. Young, MD (MED’62) and Beverly A. Young Lily Moo Young, MD (MED’65) and John G. Johansson ■ The Ziskind Family M E RCU RY Anonymous (2) ■ Lawrence D. Ackman and Ronnie Ackman Noubar B. Afeyan, PhD and Anna Afeyan Gerald Ajemian and Lucille Ajemian Dwight M. Akers, MD (MED’53) ■ and Beverly R. Akers ■ Winston D. Alt, MD (MED’80) and Deborah Gribbon Max M. April, MD (CAS’81, MED’85) and Pamela T. April (Questrom’83) Michael L. J. Apuzzo, MD (MED’65) and Helene Apuzzo ■ Jeanne F. Arnold, MD (MED’61) and Peter F. Jeffries, MD (MED’60) ■ Edward Avedisian (CFA’59, ’61) and Pamela W. Avedisian, DDH ■ Richard K. Babayan, MD and Sonya Nersessian, Esq. (LAW’85) ■ Shirley Baker and Steven Baker ■ Elizabeth Day Barnett, MD (MED’85) and Suleiman N. Mustafa-Kutana, MD ■ Paul C. Barsam, MD (STH’52) and Joyce L. Barsam, PhD Howard C. Beane, MD (MED’57) and Shirley T. Beane ■ Robert M. Beazley, MD ■ John H. Bechtel, MD (MED’50) ■ and Shirley F. Bechtel ■ Franklyn D. Berry, MD (MED’41) ■ Betty E. Bishop and David W. Bishop, MD (MED’46) ■ Elsa C. Bodon, MD (MED’41) ■ James F. Bopp, Jr. ■ S. Arthur Boruchoff, MD (MED’51) ■ and Anna Silverman-Boruchoff, MD (MED’49) ■ Yvonne K. Brockman and Stanley K. Brockman, MD (MED’55) ■ ■ Robert A. Cameron ■

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Boston University School of Medicine

Robert J. Carey, MD (MED’54) ■ and Mary E. Carey (SED’55) Richard J. Catrambone, MD, DMD (MED’92) and Sophia Catrambone ■ Robert D. Champion and Marjorie Champion ■ Edmond E. Charrette, MD (MED’62) and Maria T. Charrette ■ Harold N. Chefitz (COM’55, CGS’53) and Charlotte M. Chefitz ■ Jeremy Chess, MD (MED’70, CAS’70) David J. Chronley, MD (MED’74) and Marianne J. Chronley ■ Frank Citrone, Jr. and Carol Citrone John P. Cloherty, MD (MED’62) ■ John F. Cogan, Jr. and Mary L. Cornille (GRS’87) Alan S. Cohen, MD (MED’52) and Joan P. Cohen Patricia A. Connolly, MD (MED’84) ■ Marian M. Cook Sidney Covich ■ Suzanne Cutler, PhD (Questrom’61) ■ Brit d’Arbeloff and Alexander V. d’Arbeloff ■ Paul E. Dixon, Jr. and Rebecca K. Dixon ■ Jodi Dome Linger, D.O. and Mr. Nicholas T. Linger ■ Thomas J. Dowling, MD (MED’81) and Rosemary Dowling ■ Hilda Ratner Dressler, MD (MED’34) ■ Carol A. Dyer and Gene Gordon, MD (MED’46) ■ Alan M. Edelstein, Esq. (Questrom’47, LAW’49) and Sybil Edelstein ■ Alvin N. Eden, MD (MED’52) and Elaine R. Eden ■ Mary Jane R. England, MD (MED’64) ■ Michael J. Esposito, MD (MED’49) ■ Judith N. Feldman Idea S. Fiering ■ Bertha Offenbach Fineberg, MD (MED’36) ■ and Nathan L. Fineberg, MD (MED’30) ■ Nicholas J. Fiumara, MD (MED’39) ■ Beverly R. Franklin (CAS’44) and William E. Franklin, MD (MED’46) ■ Carl Franzblau, PhD and Myrna Franzblau (SED’73) Monte Friedkin and Skeets Friedkin Ralph G. Ganick, MD (MED’67, CAS’67) and Lois B. Ganick ■ Ray A. Garver and Donna L. Garver Marion L. Gendron (PAL’26) ■ George E. Ghareeb, MD (MED’62) and Nancy B. Ghareeb ■ Arnold Goldenberg, MD (MED’54) and Bernice Goldenberg ■ Gloria Goldenberg ■ and Philip T. Goldenberg, MD (MED’46) ■ Malcolm Gordon, MD (MED’48) and Nan Miller ■ Dorothy A. Gottlieb (CAS’76) and Leonard S. Gottlieb, MD ■ Doris Grabosky and Jack Grabosky Donald J. Grande, MD (MED’73) and Elena M. Grande ■ Ellen R. Grass ■ Robert E. Griffin and Cathleen Griffin ■ Morton S. Grossman (MET’42) ■ and Sylvia Grossman ■ Kenneth M. Grundfast, MD and Ruthanne Grundfast Fritz Grunebaum ■ Kamlyn R. Haynes, MD (MED’97, CAS’89) and Joe Parse ■ Robert W. Healy, MD (MED’67) and Bonnie M. Healy ■

Juan De J. Hernandez Batista and Maria A. Tavarez-De Hernandez ■ Arnold S. Hiatt Ann S. Hintlian and Deran Hintlian Michael G. Hirsh, MD (MED’63) and Carol N. Hirsh ■ Arline Housman ■ and Herbert E. Housman (Questrom’42) ■ Charles Housman Edward L. Housman (Questrom’42) and Charlotte Housman ■ James B. Howell, MD (MED’65) and Marlene A. Howell ■ Bernard L. Huang, MD (MED’62, CAS’57) and Ann M. Huang Richard E. Hunter, MD (MED’44) and Minta Hunter David Ingall, MD (MED’57, CAS’52, GRS’53) and Carol Ingall Patricia K. Issarescu, MD (MED’61) Joseph A. Izzi, Sr., MD and Barbara A. Izzi Esther B. Kahn (SED’55) ■ Charlotte A. Kaitz and Louis L. Kaitz (MET’78, Questrom’47) ■ Denise S. Katsaros and Arthur T. Katsaros ■ Honorable Damon J. Keith ■ Shirley P. Klein, MD (MED’68, CAS’68) ■ Joseph J. Konefal, MD (MED’77) and Karen G. Konefal ■ Burton I. Korelitz, MD (MED’51) and Ann Z. Korelitz ■ Conan Kornetsky, PhD Edward E. Krukonis, MD (MED’63) and Priscilla J. Krukonis ■ Charna C. Larkin and Alan B. Larkin ■ ■ Robert E. Leach, MD and Laurine Leach Brigitte Lonner and Joseph J. Lonner ■ Rita E. Loos ■ Thomas A. MacLean, MD (MED’64) and Colleen K. MacLean William I. Malamud, MD (MED’54) and Camille C. Malamud ■ William M. Manger, MD, PhD and Lynn S. Manger Richard C. Marcus Stella C. Martin, PhD and Clive R. Martin Ronald P. McCaffrey and Maureen McCaffrey John F. McCahan, MD and Kathleen B. McCahan ■ Jean E. McPhail (SED’63) ■ Robert F. Meenan, MD (MED’72, Questrom’89) ■ Jordan Monocandilos Rodney A. Montag and Sally A. Montag Sanford R. Montag and Nancy L. Montag Merel G. Mountain Michael F. Mullarkey, MD (MED’70) and Dawn Mullarkey (CAS’68) G. Vijaya Naidu, MD John Noble, MD and Ewa Kuligowska, MD ■ Dawn B. Norcia and David J. Norcia N. Stephen Ober, MD (MED’86, CAS’82) Anne W. O’Connor and John F. O’Connor, MD (MED’57) ■ Hytho H. Pantazelos, MD (MED’63) and Peter G. Pantazelos Dianne M. Parrotte, MD (MED’79, CAS’79) Edward F. Parsons, MD (MED’65) ■ Jordan C. Paul and Valerie J. Paul ■ Lita Perkins ■ and John S. Perkins (Questrom’36) ■ Jona A. Perlmutter, MD and Donna Perlmutter Astrid O. Peterson, MD (MED’77, CAS’74) ■

N. N. Pike, Esq. (LAW’37) ■ Carol C. Pohl, MD (MED’67) and Alan L. Pohl, MD ■ John I. Polk, MD (SED’13, MED’74) and Mary C. Nugent Polk (SON’76,’77) Helen S. Ratner and Frank Ratner, MD (MED’47) ■ ■ Iver S. Ravin, MD (MED’40) ■ Nancy E. Rice, MD (MED’65) and Millard J. Hyland, MD ■ Bessie Rosenfield ■ and Louis I. Rosenfield ■ Gerald L. Ross ■ Melanie Rothbaum and David Rothbaum, MD (MED’82) ■ Richard A. Rudders, MD Stephen W. Russell, MD (MED’55) and Gail D. Russell Hannah E. Sandson and John I. Sandson, MD ■ Francis P. Saunders, MD (MED’58) and Lydia M. Saunders Frank J. Schaberg, Jr., MD (MED’68, CAS’68) and Monica J. Schaberg, MD (MED’68, CAS’68) ■ Alan L. Schechter, MD (MED’78) and Genevieve Schechter ■ Rocco Schelzi ■ The Schulze Family ■ Honorable Richard Seeborg ■ Herman Selinsky, MD (MED’24) ■ Leslie K. Serchuck, MD (MED’90) ■ Jane L. Shapiro (CAS’69) Richard J. Shemin, MD (MED’74, CAS’72) and Susan H. Shemin Norton L. Sherman ■ and Claire Sherman The Shooshan Family Martha Skinner, MD and Sumner Stone, MD (MED’58) ■ Lois N. Talis ■ Sanford W. Udis, MD (MED’44) ■ Franz Waldeck, MD, PhD ■ Carl W. Walter, MD ■ and Margaret H. Walter ■ Murray Weinstock, MD (MED’65) and Gloria Weinstock ■ Sue Rosenwasser Weiss and Seymour Rosenwasser, MD ■ Anthony Weldon Peter S. Wellington ■ and Judith F. Wellington ■ Jerrold A. Wexler and Joan Wexler Robert H. Wexler ■ and Joanna B. Wexler ■ Burton White, MD (MED’61) and June S. White ■ Marcelle M. Willock, MD (Questrom’89) ■ Alan Winters and Hope Winters Peak Woo, MD (MED’78, CAS’78) and Celia T. Chung-Woo ■ Earle G. Woodman, MD (MED’58) ■ Sam S. Wu, MD (MED’92, CAS’87, GRS’90, SPH’92) and Patricia C. Tsang, MD (MED’92, CAS’92, GRS’92) ■ Moshe Yanai and Rachel Yanai Frances W. Young ■ Larry C. Young ■ Marion L. Young and Charles R. Young, PhD ■ ■ Barry Zuckerman, MD and Pamela Zuckerman, MD HONORARY MEMB ER S Dorothy C. Keefer (PAL’48,’46) ■ Carl Lyle ■ and Ishbel K. Lyle

GIFTS FROM THE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD, ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STAFF, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS Boston University School of Medicine is proud to recognize the generosity of members of the Dean’s Advisory Board, alumni, parents, faculty, staff, corporations, foundations, organizations, and friends this past year (July 1, 2016, to June 30, 2017). Their support has helped the School of Medicine establish new programs and projects that enhance the living and learning environment for our students and advance our research. We thank our donors for their vision and philanthropy. While space constraints prevent us from listing the many donors who gave gifts under $250, we sincerely appreciate their support. ■ President’s Society (AFLGS) Member | ■ Young Alumni Giving Society Member | ■ Faculty/Staff Member | ■ Parent | ■ Three-year Consecutive Giving ■ First-time Donor | ■ Deceased | ■ William Fairfield Warren Society Member

DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD John T. Avellino ■ Merwyn Bagan, MD, MPH (MED’62, SPH’95) ■ Elizabeth R. Brown, MD ■ Richard J. Catrambone, MD, DMD (MED’92) ■ Ann C. Cea, MD (MED’67) ■ Harold N. Chefitz (CGS’53, COM’55) ■ Suzanne Cutler, PhD (Questrom’61) ■ Shamim A. Dahod, MD (MED’87, CGS’76, CAS’78) ■

Alan M. Edelstein (Questrom’47, LAW’49) ■ Mary Jane R. England, MD (MED’64, Hon.’98) ■ Joseph S. Fastow, MD (MED’70) ■ Maurice R. Ferre, MD (MED’92, CGS’81, SPH’92) ■ Jonathan P. Gertler, MD (Questrom’99) Shahram S. Gholami, MD (MED’96) ■ Burton P. Golub, MD (MED’65) ■ Lewis Heafitz ■ Christine Spitaels Hunter, MD (MED’80, CAS’80) ■

Jeffrey R. Jay, MD (CAS’83, MED’83) ■ Sarkis J. Kechejian, MD (MED’63) ■ Elaine B. Kirshenbaum (CAS’71, SED’72, SPH’79) ■ Sherry M. Leventhal ■ JoAnn McGrath Rita Z. Mehos ■ Simon C. Parisier, MD (MED’61) ■ Terry R. Peel ■ Wayne J. Riley, MD Paul Rothbaum ■ Pedram Salimpour, MD (MED’96,’00) ■ Cheryl L. Scott, MD (MED’82) ■ Jerome S. Serchuck ■ Leslie K. Serchuck, MD (MED’90) ■ Emily W. Shanahan, MD (MED’09) Richard C. Shipley (Questrom’68,’72) ■ Lee Silver, MD (MED’82, CAS’82) ■ Rachelle L. Silver ■ Jack N. Spivack ■ Louis W. Sullivan, MD (MED’58) ■ ■ FY17 Donor ■ Deceased

$ 1 M – $ 4 .9 M The Estate of Neville R. Fendall ■  Stephen R. Karp (CAS’63) ■ ■ ■  Richard C. Shipley (Questrom’68,’72) ■ ■ ■  Jack N. Spivack ■ ■  $ 250,0 0 0 – $ 49 9,9 9 9 The Estate of William R. Clark ■  Ashraf M. Dahod and Shamim A. Dahod (MED’87, CGS’76, CAS’78) ■ ■ ■ ■  $ 1 0 0,0 0 0 – $ 249,9 9 9 Anonymous (2) ■ ■ ■ ■  Paul C. Burke and Gloria Burke ■ ■ ■  Richard J. Cavell (MED’61) and Bonnie Cavell The Estate of Marie H. Chiarenza ■  The Estate of Albert L. Lamp ■  Patricia McLellan Leavitt (MED’58, CAS’54) ■ ■  Carl A. Olsson (MED’63) and Mary D. Olsson ■ ■  Florence Robertson Trust ■  Joelyn L. Rohman ■  The Estate of Robert E. Schiesske ■  The Estate of Charles E. Wilder ■  $ 50,0 0 0 – $ 9 9,9 9 9 Norman W. Alpert and Jane D. Alpert ■  Karen and Elliott Antman ■ ■ ■  Elizabeth R. Brown ■  Richard J. Catrambone (MED’92) and Sophia Catrambone ■ ■  Jodi Dome Linger and Nicholas T. Linger ■ ■  Elizabeth C. Dooling (MED’65) ■ ■  Maurice R. Ferre (MED’92, CGS’81, SPH’92) and Maria D. Ferre ■ ■ ■  Robert E. Griffin and Cathleen Griffin ■ ■  Joseph J. Konefal (MED’77) and Karen G. Konefal Allan P. Markin and Patricia Markin ■  Joseph B. Mizgerd and Ann F. Mizgerd ■ ■  Florence Seldin and Ira L. Seldin ■  Louis W. Sullivan (MED’58) ■  Trust of Mary D. Wells ■  Madeline B. Wikler ■  $ 25,0 0 0 – $ 49,9 9 9 Robert D. Champion and Marjorie Champion ■  Shahram S. Gholami (MED’96) and Neda Gholami David T. Greenleaf (MED’65) and Katherine O. Greenleaf ■ 

Christine S. Hunter (MED’80, CAS’80) ■ ■  Denise S. Katsaros (SED’69) and Arthur T. Katsaros ■ ■  Susan E. Leeman ■ ■ Alan Leventhal (Hon.’09) and Sherry Leventhal ■ ■ ■ ■  Rita Z. Mehos ■ ■ ■  Steven A. Miller (MED’70, CAS’70) and Jacqueline H. Miller (CAS’70) ■ ■  Simon C. Parisier (MED’61) and Elaine S. Parisier ■  Carol C. Pohl (MED’67) and Alan L. Pohl ■ ■  Robert W. Schulze (CAS’86, GRS’88, MED’92, Questrom’16) and Dee S. Santilli ■ ■ ■ ■  Richard Seeborg ■  Jerome S. Serchuck and Joan S. Serchuck ■ ■ ■ ■  Lee Silver (MED’82, CAS’82) and Rachelle Silver ■ ■ ■  Joshua Solot and Justine Solot ■ ■  Tony Y. Tannoury and Viviane Tannoury ■ ■ ■ ■  Martin L. Vogel (MED’53) and Phyllis M. Vogel ■ ■  Glenn H. Weissman and Christine Weissman ■  Sam S. Wu (CAS’87, GRS’90, MED’92, SPH’92) and Patricia C. Tsang (MED’92, CAS’92, GRS’92) ■ ■  $ 1 0,0 0 0 – $ 24 ,9 9 9 Anonymous (4) ■ ■ ■  Amin Ashrafzadeh (CAS’93, MED’97) and H. Christine Ashrafzadeh (CAS’92, Questrom’96) ■ ■ William Y. Au (CAS’51, MED’55) ■ ■ John T. Avellino and R. Ellen Avellino ■ ■ ■  Merwyn Bagan (MED’62, SPH’95) and Carol J. Bagan ■ ■ ■  Donna R. Barnard (MED’65) and Douglas E. Barnard (MED’65) ■ ■  Ann C. Cea (MED’67) and Anthony Tedeschi ■ ■  Aram V. Chobanian ■ ■ ■  Michael S. Cohen (MED’89, CAS’89) and Ilona Ginsberg-Cohen ■ ■  Michael J. Critelli and Joyce M. Critelli ■  Andrew B. Crummy (MED’55) ■  Suzanne Cutler (Questrom’61) ■ ■ Hui Feng and Xiangdong Deng ■ ■ ■  Irene Ferrer Samuel Finkielsztein and Gala Finkielsztein

Daphne H. Foster (CAS’79, Questrom’82) and Lawrence Foster Patricia L. Freysinger (SON’82) ■ ■  Randolph Friedman and Donna Friedman ■ ■  Burton P. Golub (MED’65) and Lee H. Golub ■  Kamlyn R. Haynes (CAS’89, MED’97) and Joe Parse ■ ■ Lewis Heafitz and Ina B. Heafitz ■  Juan D. Hernandez Batista and Maria A. Tavarez-De Hernandez ■  Lea Highet and Ian Highet Jet K. Ho (MED’99,’99) ■ ■  The Estate of Priscilla M. Hobbs ■ ■  Rod F. Hochman (MED’79, CAS’79) and Nancy J. Hochman (Sargent’77,’83) ■ ■ Jeffrey R. Jay (MED’83, CAS’83) and Mary Ellen A. Jay ■  Sarkis J. Kechejian (MED’63) ■  Kay S. Khan (SON’65,’81) ■  Shirley P. Klein (MED’68, CAS’68) ■ ■ Joan L. Lasser (MED’66) ■  Henry T. Lew (MED’62) and Winifred Lew Zhijun Luo and Ellen H. Zhan ■ ■ ■  Barry M. Manuel (CAS’54, MED’58) and Patricia D. Manuel (SON’78, SED’86) ■ ■ ■  John Noble and Ewa Kuligowska ■  Edward F. Parsons (MED’65) ■ ■  William Patty and Eliot Patty M. Douglass Poirier (CAS’73, MED’76) and Jeffrey D. Tripp ■ ■ Peter A. Quigley and Meghan Heffernan ■  The Estate of Iver S. Ravin ■ ■  Diana L. Reeves (GRS’92, MED’95) and Dan L. Reeves ■ ■  Shelley J. Russek (MED’94) and David H. Farb ■ ■ ■  Ralph L. Sacco (MED’83) and Scott Dutcher ■  Norma A. Schulze ■ ■ ■  Richard D. Scott and Mary Scott ■ ■  Leslie K. Serchuck (MED’90) ■ ■  Eliot B. Stewart Sumner Stone (MED’58) and Martha Skinner ■ ■  Simon L. Strong (ENG’79, Questrom’91) and Sarah A. Strong $5 ,0 0 0 –$9,9 9 9 Anonymous ■ ■  Roberta J. Apfel (MED’62,’62) and Bennett Simon ■ ■  Michael L. J. Apuzzo (MED’65) and Helene Apuzzo

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

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Giving

DONOR REPORT

Ira L. Seldin and Florence Seldin ■ Muriel Shapiro and Arnold Shapiro ■ Stuart E. Siegel, MD (MED’67, CAS’67) ■ John R. Silber, PhD ■ and Kathryn U. Silber ■ Charles W. Smith and Hazel Smith (MET’83) Gordon L. Snider, MD ■ Edward Spindell, MD (MED’53) ■ and Judith K. Spindell Eliot Stewart and John M. Stewart ■ ■ Christine E. Stiefel Louis W. Sullivan, MD (MED’58) and Eva G. Sullivan ■ Elliott H. Sweetser, MD (MED’43) ■ and Aileen B. Sweetser ■ Nevart Talanian Gloria P. Talis and George J. Talis, MD (MED’50) ■ Alfred I. Tauber, MD and Paula Fredriksen, PhD Yolande Tsampalieros and Gabriel Tsampalieros ■ Deborah W. Vaughan, PhD (GRS’72) ■ Martin L. Vogel, MD (MED’53) and Phyllis M. Vogel ■ Henry R. Wolfe, MD (MED’45) and Grace A. Wolfe ■ ■ Herbert H. Wotiz, PhD ■ Lawrence A. Yannuzzi, MD (MED’64) and Julie Yannuzzi Jeremiah O. Young, MD (MED’62) and Beverly A. Young Lily Moo Young, MD (MED’65) and John G. Johansson ■ The Ziskind Family M E RCU RY Anonymous (2) ■ Lawrence D. Ackman and Ronnie Ackman Noubar B. Afeyan, PhD and Anna Afeyan Gerald Ajemian and Lucille Ajemian Dwight M. Akers, MD (MED’53) ■ and Beverly R. Akers ■ Winston D. Alt, MD (MED’80) and Deborah Gribbon Max M. April, MD (CAS’81, MED’85) and Pamela T. April (Questrom’83) Michael L. J. Apuzzo, MD (MED’65) and Helene Apuzzo ■ Jeanne F. Arnold, MD (MED’61) and Peter F. Jeffries, MD (MED’60) ■ Edward Avedisian (CFA’59, ’61) and Pamela W. Avedisian, DDH ■ Richard K. Babayan, MD and Sonya Nersessian, Esq. (LAW’85) ■ Shirley Baker and Steven Baker ■ Elizabeth Day Barnett, MD (MED’85) and Suleiman N. Mustafa-Kutana, MD ■ Paul C. Barsam, MD (STH’52) and Joyce L. Barsam, PhD Howard C. Beane, MD (MED’57) and Shirley T. Beane ■ Robert M. Beazley, MD ■ John H. Bechtel, MD (MED’50) ■ and Shirley F. Bechtel ■ Franklyn D. Berry, MD (MED’41) ■ Betty E. Bishop and David W. Bishop, MD (MED’46) ■ Elsa C. Bodon, MD (MED’41) ■ James F. Bopp, Jr. ■ S. Arthur Boruchoff, MD (MED’51) ■ and Anna Silverman-Boruchoff, MD (MED’49) ■ Yvonne K. Brockman and Stanley K. Brockman, MD (MED’55) ■ ■ Robert A. Cameron ■

26

Boston University School of Medicine

Robert J. Carey, MD (MED’54) ■ and Mary E. Carey (SED’55) Richard J. Catrambone, MD, DMD (MED’92) and Sophia Catrambone ■ Robert D. Champion and Marjorie Champion ■ Edmond E. Charrette, MD (MED’62) and Maria T. Charrette ■ Harold N. Chefitz (COM’55, CGS’53) and Charlotte M. Chefitz ■ Jeremy Chess, MD (MED’70, CAS’70) David J. Chronley, MD (MED’74) and Marianne J. Chronley ■ Frank Citrone, Jr. and Carol Citrone John P. Cloherty, MD (MED’62) ■ John F. Cogan, Jr. and Mary L. Cornille (GRS’87) Alan S. Cohen, MD (MED’52) and Joan P. Cohen Patricia A. Connolly, MD (MED’84) ■ Marian M. Cook Sidney Covich ■ Suzanne Cutler, PhD (Questrom’61) ■ Brit d’Arbeloff and Alexander V. d’Arbeloff ■ Paul E. Dixon, Jr. and Rebecca K. Dixon ■ Jodi Dome Linger, D.O. and Mr. Nicholas T. Linger ■ Thomas J. Dowling, MD (MED’81) and Rosemary Dowling ■ Hilda Ratner Dressler, MD (MED’34) ■ Carol A. Dyer and Gene Gordon, MD (MED’46) ■ Alan M. Edelstein, Esq. (Questrom’47, LAW’49) and Sybil Edelstein ■ Alvin N. Eden, MD (MED’52) and Elaine R. Eden ■ Mary Jane R. England, MD (MED’64) ■ Michael J. Esposito, MD (MED’49) ■ Judith N. Feldman Idea S. Fiering ■ Bertha Offenbach Fineberg, MD (MED’36) ■ and Nathan L. Fineberg, MD (MED’30) ■ Nicholas J. Fiumara, MD (MED’39) ■ Beverly R. Franklin (CAS’44) and William E. Franklin, MD (MED’46) ■ Carl Franzblau, PhD and Myrna Franzblau (SED’73) Monte Friedkin and Skeets Friedkin Ralph G. Ganick, MD (MED’67, CAS’67) and Lois B. Ganick ■ Ray A. Garver and Donna L. Garver Marion L. Gendron (PAL’26) ■ George E. Ghareeb, MD (MED’62) and Nancy B. Ghareeb ■ Arnold Goldenberg, MD (MED’54) and Bernice Goldenberg ■ Gloria Goldenberg ■ and Philip T. Goldenberg, MD (MED’46) ■ Malcolm Gordon, MD (MED’48) and Nan Miller ■ Dorothy A. Gottlieb (CAS’76) and Leonard S. Gottlieb, MD ■ Doris Grabosky and Jack Grabosky Donald J. Grande, MD (MED’73) and Elena M. Grande ■ Ellen R. Grass ■ Robert E. Griffin and Cathleen Griffin ■ Morton S. Grossman (MET’42) ■ and Sylvia Grossman ■ Kenneth M. Grundfast, MD and Ruthanne Grundfast Fritz Grunebaum ■ Kamlyn R. Haynes, MD (MED’97, CAS’89) and Joe Parse ■ Robert W. Healy, MD (MED’67) and Bonnie M. Healy ■

Juan De J. Hernandez Batista and Maria A. Tavarez-De Hernandez ■ Arnold S. Hiatt Ann S. Hintlian and Deran Hintlian Michael G. Hirsh, MD (MED’63) and Carol N. Hirsh ■ Arline Housman ■ and Herbert E. Housman (Questrom’42) ■ Charles Housman Edward L. Housman (Questrom’42) and Charlotte Housman ■ James B. Howell, MD (MED’65) and Marlene A. Howell ■ Bernard L. Huang, MD (MED’62, CAS’57) and Ann M. Huang Richard E. Hunter, MD (MED’44) and Minta Hunter David Ingall, MD (MED’57, CAS’52, GRS’53) and Carol Ingall Patricia K. Issarescu, MD (MED’61) Joseph A. Izzi, Sr., MD and Barbara A. Izzi Esther B. Kahn (SED’55) ■ Charlotte A. Kaitz and Louis L. Kaitz (MET’78, Questrom’47) ■ Denise S. Katsaros and Arthur T. Katsaros ■ Honorable Damon J. Keith ■ Shirley P. Klein, MD (MED’68, CAS’68) ■ Joseph J. Konefal, MD (MED’77) and Karen G. Konefal ■ Burton I. Korelitz, MD (MED’51) and Ann Z. Korelitz ■ Conan Kornetsky, PhD Edward E. Krukonis, MD (MED’63) and Priscilla J. Krukonis ■ Charna C. Larkin and Alan B. Larkin ■ ■ Robert E. Leach, MD and Laurine Leach Brigitte Lonner and Joseph J. Lonner ■ Rita E. Loos ■ Thomas A. MacLean, MD (MED’64) and Colleen K. MacLean William I. Malamud, MD (MED’54) and Camille C. Malamud ■ William M. Manger, MD, PhD and Lynn S. Manger Richard C. Marcus Stella C. Martin, PhD and Clive R. Martin Ronald P. McCaffrey and Maureen McCaffrey John F. McCahan, MD and Kathleen B. McCahan ■ Jean E. McPhail (SED’63) ■ Robert F. Meenan, MD (MED’72, Questrom’89) ■ Jordan Monocandilos Rodney A. Montag and Sally A. Montag Sanford R. Montag and Nancy L. Montag Merel G. Mountain Michael F. Mullarkey, MD (MED’70) and Dawn Mullarkey (CAS’68) G. Vijaya Naidu, MD John Noble, MD and Ewa Kuligowska, MD ■ Dawn B. Norcia and David J. Norcia N. Stephen Ober, MD (MED’86, CAS’82) Anne W. O’Connor and John F. O’Connor, MD (MED’57) ■ Hytho H. Pantazelos, MD (MED’63) and Peter G. Pantazelos Dianne M. Parrotte, MD (MED’79, CAS’79) Edward F. Parsons, MD (MED’65) ■ Jordan C. Paul and Valerie J. Paul ■ Lita Perkins ■ and John S. Perkins (Questrom’36) ■ Jona A. Perlmutter, MD and Donna Perlmutter Astrid O. Peterson, MD (MED’77, CAS’74) ■

N. N. Pike, Esq. (LAW’37) ■ Carol C. Pohl, MD (MED’67) and Alan L. Pohl, MD ■ John I. Polk, MD (SED’13, MED’74) and Mary C. Nugent Polk (SON’76,’77) Helen S. Ratner and Frank Ratner, MD (MED’47) ■ ■ Iver S. Ravin, MD (MED’40) ■ Nancy E. Rice, MD (MED’65) and Millard J. Hyland, MD ■ Bessie Rosenfield ■ and Louis I. Rosenfield ■ Gerald L. Ross ■ Melanie Rothbaum and David Rothbaum, MD (MED’82) ■ Richard A. Rudders, MD Stephen W. Russell, MD (MED’55) and Gail D. Russell Hannah E. Sandson and John I. Sandson, MD ■ Francis P. Saunders, MD (MED’58) and Lydia M. Saunders Frank J. Schaberg, Jr., MD (MED’68, CAS’68) and Monica J. Schaberg, MD (MED’68, CAS’68) ■ Alan L. Schechter, MD (MED’78) and Genevieve Schechter ■ Rocco Schelzi ■ The Schulze Family ■ Honorable Richard Seeborg ■ Herman Selinsky, MD (MED’24) ■ Leslie K. Serchuck, MD (MED’90) ■ Jane L. Shapiro (CAS’69) Richard J. Shemin, MD (MED’74, CAS’72) and Susan H. Shemin Norton L. Sherman ■ and Claire Sherman The Shooshan Family Martha Skinner, MD and Sumner Stone, MD (MED’58) ■ Lois N. Talis ■ Sanford W. Udis, MD (MED’44) ■ Franz Waldeck, MD, PhD ■ Carl W. Walter, MD ■ and Margaret H. Walter ■ Murray Weinstock, MD (MED’65) and Gloria Weinstock ■ Sue Rosenwasser Weiss and Seymour Rosenwasser, MD ■ Anthony Weldon Peter S. Wellington ■ and Judith F. Wellington ■ Jerrold A. Wexler and Joan Wexler Robert H. Wexler ■ and Joanna B. Wexler ■ Burton White, MD (MED’61) and June S. White ■ Marcelle M. Willock, MD (Questrom’89) ■ Alan Winters and Hope Winters Peak Woo, MD (MED’78, CAS’78) and Celia T. Chung-Woo ■ Earle G. Woodman, MD (MED’58) ■ Sam S. Wu, MD (MED’92, CAS’87, GRS’90, SPH’92) and Patricia C. Tsang, MD (MED’92, CAS’92, GRS’92) ■ Moshe Yanai and Rachel Yanai Frances W. Young ■ Larry C. Young ■ Marion L. Young and Charles R. Young, PhD ■ ■ Barry Zuckerman, MD and Pamela Zuckerman, MD HONORARY MEMB ER S Dorothy C. Keefer (PAL’48,’46) ■ Carl Lyle ■ and Ishbel K. Lyle

GIFTS FROM THE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD, ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STAFF, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS Boston University School of Medicine is proud to recognize the generosity of members of the Dean’s Advisory Board, alumni, parents, faculty, staff, corporations, foundations, organizations, and friends this past year (July 1, 2016, to June 30, 2017). Their support has helped the School of Medicine establish new programs and projects that enhance the living and learning environment for our students and advance our research. We thank our donors for their vision and philanthropy. While space constraints prevent us from listing the many donors who gave gifts under $250, we sincerely appreciate their support. ■ President’s Society (AFLGS) Member | ■ Young Alumni Giving Society Member | ■ Faculty/Staff Member | ■ Parent | ■ Three-year Consecutive Giving ■ First-time Donor | ■ Deceased | ■ William Fairfield Warren Society Member

DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD John T. Avellino ■ Merwyn Bagan, MD, MPH (MED’62, SPH’95) ■ Elizabeth R. Brown, MD ■ Richard J. Catrambone, MD, DMD (MED’92) ■ Ann C. Cea, MD (MED’67) ■ Harold N. Chefitz (CGS’53, COM’55) ■ Suzanne Cutler, PhD (Questrom’61) ■ Shamim A. Dahod, MD (MED’87, CGS’76, CAS’78) ■

Alan M. Edelstein (Questrom’47, LAW’49) ■ Mary Jane R. England, MD (MED’64, Hon.’98) ■ Joseph S. Fastow, MD (MED’70) ■ Maurice R. Ferre, MD (MED’92, CGS’81, SPH’92) ■ Jonathan P. Gertler, MD (Questrom’99) Shahram S. Gholami, MD (MED’96) ■ Burton P. Golub, MD (MED’65) ■ Lewis Heafitz ■ Christine Spitaels Hunter, MD (MED’80, CAS’80) ■

Jeffrey R. Jay, MD (CAS’83, MED’83) ■ Sarkis J. Kechejian, MD (MED’63) ■ Elaine B. Kirshenbaum (CAS’71, SED’72, SPH’79) ■ Sherry M. Leventhal ■ JoAnn McGrath Rita Z. Mehos ■ Simon C. Parisier, MD (MED’61) ■ Terry R. Peel ■ Wayne J. Riley, MD Paul Rothbaum ■ Pedram Salimpour, MD (MED’96,’00) ■ Cheryl L. Scott, MD (MED’82) ■ Jerome S. Serchuck ■ Leslie K. Serchuck, MD (MED’90) ■ Emily W. Shanahan, MD (MED’09) Richard C. Shipley (Questrom’68,’72) ■ Lee Silver, MD (MED’82, CAS’82) ■ Rachelle L. Silver ■ Jack N. Spivack ■ Louis W. Sullivan, MD (MED’58) ■ ■ FY17 Donor ■ Deceased

$ 1 M – $ 4 .9 M The Estate of Neville R. Fendall ■  Stephen R. Karp (CAS’63) ■ ■ ■  Richard C. Shipley (Questrom’68,’72) ■ ■ ■  Jack N. Spivack ■ ■  $ 250,0 0 0 – $ 49 9,9 9 9 The Estate of William R. Clark ■  Ashraf M. Dahod and Shamim A. Dahod (MED’87, CGS’76, CAS’78) ■ ■ ■ ■  $ 1 0 0,0 0 0 – $ 249,9 9 9 Anonymous (2) ■ ■ ■ ■  Paul C. Burke and Gloria Burke ■ ■ ■  Richard J. Cavell (MED’61) and Bonnie Cavell The Estate of Marie H. Chiarenza ■  The Estate of Albert L. Lamp ■  Patricia McLellan Leavitt (MED’58, CAS’54) ■ ■  Carl A. Olsson (MED’63) and Mary D. Olsson ■ ■  Florence Robertson Trust ■  Joelyn L. Rohman ■  The Estate of Robert E. Schiesske ■  The Estate of Charles E. Wilder ■  $ 50,0 0 0 – $ 9 9,9 9 9 Norman W. Alpert and Jane D. Alpert ■  Karen and Elliott Antman ■ ■ ■  Elizabeth R. Brown ■  Richard J. Catrambone (MED’92) and Sophia Catrambone ■ ■  Jodi Dome Linger and Nicholas T. Linger ■ ■  Elizabeth C. Dooling (MED’65) ■ ■  Maurice R. Ferre (MED’92, CGS’81, SPH’92) and Maria D. Ferre ■ ■ ■  Robert E. Griffin and Cathleen Griffin ■ ■  Joseph J. Konefal (MED’77) and Karen G. Konefal Allan P. Markin and Patricia Markin ■  Joseph B. Mizgerd and Ann F. Mizgerd ■ ■  Florence Seldin and Ira L. Seldin ■  Louis W. Sullivan (MED’58) ■  Trust of Mary D. Wells ■  Madeline B. Wikler ■  $ 25,0 0 0 – $ 49,9 9 9 Robert D. Champion and Marjorie Champion ■  Shahram S. Gholami (MED’96) and Neda Gholami David T. Greenleaf (MED’65) and Katherine O. Greenleaf ■ 

Christine S. Hunter (MED’80, CAS’80) ■ ■  Denise S. Katsaros (SED’69) and Arthur T. Katsaros ■ ■  Susan E. Leeman ■ ■ Alan Leventhal (Hon.’09) and Sherry Leventhal ■ ■ ■ ■  Rita Z. Mehos ■ ■ ■  Steven A. Miller (MED’70, CAS’70) and Jacqueline H. Miller (CAS’70) ■ ■  Simon C. Parisier (MED’61) and Elaine S. Parisier ■  Carol C. Pohl (MED’67) and Alan L. Pohl ■ ■  Robert W. Schulze (CAS’86, GRS’88, MED’92, Questrom’16) and Dee S. Santilli ■ ■ ■ ■  Richard Seeborg ■  Jerome S. Serchuck and Joan S. Serchuck ■ ■ ■ ■  Lee Silver (MED’82, CAS’82) and Rachelle Silver ■ ■ ■  Joshua Solot and Justine Solot ■ ■  Tony Y. Tannoury and Viviane Tannoury ■ ■ ■ ■  Martin L. Vogel (MED’53) and Phyllis M. Vogel ■ ■  Glenn H. Weissman and Christine Weissman ■  Sam S. Wu (CAS’87, GRS’90, MED’92, SPH’92) and Patricia C. Tsang (MED’92, CAS’92, GRS’92) ■ ■  $ 1 0,0 0 0 – $ 24 ,9 9 9 Anonymous (4) ■ ■ ■  Amin Ashrafzadeh (CAS’93, MED’97) and H. Christine Ashrafzadeh (CAS’92, Questrom’96) ■ ■ William Y. Au (CAS’51, MED’55) ■ ■ John T. Avellino and R. Ellen Avellino ■ ■ ■  Merwyn Bagan (MED’62, SPH’95) and Carol J. Bagan ■ ■ ■  Donna R. Barnard (MED’65) and Douglas E. Barnard (MED’65) ■ ■  Ann C. Cea (MED’67) and Anthony Tedeschi ■ ■  Aram V. Chobanian ■ ■ ■  Michael S. Cohen (MED’89, CAS’89) and Ilona Ginsberg-Cohen ■ ■  Michael J. Critelli and Joyce M. Critelli ■  Andrew B. Crummy (MED’55) ■  Suzanne Cutler (Questrom’61) ■ ■ Hui Feng and Xiangdong Deng ■ ■ ■  Irene Ferrer Samuel Finkielsztein and Gala Finkielsztein

Daphne H. Foster (CAS’79, Questrom’82) and Lawrence Foster Patricia L. Freysinger (SON’82) ■ ■  Randolph Friedman and Donna Friedman ■ ■  Burton P. Golub (MED’65) and Lee H. Golub ■  Kamlyn R. Haynes (CAS’89, MED’97) and Joe Parse ■ ■ Lewis Heafitz and Ina B. Heafitz ■  Juan D. Hernandez Batista and Maria A. Tavarez-De Hernandez ■  Lea Highet and Ian Highet Jet K. Ho (MED’99,’99) ■ ■  The Estate of Priscilla M. Hobbs ■ ■  Rod F. Hochman (MED’79, CAS’79) and Nancy J. Hochman (Sargent’77,’83) ■ ■ Jeffrey R. Jay (MED’83, CAS’83) and Mary Ellen A. Jay ■  Sarkis J. Kechejian (MED’63) ■  Kay S. Khan (SON’65,’81) ■  Shirley P. Klein (MED’68, CAS’68) ■ ■ Joan L. Lasser (MED’66) ■  Henry T. Lew (MED’62) and Winifred Lew Zhijun Luo and Ellen H. Zhan ■ ■ ■  Barry M. Manuel (CAS’54, MED’58) and Patricia D. Manuel (SON’78, SED’86) ■ ■ ■  John Noble and Ewa Kuligowska ■  Edward F. Parsons (MED’65) ■ ■  William Patty and Eliot Patty M. Douglass Poirier (CAS’73, MED’76) and Jeffrey D. Tripp ■ ■ Peter A. Quigley and Meghan Heffernan ■  The Estate of Iver S. Ravin ■ ■  Diana L. Reeves (GRS’92, MED’95) and Dan L. Reeves ■ ■  Shelley J. Russek (MED’94) and David H. Farb ■ ■ ■  Ralph L. Sacco (MED’83) and Scott Dutcher ■  Norma A. Schulze ■ ■ ■  Richard D. Scott and Mary Scott ■ ■  Leslie K. Serchuck (MED’90) ■ ■  Eliot B. Stewart Sumner Stone (MED’58) and Martha Skinner ■ ■  Simon L. Strong (ENG’79, Questrom’91) and Sarah A. Strong $5 ,0 0 0 –$9,9 9 9 Anonymous ■ ■  Roberta J. Apfel (MED’62,’62) and Bennett Simon ■ ■  Michael L. J. Apuzzo (MED’65) and Helene Apuzzo

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

27


Giving

DONOR REPORT

GIFTS FROM THE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD, ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STAFF, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS (CONTINUED)

■ President’s Society (AFLGS) Member | ■ Young Alumni Giving Society Member | ■ Faculty/Staff Member | ■ Parent | ■ Three-year Consecutive Giving ■ First-time Donor | ■ Deceased | ■ William Fairfield Warren Society Member

Edward Avedisian (CFA’59,’61) and Pamela A. Avedisian ■  Nancy Baler ■ ■ Calli Beatman ■ ■  Matthew K. Beatman and Debra S. Tobin Beatman ■  Robert M. Beazley and Kristen S. Beazley ■ ■  John H. Bechtel (MED’50) ■ and Shirley F. Bechtel ■  Laurel Beverley (MED’97, SPH’97) ■ ■  Gerald W. Blakeley and Tenley Albright James F. Bopp and Phyllis Bopp ■ ■ ■  Yvonne K. Brockman ■  George J. Brown (MED’73) and Barbara Y. Brown Lisa B. Caruso (SPH’99) ■ ■ ■  Harold N. Chefitz (CGS’53, COM’55) and Charlotte M. Chefitz ■  John P. Cloherty (MED’62) ■ ■  David L. Coleman ■ ■ ■  Patricia A. Connolly (MED’84) ■ ■  William R. Creevy (CAS’81, MED’85) and Jill D. Creevy ■ ■  Carol C. Cunningham ■ ■  John R. Curran (MED’80) and Teresa G. Curran ■ ■  Christopher A. Danby (MED’86) and Lisa M. Danby ■  Thomas J. Dowling (MED’81, CAS’81) and Rosemary Dowling ■ ■ ■  Frederick L. Fox (MED’68) and Gail P. Fox ■  Rosalyn B. Geller (SED’64) and Alan S. Geller ■  Frederick A. Godley (MED’83) and Kathleen Carney-Godley ■ ■ ■  Donald J. Grande (MED’73) and Elena M. Grande ■ ■  RoxAnn J. Haynes (SED’56) and Frederick M. Haynes ■ ■ ■  Michael G. Hirsh (MED’63) and Carol N. Hirsh ■ ■  John P. Howe (MED’69) and Tyrrell E. Flawn ■ ■  Clinton W. Josey and C. W. Josey ■ ■  Donald M. Kaplan (MED’73) and Edna E. Kaplan (COM’88) ■ ■  James H. Lowell and Susan W. Lowell ■ ■  Judith A. Malin (SSW’09) ■ ■  William B. Maloney and Evelyn L. Maloney ■  Jules N. Manger (CGS’66) ■  Sunit Mukherjee (MED’89, CAS’89) and Sumeeta Mukherjee ■ ■  Alan S. Multz (CAS’81, MED’85) and Michelle A. Multz ■ ■  Benjamin A. Newman ■  Julie R. Palmer (SON’80, SPH’85) ■ ■ ■ ■  Daniel G. Remick and Robin A. Remick ■ ■  Joel A. Roffman (CAS’72, MED’75) and Nancy C. Roffman ■ ■  Hal Rothbaum and Susan Rothbaum ■  Paul Rothbaum ■ ■  Jordan S. Ruboy Charitable Fund ■ ■  Jeffrey H. Samet (SPH’92) and Michele S. Marram ■ ■  Jordan E. Scott (MED’00) and Rebecca Scott ■ ■ 

David J. Chun (CAS’91, MED’95) and Susie S. Lee-Chun (CAS’91) ■ ■  Marc A. Clachko (MED’71) and Gayle W. Clachko ■ ■  Jane S. Cohen (MED’91, CAS’91) and David Cohen (MED’91, CAS’91) ■ ■  Ronald G. Collman (MED’81, CAS’81) ■ ■  Mark H. Cooley (MED’60) ■ ■  Andres F. Costas-Centivany (MED’84) and Barbara Robinson-Costas ■ ■  Anita P. Courcoulas (MED’88) ■  Joan H. Craw ■ ■  Leah A. Darak (MED’91, CAS’91) and Harold Darak ■  Joel R. Daven (MED’75) and Jennifer Daven ■ ■  Lilibeth K. Denham (MED’97) and Kristin L. Dardano ■ ■  Sidney Devorsetz and Suzanne Devorsetz ■  Lester S. Dewis (CAS’57, MED’61) and Susan C. Dewis (Sargent’62) ■  Nicolas P. DiCiaccio and Marguerite Shepard-DiCiaccio ■  Lawrence A. Dressner and Monique Dressner Michael S. Drucker (MED’69) and Deirdre D. Drucker ■ ■  David A. Druckman (MED’91, CAS’91) and Beth Druckman ■ ■  Prabha Dwivedi and Sunil K. Dwivedi ■ ■ ■  Alvin N. Eden (MED’52) and Elaine R. Eden ■ ■ Karen A. Engelbourg and Donald B. Stewart (Questrom’98) ■ ■ ■  Jonathan I. Epstein (MED’81, CAS’81) ■ ■ Roger M. Epstein (MED’82) ■ ■  Michael J. Esposito (MED’49) and Dina M. Esposito ■ ■  John R. Evans ■ ■  Francis A. Farraye and Renee Remily ■ ■ ■  Peter A. Fauci (MED’57) and Linda E. Kelly Fauci ■  Edward B. Feinberg and Ruth Feinberg ■ ■ ■  Geraldine L. Feldman (MED’69, CAS’69) ■ ■ ■  David T. Felson (SPH’84) and Elaine R. Landes ■ ■ ■  I. Howard Fine (MED’66) and Victoria Fine ■ ■  David A. Fleishman (MED’69) and Jacqueline G. Fleishman ■  Nancy S. Flint (SON’77,’81) and Loring S. Flint (CAS’73, MED’76) ■ ■  David W. Fontaine (MED’90) and Laurie Fontaine ■  Joseph M. Fonte (CAS’92, MED’97) and Lina Fonte ■  Edward W. Forbes (MED’69, CAS’69) and Ellen G. Forbes ■ ■  Harold W. Forbes and Carol S. Forbes ■ ■  John S. Fordtran and Jewel E. Fordtran ■  Karen Fowler ■ ■  Anne M. Frasca ■ ■  Angela Frasure ■ ■  Martha M. Frigoletto (MED’66) ■ ■ ■  Ralph G. Ganick (MED’67, CAS’67) and Lois B. Ganick ■ ■ ■  The Estate of Anne M. Garrett

28

Boston University School of Medicine

Ethan M. Shevach (MED’67, CAS’67) and Ruth S. Shevach ■ ■  William F. Shields (GRS’90, MED’94) ■ ■  Richard L. Simmons (MED’59) and Roberta G. Simmons ■ ■ ■ The Estate of Louis V. Sorrentino ■ ■  Stephen M. Tringale (CAS’80, GRS’86, MED’90) ■ ■  Peak Woo (MED’78, CAS’78) and Celia T. Chung-Woo ■ ■  Larry C. Young ■  $ 2 , 500–$ 4,999 Parag M. Amin (CAS’99, MED’03) and Vandana Madhavan ■ ■  Matthew Andrade and Ilbret Andrade ■  James E. Andrews (MED’78) and Deborah L. Andrews ■ ■  Jeanne F. Arnold (MED’61) and Peter F. Jeffries (MED’60) ■ ■ ■  Elizabeth D. Barnett (MED’85) and Suleiman Kutana ■ ■ ■  James B. Bassett (MED’80) and Lily L. Bassett (Questrom’79) ■ ■  Howard C. Bauchner (MED’79) and Christine M. McElroy (GRS’81,’84) ■ ■ ■ ■  Richard D. Bland (MED’66) and Marlene Rabinovitch ■ ■  Susan E. Bradford (MED’67, CAS’67) ■  Hsi Pin Chen (CAS’89, SPH’91, MED’96,’96) and Kenneth E. Hancock (ENG’92,’01) ■ ■  Yi-Chuan Ching (MED’58) ■ ■ ■  Sheryl L. Choo and Michael C. Choo (MED’87, CAS’87) ■ ■  David J. Chronley (MED’74) and Marianne K. Chronley ■ ■  Ronald B. Corley and Janice Corley ■ ■ ■ ■  Kimberly O. Dever (MED’92, CAS’92) and Robert Dever ■  Maria J. DiChiara and David P. DiChiara (CAS’80, MED’84) ■ ■ ■  Bill and Kay Dixon ■ ■  Margaret L. Eagle ■  Barbara E. Edelin Alan M. Edelstein (Questrom’47, LAW’49) and Sybil Edelstein ■ ■ ■  David R. Edelstein (MED’80) and Eve L. Edelstein ■ ■  Mary Jane England (MED’64) ■ ■ ■ ■  Joseph S. Fastow (MED’70) and Ellen K. Fastow ■ ■  Richard K. Forster (MED’63) and Janet F. Forster ■  Lance Franczyk and Jessica Franczyk ■ ■  Malcolm Gordon (MED’48) and Nan Miller ■  Dorothy M. Green ■ ■  Robert W. Healy (MED’67) and Bonnie M. Healy ■ ■ ■  Marcia Edelstein Herrmann (MED’78) and Jeffrey C. Herrmann ■ ■  Paul Kaufman (MED’55) and Mary F. Kaufman ■ ■ ■  M. David Kelleher (MED’65) ■ ■ ■  Peter C. Kelly (MED’65) ■ ■  Abdul Khalique and Farhat N. Khalique ■ ■  Baroukh E. Kodsi and Marie E. Kodsi ■ ■ ■ 

Bernard E. Kreger ■ ■ ■  Grace J. Lee (MED’92) and Joon S. Lee ■ ■  Elena Levinsky (MET’77) ■ ■   Robert M. Lincer (MED’81, CAS’81) ■  Charles Loree ■ ■  Kevin T. Maguire ■  Edward J. McDonald and Catherine A. McDonald ■ ■  Robert F. Meenan (MED’72, Questrom’89) and Yana Kotlar (SSW’14) ■ ■ ■  Thomas J. Moore and Mary C. Moore ■ ■ ■ ■  Margo Moskos (SPH’85, MED’89) and David Burns (GRS’87, MED’90) ■ ■ Jeffry R. Nurenberg (MED’69, CAS’69) and Barbara Nurenberg ■ ■ Daniel S. O’Connell ■  Henry T. Oyama (CAS’53, MED’57) ■ ■ ■  Terry R. Peel and Ann D. Peel ■  Scott D. Pendergast (MED’91) and Judy T. Pendergast ■ ■  Astrid O. Peterson (CAS’74, MED’77) ■ ■  Peter E. Pochi (MED’55) ■ ■  George Rosenthal ■ ■  Carl E. Rosow (MED’73, GRS’80) and Anna L. Rosow ■ ■  Scott M. Ross (MED’82) and Angela V. Ross (SDM’84,’86) ■ ■  Daniel Rotrosen (MED’78) and Elizabeth M. Dugan ■ ■  Frank J. Schaberg (MED’68, CAS’68) and Monica J. Schaberg (MED’68, CAS’68) ■ ■  Alan L. Schechter (MED’78) and Genevieve Schechter ■ ■  David N. Schwartz (SDM’79, MED’82) and Debora B. Schwartz (CAS’78) ■ ■  Robert A. Snyder (MED’77) and April Snyder ■ ■  Manuel A. Suarez-Barcelo (MED’90) and Yelitza Rocha-Suarez ■ ■  Marian A. Vita ■  George Walcott (MED’62) and Elizabeth W. Walcott ■ ■  David L. Walton (MED’83) and Machiko Nakatani ■ ■  Diane J. Weiss (MED’84) and Antonio Villalobos ■ ■  Lily M. Young (MED’65) and John G. Johansson ■  $1 ,000–$2,499 Anonymous (3) ■ ■ ■ ■ Ballapuram Adhinarayanan ■  Christopher W. Akey and Ildiko V. Akey ■  Robert G. Alexander (CAS’67, MED’74) and Teresa D. Alexander ■ ■  Daniel P. Alford (SPH’86, MED’92) and Barbara J. St. Onge ■ ■ ■  Kenneth M. Algino (MED’89, CAS’89) and Laura R. Algino ■  David J. Ament and Christine Ament ■ ■  Rahul S. Anand (CAS’97, MED’01) and Meredith Anand ■ ■  Albert A. Apshaga (MED’49) and Dorothy M. Apshaga ■ ■ ■  Carola A. Arndt (MED’78, CAS’78) ■ ■  Jacob Asher (MED’82) and Nancy Hosay ■ ■ 

Janis L. Baccari (CAS’91, MED’95) ■ ■  Thomas C. Bagnoli (MED’64) and Ann G. Bagnoli ■  David A. Bailen (MED’67) and Helene R. Bailen (CAS’63) ■ ■  Barbara J. Baker (MED’70) ■ ■  Gary Balady and Rosemary Mehl ■ ■ ■ ■  Thomas W. Barber ■ ■  David L. Barrasso (MED’74) and Sibylle C. Barrasso ■  George H. Bass and Barbara E. Bass ■  Luis A. Bauzo (CAS’79, MED’84) and Jill V. Read ■ ■  Howard C. Beane (MED’57) and Shirley T. Beane ■ ■  Judith S. Berger ■ ■  Steven L. Berk (MED’75) and Shirley A. Berk ■  Audrey B. Berman and Leonard D. Berman ■ ■ ■  Lenore J. Brancato (MED’84, CAS’84) and Louis Potters ■ ■  Bruce N. Brent (CAS’72, MED’75) and Christine S. Brent ■  Brian K. Brighton (Sargent’97, SPH’02, MED’02) and Erin C. Brighton (CAS’98, SPH’01) ■  Gordon Brody and Lucy Brody ■ ■  Lucy L. Brody ■ ■  Walter J. Brodzinski (MED’64) and Joan M. Brodzinski ■  Ben R. Bronstein (CGS’70, CAS’72, MED’76, Questrom’89) and Magda S. Bronstein ■  Christopher D. Brown (MED’96) and Patricia S. Brown ■ ■  Robert H. Brown (MED’65) and Joyce W. Brown ■ ■ ■  Scott E. Brown and Lisa R. Brown ■  Gloria G. Bruggeman ■ ■  Nancy J. Bryant (MED’87) ■ ■  John E. Burke (MED’79) and Christine Burke ■ ■  Mary C. Burke (MED’83) and Nancy Mayo ■ ■  Joseph F. Calabrese and Mary T. Calabrese ■ ■ ■  Brian L. Cameron (MED’87) and Doris R. Cameron (MED’87) ■ ■  David C. Campbell ■  Mark A. Cannon (Questrom’79, MED’84) and Hope S. Cannon ■  Peter N. Carbonara (MED’57) and Jean M. Carbonara ■  Russell Gerri Carney ■  Arthur P. Carriere (CAS’58, MED’62) ■ ■  Alan C. Carver (MED’95) and Deborah C. Carver ■ ■  Michael J. Cassidy (MED’73) and Andrea W. Cassidy ■ ■  David M. Center (MED’72, CAS’72) and Patricia Rabbett ■ ■ ■  Edmond E. Charrette (MED’62) and Maria T. Charrette ■ ■  John V. Chobanian (MED’81) and Stephanie M. Pawlowski ■  Stephen P. Christiansen and Karen C. Christiansen ■ ■ ■ 

George E. Ghareeb (MED’62) and Nancy B. Ghareeb ■ ■  Jeffrey Glassroth and Carol H. Glassroth ■  Jeffry A. Goldes (MED’79) and Elizabeth Goldes ■  Gerald D. Goldman (MED’77) and Margery S. Goldman (SED’74,’77) ■  Daniel M. Goodenberger ■  Leonard A. Greene (CAS’52, MED’60) and Joan E. Greene ■ ■  Gene A. Grindlinger (MED’70, CAS’70) and Jeanne Grindlinger ■ ■ ■  Susan M. Guillory ■  William E. Guptill (MED’92) and Ruth Guptill ■ ■  Xiaozhe Han (SDM’04,’08, MED’04) and Li Wang (SDM’04,’06) ■ ■  Roderick J. Hancock and Cynthia L. Berger ■ ■  Peter Hayden and Laura A. Hayden ■ ■  David G. Heller (MED’68, CAS’68) and Nancy R. Heller (SED’65) ■ ■  Lester K. Henderson (MED’69) and Eleanor A. Henderson ■ ■  Stephen W. Hildreth ■ ■  Brian J. Hines (MED’96) and Tracy Shevell ■ ■  George L. Hines (MED’69, CAS’69) and Helene A. Hines (Sargent’69) ■ ■ ■  Victor I. Hochberg (MED’63) and Bevi Schram ■ ■  Therese M. Hollingworth ■ ■  Ruth A. Homan ■ ■  Tonya M. Hongsermeier (Sargent’81, MED’87, Questrom’96) ■  James B. Howell (MED’65) and Marlene A. Howell ■  Douglas H. Hughes and Terence M. Keane ■ ■ ■  Jeffrey P. Hurley (MED’84) ■ ■  Keith A. Hutchinson and Janel N. Hutchinson ■  Harry M. Iannotti (MED’66) and Judith A. Iannotti ■ ■  Hernan J. Jara ■ ■ ■  Andre Jeter ■ ■  Malcolm N. Joseph III (MED’76) Mark C. Joseph ■ ■  Carol S. Judd (CAS’66) ■  Cherry Junn (CAS’07, MED’10) ■ ■  Joseph H. Kahn and Nancy H. Kahn ■ ■ ■  Ronald L. Katz (MED’56) ■ ■ ■ Foster Kay (MED’58) ■  Damon J. Keith ■  Paul J. Killoran (MED’54) and Elizabeth E. Killoran ■ ■ ■  Mary D. Kirchner ■ ■  Sandra L. Kirmeyer Daniel S. Kirshenbaum (CAS’07, MED’11) and Laura B. Kirshenbaum (LAW’12) ■ ■  Paul B. Kluger (CAS’78) and Truth Hawk ■  Eric Koerner and Anne Koerner ■ ■  Sean S. Koh ■  Burton I. Korelitz (MED’51) and Ann Z. Korelitz ■ ■  Gail K. Kraft (MED’70) and Arnold A. Kraft ■ ■ 

Sonia Y. Kragh (MED’87) and Sriram Narsipur Edward E. Krukonis (MED’63) and Priscilla J. Krukonis ■ ■  Michael J. Kussman (MED’68, CAS’68) and Virginia D. Kussman ■  Christopher Kutteruf (MED’72) and Anita Robinson ■ ■  Sylvia M. LaChapelle Sanjay Lalla (MED’91, CAS’91) and Gina Lalla Byron L. Lam (CAS’84, MED’86) and Diane Zheng ■ ■  Cecelia Lance ■  Gary Langer ■ ■  Charna C. Larkin ■  Diana Laufer ■ ■  Arthur M. Lauretano (MED’88, CAS’88) and Adrienne Lauretano ■ ■  Howard M. Ledewitz (MED’65) and Carolyn Ledewitz ■ ■ ■  Frank Lee (MED’88, CAS’88) and Sally Lee ■ ■ ■  James E. Lee (CAS’09, MED’10, SDM’14, Questrom’18) ■  Aviva Lee-Parritz and David Lee-Parritz ■ ■  Elliott H. Leitman (CAS’88, MED’92) and Candace Leitman ■ ■  Wayne I. Lencer (MED’77) and Karen Klein Richard P. Lenz and Jean H. Tibbetts ■ ■ ■  Jack P. Leventhal (MED’73) and Mary A. Leventhal ■ ■  Keith P. Lewis ■ ■  Richard Lindblom ■  Felicia H. Liu (MED’73) and John T. Citron ■  Martin H. Loeffler and Sidsel Loeffler ■ ■ ■  Tamiko A. Long (MED’92) Joseph Loscalzo and Anita B. Loscalzo ■  Hamilton Lott and Barbara H. Lott ■ ■  Michael K. Louie (ENG’98, MED’02) and Jennifer C. Louie ■ ■  Kenneth Ludmerer and Loren Ludmerer ■  George D. Malkasian (MED’54) and Mary E. Malkasian ■ ■  Robert D. Manchester (Questrom’74) and Shirley A. Manchester ■  Neal Mandell (MED’86) and Amy L. Mandell ■ ■  Frank I. Marcus (MED’53) and Janet Marcus ■ ■  Bruce C. Marshall and Karen C. Marshall ■  Suzanne Maselli ■ ■  Rebecca A. Massey ■ ■  Ingerlisa W. Mattoch (MED’00,’04) and Ian S. Mattoch ■ ■  Richard H. Mattson (MED’57) and Martha Mattson ■  John F. McCahan and Kathleen B. McCahan ■ ■  Jean E. McPhail Ashraf Metwally and Nancy Yang ■ ■ ■  Mark S. Michelman (MED’67) and Susan F. Michelman ■ ■  Frances H. Miller (LAW’65) and Hugh Miller (MED’55) ■ 

Heather H. Miselis (MED’00,’04, SPH’00) and Nathan R. Miselis (GRS’95) ■ ■ ■  Rebecca G. Mishuris (MED’08) and Gary Mishuris ■ ■ ■  Elizabeth A. Moran (MED’94) ■ ■  Patricia G. Morikawa (MED’89) ■ ■  Harvey L. Moskowitz and Lorraine F. Moskowitz ■  Joseph T. Mullen (MED’55) ■  Praveen V. Mummaneni (MED’95, CAS’95) and Valli P. Mummaneni ■  Carol A. Myers (Sargent’82) and Richard H. Myers ■ ■ ■ ■  Robert S. Napoletano (MED’85) and Laura L. Napoletano ■  Roger W. Neal and Roberta A. Neal ■ ■  Kishwer S. Nehal (MED’92, CAS’92) ■ ■  Ralph A. Nelson (MED’65) and Anne E. Nelson ■ ■  Romain Niclou and Valirie Niclou ■ ■ ■  Keyvan Nouri (CAS’89, MED’93) ■  Robert J. Nozza and Wilma T. Nozza ■  Stephen C. O’Connor (CAS’85, MED’90) and Margot S. O’Connor Thomas F. O’Leary (MED’56) ■ ■  Armando Oliver ■ ■  Jay D. Orlander (SPH’92) and Anna J. Mitus (MED’83, CAS’83) ■ ■ ■  Rafael A. Ortega and Shawn A. Sefton ■ ■  Harold L. Osher (MED’47) and Peggy L. Osher ■  Mimi I. Peak (MED’82) and Steven E. Peak ■  Kenneth Pedini (MED’66) and Egle D. Pedini (MED’67, CAS’67) ■ ■  Burt M. Perlmutter (MED’63) and Roberta Perlmutter ■ ■ ■  Jacquline T. Perry (MED’83) and William Barclay Tony N. Pira ■ ■  Turin Pollard ■ ■  Joel Potash (MED’62) and Sandra Hurd ■ ■  John J. Przygoda (MED’77) and Janet C. Przygoda ■ ■  Susan E. Pursell (CAS’84, MED’90) and Michael A. Wack ■ ■ ■  B. Andre Quamina (GRS’65, MED’66,’66) and Dorothy Quamina ■ ■  Albert Quintiliani (MED’58) and Ann Quintiliani ■ ■  Jean E. Ramsey (MED’90, SPH’08) and David T. Ramsey ■ ■ Helen S. Ratner ■ ■ ■  David J. Reitman (MED’96) ■  Kenneth L. Renkens (CAS’76, MED’82) and Debra Lay-Renkens (CAS’73) ■ ■  Fletcher A. Reynolds (CAS’91, GRS’92, MED’96) and Frances H. Reynolds (CGS’88, CAS’90) ■ ■  Nancy E. Rice (MED’65) and Millard J. Hyland ■ ■  Gregory Robke ■  Alan L. Rothman (MED’83,’83, CAS’83) and Lori B. Bornstein (ENG’88) ■ ■  Robert L. Ryan and Sharon G. Ryan (Sargent’70) ■ ■ ■ ■  Osamu Sakai and Mariko Sakai ■ ■ 

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

29


Giving

DONOR REPORT

GIFTS FROM THE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD, ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STAFF, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS (CONTINUED)

■ President’s Society (AFLGS) Member | ■ Young Alumni Giving Society Member | ■ Faculty/Staff Member | ■ Parent | ■ Three-year Consecutive Giving ■ First-time Donor | ■ Deceased | ■ William Fairfield Warren Society Member

Edward Avedisian (CFA’59,’61) and Pamela A. Avedisian ■  Nancy Baler ■ ■ Calli Beatman ■ ■  Matthew K. Beatman and Debra S. Tobin Beatman ■  Robert M. Beazley and Kristen S. Beazley ■ ■  John H. Bechtel (MED’50) ■ and Shirley F. Bechtel ■  Laurel Beverley (MED’97, SPH’97) ■ ■  Gerald W. Blakeley and Tenley Albright James F. Bopp and Phyllis Bopp ■ ■ ■  Yvonne K. Brockman ■  George J. Brown (MED’73) and Barbara Y. Brown Lisa B. Caruso (SPH’99) ■ ■ ■  Harold N. Chefitz (CGS’53, COM’55) and Charlotte M. Chefitz ■  John P. Cloherty (MED’62) ■ ■  David L. Coleman ■ ■ ■  Patricia A. Connolly (MED’84) ■ ■  William R. Creevy (CAS’81, MED’85) and Jill D. Creevy ■ ■  Carol C. Cunningham ■ ■  John R. Curran (MED’80) and Teresa G. Curran ■ ■  Christopher A. Danby (MED’86) and Lisa M. Danby ■  Thomas J. Dowling (MED’81, CAS’81) and Rosemary Dowling ■ ■ ■  Frederick L. Fox (MED’68) and Gail P. Fox ■  Rosalyn B. Geller (SED’64) and Alan S. Geller ■  Frederick A. Godley (MED’83) and Kathleen Carney-Godley ■ ■ ■  Donald J. Grande (MED’73) and Elena M. Grande ■ ■  RoxAnn J. Haynes (SED’56) and Frederick M. Haynes ■ ■ ■  Michael G. Hirsh (MED’63) and Carol N. Hirsh ■ ■  John P. Howe (MED’69) and Tyrrell E. Flawn ■ ■  Clinton W. Josey and C. W. Josey ■ ■  Donald M. Kaplan (MED’73) and Edna E. Kaplan (COM’88) ■ ■  James H. Lowell and Susan W. Lowell ■ ■  Judith A. Malin (SSW’09) ■ ■  William B. Maloney and Evelyn L. Maloney ■  Jules N. Manger (CGS’66) ■  Sunit Mukherjee (MED’89, CAS’89) and Sumeeta Mukherjee ■ ■  Alan S. Multz (CAS’81, MED’85) and Michelle A. Multz ■ ■  Benjamin A. Newman ■  Julie R. Palmer (SON’80, SPH’85) ■ ■ ■ ■  Daniel G. Remick and Robin A. Remick ■ ■  Joel A. Roffman (CAS’72, MED’75) and Nancy C. Roffman ■ ■  Hal Rothbaum and Susan Rothbaum ■  Paul Rothbaum ■ ■  Jordan S. Ruboy Charitable Fund ■ ■  Jeffrey H. Samet (SPH’92) and Michele S. Marram ■ ■  Jordan E. Scott (MED’00) and Rebecca Scott ■ ■ 

David J. Chun (CAS’91, MED’95) and Susie S. Lee-Chun (CAS’91) ■ ■  Marc A. Clachko (MED’71) and Gayle W. Clachko ■ ■  Jane S. Cohen (MED’91, CAS’91) and David Cohen (MED’91, CAS’91) ■ ■  Ronald G. Collman (MED’81, CAS’81) ■ ■  Mark H. Cooley (MED’60) ■ ■  Andres F. Costas-Centivany (MED’84) and Barbara Robinson-Costas ■ ■  Anita P. Courcoulas (MED’88) ■  Joan H. Craw ■ ■  Leah A. Darak (MED’91, CAS’91) and Harold Darak ■  Joel R. Daven (MED’75) and Jennifer Daven ■ ■  Lilibeth K. Denham (MED’97) and Kristin L. Dardano ■ ■  Sidney Devorsetz and Suzanne Devorsetz ■  Lester S. Dewis (CAS’57, MED’61) and Susan C. Dewis (Sargent’62) ■  Nicolas P. DiCiaccio and Marguerite Shepard-DiCiaccio ■  Lawrence A. Dressner and Monique Dressner Michael S. Drucker (MED’69) and Deirdre D. Drucker ■ ■  David A. Druckman (MED’91, CAS’91) and Beth Druckman ■ ■  Prabha Dwivedi and Sunil K. Dwivedi ■ ■ ■  Alvin N. Eden (MED’52) and Elaine R. Eden ■ ■ Karen A. Engelbourg and Donald B. Stewart (Questrom’98) ■ ■ ■  Jonathan I. Epstein (MED’81, CAS’81) ■ ■ Roger M. Epstein (MED’82) ■ ■  Michael J. Esposito (MED’49) and Dina M. Esposito ■ ■  John R. Evans ■ ■  Francis A. Farraye and Renee Remily ■ ■ ■  Peter A. Fauci (MED’57) and Linda E. Kelly Fauci ■  Edward B. Feinberg and Ruth Feinberg ■ ■ ■  Geraldine L. Feldman (MED’69, CAS’69) ■ ■ ■  David T. Felson (SPH’84) and Elaine R. Landes ■ ■ ■  I. Howard Fine (MED’66) and Victoria Fine ■ ■  David A. Fleishman (MED’69) and Jacqueline G. Fleishman ■  Nancy S. Flint (SON’77,’81) and Loring S. Flint (CAS’73, MED’76) ■ ■  David W. Fontaine (MED’90) and Laurie Fontaine ■  Joseph M. Fonte (CAS’92, MED’97) and Lina Fonte ■  Edward W. Forbes (MED’69, CAS’69) and Ellen G. Forbes ■ ■  Harold W. Forbes and Carol S. Forbes ■ ■  John S. Fordtran and Jewel E. Fordtran ■  Karen Fowler ■ ■  Anne M. Frasca ■ ■  Angela Frasure ■ ■  Martha M. Frigoletto (MED’66) ■ ■ ■  Ralph G. Ganick (MED’67, CAS’67) and Lois B. Ganick ■ ■ ■  The Estate of Anne M. Garrett

28

Boston University School of Medicine

Ethan M. Shevach (MED’67, CAS’67) and Ruth S. Shevach ■ ■  William F. Shields (GRS’90, MED’94) ■ ■  Richard L. Simmons (MED’59) and Roberta G. Simmons ■ ■ ■ The Estate of Louis V. Sorrentino ■ ■  Stephen M. Tringale (CAS’80, GRS’86, MED’90) ■ ■  Peak Woo (MED’78, CAS’78) and Celia T. Chung-Woo ■ ■  Larry C. Young ■  $ 2 , 500–$ 4,999 Parag M. Amin (CAS’99, MED’03) and Vandana Madhavan ■ ■  Matthew Andrade and Ilbret Andrade ■  James E. Andrews (MED’78) and Deborah L. Andrews ■ ■  Jeanne F. Arnold (MED’61) and Peter F. Jeffries (MED’60) ■ ■ ■  Elizabeth D. Barnett (MED’85) and Suleiman Kutana ■ ■ ■  James B. Bassett (MED’80) and Lily L. Bassett (Questrom’79) ■ ■  Howard C. Bauchner (MED’79) and Christine M. McElroy (GRS’81,’84) ■ ■ ■ ■  Richard D. Bland (MED’66) and Marlene Rabinovitch ■ ■  Susan E. Bradford (MED’67, CAS’67) ■  Hsi Pin Chen (CAS’89, SPH’91, MED’96,’96) and Kenneth E. Hancock (ENG’92,’01) ■ ■  Yi-Chuan Ching (MED’58) ■ ■ ■  Sheryl L. Choo and Michael C. Choo (MED’87, CAS’87) ■ ■  David J. Chronley (MED’74) and Marianne K. Chronley ■ ■  Ronald B. Corley and Janice Corley ■ ■ ■ ■  Kimberly O. Dever (MED’92, CAS’92) and Robert Dever ■  Maria J. DiChiara and David P. DiChiara (CAS’80, MED’84) ■ ■ ■  Bill and Kay Dixon ■ ■  Margaret L. Eagle ■  Barbara E. Edelin Alan M. Edelstein (Questrom’47, LAW’49) and Sybil Edelstein ■ ■ ■  David R. Edelstein (MED’80) and Eve L. Edelstein ■ ■  Mary Jane England (MED’64) ■ ■ ■ ■  Joseph S. Fastow (MED’70) and Ellen K. Fastow ■ ■  Richard K. Forster (MED’63) and Janet F. Forster ■  Lance Franczyk and Jessica Franczyk ■ ■  Malcolm Gordon (MED’48) and Nan Miller ■  Dorothy M. Green ■ ■  Robert W. Healy (MED’67) and Bonnie M. Healy ■ ■ ■  Marcia Edelstein Herrmann (MED’78) and Jeffrey C. Herrmann ■ ■  Paul Kaufman (MED’55) and Mary F. Kaufman ■ ■ ■  M. David Kelleher (MED’65) ■ ■ ■  Peter C. Kelly (MED’65) ■ ■  Abdul Khalique and Farhat N. Khalique ■ ■  Baroukh E. Kodsi and Marie E. Kodsi ■ ■ ■ 

Bernard E. Kreger ■ ■ ■  Grace J. Lee (MED’92) and Joon S. Lee ■ ■  Elena Levinsky (MET’77) ■ ■   Robert M. Lincer (MED’81, CAS’81) ■  Charles Loree ■ ■  Kevin T. Maguire ■  Edward J. McDonald and Catherine A. McDonald ■ ■  Robert F. Meenan (MED’72, Questrom’89) and Yana Kotlar (SSW’14) ■ ■ ■  Thomas J. Moore and Mary C. Moore ■ ■ ■ ■  Margo Moskos (SPH’85, MED’89) and David Burns (GRS’87, MED’90) ■ ■ Jeffry R. Nurenberg (MED’69, CAS’69) and Barbara Nurenberg ■ ■ Daniel S. O’Connell ■  Henry T. Oyama (CAS’53, MED’57) ■ ■ ■  Terry R. Peel and Ann D. Peel ■  Scott D. Pendergast (MED’91) and Judy T. Pendergast ■ ■  Astrid O. Peterson (CAS’74, MED’77) ■ ■  Peter E. Pochi (MED’55) ■ ■  George Rosenthal ■ ■  Carl E. Rosow (MED’73, GRS’80) and Anna L. Rosow ■ ■  Scott M. Ross (MED’82) and Angela V. Ross (SDM’84,’86) ■ ■  Daniel Rotrosen (MED’78) and Elizabeth M. Dugan ■ ■  Frank J. Schaberg (MED’68, CAS’68) and Monica J. Schaberg (MED’68, CAS’68) ■ ■  Alan L. Schechter (MED’78) and Genevieve Schechter ■ ■  David N. Schwartz (SDM’79, MED’82) and Debora B. Schwartz (CAS’78) ■ ■  Robert A. Snyder (MED’77) and April Snyder ■ ■  Manuel A. Suarez-Barcelo (MED’90) and Yelitza Rocha-Suarez ■ ■  Marian A. Vita ■  George Walcott (MED’62) and Elizabeth W. Walcott ■ ■  David L. Walton (MED’83) and Machiko Nakatani ■ ■  Diane J. Weiss (MED’84) and Antonio Villalobos ■ ■  Lily M. Young (MED’65) and John G. Johansson ■  $1 ,000–$2,499 Anonymous (3) ■ ■ ■ ■ Ballapuram Adhinarayanan ■  Christopher W. Akey and Ildiko V. Akey ■  Robert G. Alexander (CAS’67, MED’74) and Teresa D. Alexander ■ ■  Daniel P. Alford (SPH’86, MED’92) and Barbara J. St. Onge ■ ■ ■  Kenneth M. Algino (MED’89, CAS’89) and Laura R. Algino ■  David J. Ament and Christine Ament ■ ■  Rahul S. Anand (CAS’97, MED’01) and Meredith Anand ■ ■  Albert A. Apshaga (MED’49) and Dorothy M. Apshaga ■ ■ ■  Carola A. Arndt (MED’78, CAS’78) ■ ■  Jacob Asher (MED’82) and Nancy Hosay ■ ■ 

Janis L. Baccari (CAS’91, MED’95) ■ ■  Thomas C. Bagnoli (MED’64) and Ann G. Bagnoli ■  David A. Bailen (MED’67) and Helene R. Bailen (CAS’63) ■ ■  Barbara J. Baker (MED’70) ■ ■  Gary Balady and Rosemary Mehl ■ ■ ■ ■  Thomas W. Barber ■ ■  David L. Barrasso (MED’74) and Sibylle C. Barrasso ■  George H. Bass and Barbara E. Bass ■  Luis A. Bauzo (CAS’79, MED’84) and Jill V. Read ■ ■  Howard C. Beane (MED’57) and Shirley T. Beane ■ ■  Judith S. Berger ■ ■  Steven L. Berk (MED’75) and Shirley A. Berk ■  Audrey B. Berman and Leonard D. Berman ■ ■ ■  Lenore J. Brancato (MED’84, CAS’84) and Louis Potters ■ ■  Bruce N. Brent (CAS’72, MED’75) and Christine S. Brent ■  Brian K. Brighton (Sargent’97, SPH’02, MED’02) and Erin C. Brighton (CAS’98, SPH’01) ■  Gordon Brody and Lucy Brody ■ ■  Lucy L. Brody ■ ■  Walter J. Brodzinski (MED’64) and Joan M. Brodzinski ■  Ben R. Bronstein (CGS’70, CAS’72, MED’76, Questrom’89) and Magda S. Bronstein ■  Christopher D. Brown (MED’96) and Patricia S. Brown ■ ■  Robert H. Brown (MED’65) and Joyce W. Brown ■ ■ ■  Scott E. Brown and Lisa R. Brown ■  Gloria G. Bruggeman ■ ■  Nancy J. Bryant (MED’87) ■ ■  John E. Burke (MED’79) and Christine Burke ■ ■  Mary C. Burke (MED’83) and Nancy Mayo ■ ■  Joseph F. Calabrese and Mary T. Calabrese ■ ■ ■  Brian L. Cameron (MED’87) and Doris R. Cameron (MED’87) ■ ■  David C. Campbell ■  Mark A. Cannon (Questrom’79, MED’84) and Hope S. Cannon ■  Peter N. Carbonara (MED’57) and Jean M. Carbonara ■  Russell Gerri Carney ■  Arthur P. Carriere (CAS’58, MED’62) ■ ■  Alan C. Carver (MED’95) and Deborah C. Carver ■ ■  Michael J. Cassidy (MED’73) and Andrea W. Cassidy ■ ■  David M. Center (MED’72, CAS’72) and Patricia Rabbett ■ ■ ■  Edmond E. Charrette (MED’62) and Maria T. Charrette ■ ■  John V. Chobanian (MED’81) and Stephanie M. Pawlowski ■  Stephen P. Christiansen and Karen C. Christiansen ■ ■ ■ 

George E. Ghareeb (MED’62) and Nancy B. Ghareeb ■ ■  Jeffrey Glassroth and Carol H. Glassroth ■  Jeffry A. Goldes (MED’79) and Elizabeth Goldes ■  Gerald D. Goldman (MED’77) and Margery S. Goldman (SED’74,’77) ■  Daniel M. Goodenberger ■  Leonard A. Greene (CAS’52, MED’60) and Joan E. Greene ■ ■  Gene A. Grindlinger (MED’70, CAS’70) and Jeanne Grindlinger ■ ■ ■  Susan M. Guillory ■  William E. Guptill (MED’92) and Ruth Guptill ■ ■  Xiaozhe Han (SDM’04,’08, MED’04) and Li Wang (SDM’04,’06) ■ ■  Roderick J. Hancock and Cynthia L. Berger ■ ■  Peter Hayden and Laura A. Hayden ■ ■  David G. Heller (MED’68, CAS’68) and Nancy R. Heller (SED’65) ■ ■  Lester K. Henderson (MED’69) and Eleanor A. Henderson ■ ■  Stephen W. Hildreth ■ ■  Brian J. Hines (MED’96) and Tracy Shevell ■ ■  George L. Hines (MED’69, CAS’69) and Helene A. Hines (Sargent’69) ■ ■ ■  Victor I. Hochberg (MED’63) and Bevi Schram ■ ■  Therese M. Hollingworth ■ ■  Ruth A. Homan ■ ■  Tonya M. Hongsermeier (Sargent’81, MED’87, Questrom’96) ■  James B. Howell (MED’65) and Marlene A. Howell ■  Douglas H. Hughes and Terence M. Keane ■ ■ ■  Jeffrey P. Hurley (MED’84) ■ ■  Keith A. Hutchinson and Janel N. Hutchinson ■  Harry M. Iannotti (MED’66) and Judith A. Iannotti ■ ■  Hernan J. Jara ■ ■ ■  Andre Jeter ■ ■  Malcolm N. Joseph III (MED’76) Mark C. Joseph ■ ■  Carol S. Judd (CAS’66) ■  Cherry Junn (CAS’07, MED’10) ■ ■  Joseph H. Kahn and Nancy H. Kahn ■ ■ ■  Ronald L. Katz (MED’56) ■ ■ ■ Foster Kay (MED’58) ■  Damon J. Keith ■  Paul J. Killoran (MED’54) and Elizabeth E. Killoran ■ ■ ■  Mary D. Kirchner ■ ■  Sandra L. Kirmeyer Daniel S. Kirshenbaum (CAS’07, MED’11) and Laura B. Kirshenbaum (LAW’12) ■ ■  Paul B. Kluger (CAS’78) and Truth Hawk ■  Eric Koerner and Anne Koerner ■ ■  Sean S. Koh ■  Burton I. Korelitz (MED’51) and Ann Z. Korelitz ■ ■  Gail K. Kraft (MED’70) and Arnold A. Kraft ■ ■ 

Sonia Y. Kragh (MED’87) and Sriram Narsipur Edward E. Krukonis (MED’63) and Priscilla J. Krukonis ■ ■  Michael J. Kussman (MED’68, CAS’68) and Virginia D. Kussman ■  Christopher Kutteruf (MED’72) and Anita Robinson ■ ■  Sylvia M. LaChapelle Sanjay Lalla (MED’91, CAS’91) and Gina Lalla Byron L. Lam (CAS’84, MED’86) and Diane Zheng ■ ■  Cecelia Lance ■  Gary Langer ■ ■  Charna C. Larkin ■  Diana Laufer ■ ■  Arthur M. Lauretano (MED’88, CAS’88) and Adrienne Lauretano ■ ■  Howard M. Ledewitz (MED’65) and Carolyn Ledewitz ■ ■ ■  Frank Lee (MED’88, CAS’88) and Sally Lee ■ ■ ■  James E. Lee (CAS’09, MED’10, SDM’14, Questrom’18) ■  Aviva Lee-Parritz and David Lee-Parritz ■ ■  Elliott H. Leitman (CAS’88, MED’92) and Candace Leitman ■ ■  Wayne I. Lencer (MED’77) and Karen Klein Richard P. Lenz and Jean H. Tibbetts ■ ■ ■  Jack P. Leventhal (MED’73) and Mary A. Leventhal ■ ■  Keith P. Lewis ■ ■  Richard Lindblom ■  Felicia H. Liu (MED’73) and John T. Citron ■  Martin H. Loeffler and Sidsel Loeffler ■ ■ ■  Tamiko A. Long (MED’92) Joseph Loscalzo and Anita B. Loscalzo ■  Hamilton Lott and Barbara H. Lott ■ ■  Michael K. Louie (ENG’98, MED’02) and Jennifer C. Louie ■ ■  Kenneth Ludmerer and Loren Ludmerer ■  George D. Malkasian (MED’54) and Mary E. Malkasian ■ ■  Robert D. Manchester (Questrom’74) and Shirley A. Manchester ■  Neal Mandell (MED’86) and Amy L. Mandell ■ ■  Frank I. Marcus (MED’53) and Janet Marcus ■ ■  Bruce C. Marshall and Karen C. Marshall ■  Suzanne Maselli ■ ■  Rebecca A. Massey ■ ■  Ingerlisa W. Mattoch (MED’00,’04) and Ian S. Mattoch ■ ■  Richard H. Mattson (MED’57) and Martha Mattson ■  John F. McCahan and Kathleen B. McCahan ■ ■  Jean E. McPhail Ashraf Metwally and Nancy Yang ■ ■ ■  Mark S. Michelman (MED’67) and Susan F. Michelman ■ ■  Frances H. Miller (LAW’65) and Hugh Miller (MED’55) ■ 

Heather H. Miselis (MED’00,’04, SPH’00) and Nathan R. Miselis (GRS’95) ■ ■ ■  Rebecca G. Mishuris (MED’08) and Gary Mishuris ■ ■ ■  Elizabeth A. Moran (MED’94) ■ ■  Patricia G. Morikawa (MED’89) ■ ■  Harvey L. Moskowitz and Lorraine F. Moskowitz ■  Joseph T. Mullen (MED’55) ■  Praveen V. Mummaneni (MED’95, CAS’95) and Valli P. Mummaneni ■  Carol A. Myers (Sargent’82) and Richard H. Myers ■ ■ ■ ■  Robert S. Napoletano (MED’85) and Laura L. Napoletano ■  Roger W. Neal and Roberta A. Neal ■ ■  Kishwer S. Nehal (MED’92, CAS’92) ■ ■  Ralph A. Nelson (MED’65) and Anne E. Nelson ■ ■  Romain Niclou and Valirie Niclou ■ ■ ■  Keyvan Nouri (CAS’89, MED’93) ■  Robert J. Nozza and Wilma T. Nozza ■  Stephen C. O’Connor (CAS’85, MED’90) and Margot S. O’Connor Thomas F. O’Leary (MED’56) ■ ■  Armando Oliver ■ ■  Jay D. Orlander (SPH’92) and Anna J. Mitus (MED’83, CAS’83) ■ ■ ■  Rafael A. Ortega and Shawn A. Sefton ■ ■  Harold L. Osher (MED’47) and Peggy L. Osher ■  Mimi I. Peak (MED’82) and Steven E. Peak ■  Kenneth Pedini (MED’66) and Egle D. Pedini (MED’67, CAS’67) ■ ■  Burt M. Perlmutter (MED’63) and Roberta Perlmutter ■ ■ ■  Jacquline T. Perry (MED’83) and William Barclay Tony N. Pira ■ ■  Turin Pollard ■ ■  Joel Potash (MED’62) and Sandra Hurd ■ ■  John J. Przygoda (MED’77) and Janet C. Przygoda ■ ■  Susan E. Pursell (CAS’84, MED’90) and Michael A. Wack ■ ■ ■  B. Andre Quamina (GRS’65, MED’66,’66) and Dorothy Quamina ■ ■  Albert Quintiliani (MED’58) and Ann Quintiliani ■ ■  Jean E. Ramsey (MED’90, SPH’08) and David T. Ramsey ■ ■ Helen S. Ratner ■ ■ ■  David J. Reitman (MED’96) ■  Kenneth L. Renkens (CAS’76, MED’82) and Debra Lay-Renkens (CAS’73) ■ ■  Fletcher A. Reynolds (CAS’91, GRS’92, MED’96) and Frances H. Reynolds (CGS’88, CAS’90) ■ ■  Nancy E. Rice (MED’65) and Millard J. Hyland ■ ■  Gregory Robke ■  Alan L. Rothman (MED’83,’83, CAS’83) and Lori B. Bornstein (ENG’88) ■ ■  Robert L. Ryan and Sharon G. Ryan (Sargent’70) ■ ■ ■ ■  Osamu Sakai and Mariko Sakai ■ ■ 

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

29


Giving

DONOR REPORT

GIFTS FROM THE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD, ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STAFF, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS (CONTINUED)

■ President’s Society (AFLGS) Member | ■ Young Alumni Giving Society Member | ■ Faculty/Staff Member | ■ Parent | ■ Three-year Consecutive Giving ■ First-time Donor | ■ Deceased | ■ William Fairfield Warren Society Member

David J. Salant and Anne Salant ■ ■  Morton E. Salomon (MED’77) and Teri Salomon ■ ■  Richard J. Samaha (MED’66, GRS’66) and Christine Samaha ■ ■  Mark S. Samberg (CAS’72, MED’74) and Marcee Samberg ■ ■  Jose M. Santiago (MED’73) and Janice E. Catt ■  David S. Saperstein (CAS’88, MED’92) and Francine N. Saperstein ■ ■  Dennis J. Sargent (MED’77, CAS’77) and Katherine Forte Sargent (MED’77, CAS’77) ■ ■  Maureen Sayres-Van Niel (MED’78) and Anthony Van Niel John A. Schaefer and Peter C. Macchia ■ ■  Harold S. Schell (MED’70) and Antoinette M. Schell ■ ■ ■  Elihu M. Schimmel and Edith Schimmel ■  Anthony L. Schwagerl (MED’03,’06) ■  Gary S. Schwartz (MED’91) and Suzanne Schwartz ■ ■  Mitchell S. Schwartz and Lisa Schwartz ■ ■ ■  Steven B. Schwartz (CAS’73, MED’77) and Paula A. Leonard-Schwartz (MED’77, CAS’77) ■ ■  Cheryl L. Scott (MED’82) and Stephen Robinson ■  Anjan R. Shah (CAS’98, MED’02) and Mona B. Shah (CAS’98, MED’02) ■ ■  Udayan K. Shah (MED’92, CAS’92) and Barbara Ziv ■  Jay R. Shapiro (MED’57) and Judith B. Shapiro Edward J. Sherwood (CAS’72, MED’75) and Shirley Y. Sherwood ■ ■  Barbara P. Shineman ■  Neal H. Shuren (MED’90, CAS’90) and Maria M. Shuren ■ ■  Kenneth B. Simons (MED’80) and Wendy A. Simons ■  Donald M. Small ■  Jonathan G. Smith and Megan Smith ■ ■  Rebecca E. Snider (MED’84) and Jack B. Beard ■ ■  Jenny C. So (MED’94, CAS’94) and Kiran N. Batheja (CGS’88, CAS’90) ■  Sally L. Speer ■ ■  Craig J. Stanley and Carol A. Stanley ■ ■  Gary L. Stanton (MED’77) and Rebecca H. Stanton (LAW’89) ■ ■ ■  Robert J. Stenger and Cynthia E. Stenger ■ ■  Burton G. Surick (MED’86, CAS’86) and Ilona W. Surick (MED’86, CAS’86) ■ ■  Ramin R. Tabaddor (CAS’96, MED’01) and Elisa Tabaddor ■ ■  Frankie A. Tester ■  Arthur C. Theodore (MED’79) and Dawn M. Theodore ■ ■ ■  H. Emerson Thomas (MED’62) ■  Craig I. Title (MED’96, CAS’96) and Rachel S. Title (CAS’99, MED’02) ■  C. Alex To (CAS’87, MED’91) and Anthony Chell Edmund C. Tramont (MED’66) ■ ■  Barbara R. Trotter ■ ■ 

Kathleen L. Irwin (MED’83) and Richard W. Steketee ■  Friends of James Marcellino ■  Nancy Roberson Jasper (MED’84) and Sterling Jasper Jr. ■  Ming Jin and Julie X. Yang ■  Allen E. Joseph (MED’84) and Polly J. Panitz (MED’84) ■  Joseph P. Kannam (CAS’85, MED’89) and Rebecca E. Kannam Warren Kantrowitz (MED’60) and Harriet A. Kantrowitz ■ ■  Eve M. Kaplan (CAS’73) Michael J. Katz (MED’97) and Allison Katz ■  Joel M. Kaufman (CAS’73, MED’77) and Carol G. Kaufman ■  Julie Kaufmann (MED’87, GRS’87) and Geoffrey A. Modest Robert D. Keefe David J. Kerness Andrew H. Kim (MED’01,’05) Rosalind Kim (GRS’72) and Sung-Hou Kim ■  Carolyn L. Kinney (MED’81, CAS’81) and William Eckhardt ■  Ethan H. Kisch (CAS’73, MED’76) and Helene Kisch-Pniewski (MED’76) Elizabeth S. Klings ■  Harold J. Kober ■  Robert P. Kreminski and Barbara R. Kreminski ■  Enid M. Kublin Joseph Kulas ■  Karen M. Kyle (MED’85, CAS’85) ■  Stephanie J. Larouche (CAS’72, MED’73) ■  Ruth M. Lawrence (MED’64) ■  Hau D. Le (CAS’01, MED’05) and Celina Le ■  Faye Lee (MED’76) ■  Hyunjoo J. Lee (MED’08,’08) ■ ■  Cindie Leigh Paul M. Leiman (CAS’72, MED’74) and Carol R. Leiman ■ ■  Mark F. LePore (CAS’96,’99, MED’99) ■  James L. Lerner ■  Howard I. Levy (MED’67, CAS’67) and Gareth W. Levy ■  Ivan Y. Lim and Ann T. Lim ■ ■  Thomas Liong and Yung L. Liong ■  Frederic F. Little and Claudia L. Ordonez ■  Robert H. Lofgren (MED’56) and Helene J. Lofgren (CAS’64, SED’70) ■  Bruce W. Lowney (MED’68) ■ ■  Kirsten W. Lundeen (CGS’01, CAS’03) and Joshua Lingel ■ ■  Megan F. Luton Jonathan I. Macy (CAS’72, MED’76,’76) and Jeannette M. Macy ■  Thomas H. Marshall and Linda G. Marshall ■  Gary E. Martilla ■ ■ Katherine E. Mason (MED’02,’06, SPH’02) ■  Ronald B. Matloff (MED’72) and Cindy Matloff (SED’70) ■  Arthur J. McDonald and Melanie P. McDonald ■ 

30

Boston University School of Medicine

Ruth E. Tuomala (CAS’72, MED’74) and Ernest G. Cravalho ■ ■  Sergey M. Urman (MED’03) ■  Daniel M. Veltre and Mary Veltre ■ ■ ■  Robert A. Vigersky (MED’70, CAS’70) and Karen J. Fitzgerald ■ ■  Stephen T. Villanyi and Pamela J. Villanyi ■ ■ ■  Emil Von Arx (MED’67) and Anna D. Von Arx ■ ■  Mary J. Wagner (MED’88, CAS’88) and Karl D. Bihn ■ ■  Michael D. Walker (MED’60) and Katherine Walker ■ ■  David J. Wallace ■  Jerome D. Waye (MED’58) and Marguerite B. Waye ■  Jeffrey D. Wayne (MED’92) and Diane B. Wayne ■ ■  Annetta K. Weaver (MED’68) and Thomas G. Weaver ■ ■  Estelle Weedon ■ ■  Norman Weinstein (MED’53) and Marilyn S. Weinstein ■ ■  Murray Weinstock (MED’65) and Gloria Weinstock ■  Andrew M. Wexler (MED’80) and Geri S. Wexler (Sargent’76) ■  Thomas V. Whalen (CAS’73, MED’76) and Elaine W. Whalen ■ ■ ■  Burton White (MED’61) and June S. White ■ ■  Eugene P. Whittier (MED’52) ■ ■  Lancelot L. Williams (MED’88) ■ ■  Tumika Williams-Wilson (MED’85) ■  Marcelle M. Willock (Questrom’89) ■ ■  Samuel A. Wineburgh and Elinn Wineburgh ■  Gregory R. Witter and Gina M. Witter ■  Gary J. Wolf (MED’74) and Lynn Wolf ■ ■  Gary L. Wolf ■ ■  Juanita D. Wyatt-Hathaway (MED’90) and Gary S. Hathaway ■ ■  Herbert M. Wyman (MED’63) and Audrey S. Wyman ■  Joshua Wynne (MED’71, CAS’71) and Susan I. Farkas ■  Marion L. Young ■  Robert L. Young (CGS’88, CAS’90) and Tanya J. Bentley-Young ■  Kevin Yu (CAS’02, MED’06) ■ ■  Thomas J. Zaccheo (MED’62) and Janice Zaccheo ■ ■  $ 500– $ 999 Anonymous (2) ■  Elizabeth P. Akoma (MED’00) ■  Morris S. Albert (MED’60) and Barbara D. Albert ■  Matthew J. Amerlan and Erin E. Amerlan Thomas A. Amoroso (MED’90, SPH’09) and Family ■  Brian Anderson ■  Monica A. Ansani (MED’97) David S. Babin (MED’62) and Nancy C. Babin ■  David H. Baker (MED’51) and Elizabeth H. Baker Blanche K. Baler (GRS’48,’51, MED’54) ■ 

Philip S. Barie (MED’77, CAS’77) and Elaine D. Barie ■  G. Curtis Barry (MED’63) and Pauline T. Barry ■ ■  Scott D. Becker (MED’83, CAS’83) and Rehana P. Becker Marshall S. Bedine (MED’67) and Joyce R. Bedine ■  Karl T. Benedict and Patricia H. Benedict ■  Timothy R. Berigan (MED’92) and Yadira C. Berigan ■  Marvin D. Berman (CAS’72, MED’74) and Ronna D. Finer-Berman (SED’73) ■  Peter David Berman (MED’85) and Holly Berman Sheilah A. Bernard ■ ■  Paul V. Bertocci (MED’70) and Barbara J. Bertocci ■  Eric A. Birken (MED’68, CAS’68) and Marcia D. Birken Barbara H. Bjornson (CAS’71, MED’75) Robert Blanchflower and Liz Blanchflower ■  Kip Bodi (ENG’06, GRS’07) ■ ■  Anthony F. Bonacci (MED’67) and Sheila J. Bonacci ■  Louis J. Bresnick (GRS’93, MED’97) ■  Howard S. Britt (MED’70, CAS’70) and Gail L. Britt ■  David A. Bross (MED’88) Karen T. Brown (MED’79) and Peter Suchy ■  Linda Burke-Galloway (MED’87) ■  Linda R. Burnham (SED’84) and Howard M. Burnham Samuel A. Burstein (MED’72) and Cheryl N. Boyd ■  John W. Carpenter (CAS’65) and Ellen S. Carpenter ■  David F. Casey (MED’62) and Diane M. Casey ■  Renee W. Chan ■  Charson Chang (MED’86, CAS’86) John R. Charpie (MED’90, GRS’90) and Kathryn C. Charpie ■  Vicki A. Chavin (CAS’87, MED’91) and Jeffrey M. Chavin ■  Agnes H. Chen (MED’01) and Bernard Chen ■  Edmund W. Cheung (MED’93, CAS’93) and Kathy Tsai June J. Christmas (MED’49) Beckey F. Cochran Tod D. Cooperman (MED’87, CAS’87) and Sharon Cooperman ■  M. Cornelia Cremens (SPH’83, MED’88) Benedict D. Daly (MED’65,’65) and Joan M. Daly ■  Abdulrasul A. Damji (ENG’85,’90) and Amina Damji ■ ■ ■  Anne L. d’Avenas (MED’80) and Jerome S. Brody Mary L. Del Monte (MED’67) George Dermksian (MED’54) and Tamara Dermksian ■  Jennifer Dickens ■  Ineke M. Dikland ■  Kimberly A. Dodd (CAS’92, MED’02, SPH’10) ■  John M. Doggett and Patricia H. Doggett

Bernadine R. Donahue (MED’84, CAS’84) and Kenneth Sheehan ■  Teresa Doty ■  Donald S. Dworken (MED’55) and Nancy L. Dworken ■  Robert T. Eberhardt and Margaret M. Eberhardt ■ ■ ■ ■  Holly B. Falzone (Questrom’03) and Richard Falzone ■  Stuart R. Ferguson (MED’79) and Carolyn H. Welsh (MED’79) ■  Shawn M. Ferullo (CAS’97, MED’01) and Karen Ferullo ■ ■  Timothy J. Fitzgerald ■ ■  John W. Folley (STH’75) and Susan H. Folley ■  Benjamin S. Frank (MED’03,’03) and Jennifer Frank (CAS’95, MED’99) Howard J. Frankel (MED’64) and Judy W. Frankel (CAS’63) Mark S. Freshwater and Deborah L. Freshwater ■  Fayne L. Frey (CAS’83, MED’87) and Roger J. Frey ■  Robert I. Friedman (MED’72) and Donna A. Friedman (CAS’72) ■  Friends of Walter H. Connery ■  Joseph R. Gaeta (MED’58) and Carol A. Gaeta ■  Wanzo Galloway ■  George H. Gallup David F. Garvin (MED’65) and Jacqueline T. Garvin ■  Jeanne M. Garvin (MED’72, CAS’72) ■  Norman C. Gaudrault (MED’62) and Evelyn L. Gaudrault ■  Betty J. Gaver ■  Charles M. Geller (MED’87, CAS’87) and Kim A. Feldinger Geller ■  Mark Gillie Richard W. Gillies (MED’59) Nicholas Giosa (MED’52) ■  Ronni L. Goldsmith (MED’88) ■  Jeffrey H. Gottlieb (MED’81) and Regina Gottlieb ■ ■  Clifford Greenblatt ■  Neal S. Greenstein (MED’81, CAS’81) and Cindy S. Greenstein ■  Jack Gresser ■  Kirsi M. Groden and Brian F. Groden (MED’88) ■  Shuchi Gupta (MED’97, CAS’97) Cynthia A. Hadley (MED’79) Michelle A. Hankins (MED’87) and Andrew Strassman ■  Eric J. Hardt and Susan W. Hardt ■  Kevan L. Hartshorn and Ruth Kandel ■ ■  Patrick J. Healey (MED’87) and Pamela M. Healey Jared Heaton ■  Eliot Heller and Bridgette Heller John A. Hermos (MED’65) and Rosalie J. Hermos (SPH’91) ■ ■  Neal D. Hoffman (MED’87, CAS’87) and Andrew Ingall Kevin S. Hopkins (MED’84) Thomas M. Hyndman Alexander Ingerman (MED’88) and Sandra R. Weitz (MED’88)

Joseph P. McEvoy (CAS’72, MED’73) and Shirley A. McEvoy ■  Natalie J. McKnight and Christopher J. McKnight ■ ■ ■ ■  Marisa Messore (MED’92) ■  Danica V. Mijovic-Prelec (GRS’90) and Drazen Prelec ■  Bennett Miller (MED’51) ■  Joseph P. Mizgerd and Louise Mizgerd ■ ■  Gary Moebus ■  Linda M. Monkell ■  Audrey Morris ■  Carol D. Morris (MED’94) Evan E. Mortimer (MED’73) ■  Wayne E. Moschetti (MED’07) and Jessica Moschetti ■  Abdu S. Mukhtar (MED’00) ■  Swati A. Namburi (MED’95, CAS’95) and Krishnan Nair ■ ■  Rebecca Reetz Neal (MED’85) ■  Steven D. Ness ■  Philip M. Newhall (MED’94) and Janet E. Tuttle-Newhall Thomas R. Newkirk and Carole Newkirk ■  Michael J. Newman and Suzanne Newman Michael S. Niederman (MED’77, CAS’77) and Ronna D. Niederman (COM’75) ■  K. Michael Nolan and Julie M. Nolan ■ ■  Richard K. Norman (GRS’01) Gilbert A. Norwood (CAS’53, MED’57) ■ ■  Daniel J. Oates (MED’00, CAS’00, SPH’05) ■  John F. O’Brien (MED’59) and Julianne O. Larsen ■  Sharon E. O’Brien ■  George T. O’Connor (MED’79,’79, CAS’79) and Rosemary A. O’Connell ■ ■  John D. Ogilby (MED’79) and Katrina V. Ogilby Stephen T. Olin (MED’73) and Laura S. Olin ■  Carol A. O’Neil (MED’71) Rita M. O’Neil Lorene Osmanski (CAS’85, MED’89) and James P. Osmanski ■  Floris N. Palmer Cristina M. Palumbo (ENG’95, MED’99) and Michael H. Palumbo (COM’95) ■  Jai G. Parekh (CAS’89, MED’93) and Swati J. Parekh (CAS’90) ■  Mary K. Patz (MED’91) and Richard J. Patz ■  Jordan C. Paul and Valerie J. Paul ■  David C. Pelini (MED’80, CAS’80) and Susan E. Pelini (MED’80, CAS’80) Da Ba Pho (MED’65) and Anne Pho ■ ■  Martin R. Plaut (GRS’52, MED’56) Steven P. Poplack (MED’88) and Laura S. P. Poplack ■  Mary V. Pratt Pamela A. Propeck (MED’86, CAS’86) ■  Charles F. Reilly and Ronda S. Reilly ■  Kelli J. Richardson Michael Richerson and Lisa Richerson ■  Marc W. Richman (MED’63) and Anna Richman ■  Richard J. Rihn (MED’51) ■  Mark J. Riley and Melissa J. Saraiva ■ 

Gregory K. Robbins (MED’90) and Elizabeth O. Robbins ■  Norman M. Roberts and Margaret J. Roberts ■  Stephanie D. Robertson (MED’96) John S. Rose and Rosanne Haroian Ann S. Rosenthal Kate Rosenthal Richard I. Rothstein (CAS’74, MED’80) and Lia L. Rothstein (CAS’74, CFA’82) ■  Katherine E. Rowan and Robert Baker ■  Alan G. Salz (MED’81, CAS’81) and Linda Hsueh (MED’81, CAS’81) ■  Sheelu Samuel (Questrom’01, MED’01) ■  Ann L. Schafstedde N. Paul Schepis (MED’58) and Carole E. Schepis Jerry M. Schreibstein (MED’89, CAS’89) and Harlene Ginsberg (LAW’88) ■  John A. Scolaro (MED’03,’07) and Christie C. Scolaro ■  Michael J. Scollins (MED’69) and Mary D. Scollins (MED’69) Ronald Stoloff and Judi B. Seldin Robert M. Seymour (MED’64) and Elizabeth S. Seymour Neal Shadoff (GRS’74, MED’78) and Susan S. Shadoff (SED’74) ■  Kenath J. Shamir (MED’87, CAS’87) ■  Bruce K. Shapiro (MED’72, CAS’72) and Elizabeth B. Shapiro (SON’72) ■  Michael J. Sheehy (CAS’83, MED’87) and Sandra Sheehy Arthur D. Shiff (MED’67, CAS’67) and Eileen Shiff ■  Evan L. Siegel (MED’84, CAS’84) and Diana R. Siegel ■  Stuart E. Siegel (MED’67, CAS’67) ■ ■  Allan W. Silberman (GRS’73, MED’75) and Kathleen A. Silberman ■  Daniel I. Silvershein (MED’93, CAS’93) and Judy S. Schwab (CAS’91) ■  Carol J. Singer-Granick (MED’78) and Mark S. Granick Janice Slusser ■  Monica Smiddy (MED’89) Cathy K. Smith and William S. Smith ■  Galen J. Smith and Julia F. Carlson ■  Graham M. Snyder (MED’05) and Amy Snyder ■  Rosemary K. Sokas (CAS’72, MED’74) and Ahmed Achrati ■ ■  Jorge A. Soto and Ana M. Betancur ■ ■ ■  Heidi B. Star (Questrom’86) and Barry L. Star ■  James D. Stern (MED’88, CAS’88) and Barbara L. Stern Kimberly A. Stock (MED’97) and Jonathan Stock ■  Susan C. Stoddard ■  Susan M. Strahosky (SED’72, MED’80, CAS’80) and James H. Roberts ■ ■  Domenic M. Strazzulla (MED’81) and Sandra Strazzulla Elihu L. Sussman (MED’69, CAS’69) and Geraldine A. Sussman ■  William J. Tate (MED’61) and Constance Tate

Hildegard R. Thomssen (MED’77) and Eli L. Thomssen ■  John F. Tilzey (MED’94,’94) and Carol Tilzey Timbie Family Madeleine Timin ■  Hillary S. Tompkins (MED’04) and Edward Hickey ■  Keith Tornheim and Susan F. Tornheim ■ ■  Jens N.F. Touborg (MED’66) and Merry D. Touborg ■  John W. Towne (MED’62) and Connie R. Towne ■  Valori D. Treloar (MED’85) and Stanley R. Mescon (DGE’74, SED’76, Questrom’81) ■  John A. Tripodoro and Anthony Tripodoro ■  Shu-Chen Tseng ■ ■ ■  Gene S. Tyler ■  Khashayar Vakili (CAS’95, MED’98,’02) and Ghazaleh Sadri-Vakili (MED’03) ■  Kathi J. Vandever Paul A. Vigna (CAS’85, MED’89) and Judith A. Vigna ■  Paul A. Vita ■  Michael W. Von Plato (MED’17) ■ ■ Martin G. Voshell and Gail A. Voshell ■  David H. Walker (MED’73) and Margret M. Walker ■  Susan L. Walker ■  Robert C. Warren (MED’86, CAS’86) and Therese A. Warren ■  Lucille I. Weinstein (MED’75) and Mark J. Weinstein ■  Howard Weitzman ■  Judith F. Wellington Henry O. White (MED’53) and Marian R. White ■  Allison P. Whittle (MED’86, CAS’86) ■  Shirvinda A. Wijesekera (MED’98, CAS’98) and Namita G. Wijesekera (MED’98, CAS’98) ■  Michael H. Wilensky (MED’73) and Enid Wilensky ■  Richard E. Wilker (MED’76) and Phyllis B. Wilker (SED’00) ■  Charles T. Williams ■ ■  Diane F. Wilson Daniel L. Wu and Katherine Wu ■  Kathryn Young ■  Barry J. Zamost (CAS’73, MED’76) and Rita L. Zamost ■  Laima I. Zarins (MED’02) and Bertram Zarins David H. Zornow (MED’66) and Iva Zornow ■  $2 5 0 –$49 9 Anonymous (2) ■ ■ ■  George H. Abbot (MED’60) and Marjorie H. Abbot (SED’63) Jodi F. Abbott ■ ■  Mary Abraham and Naif Abraham Lloyd P. Aiello (GRS’88, MED’88) and Mami A. Iwamoto ■  John Allardice and Susan Allardice Caroline S. Alpert (UNI’95, MED’00,’01) ■  Carol E. Anderson (MED’72) ■  Erik S. Anderson ■ 

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

31


Giving

DONOR REPORT

GIFTS FROM THE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD, ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STAFF, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS (CONTINUED)

■ President’s Society (AFLGS) Member | ■ Young Alumni Giving Society Member | ■ Faculty/Staff Member | ■ Parent | ■ Three-year Consecutive Giving ■ First-time Donor | ■ Deceased | ■ William Fairfield Warren Society Member

David J. Salant and Anne Salant ■ ■  Morton E. Salomon (MED’77) and Teri Salomon ■ ■  Richard J. Samaha (MED’66, GRS’66) and Christine Samaha ■ ■  Mark S. Samberg (CAS’72, MED’74) and Marcee Samberg ■ ■  Jose M. Santiago (MED’73) and Janice E. Catt ■  David S. Saperstein (CAS’88, MED’92) and Francine N. Saperstein ■ ■  Dennis J. Sargent (MED’77, CAS’77) and Katherine Forte Sargent (MED’77, CAS’77) ■ ■  Maureen Sayres-Van Niel (MED’78) and Anthony Van Niel John A. Schaefer and Peter C. Macchia ■ ■  Harold S. Schell (MED’70) and Antoinette M. Schell ■ ■ ■  Elihu M. Schimmel and Edith Schimmel ■  Anthony L. Schwagerl (MED’03,’06) ■  Gary S. Schwartz (MED’91) and Suzanne Schwartz ■ ■  Mitchell S. Schwartz and Lisa Schwartz ■ ■ ■  Steven B. Schwartz (CAS’73, MED’77) and Paula A. Leonard-Schwartz (MED’77, CAS’77) ■ ■  Cheryl L. Scott (MED’82) and Stephen Robinson ■  Anjan R. Shah (CAS’98, MED’02) and Mona B. Shah (CAS’98, MED’02) ■ ■  Udayan K. Shah (MED’92, CAS’92) and Barbara Ziv ■  Jay R. Shapiro (MED’57) and Judith B. Shapiro Edward J. Sherwood (CAS’72, MED’75) and Shirley Y. Sherwood ■ ■  Barbara P. Shineman ■  Neal H. Shuren (MED’90, CAS’90) and Maria M. Shuren ■ ■  Kenneth B. Simons (MED’80) and Wendy A. Simons ■  Donald M. Small ■  Jonathan G. Smith and Megan Smith ■ ■  Rebecca E. Snider (MED’84) and Jack B. Beard ■ ■  Jenny C. So (MED’94, CAS’94) and Kiran N. Batheja (CGS’88, CAS’90) ■  Sally L. Speer ■ ■  Craig J. Stanley and Carol A. Stanley ■ ■  Gary L. Stanton (MED’77) and Rebecca H. Stanton (LAW’89) ■ ■ ■  Robert J. Stenger and Cynthia E. Stenger ■ ■  Burton G. Surick (MED’86, CAS’86) and Ilona W. Surick (MED’86, CAS’86) ■ ■  Ramin R. Tabaddor (CAS’96, MED’01) and Elisa Tabaddor ■ ■  Frankie A. Tester ■  Arthur C. Theodore (MED’79) and Dawn M. Theodore ■ ■ ■  H. Emerson Thomas (MED’62) ■  Craig I. Title (MED’96, CAS’96) and Rachel S. Title (CAS’99, MED’02) ■  C. Alex To (CAS’87, MED’91) and Anthony Chell Edmund C. Tramont (MED’66) ■ ■  Barbara R. Trotter ■ ■ 

Kathleen L. Irwin (MED’83) and Richard W. Steketee ■  Friends of James Marcellino ■  Nancy Roberson Jasper (MED’84) and Sterling Jasper Jr. ■  Ming Jin and Julie X. Yang ■  Allen E. Joseph (MED’84) and Polly J. Panitz (MED’84) ■  Joseph P. Kannam (CAS’85, MED’89) and Rebecca E. Kannam Warren Kantrowitz (MED’60) and Harriet A. Kantrowitz ■ ■  Eve M. Kaplan (CAS’73) Michael J. Katz (MED’97) and Allison Katz ■  Joel M. Kaufman (CAS’73, MED’77) and Carol G. Kaufman ■  Julie Kaufmann (MED’87, GRS’87) and Geoffrey A. Modest Robert D. Keefe David J. Kerness Andrew H. Kim (MED’01,’05) Rosalind Kim (GRS’72) and Sung-Hou Kim ■  Carolyn L. Kinney (MED’81, CAS’81) and William Eckhardt ■  Ethan H. Kisch (CAS’73, MED’76) and Helene Kisch-Pniewski (MED’76) Elizabeth S. Klings ■  Harold J. Kober ■  Robert P. Kreminski and Barbara R. Kreminski ■  Enid M. Kublin Joseph Kulas ■  Karen M. Kyle (MED’85, CAS’85) ■  Stephanie J. Larouche (CAS’72, MED’73) ■  Ruth M. Lawrence (MED’64) ■  Hau D. Le (CAS’01, MED’05) and Celina Le ■  Faye Lee (MED’76) ■  Hyunjoo J. Lee (MED’08,’08) ■ ■  Cindie Leigh Paul M. Leiman (CAS’72, MED’74) and Carol R. Leiman ■ ■  Mark F. LePore (CAS’96,’99, MED’99) ■  James L. Lerner ■  Howard I. Levy (MED’67, CAS’67) and Gareth W. Levy ■  Ivan Y. Lim and Ann T. Lim ■ ■  Thomas Liong and Yung L. Liong ■  Frederic F. Little and Claudia L. Ordonez ■  Robert H. Lofgren (MED’56) and Helene J. Lofgren (CAS’64, SED’70) ■  Bruce W. Lowney (MED’68) ■ ■  Kirsten W. Lundeen (CGS’01, CAS’03) and Joshua Lingel ■ ■  Megan F. Luton Jonathan I. Macy (CAS’72, MED’76,’76) and Jeannette M. Macy ■  Thomas H. Marshall and Linda G. Marshall ■  Gary E. Martilla ■ ■ Katherine E. Mason (MED’02,’06, SPH’02) ■  Ronald B. Matloff (MED’72) and Cindy Matloff (SED’70) ■  Arthur J. McDonald and Melanie P. McDonald ■ 

30

Boston University School of Medicine

Ruth E. Tuomala (CAS’72, MED’74) and Ernest G. Cravalho ■ ■  Sergey M. Urman (MED’03) ■  Daniel M. Veltre and Mary Veltre ■ ■ ■  Robert A. Vigersky (MED’70, CAS’70) and Karen J. Fitzgerald ■ ■  Stephen T. Villanyi and Pamela J. Villanyi ■ ■ ■  Emil Von Arx (MED’67) and Anna D. Von Arx ■ ■  Mary J. Wagner (MED’88, CAS’88) and Karl D. Bihn ■ ■  Michael D. Walker (MED’60) and Katherine Walker ■ ■  David J. Wallace ■  Jerome D. Waye (MED’58) and Marguerite B. Waye ■  Jeffrey D. Wayne (MED’92) and Diane B. Wayne ■ ■  Annetta K. Weaver (MED’68) and Thomas G. Weaver ■ ■  Estelle Weedon ■ ■  Norman Weinstein (MED’53) and Marilyn S. Weinstein ■ ■  Murray Weinstock (MED’65) and Gloria Weinstock ■  Andrew M. Wexler (MED’80) and Geri S. Wexler (Sargent’76) ■  Thomas V. Whalen (CAS’73, MED’76) and Elaine W. Whalen ■ ■ ■  Burton White (MED’61) and June S. White ■ ■  Eugene P. Whittier (MED’52) ■ ■  Lancelot L. Williams (MED’88) ■ ■  Tumika Williams-Wilson (MED’85) ■  Marcelle M. Willock (Questrom’89) ■ ■  Samuel A. Wineburgh and Elinn Wineburgh ■  Gregory R. Witter and Gina M. Witter ■  Gary J. Wolf (MED’74) and Lynn Wolf ■ ■  Gary L. Wolf ■ ■  Juanita D. Wyatt-Hathaway (MED’90) and Gary S. Hathaway ■ ■  Herbert M. Wyman (MED’63) and Audrey S. Wyman ■  Joshua Wynne (MED’71, CAS’71) and Susan I. Farkas ■  Marion L. Young ■  Robert L. Young (CGS’88, CAS’90) and Tanya J. Bentley-Young ■  Kevin Yu (CAS’02, MED’06) ■ ■  Thomas J. Zaccheo (MED’62) and Janice Zaccheo ■ ■  $ 500– $ 999 Anonymous (2) ■  Elizabeth P. Akoma (MED’00) ■  Morris S. Albert (MED’60) and Barbara D. Albert ■  Matthew J. Amerlan and Erin E. Amerlan Thomas A. Amoroso (MED’90, SPH’09) and Family ■  Brian Anderson ■  Monica A. Ansani (MED’97) David S. Babin (MED’62) and Nancy C. Babin ■  David H. Baker (MED’51) and Elizabeth H. Baker Blanche K. Baler (GRS’48,’51, MED’54) ■ 

Philip S. Barie (MED’77, CAS’77) and Elaine D. Barie ■  G. Curtis Barry (MED’63) and Pauline T. Barry ■ ■  Scott D. Becker (MED’83, CAS’83) and Rehana P. Becker Marshall S. Bedine (MED’67) and Joyce R. Bedine ■  Karl T. Benedict and Patricia H. Benedict ■  Timothy R. Berigan (MED’92) and Yadira C. Berigan ■  Marvin D. Berman (CAS’72, MED’74) and Ronna D. Finer-Berman (SED’73) ■  Peter David Berman (MED’85) and Holly Berman Sheilah A. Bernard ■ ■  Paul V. Bertocci (MED’70) and Barbara J. Bertocci ■  Eric A. Birken (MED’68, CAS’68) and Marcia D. Birken Barbara H. Bjornson (CAS’71, MED’75) Robert Blanchflower and Liz Blanchflower ■  Kip Bodi (ENG’06, GRS’07) ■ ■  Anthony F. Bonacci (MED’67) and Sheila J. Bonacci ■  Louis J. Bresnick (GRS’93, MED’97) ■  Howard S. Britt (MED’70, CAS’70) and Gail L. Britt ■  David A. Bross (MED’88) Karen T. Brown (MED’79) and Peter Suchy ■  Linda Burke-Galloway (MED’87) ■  Linda R. Burnham (SED’84) and Howard M. Burnham Samuel A. Burstein (MED’72) and Cheryl N. Boyd ■  John W. Carpenter (CAS’65) and Ellen S. Carpenter ■  David F. Casey (MED’62) and Diane M. Casey ■  Renee W. Chan ■  Charson Chang (MED’86, CAS’86) John R. Charpie (MED’90, GRS’90) and Kathryn C. Charpie ■  Vicki A. Chavin (CAS’87, MED’91) and Jeffrey M. Chavin ■  Agnes H. Chen (MED’01) and Bernard Chen ■  Edmund W. Cheung (MED’93, CAS’93) and Kathy Tsai June J. Christmas (MED’49) Beckey F. Cochran Tod D. Cooperman (MED’87, CAS’87) and Sharon Cooperman ■  M. Cornelia Cremens (SPH’83, MED’88) Benedict D. Daly (MED’65,’65) and Joan M. Daly ■  Abdulrasul A. Damji (ENG’85,’90) and Amina Damji ■ ■ ■  Anne L. d’Avenas (MED’80) and Jerome S. Brody Mary L. Del Monte (MED’67) George Dermksian (MED’54) and Tamara Dermksian ■  Jennifer Dickens ■  Ineke M. Dikland ■  Kimberly A. Dodd (CAS’92, MED’02, SPH’10) ■  John M. Doggett and Patricia H. Doggett

Bernadine R. Donahue (MED’84, CAS’84) and Kenneth Sheehan ■  Teresa Doty ■  Donald S. Dworken (MED’55) and Nancy L. Dworken ■  Robert T. Eberhardt and Margaret M. Eberhardt ■ ■ ■ ■  Holly B. Falzone (Questrom’03) and Richard Falzone ■  Stuart R. Ferguson (MED’79) and Carolyn H. Welsh (MED’79) ■  Shawn M. Ferullo (CAS’97, MED’01) and Karen Ferullo ■ ■  Timothy J. Fitzgerald ■ ■  John W. Folley (STH’75) and Susan H. Folley ■  Benjamin S. Frank (MED’03,’03) and Jennifer Frank (CAS’95, MED’99) Howard J. Frankel (MED’64) and Judy W. Frankel (CAS’63) Mark S. Freshwater and Deborah L. Freshwater ■  Fayne L. Frey (CAS’83, MED’87) and Roger J. Frey ■  Robert I. Friedman (MED’72) and Donna A. Friedman (CAS’72) ■  Friends of Walter H. Connery ■  Joseph R. Gaeta (MED’58) and Carol A. Gaeta ■  Wanzo Galloway ■  George H. Gallup David F. Garvin (MED’65) and Jacqueline T. Garvin ■  Jeanne M. Garvin (MED’72, CAS’72) ■  Norman C. Gaudrault (MED’62) and Evelyn L. Gaudrault ■  Betty J. Gaver ■  Charles M. Geller (MED’87, CAS’87) and Kim A. Feldinger Geller ■  Mark Gillie Richard W. Gillies (MED’59) Nicholas Giosa (MED’52) ■  Ronni L. Goldsmith (MED’88) ■  Jeffrey H. Gottlieb (MED’81) and Regina Gottlieb ■ ■  Clifford Greenblatt ■  Neal S. Greenstein (MED’81, CAS’81) and Cindy S. Greenstein ■  Jack Gresser ■  Kirsi M. Groden and Brian F. Groden (MED’88) ■  Shuchi Gupta (MED’97, CAS’97) Cynthia A. Hadley (MED’79) Michelle A. Hankins (MED’87) and Andrew Strassman ■  Eric J. Hardt and Susan W. Hardt ■  Kevan L. Hartshorn and Ruth Kandel ■ ■  Patrick J. Healey (MED’87) and Pamela M. Healey Jared Heaton ■  Eliot Heller and Bridgette Heller John A. Hermos (MED’65) and Rosalie J. Hermos (SPH’91) ■ ■  Neal D. Hoffman (MED’87, CAS’87) and Andrew Ingall Kevin S. Hopkins (MED’84) Thomas M. Hyndman Alexander Ingerman (MED’88) and Sandra R. Weitz (MED’88)

Joseph P. McEvoy (CAS’72, MED’73) and Shirley A. McEvoy ■  Natalie J. McKnight and Christopher J. McKnight ■ ■ ■ ■  Marisa Messore (MED’92) ■  Danica V. Mijovic-Prelec (GRS’90) and Drazen Prelec ■  Bennett Miller (MED’51) ■  Joseph P. Mizgerd and Louise Mizgerd ■ ■  Gary Moebus ■  Linda M. Monkell ■  Audrey Morris ■  Carol D. Morris (MED’94) Evan E. Mortimer (MED’73) ■  Wayne E. Moschetti (MED’07) and Jessica Moschetti ■  Abdu S. Mukhtar (MED’00) ■  Swati A. Namburi (MED’95, CAS’95) and Krishnan Nair ■ ■  Rebecca Reetz Neal (MED’85) ■  Steven D. Ness ■  Philip M. Newhall (MED’94) and Janet E. Tuttle-Newhall Thomas R. Newkirk and Carole Newkirk ■  Michael J. Newman and Suzanne Newman Michael S. Niederman (MED’77, CAS’77) and Ronna D. Niederman (COM’75) ■  K. Michael Nolan and Julie M. Nolan ■ ■  Richard K. Norman (GRS’01) Gilbert A. Norwood (CAS’53, MED’57) ■ ■  Daniel J. Oates (MED’00, CAS’00, SPH’05) ■  John F. O’Brien (MED’59) and Julianne O. Larsen ■  Sharon E. O’Brien ■  George T. O’Connor (MED’79,’79, CAS’79) and Rosemary A. O’Connell ■ ■  John D. Ogilby (MED’79) and Katrina V. Ogilby Stephen T. Olin (MED’73) and Laura S. Olin ■  Carol A. O’Neil (MED’71) Rita M. O’Neil Lorene Osmanski (CAS’85, MED’89) and James P. Osmanski ■  Floris N. Palmer Cristina M. Palumbo (ENG’95, MED’99) and Michael H. Palumbo (COM’95) ■  Jai G. Parekh (CAS’89, MED’93) and Swati J. Parekh (CAS’90) ■  Mary K. Patz (MED’91) and Richard J. Patz ■  Jordan C. Paul and Valerie J. Paul ■  David C. Pelini (MED’80, CAS’80) and Susan E. Pelini (MED’80, CAS’80) Da Ba Pho (MED’65) and Anne Pho ■ ■  Martin R. Plaut (GRS’52, MED’56) Steven P. Poplack (MED’88) and Laura S. P. Poplack ■  Mary V. Pratt Pamela A. Propeck (MED’86, CAS’86) ■  Charles F. Reilly and Ronda S. Reilly ■  Kelli J. Richardson Michael Richerson and Lisa Richerson ■  Marc W. Richman (MED’63) and Anna Richman ■  Richard J. Rihn (MED’51) ■  Mark J. Riley and Melissa J. Saraiva ■ 

Gregory K. Robbins (MED’90) and Elizabeth O. Robbins ■  Norman M. Roberts and Margaret J. Roberts ■  Stephanie D. Robertson (MED’96) John S. Rose and Rosanne Haroian Ann S. Rosenthal Kate Rosenthal Richard I. Rothstein (CAS’74, MED’80) and Lia L. Rothstein (CAS’74, CFA’82) ■  Katherine E. Rowan and Robert Baker ■  Alan G. Salz (MED’81, CAS’81) and Linda Hsueh (MED’81, CAS’81) ■  Sheelu Samuel (Questrom’01, MED’01) ■  Ann L. Schafstedde N. Paul Schepis (MED’58) and Carole E. Schepis Jerry M. Schreibstein (MED’89, CAS’89) and Harlene Ginsberg (LAW’88) ■  John A. Scolaro (MED’03,’07) and Christie C. Scolaro ■  Michael J. Scollins (MED’69) and Mary D. Scollins (MED’69) Ronald Stoloff and Judi B. Seldin Robert M. Seymour (MED’64) and Elizabeth S. Seymour Neal Shadoff (GRS’74, MED’78) and Susan S. Shadoff (SED’74) ■  Kenath J. Shamir (MED’87, CAS’87) ■  Bruce K. Shapiro (MED’72, CAS’72) and Elizabeth B. Shapiro (SON’72) ■  Michael J. Sheehy (CAS’83, MED’87) and Sandra Sheehy Arthur D. Shiff (MED’67, CAS’67) and Eileen Shiff ■  Evan L. Siegel (MED’84, CAS’84) and Diana R. Siegel ■  Stuart E. Siegel (MED’67, CAS’67) ■ ■  Allan W. Silberman (GRS’73, MED’75) and Kathleen A. Silberman ■  Daniel I. Silvershein (MED’93, CAS’93) and Judy S. Schwab (CAS’91) ■  Carol J. Singer-Granick (MED’78) and Mark S. Granick Janice Slusser ■  Monica Smiddy (MED’89) Cathy K. Smith and William S. Smith ■  Galen J. Smith and Julia F. Carlson ■  Graham M. Snyder (MED’05) and Amy Snyder ■  Rosemary K. Sokas (CAS’72, MED’74) and Ahmed Achrati ■ ■  Jorge A. Soto and Ana M. Betancur ■ ■ ■  Heidi B. Star (Questrom’86) and Barry L. Star ■  James D. Stern (MED’88, CAS’88) and Barbara L. Stern Kimberly A. Stock (MED’97) and Jonathan Stock ■  Susan C. Stoddard ■  Susan M. Strahosky (SED’72, MED’80, CAS’80) and James H. Roberts ■ ■  Domenic M. Strazzulla (MED’81) and Sandra Strazzulla Elihu L. Sussman (MED’69, CAS’69) and Geraldine A. Sussman ■  William J. Tate (MED’61) and Constance Tate

Hildegard R. Thomssen (MED’77) and Eli L. Thomssen ■  John F. Tilzey (MED’94,’94) and Carol Tilzey Timbie Family Madeleine Timin ■  Hillary S. Tompkins (MED’04) and Edward Hickey ■  Keith Tornheim and Susan F. Tornheim ■ ■  Jens N.F. Touborg (MED’66) and Merry D. Touborg ■  John W. Towne (MED’62) and Connie R. Towne ■  Valori D. Treloar (MED’85) and Stanley R. Mescon (DGE’74, SED’76, Questrom’81) ■  John A. Tripodoro and Anthony Tripodoro ■  Shu-Chen Tseng ■ ■ ■  Gene S. Tyler ■  Khashayar Vakili (CAS’95, MED’98,’02) and Ghazaleh Sadri-Vakili (MED’03) ■  Kathi J. Vandever Paul A. Vigna (CAS’85, MED’89) and Judith A. Vigna ■  Paul A. Vita ■  Michael W. Von Plato (MED’17) ■ ■ Martin G. Voshell and Gail A. Voshell ■  David H. Walker (MED’73) and Margret M. Walker ■  Susan L. Walker ■  Robert C. Warren (MED’86, CAS’86) and Therese A. Warren ■  Lucille I. Weinstein (MED’75) and Mark J. Weinstein ■  Howard Weitzman ■  Judith F. Wellington Henry O. White (MED’53) and Marian R. White ■  Allison P. Whittle (MED’86, CAS’86) ■  Shirvinda A. Wijesekera (MED’98, CAS’98) and Namita G. Wijesekera (MED’98, CAS’98) ■  Michael H. Wilensky (MED’73) and Enid Wilensky ■  Richard E. Wilker (MED’76) and Phyllis B. Wilker (SED’00) ■  Charles T. Williams ■ ■  Diane F. Wilson Daniel L. Wu and Katherine Wu ■  Kathryn Young ■  Barry J. Zamost (CAS’73, MED’76) and Rita L. Zamost ■  Laima I. Zarins (MED’02) and Bertram Zarins David H. Zornow (MED’66) and Iva Zornow ■  $2 5 0 –$49 9 Anonymous (2) ■ ■ ■  George H. Abbot (MED’60) and Marjorie H. Abbot (SED’63) Jodi F. Abbott ■ ■  Mary Abraham and Naif Abraham Lloyd P. Aiello (GRS’88, MED’88) and Mami A. Iwamoto ■  John Allardice and Susan Allardice Caroline S. Alpert (UNI’95, MED’00,’01) ■  Carol E. Anderson (MED’72) ■  Erik S. Anderson ■ 

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

31


Giving

DONOR REPORT

GIFTS FROM THE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD, ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STAFF, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS (CONTINUED)

■ President’s Society (AFLGS) Member | ■ Young Alumni Giving Society Member | ■ Faculty/Staff Member | ■ Parent | ■ Three-year Consecutive Giving ■ First-time Donor | ■ Deceased | ■ William Fairfield Warren Society Member

Michael S. Annunziata (MED’66,’66) ■  Nancy E. Anthracite (CAS’72, MED’73) ■  David Atkinson and Francine Atkinson ■ ■  Irwin Avery (MED’66) and Ann A. Avery ■  Stewart F. Babbott (MED’87) and Cecelia Babbott Debra A. Babcock (MED’80) and Mark R. Rosekind Jeffery L. Barker (MED’68) and Marion M. Barker ■  Kathy A. Barker Tamar F. Barlam (SPH’09) ■ ■ ■  Paul F. Barresi (MED’83) and Judy Barresi ■  James J. Heffernan (MED’77, SPH’92) and Mary A. Barry (SPH’88) ■ ■  Jasbir Bedi ■  Edward L. Bedrick (MED’79) and Amy B. Bedrick ■  Barry J. Benjamin (CAS’68, MED’72) and Susan M. Benjamin (CGS’67, SED’69) ■  Jerome F. Bergheim (MED’66) and Diana R. Bergheim (SED’61,’63) ■ ■  Alan D. Berkenwald (MED’78) and Joan Berkenwald ■  Sharon H. Berreby (MED’03) and Patrick Berreby ■  Frederick B. Berrien (MED’68) and Virginia C. Berrien (SON’80) ■  Florencio Berrios Castrodad Shailesh Bhat (MED’95, CAS’95) and Aarti Maskeri ■  Albert J. Birmingham ■  Jared M. Blackman ■  Mary A. Blanchard ■  Charles M. Bliss (MED’63) and Barbara W. Bliss ■ ■  Charles M. Blitzer (MED’79, CAS’79) and Sandy Blitzer ■  Paul J. Block (MED’77) and Lois L. Block (SPH’80) Harold P. Blum (MED’53) and Elsa J. Blum ■  Jules L. Boissonneault and Patricia E. Boissonneault Robert S. Boltax (CAS’59, MED’63) ■  Ronald L. Boucek ■  Francis H. Boudreau (MED’94,’98) Janet L. Boyle David Breen and Katherine Breen ■ ■  Gary R. Briefel (MED’72) and Ellen F. Briefel Jorge A. Brito (MED’81) ■  Adolfo Brizzi and Marie Brizzi Selwyn A. Broitman ■  Andrew E. Budson ■ ■  Wendy O. Buffett (MED’93) and Marc Davis Robert M. Burchuk (MED’82, CAS’82) and Christine Burchuk ■  Robyn K. Burnside ■  William F. Butterfield ■  Michael J. Cahalane (MED’80) and Nancy L. Cahalane ■  Michael J. Canata ■  Katharine Canfield and David C. King ■ ■  Jesse A. Caron (CAS’99, MED’03) and Jessica Alverio-Caron (CAS’00) ■ 

Gordon S. Manning (MED’80, CAS’80) and Karen F. Rothman (MED’81, CAS’81) ■  Peter J. Mannon (MED’83, CAS’83) and Roslyn B. Mannon John R. Marcaccio (MED’64) and Patricia H. Marcaccio ■  Francis G. Martinis (MED’92, CAS’92) and Antonella P. Martinis ■  J. Peter Maselli (MED’60) and Maryann Maselli ■  Richard T. Mason (MED’63) and Vivian Mason ■  Michael A. Mayr (MED’12, SDM’16) Italo C. Mazzarella (MED’56) and Barbara R. Mazzarella ■  Laura J. McCarthy Brian J. McKinnon (MED’90) and Caroline R. McKinnon ■  Shirley A. McMahon (MED’65) and Yesugey Oktay ■  David Mischoulon (MED’94,’94) and Alisabet J. Clain ■  James F. Mitchell (MED’80) ■  Peter J. Mogayzel (MED’90, GRS’90) and Cyndra R. Mogayzel ■  Chester H. Mohr (MED’83) David W. Moore (MED’65) and Jaye Moore ■ ■  E. Blake Moore Gustavo Mostoslavsky ■ ■  Michael S. Murphy (Sargent’87, MED’93) and Lori A. Farnan (MED’95) ■  Allan Myers ■  Arthur L. Naddell (MED’62) and Janet Naddell Janice Nadelhaft ■  Robert M. Najarian (MED’05) and Kristin Kludjian Najarian ■  James D. Nallo and Margaret M. Brady-Nallo ■  Mark H. Nelson (COM’88) and Ruth Gallagher Nelson ■  Victor E. Nerses and Carol A. Huber ■  Kirsten M. Nielsen (MED’04) ■  Clyde A. Niles Betty M. Nobel ■  Ned R. Novsam (CAS’74, MED’79) and Patricia J. Novsam ■ 

32

Boston University School of Medicine

Anthony V. Caruso and Gerianne M. Caruso Robert W. Chamberlain (CAS’72, MED’74) and Patricia A. Chamberlain ■  Louis C. Gerstenfeld (GRS’82) and Nancy L. Chapin (GRS’80, MED’84) ■ ■ ■  Maureen A. Alphonse-Charles (CAS’85) and Jean B. Charles (CAS’81, MED’85) ■  William A. Christmas (MED’65) and Polly Raye ■  Frank L. Christopher (CAS’91, MED’95) and Greer M. Evans-Christopher (Sargent’93,’96) Linda C. Coffman Jerome C. Coger Gary R. Cohen (MED’82) and Cheryl N. Cohen (Questrom’80) ■ ■  Jasminka Colakhodzic Brian I. Collet (MED’80, CAS’80) and Ann I. Collet ■  John T. Collins and Kathleen M. Collins Joseph M. Collins and Ann Marie Collins ■  Patrick H. Collins ■  Bernard M. Cooke (MED’73) and Kiyo Cooke ■  Selma F. Cooperband (SED’54) ■ ■  Ronald E. Coutu (MED’66) and Judith A. Coutu ■  Lorraine M. Curry ■  James E. Dalen Tristram C. Dammin and Beverly H. Dammin Peter J. Deckers (MED’66) and Barbara A. Deckers Mary L. Delaney (MED’86) and Steven Delaney ■  Anthony M. DeLuise (CAS’97, MED’01) and Monica DeLuise Edward C. DePhilippis Keryn M. Dias (MED’91) ■  William G. Dietrich (MED’82, CAS’82) and Regina M. Bielawski ■  Wayne L. Dingwell and Leah E. Dingwell Joseph F. DiTroia (MED’64) and Susan G. DiTroia ■  Mark C. Dmohowski ■  Glenn A. Dobecki Jean M. Doelling (MED’58) and Norman Doelling ■  Jeffery W. Howe and Reva M. Dolobowsky Clare A. Donnelly-Taylor (MED’12) Andrew M. Doolittle (MED’99) and Tove Doolittle ■  Frank A. DuPont (CAS’85, MED’85) and Terese S. DuPont (CAS’82) ■  Davor Dvanajscak ■  Sheryl Egan and Matthew Egan ■ ■  Matthew R. Egyud (MED’08,’13) Guy R. Eigenbrode (LAW’76) and Patricia Nicholas ■  Cynthia C. Espanola (MED’93) and David Walinski ■  Victor Evdokimoff (CGS’64, CAS’66) ■ ■  Leendert J. Faling and Judith R. Faling ■ ■  Ahad A. Fazelat (MED’01,’05, SPH’01) and Joyia E. Fazelat (MED’05) ■  Elizabeth L. Finch and Peter G. Coe ■ ■ 

Daniel R. Fishbein (MED’85, CAS’85) and Ilene M. Schuchman ■  Walter D. Fitzhugh (MED’92) and Mary D. Fitzhugh James D. Fletcher (CAS’86, MED’90) and Robin Fletcher ■  Eliot Foley James T. Ford ■  Giuseppe Francioni Patricia O. Francis (MED’79) and Ronald L. Francis ■  Samuel A. Frank (MED’98) and Jennifer H. Frank Richard D. Frary (MED’56) and Joan S. Frary ■  Marilynn C. Frederiksen (MED’74) and James W. Frederiksen Paul S. Freedberg (MED’74) and Maria S. Freedberg ■  Friends of Michael Gully at Benet Laboratories ■  Bryan D. Fry and Deedra L. Fry ■  Robert S. Galen (MED’70, CAS’70) and Lorilee R. Sandmann ■  Alison Gallup ■  Arvin Garg (MED’99, SPH’99) and Priya S. Garg ■ ■  Steven L. Garner (CAS’81, MED’85) ■  David Garnett Generoso G. Gascon (MED’62) and Susan C. Gascon Sarah J. Gasperini Jon B. Getz (MED’84, CAS’84) and Kelly Beach Andrew J. Ghio (MED’81) and Beth A. Ghio ■  Casimiro Giampaolo and Jo Ellen Mistarz ■  Jeffrey Robbins Goldbarg (MED’74) and Laurie H. Goldbarg Robert N. Golden (MED’79) and Shannon C. Kenney ■  Jianlin Gong and Baizheng Song ■ ■  Edward M. Gosselin (MED’90) and Geri A. Gosselin ■  Steven A. Gould (MED’73) ■  Thomas A. Green Scott Greenbaum (MED’85, CAS’85) and Melissa Greenbaum William G. Griever (MED’88) and Susan Griever ■  Charles F. Grimes (LAW’76) and Patricia B. Grimes ■  Gregg H. Grinspan (MED’79) and Phyllis Grinspan ■  Harvey R. Gross (MED’70) and Beth C. Gross ■  Alan D. Haber (MED’84, CAS’84) and Marian M. Haber ■  Jonathan P. Hains George S. Harlem and Rosina P. Harlem ■  Hollis E. Harrington ■  George A. Hasiotis (MED’65) and Eugenia J. Hasiotis Bartlett H. Hayes (MED’85) and Elizabeth B. Hayes Lynn E. Hendricks Elizabeth L. Hohmann ■ ■  Robin A. Horn (MED’89) and Mark F. Mendell

Bing Hou (ENG’95) and Gui-Hua Zhang ■ ■  Michael A. Husson (MED’80) and Mary L. Todd (MED’81) ■  Robert K. Jackler (MED’79) and Laurie M. Jackler (CGS’74, CAS’76) Charlsie K. James Zhiren Jin and Lily Shao ■ ■  Jerome Johnson Judith A. Johnson ■  Thomas C. Johnston (MED’80, GRS’80) and Elizabeth A. Roche-Johnston ■  Hugh R. Jones Joseph L. Jorizzo (CAS’71, MED’75) and Irene N. Carros ■  David S. Kam (SDM’82, MED’85) and Laura M. Kam ■  Elizabeth Kantor (DGE’69, CAS’71, MED’75) ■  Sandra S. Kaplan (MED’59) David M. Kaufman (MED’75) and Harriet B. Kaufman ■  Patricia L. Kavanagh (Questrom’92, MED’03) ■ ■  David Kawilarang and Rinawati Permana ■ ■  Derek H. Keller (MED’08) and Debbi McInteer ■  Bettina B. Kilburn (MED’82) and Norman W. Kilburn ■  Robert M. Kim (MED’60) and Bette P. Kim ■  Mark Kimble and Kathryn Kimble Marie M. Klossner Richard S. Knorr ■  Ping-Ping Kuang (MED’07) and Bin Liu (MED’97) ■ ■ ■  Neda Laiteerapong (CAS’01, MED’05) and Mark Roberts Corey J. Langer (MED’81, CAS’81) and Mindy R. Langer (MED’81) ■  Alan A. Larocque (ENG’72, GRS’79, MED’80) and Kathleen A. Larocque (CAS’74) ■  Jonathan H. Lass (CAS’72, MED’73) and Leah S. Lass (CFA’71) ■  Robert G. Layton (MED’72) and Judith H. Layton ■  Gail G. Lee (MED’81, CAS’81) Burton L. Lesnick (MED’88, CAS’88) and Lisa J. Kobrynski Veda K. Levin (CAS’69) and David S. Levin ■  Andrew R. Levinsky (COM’83, SED’87) Harold D. Levy (MED’59) and Patricia M. Levy ■  Joshua D. Liberman (MED’00) Holly Lindner ■ ■  Jeffrey Liong and Ria Liong ■  Luisa Longenberger and Henry W. Longenberger ■  Ricardo J. Lopez (CAS’98, MED’02) and Camili Toledo Anthony M. Lore and Heather A. Lore ■  Richard E. Luka (MED’89) and Amy R. Luka ■ ■  David M. Maganza Joshua M. Mammen (CAS’96,’99, MED’99) and Julie Mammen

Brian F. O’Donnell (MED’87) and Olga S. O’Donnell ■  Mary E. O’Donnell ■  Charles C. Paniszyn (MED’80, CAS’80) and Lucy C. Paniszyn (MED’81, CAS’81) ■  Andrew M. Parad (MED’06) and Adrienne L. Parad (MED’07) ■  Karla C. Pastrana (MED’02) and Alvin Pastrana James M. Perlotto (MED’82) and Thomas Masse ■  Steven J. Pike ■  Alexandra I. Pinkerson (MED’96) and Robert O. Leaver ■  Herbert S. Plovnick (CAS’67, MED’71) and Kathleen R. Plovnick (CAS’68, ENG’89) ■  Charles E. Pope and Joanne Pope ■  Lois G. Poucher (SON’69) and John S. Poucher ■  Robert A. Prendergast (MED’57) Frederic F. Primich (MED’57) and Doris Primich ■ ■  James F. Primich (MED’99) and Elizabeth Primich Eric L. Putnoi (MED’01) and Deborah Polansky ■  Leon T. Rabinowitz (MED’67, CAS’67) and Lesley Wilson ■  Elvin R. Ramey (MED’78, CAS’78) and Lisa S. Ramey (CAS’76, MED’79) ■  Joel S. Rankin (MED’57) and Verna B. Rankin ■ ■  Ronald J. Rapoport (MED’74) and Jenny M. Rapoport Robert E. Remis and Ruth E. Remis Stella A. Renaker Roger D. Reville (MED’62) and Mary Beth Reville ■  Stephen M. Rich (MED’78) and Esther T. Rich ■  Nancy L. Ricks (SED’67,’74) ■  Michael R. Rifkin (MED’77) and Laura K. Rifkin ■  Kenneth J. Ritter (MED’58) and Lola H. Ritter ■  Patricia L. Roberts (MED’81, CAS’81) and Michael S. Rosenblatt (SPH’89, Questrom’97) ■ ■  Stephanie A. Rodgers ■  Daniel S. Romm (MED’81, CAS’81) and Joyce R. Romm

Michael T. Rosenbaum (MED’78) and Julie A. Arnow ■ ■ ■  Bruce Rosenberg and Jane Rosenberg ■  James W. Rosenberg (MED’68) ■  Gerald Rosenblatt (CAS’53, SED’54, MED’59) and Lorraine M. Rosenblatt ■ ■  Mark C. Rouvalis and Cynthia J. Rouvalis ■  Richard A. Rubenstein (MED’70) and Christina Rubenstein Steven B. Rupp ■  Wayne Rusch and Theresa L. Rusch ■  Vincent J. Russo (MED’64, SPH’83) and Sheila K. Russo ■  Selma H. Rutenburg (CAS’46, MED’49) ■  Peter J. Sapienza (MED’69) and Barbara G. Sapienza ■  Rose A. Sarawgi ■  Lawrence A. Schissel (MED’85) and Mary D. Schissel Todd E. Schlegel and Julia J. Schlegel ■  Victor C. Schlitzer ■  Joel R. Schulman (MED’72) and Joan S. Van Berg (CAS’76) ■  Edward P. Schuman (MED’77, CAS’77) and Amy H. Zucker ■ ■  Joseph F. Seber (MED’78) ■  Srbui Seferian (CAS’96) ■  Peter M. Seymour (MED’81) and Sherry Seymour Jeffrey A. Shane (MED’68, CAS’68) and Roberta H. Shane ■  Richard A. Shapiro and Ruth Shapiro Daniel L. Shaw Leslie M. Shaw Susan M. Shmoys (MED’81, CAS’81) and Gary Rauch ■  Myron A. Shoham (MED’71, CAS’71) and Andrea B. Shoham ■  Alyse B. Sicklick (CAS’84, MED’88) and Jay E. Sicklick ■  Gerard M. Silberman ■  Judith Silver ■  Paul E. Simon (MED’73) and Miriam L. Simon Artemis P. Simopoulos (MED’56) ■ ■  Elinor M. Siner (MED’56) and Joel L. Siner ■  Marie Sisley ■  Kenneth C. Spengler (MED’69) and Ellen D. Spengler ■  Glenn C. Staub (Questrom’87) ■ 

Impact: The Campaign for BU and the School of Medicine

IMPACT BY THE NUMBERS

W

$239.5M Raised

ith your help, the next generation of clinicians, medical leaders, and researchers can join us in turning possibility into reality. There are so many ways to make an impact. You can help students receive a cutting-edge education that will prepare them for rewarding careers and give them the tools and resources they need to become trailblazers in their chosen fields. Or, you can help us support our dedicated faculty, who conduct groundbreaking research while bringing excitement to the classroom. No matter your contribution, you can have a hand in advancing medical education and research. Generous support from alumni, parents, and friends will have an enduring and significant impact on the experience of students, faculty, and researchers at the School of Medicine. Learn more about making your own impact at www.bu.edu/supportingbusm, or contact the BUSM Development Office at 617-638-4570 or busmdev@bu.edu.

Daniel M. Steigman (MED’82) and Deborah S. Steigman Raymond E. Stephens Sally B. Strazdins Carrie D. Stucken (MED’07) and Charlton E. Stucken (MED’07) ■  Carmen S. Suardy and James I. Wasserman ■  Paul A. Sueno (ENG’02, MED’06) ■  Diane M. Sullivan ■  Carter B. Tallman (MED’62) and Sylvia H. Tallman Paul Tannenbaum and Marcey Tannenbaum ■  Andrew L. Taylor (MED’63) and Antoinette R. Taylor ■  Andrew W. Taylor ■ ■  Judith Tolnick Champa Michael P. Tragakis (CAS’62, MED’66) and Starzoula M. Tragakis ■  Joseph R. Tucci (MED’59) and Marjorie Tucci ■ ■  Edward Vaimberg and Mitzi Vaimberg ■ ■  William G. Valenzuela and Celina Valenzuela ■  Judith L. VanZant Vivian A. Virden ■  Andy Volin and Jen Liong ■  Victor A. Wallenkampf and Janet M. Wallenkampf Karen E. Wang (MED’98) and Bryan S. Wang Mary L. Warner and Mark A. Beebe ■ ■ ■  Emily B. Wasserman (MED’11) Laurence M. Weinberg (MED’76) and Deborah W. Weinberg ■  Jerry R. Wexler (MED’71, CAS’71) and Helen H. Wexler (SED’71) ■  Brooks S. White (MED’51) ■  William D. Whitney and Jean Whitney ■  Robert R. Wolff (MED’74) and Susan C. Wolff ■ ■  Benjamin L. Wolozin and Danielle Murstein ■  Lawrence W. Wood (MED’62) and Beverly P. Wood ■  James J. Zerner (GRS’91, MED’95) and Meridan D. Zerner Gordon H. Zuerndorfer (MED’83) and Ellen J. Zuerndorfer ■ ■  John F. Zwetchkenbaum (MED’85) and Kimberly Zwetchkenbaum

An update on the progress of the nine-year, $240 million campaign for BUSM

$200.8M Permanently Restricted $38.7M Current Use 22 Months Remain in the Campaign More than $22.4M Raised for Student Scholarships

$4.5M in School of Medicine Annual Fund Support

2,356 Alumni Participating in Campaign

$135M Raised from

Corporations and Foundations

Figures are as of December 1, 2017. Campaign concludes September 30, 2019.

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

33


Giving

DONOR REPORT

GIFTS FROM THE DEAN’S ADVISORY BOARD, ALUMNI, FACULTY AND STAFF, PARENTS, AND FRIENDS (CONTINUED)

■ President’s Society (AFLGS) Member | ■ Young Alumni Giving Society Member | ■ Faculty/Staff Member | ■ Parent | ■ Three-year Consecutive Giving ■ First-time Donor | ■ Deceased | ■ William Fairfield Warren Society Member

Michael S. Annunziata (MED’66,’66) ■  Nancy E. Anthracite (CAS’72, MED’73) ■  David Atkinson and Francine Atkinson ■ ■  Irwin Avery (MED’66) and Ann A. Avery ■  Stewart F. Babbott (MED’87) and Cecelia Babbott Debra A. Babcock (MED’80) and Mark R. Rosekind Jeffery L. Barker (MED’68) and Marion M. Barker ■  Kathy A. Barker Tamar F. Barlam (SPH’09) ■ ■ ■  Paul F. Barresi (MED’83) and Judy Barresi ■  James J. Heffernan (MED’77, SPH’92) and Mary A. Barry (SPH’88) ■ ■  Jasbir Bedi ■  Edward L. Bedrick (MED’79) and Amy B. Bedrick ■  Barry J. Benjamin (CAS’68, MED’72) and Susan M. Benjamin (CGS’67, SED’69) ■  Jerome F. Bergheim (MED’66) and Diana R. Bergheim (SED’61,’63) ■ ■  Alan D. Berkenwald (MED’78) and Joan Berkenwald ■  Sharon H. Berreby (MED’03) and Patrick Berreby ■  Frederick B. Berrien (MED’68) and Virginia C. Berrien (SON’80) ■  Florencio Berrios Castrodad Shailesh Bhat (MED’95, CAS’95) and Aarti Maskeri ■  Albert J. Birmingham ■  Jared M. Blackman ■  Mary A. Blanchard ■  Charles M. Bliss (MED’63) and Barbara W. Bliss ■ ■  Charles M. Blitzer (MED’79, CAS’79) and Sandy Blitzer ■  Paul J. Block (MED’77) and Lois L. Block (SPH’80) Harold P. Blum (MED’53) and Elsa J. Blum ■  Jules L. Boissonneault and Patricia E. Boissonneault Robert S. Boltax (CAS’59, MED’63) ■  Ronald L. Boucek ■  Francis H. Boudreau (MED’94,’98) Janet L. Boyle David Breen and Katherine Breen ■ ■  Gary R. Briefel (MED’72) and Ellen F. Briefel Jorge A. Brito (MED’81) ■  Adolfo Brizzi and Marie Brizzi Selwyn A. Broitman ■  Andrew E. Budson ■ ■  Wendy O. Buffett (MED’93) and Marc Davis Robert M. Burchuk (MED’82, CAS’82) and Christine Burchuk ■  Robyn K. Burnside ■  William F. Butterfield ■  Michael J. Cahalane (MED’80) and Nancy L. Cahalane ■  Michael J. Canata ■  Katharine Canfield and David C. King ■ ■  Jesse A. Caron (CAS’99, MED’03) and Jessica Alverio-Caron (CAS’00) ■ 

Gordon S. Manning (MED’80, CAS’80) and Karen F. Rothman (MED’81, CAS’81) ■  Peter J. Mannon (MED’83, CAS’83) and Roslyn B. Mannon John R. Marcaccio (MED’64) and Patricia H. Marcaccio ■  Francis G. Martinis (MED’92, CAS’92) and Antonella P. Martinis ■  J. Peter Maselli (MED’60) and Maryann Maselli ■  Richard T. Mason (MED’63) and Vivian Mason ■  Michael A. Mayr (MED’12, SDM’16) Italo C. Mazzarella (MED’56) and Barbara R. Mazzarella ■  Laura J. McCarthy Brian J. McKinnon (MED’90) and Caroline R. McKinnon ■  Shirley A. McMahon (MED’65) and Yesugey Oktay ■  David Mischoulon (MED’94,’94) and Alisabet J. Clain ■  James F. Mitchell (MED’80) ■  Peter J. Mogayzel (MED’90, GRS’90) and Cyndra R. Mogayzel ■  Chester H. Mohr (MED’83) David W. Moore (MED’65) and Jaye Moore ■ ■  E. Blake Moore Gustavo Mostoslavsky ■ ■  Michael S. Murphy (Sargent’87, MED’93) and Lori A. Farnan (MED’95) ■  Allan Myers ■  Arthur L. Naddell (MED’62) and Janet Naddell Janice Nadelhaft ■  Robert M. Najarian (MED’05) and Kristin Kludjian Najarian ■  James D. Nallo and Margaret M. Brady-Nallo ■  Mark H. Nelson (COM’88) and Ruth Gallagher Nelson ■  Victor E. Nerses and Carol A. Huber ■  Kirsten M. Nielsen (MED’04) ■  Clyde A. Niles Betty M. Nobel ■  Ned R. Novsam (CAS’74, MED’79) and Patricia J. Novsam ■ 

32

Boston University School of Medicine

Anthony V. Caruso and Gerianne M. Caruso Robert W. Chamberlain (CAS’72, MED’74) and Patricia A. Chamberlain ■  Louis C. Gerstenfeld (GRS’82) and Nancy L. Chapin (GRS’80, MED’84) ■ ■ ■  Maureen A. Alphonse-Charles (CAS’85) and Jean B. Charles (CAS’81, MED’85) ■  William A. Christmas (MED’65) and Polly Raye ■  Frank L. Christopher (CAS’91, MED’95) and Greer M. Evans-Christopher (Sargent’93,’96) Linda C. Coffman Jerome C. Coger Gary R. Cohen (MED’82) and Cheryl N. Cohen (Questrom’80) ■ ■  Jasminka Colakhodzic Brian I. Collet (MED’80, CAS’80) and Ann I. Collet ■  John T. Collins and Kathleen M. Collins Joseph M. Collins and Ann Marie Collins ■  Patrick H. Collins ■  Bernard M. Cooke (MED’73) and Kiyo Cooke ■  Selma F. Cooperband (SED’54) ■ ■  Ronald E. Coutu (MED’66) and Judith A. Coutu ■  Lorraine M. Curry ■  James E. Dalen Tristram C. Dammin and Beverly H. Dammin Peter J. Deckers (MED’66) and Barbara A. Deckers Mary L. Delaney (MED’86) and Steven Delaney ■  Anthony M. DeLuise (CAS’97, MED’01) and Monica DeLuise Edward C. DePhilippis Keryn M. Dias (MED’91) ■  William G. Dietrich (MED’82, CAS’82) and Regina M. Bielawski ■  Wayne L. Dingwell and Leah E. Dingwell Joseph F. DiTroia (MED’64) and Susan G. DiTroia ■  Mark C. Dmohowski ■  Glenn A. Dobecki Jean M. Doelling (MED’58) and Norman Doelling ■  Jeffery W. Howe and Reva M. Dolobowsky Clare A. Donnelly-Taylor (MED’12) Andrew M. Doolittle (MED’99) and Tove Doolittle ■  Frank A. DuPont (CAS’85, MED’85) and Terese S. DuPont (CAS’82) ■  Davor Dvanajscak ■  Sheryl Egan and Matthew Egan ■ ■  Matthew R. Egyud (MED’08,’13) Guy R. Eigenbrode (LAW’76) and Patricia Nicholas ■  Cynthia C. Espanola (MED’93) and David Walinski ■  Victor Evdokimoff (CGS’64, CAS’66) ■ ■  Leendert J. Faling and Judith R. Faling ■ ■  Ahad A. Fazelat (MED’01,’05, SPH’01) and Joyia E. Fazelat (MED’05) ■  Elizabeth L. Finch and Peter G. Coe ■ ■ 

Daniel R. Fishbein (MED’85, CAS’85) and Ilene M. Schuchman ■  Walter D. Fitzhugh (MED’92) and Mary D. Fitzhugh James D. Fletcher (CAS’86, MED’90) and Robin Fletcher ■  Eliot Foley James T. Ford ■  Giuseppe Francioni Patricia O. Francis (MED’79) and Ronald L. Francis ■  Samuel A. Frank (MED’98) and Jennifer H. Frank Richard D. Frary (MED’56) and Joan S. Frary ■  Marilynn C. Frederiksen (MED’74) and James W. Frederiksen Paul S. Freedberg (MED’74) and Maria S. Freedberg ■  Friends of Michael Gully at Benet Laboratories ■  Bryan D. Fry and Deedra L. Fry ■  Robert S. Galen (MED’70, CAS’70) and Lorilee R. Sandmann ■  Alison Gallup ■  Arvin Garg (MED’99, SPH’99) and Priya S. Garg ■ ■  Steven L. Garner (CAS’81, MED’85) ■  David Garnett Generoso G. Gascon (MED’62) and Susan C. Gascon Sarah J. Gasperini Jon B. Getz (MED’84, CAS’84) and Kelly Beach Andrew J. Ghio (MED’81) and Beth A. Ghio ■  Casimiro Giampaolo and Jo Ellen Mistarz ■  Jeffrey Robbins Goldbarg (MED’74) and Laurie H. Goldbarg Robert N. Golden (MED’79) and Shannon C. Kenney ■  Jianlin Gong and Baizheng Song ■ ■  Edward M. Gosselin (MED’90) and Geri A. Gosselin ■  Steven A. Gould (MED’73) ■  Thomas A. Green Scott Greenbaum (MED’85, CAS’85) and Melissa Greenbaum William G. Griever (MED’88) and Susan Griever ■  Charles F. Grimes (LAW’76) and Patricia B. Grimes ■  Gregg H. Grinspan (MED’79) and Phyllis Grinspan ■  Harvey R. Gross (MED’70) and Beth C. Gross ■  Alan D. Haber (MED’84, CAS’84) and Marian M. Haber ■  Jonathan P. Hains George S. Harlem and Rosina P. Harlem ■  Hollis E. Harrington ■  George A. Hasiotis (MED’65) and Eugenia J. Hasiotis Bartlett H. Hayes (MED’85) and Elizabeth B. Hayes Lynn E. Hendricks Elizabeth L. Hohmann ■ ■  Robin A. Horn (MED’89) and Mark F. Mendell

Bing Hou (ENG’95) and Gui-Hua Zhang ■ ■  Michael A. Husson (MED’80) and Mary L. Todd (MED’81) ■  Robert K. Jackler (MED’79) and Laurie M. Jackler (CGS’74, CAS’76) Charlsie K. James Zhiren Jin and Lily Shao ■ ■  Jerome Johnson Judith A. Johnson ■  Thomas C. Johnston (MED’80, GRS’80) and Elizabeth A. Roche-Johnston ■  Hugh R. Jones Joseph L. Jorizzo (CAS’71, MED’75) and Irene N. Carros ■  David S. Kam (SDM’82, MED’85) and Laura M. Kam ■  Elizabeth Kantor (DGE’69, CAS’71, MED’75) ■  Sandra S. Kaplan (MED’59) David M. Kaufman (MED’75) and Harriet B. Kaufman ■  Patricia L. Kavanagh (Questrom’92, MED’03) ■ ■  David Kawilarang and Rinawati Permana ■ ■  Derek H. Keller (MED’08) and Debbi McInteer ■  Bettina B. Kilburn (MED’82) and Norman W. Kilburn ■  Robert M. Kim (MED’60) and Bette P. Kim ■  Mark Kimble and Kathryn Kimble Marie M. Klossner Richard S. Knorr ■  Ping-Ping Kuang (MED’07) and Bin Liu (MED’97) ■ ■ ■  Neda Laiteerapong (CAS’01, MED’05) and Mark Roberts Corey J. Langer (MED’81, CAS’81) and Mindy R. Langer (MED’81) ■  Alan A. Larocque (ENG’72, GRS’79, MED’80) and Kathleen A. Larocque (CAS’74) ■  Jonathan H. Lass (CAS’72, MED’73) and Leah S. Lass (CFA’71) ■  Robert G. Layton (MED’72) and Judith H. Layton ■  Gail G. Lee (MED’81, CAS’81) Burton L. Lesnick (MED’88, CAS’88) and Lisa J. Kobrynski Veda K. Levin (CAS’69) and David S. Levin ■  Andrew R. Levinsky (COM’83, SED’87) Harold D. Levy (MED’59) and Patricia M. Levy ■  Joshua D. Liberman (MED’00) Holly Lindner ■ ■  Jeffrey Liong and Ria Liong ■  Luisa Longenberger and Henry W. Longenberger ■  Ricardo J. Lopez (CAS’98, MED’02) and Camili Toledo Anthony M. Lore and Heather A. Lore ■  Richard E. Luka (MED’89) and Amy R. Luka ■ ■  David M. Maganza Joshua M. Mammen (CAS’96,’99, MED’99) and Julie Mammen

Brian F. O’Donnell (MED’87) and Olga S. O’Donnell ■  Mary E. O’Donnell ■  Charles C. Paniszyn (MED’80, CAS’80) and Lucy C. Paniszyn (MED’81, CAS’81) ■  Andrew M. Parad (MED’06) and Adrienne L. Parad (MED’07) ■  Karla C. Pastrana (MED’02) and Alvin Pastrana James M. Perlotto (MED’82) and Thomas Masse ■  Steven J. Pike ■  Alexandra I. Pinkerson (MED’96) and Robert O. Leaver ■  Herbert S. Plovnick (CAS’67, MED’71) and Kathleen R. Plovnick (CAS’68, ENG’89) ■  Charles E. Pope and Joanne Pope ■  Lois G. Poucher (SON’69) and John S. Poucher ■  Robert A. Prendergast (MED’57) Frederic F. Primich (MED’57) and Doris Primich ■ ■  James F. Primich (MED’99) and Elizabeth Primich Eric L. Putnoi (MED’01) and Deborah Polansky ■  Leon T. Rabinowitz (MED’67, CAS’67) and Lesley Wilson ■  Elvin R. Ramey (MED’78, CAS’78) and Lisa S. Ramey (CAS’76, MED’79) ■  Joel S. Rankin (MED’57) and Verna B. Rankin ■ ■  Ronald J. Rapoport (MED’74) and Jenny M. Rapoport Robert E. Remis and Ruth E. Remis Stella A. Renaker Roger D. Reville (MED’62) and Mary Beth Reville ■  Stephen M. Rich (MED’78) and Esther T. Rich ■  Nancy L. Ricks (SED’67,’74) ■  Michael R. Rifkin (MED’77) and Laura K. Rifkin ■  Kenneth J. Ritter (MED’58) and Lola H. Ritter ■  Patricia L. Roberts (MED’81, CAS’81) and Michael S. Rosenblatt (SPH’89, Questrom’97) ■ ■  Stephanie A. Rodgers ■  Daniel S. Romm (MED’81, CAS’81) and Joyce R. Romm

Michael T. Rosenbaum (MED’78) and Julie A. Arnow ■ ■ ■  Bruce Rosenberg and Jane Rosenberg ■  James W. Rosenberg (MED’68) ■  Gerald Rosenblatt (CAS’53, SED’54, MED’59) and Lorraine M. Rosenblatt ■ ■  Mark C. Rouvalis and Cynthia J. Rouvalis ■  Richard A. Rubenstein (MED’70) and Christina Rubenstein Steven B. Rupp ■  Wayne Rusch and Theresa L. Rusch ■  Vincent J. Russo (MED’64, SPH’83) and Sheila K. Russo ■  Selma H. Rutenburg (CAS’46, MED’49) ■  Peter J. Sapienza (MED’69) and Barbara G. Sapienza ■  Rose A. Sarawgi ■  Lawrence A. Schissel (MED’85) and Mary D. Schissel Todd E. Schlegel and Julia J. Schlegel ■  Victor C. Schlitzer ■  Joel R. Schulman (MED’72) and Joan S. Van Berg (CAS’76) ■  Edward P. Schuman (MED’77, CAS’77) and Amy H. Zucker ■ ■  Joseph F. Seber (MED’78) ■  Srbui Seferian (CAS’96) ■  Peter M. Seymour (MED’81) and Sherry Seymour Jeffrey A. Shane (MED’68, CAS’68) and Roberta H. Shane ■  Richard A. Shapiro and Ruth Shapiro Daniel L. Shaw Leslie M. Shaw Susan M. Shmoys (MED’81, CAS’81) and Gary Rauch ■  Myron A. Shoham (MED’71, CAS’71) and Andrea B. Shoham ■  Alyse B. Sicklick (CAS’84, MED’88) and Jay E. Sicklick ■  Gerard M. Silberman ■  Judith Silver ■  Paul E. Simon (MED’73) and Miriam L. Simon Artemis P. Simopoulos (MED’56) ■ ■  Elinor M. Siner (MED’56) and Joel L. Siner ■  Marie Sisley ■  Kenneth C. Spengler (MED’69) and Ellen D. Spengler ■  Glenn C. Staub (Questrom’87) ■ 

Impact: The Campaign for BU and the School of Medicine

IMPACT BY THE NUMBERS

W

$239.5M Raised

ith your help, the next generation of clinicians, medical leaders, and researchers can join us in turning possibility into reality. There are so many ways to make an impact. You can help students receive a cutting-edge education that will prepare them for rewarding careers and give them the tools and resources they need to become trailblazers in their chosen fields. Or, you can help us support our dedicated faculty, who conduct groundbreaking research while bringing excitement to the classroom. No matter your contribution, you can have a hand in advancing medical education and research. Generous support from alumni, parents, and friends will have an enduring and significant impact on the experience of students, faculty, and researchers at the School of Medicine. Learn more about making your own impact at www.bu.edu/supportingbusm, or contact the BUSM Development Office at 617-638-4570 or busmdev@bu.edu.

Daniel M. Steigman (MED’82) and Deborah S. Steigman Raymond E. Stephens Sally B. Strazdins Carrie D. Stucken (MED’07) and Charlton E. Stucken (MED’07) ■  Carmen S. Suardy and James I. Wasserman ■  Paul A. Sueno (ENG’02, MED’06) ■  Diane M. Sullivan ■  Carter B. Tallman (MED’62) and Sylvia H. Tallman Paul Tannenbaum and Marcey Tannenbaum ■  Andrew L. Taylor (MED’63) and Antoinette R. Taylor ■  Andrew W. Taylor ■ ■  Judith Tolnick Champa Michael P. Tragakis (CAS’62, MED’66) and Starzoula M. Tragakis ■  Joseph R. Tucci (MED’59) and Marjorie Tucci ■ ■  Edward Vaimberg and Mitzi Vaimberg ■ ■  William G. Valenzuela and Celina Valenzuela ■  Judith L. VanZant Vivian A. Virden ■  Andy Volin and Jen Liong ■  Victor A. Wallenkampf and Janet M. Wallenkampf Karen E. Wang (MED’98) and Bryan S. Wang Mary L. Warner and Mark A. Beebe ■ ■ ■  Emily B. Wasserman (MED’11) Laurence M. Weinberg (MED’76) and Deborah W. Weinberg ■  Jerry R. Wexler (MED’71, CAS’71) and Helen H. Wexler (SED’71) ■  Brooks S. White (MED’51) ■  William D. Whitney and Jean Whitney ■  Robert R. Wolff (MED’74) and Susan C. Wolff ■ ■  Benjamin L. Wolozin and Danielle Murstein ■  Lawrence W. Wood (MED’62) and Beverly P. Wood ■  James J. Zerner (GRS’91, MED’95) and Meridan D. Zerner Gordon H. Zuerndorfer (MED’83) and Ellen J. Zuerndorfer ■ ■  John F. Zwetchkenbaum (MED’85) and Kimberly Zwetchkenbaum

An update on the progress of the nine-year, $240 million campaign for BUSM

$200.8M Permanently Restricted $38.7M Current Use 22 Months Remain in the Campaign More than $22.4M Raised for Student Scholarships

$4.5M in School of Medicine Annual Fund Support

2,356 Alumni Participating in Campaign

$135M Raised from

Corporations and Foundations

Figures are as of December 1, 2017. Campaign concludes September 30, 2019.

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

33


Giving

DONOR REPORT

THE FOLLOWING CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS, AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS GAVE TO BUSM FROM JULY 1, 2016, TO JUNE 30, 2017.

$1M–$4.9M

American Heart Association Evans Medical Foundation, Inc. Karp Family Foundation National Football League National Institutes of Health Pfizer, Inc. RespiVert Ltd.

$500,000–$999,999

Anonymous Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Ortho-McNeil Janssen Pharmaceutical, Inc.

$250,000–$499,999

AbbVie, Inc. Alzheimer’s Association American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Atlantic Philanthropies, Inc. Becton Dickinson & Company Bob Woodruff Foundation BrightFocus Foundation Crown Family Foundation Cure Alzheimer’s Fund Dairy Management, Inc. Edward N. & Della L. Thome Memorial Foundation Genentech, Inc. The Louis E. Wolfson Foundation McNeil Consumer Pharmaceuticals The Nooril-Iman Charitable Foundation, Inc. Ono Pharmaceutical Company Paul G. Allen Family Foundation Predictius Bioscience The Shipley Foundation St. Baldrick’s Foundation W. K. Kellogg Foundation Walmart Foundation The William Wood Foundation

$100,000–$249,999

Alpha-1 Foundation Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation American Cancer Society American Diabetes Association American Parkinson Disease Association BELLUS Health Inc. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation CHDI Foundation Concussion Legacy Foundation Cystic Fibrosis Foundation The Ellison Foundation The Hartwell Foundation J. T. Tai & Co. Foundation, Inc. John Templeton Foundation Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Kaiser Permanente Landreth Family Foundation LUNGevity Foundation Mass Lions Eye Research Fund Massachusetts General Hospital The Medical Foundation Melanoma Research Alliance Nancy Lurie Marks Family Foundation New Hampshire Charitable Foundation

34

Boston University School of Medicine

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Pure North Richard and Susan Smith Family Foundation Scleroderma Foundation Searle Foundation Susan G. Komen for the Cure The Wildflower Foundation, Inc. Zoetis, Inc.

$50,000–$99,999

Alios Biopharma, Inc. Allergan Sales Inc. The Alpert Family Foundation AMAG Pharmaceuticals American Academy of Asthma & Immunology American College of Rheumatology Research and Education Foundation American College of Surgeons Chaikin-Wile Foundation Charles Schwab Corporation CurePSP Echosens Edward Mallinckrodt, Jr. Foundation Elliott M. and Karen H. Antman Trust Gladys Brooks Foundation GlaxoSmithKline Global Health Through Education, Training and Service Harrington Discovery Institute Lahey Hospital March of Dimes National Foundation Mary Kay Foundation Melanoma Research Foundation Merck & Co., Inc. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Phoenicia Biosciences, Inc. Societe Francophone du Diabete SQM North America Corporation Sullivan Family Foundation, Inc. The Wellcome Trust

$25,000–$49,999

American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists American Egg Board American Friends of The Hebrew University, Inc. Association Francaise Contre les Myopathies Boston Medical Center Bournewood Hospital Brigham & Women’s Hospital Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust Cyprotex US, LLC Dairy Research Institute Foundation for the National Institutes of Health FSH Society George T. Wilkinson, Inc. Katsaros Family Foundation Lee & Rachelle Silver Family Trust Merck, Sharp & Dohme Corp. Newton Family Fund Ounsworth-Fitzgerald Foundation

Pharmaxis Ltd Schlumberger Foundation, Inc. Sherry and Alan Leventhal Family Foundation Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation Steven & Jacqueline Miller Family Foundation

$10,000–$24,999

Anonymous Aethlon Medical, Inc. Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer Art Because Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc. Autism Research Institute Biogen, Inc. Cami Foundation, Inc. Cepheid The Critelli Family Foundation Foundation for Neurologic Diseases GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Global Health Through Education Training & Service Icahn School of Medicine-Mount Sinai Ina & Lewis Heafitz Charitable Foundation The Lew Family Trust Manan Trust Morgan Stanley Global Impact Funding Trust, Inc. MPN Research Foundation NE Corneal Transplant Fund Novogen Quigley and Heffernan Family Charitable Trust Randy and Donna Friedman Charitable Fund Renaissance Charitable Foundation, Inc. Schwab Charitable Fund Senior Living Residences, LLC Shin Kong Life Foundation Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited Takeda Vaccines, Inc. University of Haifa William E. Cross Foundation, Inc. Wolters Kluwer Health

$5,000–$9,999

Abraham Kaplan Charitable Foundation American Skin Association American Society of Scleroderma Research, Inc. Best Automatic Sprinkler Corporation The Boston Foundation Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Dominick & Rose Ciampa Foundation, Inc. Edward Taylor Coombs Foundation FJC Haynes Family Foundation Jean Rothbaum Trust Kanae Foundation for the Promotion of Medical Science Karin Grunebaum Cancer Research Foundation Malin Family Foundation

Peak Woo, MD, PLLC The Paul E. Singer Foundation Solar D-Next Generation Sunscreen The Community Foundation of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County Third Generation Enterprises, LLC V Foundation for Cancer Research W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Zeisler & Zeisler, P.C.

$2,500–$4,999

6 Degrees Group Aid for Cancer Research American Plumbing & Heating Corporation American Society of Hematology Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, LLC Brigham & Women’s Hospital The Irving T. Bush Foundation, Inc. The Barbara E. Edelin Living Trust Friends of the Framingham Heart Study Gordon Foundation, Inc. Herff Jones, LLC Jones Lang LaSalle Americas, Inc. Nassau Wings Motor Cycle Club, Inc. The O’Connell Family Foundation, Inc. Peter C. Kelly Trust Rubin and Rudman, LLP Technosystems Service Corporation Timmons Team Alzheimer’s Run Vanguard Charitable

$1,000–$2,499

Albert B. Kahn Foundation All-Star Pest Services, LLC Annetta K. Weaver Living Trust Barbara P. Shineman Revocable Trust Brown Eye Care Associates, M.D., P.A. Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America Cross Current Research, LLC Curriculum Associates, LLC DeSales Media Group, Inc. Faculty Practice Foundation, Inc. Foster Victor Wealth Advisors, LLC Helen S. Ratner Trust Inland Northwest Community Foundation Maine Community Foundation Mt. Sinai School of Medicine Oak Bluffs Christian Union, Inc. Otis Elevator Company Peter Mac, LLC Plymouth Bay Internal Medicine Richard S. Shineman Foundation Rich’s Carpet and Flooring RNA Society Roger M. Epstein Revocable Trust Ronald L. Katz Family Foundation Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium Stop Concussions USA Tree Technology & Landscape Co., Inc. Victor I. Hochberg Living Trust

GIFTS CONTINUED

$500–$999

BU Medical Center Anesthesiologists, Inc. Chapman Construction/Design Company Exposure Scientific, LLC Faye Lee, M.D., A. M. C. Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians Horizon Pediatrics, Inc. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. JP Electric Michael H. Wilensky M.D., LLP The Nolan Family Trust Seasons of Danvers United Way of Central New Mexico

$250–$499

ADB-1 Properties, LLC Boston Properties Cape Cod Health Care Care.com Gardner Business Media, Inc. Gilmore Painting Co. Hollis E. Harrington, Jr. Trust Inquirers Class Joseph F. Seber, M.D., P.A. Kemco Floors, LLC Kenneth J. Ritter MD, PLLC Keurig Canada Inc. Lincoln Psychiatric Services, Inc. Mary E. O’Donnell Rev. Liv Tr Orleans Council on Aging Town of Orleans

$1–$249

A3 Merchandise, LLC The Irving and Betty Allen Living Trust Alma Nove AMVETS Ladies Auxiliary, 79 Anne P. Iverson Revocable Trust Archbishop Williams High School, Inc. Arthur I. Segel 1994 Trust Barton & Loguidice, D.P.C. The Benevity Community Impact Fund The Diane Marie Bitter Trust Blackstone-Millville Regional School District Educator’s Association Blackstone-Millville Support Personal Association Boston Latin School Butter Nut Cove Campbell Campbell Edwards & Conroy PC Cape Cod Five Trust and Asset Management Cape Cod Package Store, Inc. CDN Insurance Brokerage Commonweatlh of Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game Couch Holdings, LLC CWB Contractors, Inc. D & L Engineering Sales Limited David D. Corbett Revocable Trust David O. Whittemore Trust Davis & Dold Dental, LLC Dennis B. Lind, M.D. The Doolan Family Trust Framingham Teachers Association

Garden City Neurology, Ltd. GK Dermatology, PC Hartselle High School Herbert White Revocable Trust Horizon Home Care IBEW Local Union 97 Irving and Marilyn Jeris Living Trust Jackson Family Trust Jane B. Allen Trust Agreement John M. Nigro, M.D. Family Trust John N. Goldman and Margaret B. Goldman Trust Kienholz Family Revocable Trust The Kiwanis Club of Riverfront Kosek Family Trust Laird Plastics The L’Heureux Family Trust M.D.M. Realty Inc. Margaret J. Connors Revocable Trust Mary Hankins and Thomas Boyton Trust McConnell Family Trust Monroe County Counselors Association Municipality of the County of Kings Murphy & King, P.C. New Hampshire Federal Credit Union Nova Scotia Executive Committee Canadian Bar Association Old Man Maple Oriental Order of Groundhogs P & E Davidian Rev. Trust P&S Milsky Nominee Trust Parody Tease, LLC Paul Anthony Ltd.

Paul C. Hayden Jr. & Sons Plumbing & Heating, Inc. Pepco PGA Realty Company, LLC Phoebe A. Chardon Revocable Trust Phoebe A S Markey Revocable Trust RAE Chiropractic, LLC Richard S. Greene, M.D., P.A. Rochester Area Community Foundation Rotary Club of Bedford Samuel F. McCormack Company, Inc. SCM Group North America Southboro Adult Hockey League Springhill Institution Stax, Inc. Stello Construction Enterprises, Inc. Szmuc/Markwalder Revocable Trust Targovnik Family Foundation Temple Sinai of Palm Beach County Tracey L. Gosselin Trust United Way of the National Capital Area Uxbridge Teachers Association Vincent D. Dinick, D.M.D., M.D., PC Wagner Nurses & MPA, Inc. Windsor Mountain International Summer Camp Yeung Family Trust Your Encore

MATCHING GIFT CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS, COMPANIES, AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AXA Foundation Bank of America, N.A. Brown Capital Management, LLC Citizens Banking Corporation

MasterCard International, Inc. Pfizer, Inc. Philips Electronics North America Corporation Procter & Gamble

Fidelity Investments

S&P Global

General Electric Company

Stanley Black & Decker

Google, Inc. IBM Johnson & Johnson

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

35


Giving

DONOR REPORT

THE FOLLOWING CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS, AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS GAVE TO BUSM FROM JULY 1, 2016, TO JUNE 30, 2017.

$1M–$4.9M

American Heart Association Evans Medical Foundation, Inc. Karp Family Foundation National Football League National Institutes of Health Pfizer, Inc. RespiVert Ltd.

$500,000–$999,999

Anonymous Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Ortho-McNeil Janssen Pharmaceutical, Inc.

$250,000–$499,999

AbbVie, Inc. Alzheimer’s Association American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology Atlantic Philanthropies, Inc. Becton Dickinson & Company Bob Woodruff Foundation BrightFocus Foundation Crown Family Foundation Cure Alzheimer’s Fund Dairy Management, Inc. Edward N. & Della L. Thome Memorial Foundation Genentech, Inc. The Louis E. Wolfson Foundation McNeil Consumer Pharmaceuticals The Nooril-Iman Charitable Foundation, Inc. Ono Pharmaceutical Company Paul G. Allen Family Foundation Predictius Bioscience The Shipley Foundation St. Baldrick’s Foundation W. K. Kellogg Foundation Walmart Foundation The William Wood Foundation

$100,000–$249,999

Alpha-1 Foundation Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation American Cancer Society American Diabetes Association American Parkinson Disease Association BELLUS Health Inc. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation CHDI Foundation Concussion Legacy Foundation Cystic Fibrosis Foundation The Ellison Foundation The Hartwell Foundation J. T. Tai & Co. Foundation, Inc. John Templeton Foundation Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Kaiser Permanente Landreth Family Foundation LUNGevity Foundation Mass Lions Eye Research Fund Massachusetts General Hospital The Medical Foundation Melanoma Research Alliance Nancy Lurie Marks Family Foundation New Hampshire Charitable Foundation

34

Boston University School of Medicine

Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Pure North Richard and Susan Smith Family Foundation Scleroderma Foundation Searle Foundation Susan G. Komen for the Cure The Wildflower Foundation, Inc. Zoetis, Inc.

$50,000–$99,999

Alios Biopharma, Inc. Allergan Sales Inc. The Alpert Family Foundation AMAG Pharmaceuticals American Academy of Asthma & Immunology American College of Rheumatology Research and Education Foundation American College of Surgeons Chaikin-Wile Foundation Charles Schwab Corporation CurePSP Echosens Edward Mallinckrodt, Jr. Foundation Elliott M. and Karen H. Antman Trust Gladys Brooks Foundation GlaxoSmithKline Global Health Through Education, Training and Service Harrington Discovery Institute Lahey Hospital March of Dimes National Foundation Mary Kay Foundation Melanoma Research Foundation Merck & Co., Inc. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Phoenicia Biosciences, Inc. Societe Francophone du Diabete SQM North America Corporation Sullivan Family Foundation, Inc. The Wellcome Trust

$25,000–$49,999

American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists American Egg Board American Friends of The Hebrew University, Inc. Association Francaise Contre les Myopathies Boston Medical Center Bournewood Hospital Brigham & Women’s Hospital Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust Cyprotex US, LLC Dairy Research Institute Foundation for the National Institutes of Health FSH Society George T. Wilkinson, Inc. Katsaros Family Foundation Lee & Rachelle Silver Family Trust Merck, Sharp & Dohme Corp. Newton Family Fund Ounsworth-Fitzgerald Foundation

Pharmaxis Ltd Schlumberger Foundation, Inc. Sherry and Alan Leventhal Family Foundation Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation Steven & Jacqueline Miller Family Foundation

$10,000–$24,999

Anonymous Aethlon Medical, Inc. Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer Art Because Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc. Autism Research Institute Biogen, Inc. Cami Foundation, Inc. Cepheid The Critelli Family Foundation Foundation for Neurologic Diseases GlaxoSmithKline Foundation Global Health Through Education Training & Service Icahn School of Medicine-Mount Sinai Ina & Lewis Heafitz Charitable Foundation The Lew Family Trust Manan Trust Morgan Stanley Global Impact Funding Trust, Inc. MPN Research Foundation NE Corneal Transplant Fund Novogen Quigley and Heffernan Family Charitable Trust Randy and Donna Friedman Charitable Fund Renaissance Charitable Foundation, Inc. Schwab Charitable Fund Senior Living Residences, LLC Shin Kong Life Foundation Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited Takeda Vaccines, Inc. University of Haifa William E. Cross Foundation, Inc. Wolters Kluwer Health

$5,000–$9,999

Abraham Kaplan Charitable Foundation American Skin Association American Society of Scleroderma Research, Inc. Best Automatic Sprinkler Corporation The Boston Foundation Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Dominick & Rose Ciampa Foundation, Inc. Edward Taylor Coombs Foundation FJC Haynes Family Foundation Jean Rothbaum Trust Kanae Foundation for the Promotion of Medical Science Karin Grunebaum Cancer Research Foundation Malin Family Foundation

Peak Woo, MD, PLLC The Paul E. Singer Foundation Solar D-Next Generation Sunscreen The Community Foundation of Harrisonburg and Rockingham County Third Generation Enterprises, LLC V Foundation for Cancer Research W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Zeisler & Zeisler, P.C.

$2,500–$4,999

6 Degrees Group Aid for Cancer Research American Plumbing & Heating Corporation American Society of Hematology Barnes & Noble College Booksellers, LLC Brigham & Women’s Hospital The Irving T. Bush Foundation, Inc. The Barbara E. Edelin Living Trust Friends of the Framingham Heart Study Gordon Foundation, Inc. Herff Jones, LLC Jones Lang LaSalle Americas, Inc. Nassau Wings Motor Cycle Club, Inc. The O’Connell Family Foundation, Inc. Peter C. Kelly Trust Rubin and Rudman, LLP Technosystems Service Corporation Timmons Team Alzheimer’s Run Vanguard Charitable

$1,000–$2,499

Albert B. Kahn Foundation All-Star Pest Services, LLC Annetta K. Weaver Living Trust Barbara P. Shineman Revocable Trust Brown Eye Care Associates, M.D., P.A. Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America Cross Current Research, LLC Curriculum Associates, LLC DeSales Media Group, Inc. Faculty Practice Foundation, Inc. Foster Victor Wealth Advisors, LLC Helen S. Ratner Trust Inland Northwest Community Foundation Maine Community Foundation Mt. Sinai School of Medicine Oak Bluffs Christian Union, Inc. Otis Elevator Company Peter Mac, LLC Plymouth Bay Internal Medicine Richard S. Shineman Foundation Rich’s Carpet and Flooring RNA Society Roger M. Epstein Revocable Trust Ronald L. Katz Family Foundation Scleroderma Clinical Trials Consortium Stop Concussions USA Tree Technology & Landscape Co., Inc. Victor I. Hochberg Living Trust

GIFTS CONTINUED

$500–$999

BU Medical Center Anesthesiologists, Inc. Chapman Construction/Design Company Exposure Scientific, LLC Faye Lee, M.D., A. M. C. Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians Horizon Pediatrics, Inc. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. JP Electric Michael H. Wilensky M.D., LLP The Nolan Family Trust Seasons of Danvers United Way of Central New Mexico

$250–$499

ADB-1 Properties, LLC Boston Properties Cape Cod Health Care Care.com Gardner Business Media, Inc. Gilmore Painting Co. Hollis E. Harrington, Jr. Trust Inquirers Class Joseph F. Seber, M.D., P.A. Kemco Floors, LLC Kenneth J. Ritter MD, PLLC Keurig Canada Inc. Lincoln Psychiatric Services, Inc. Mary E. O’Donnell Rev. Liv Tr Orleans Council on Aging Town of Orleans

$1–$249

A3 Merchandise, LLC The Irving and Betty Allen Living Trust Alma Nove AMVETS Ladies Auxiliary, 79 Anne P. Iverson Revocable Trust Archbishop Williams High School, Inc. Arthur I. Segel 1994 Trust Barton & Loguidice, D.P.C. The Benevity Community Impact Fund The Diane Marie Bitter Trust Blackstone-Millville Regional School District Educator’s Association Blackstone-Millville Support Personal Association Boston Latin School Butter Nut Cove Campbell Campbell Edwards & Conroy PC Cape Cod Five Trust and Asset Management Cape Cod Package Store, Inc. CDN Insurance Brokerage Commonweatlh of Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game Couch Holdings, LLC CWB Contractors, Inc. D & L Engineering Sales Limited David D. Corbett Revocable Trust David O. Whittemore Trust Davis & Dold Dental, LLC Dennis B. Lind, M.D. The Doolan Family Trust Framingham Teachers Association

Garden City Neurology, Ltd. GK Dermatology, PC Hartselle High School Herbert White Revocable Trust Horizon Home Care IBEW Local Union 97 Irving and Marilyn Jeris Living Trust Jackson Family Trust Jane B. Allen Trust Agreement John M. Nigro, M.D. Family Trust John N. Goldman and Margaret B. Goldman Trust Kienholz Family Revocable Trust The Kiwanis Club of Riverfront Kosek Family Trust Laird Plastics The L’Heureux Family Trust M.D.M. Realty Inc. Margaret J. Connors Revocable Trust Mary Hankins and Thomas Boyton Trust McConnell Family Trust Monroe County Counselors Association Municipality of the County of Kings Murphy & King, P.C. New Hampshire Federal Credit Union Nova Scotia Executive Committee Canadian Bar Association Old Man Maple Oriental Order of Groundhogs P & E Davidian Rev. Trust P&S Milsky Nominee Trust Parody Tease, LLC Paul Anthony Ltd.

Paul C. Hayden Jr. & Sons Plumbing & Heating, Inc. Pepco PGA Realty Company, LLC Phoebe A. Chardon Revocable Trust Phoebe A S Markey Revocable Trust RAE Chiropractic, LLC Richard S. Greene, M.D., P.A. Rochester Area Community Foundation Rotary Club of Bedford Samuel F. McCormack Company, Inc. SCM Group North America Southboro Adult Hockey League Springhill Institution Stax, Inc. Stello Construction Enterprises, Inc. Szmuc/Markwalder Revocable Trust Targovnik Family Foundation Temple Sinai of Palm Beach County Tracey L. Gosselin Trust United Way of the National Capital Area Uxbridge Teachers Association Vincent D. Dinick, D.M.D., M.D., PC Wagner Nurses & MPA, Inc. Windsor Mountain International Summer Camp Yeung Family Trust Your Encore

MATCHING GIFT CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS, COMPANIES, AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AXA Foundation Bank of America, N.A. Brown Capital Management, LLC Citizens Banking Corporation

MasterCard International, Inc. Pfizer, Inc. Philips Electronics North America Corporation Procter & Gamble

Fidelity Investments

S&P Global

General Electric Company

Stanley Black & Decker

Google, Inc. IBM Johnson & Johnson

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

35


Alumni

CONTACT US Facebook “f ” Logo

NEWS

alumbusm@bu.edu

CLASS NOTES

1953

1964

Frank I. Marcus of Tucson, Arizona, writes, “I continue to be an active member of the cardiology section of the university and a principal investigator on an NIH grant to study a genetic disease, right ventricular cardiomyopathy. I do other research as well as participate in clinical activities.”

Lawrence A. Yannuzzi of New York, New York, writes, “More than 50 years have passed since graduation in 1964. Over 600 clinical/scientific papers, 14 books, and numerous awards in ophthalmology (retinal) have been mixed in with patient care (macular disease), training retinal fellows, research, and my expanding family (eight grandchildren). I cherish my education at BUSM and fondly recall all of my distinguished classmates and friends.”

1959 Richard I. Basch of Sarasota, Florida, writes, “I have retired from the practice of diagnostic interventional radiology after 51 years. Since becoming very active at the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, I have been a trustee there for the last decade. We have sponsored a fine arts building and I have been awarded an honorary doctor of arts degree. I am dodging hurricanes at present and hope to enjoy our collection of studio art glass for a good while longer.”

1962 Gerald W. Hazard of Barnstable, Massachusetts, writes, “My wife Anne and I became great-grandparents thanks to our oldest granddaughter Jen!”

1969 Jerilynn C. Prior of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, writes, “At 74, I’m working as a professor (medicine/endocrinology) full time at the University of British Columbia; I continue to rise to the (many) challenges of innovative research and to learn. This past May, we celebrated the 15th anniversary of The Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research (www.cemcor.ca), a research and knowledge translation collaborator which I founded in 2002 ‘to reframe scientific knowledge of the menstrual cycle and ovulation in a woman-centered context.’ During this event, I gave a ‘TED-type’ talk on the ‘Preventive Powers of Progesterone.’ Our website, primarily aimed to inform and empower women (with additional information for

healthcare providers and researchers), now receives between 3,500 and 7,000 pageviews a day from more than 180 countries. In May 2019, I’m hoping to celebrate our 50th BUSM reunion with my classmates in Boston. Cheers!”

1971 Peter M. Taft of La Mesa, California, writes, “After I graduated from Boston University School of Medicine in June 1971, Thayer, my wife of 2 years, and I drove cross-country to San Diego, where I began a surgical internship at the UC San Diego Medical Center. After that, we took a two-year detour to Morocco, where I was the sole MD at Naval Communications Station, Sidi Yahia (a base of 1,800 people). As head of the medical department there, I supervised 10-plus corpsmen. Our oldest son was born in Morocco, and we returned to San Diego in 1974. I completed my general surgical training in 1979, and then joined the San Diego Kaiser Permanente (KP) Department of Surgery. Along the way, we had a second son. In 1986, I became chief of surgery and served three 6-year terms, during which time I hired the majority of our department surgeons. My own mixed GS/VS practice evolved, and in my later years I practiced only vascular surgery. I

Alumni in Print The book also emphasizes the need for Automated External Defibrillators in all public buildings

36

Boston University School of Medicine

If you have news, announcements, or creative works you’d like to share with your fellow alumni, please write to the BUSM Alumni Association at 72 E. Concord Street, L120, Boston, MA 02118 or email alumbusm@bu.edu.

also was the San Diego KP lead physician for implementing our ambulatory and inpatient electronic medical record, KP HealthConnect. I retired in 2010 but continued to do some ambulatory vascular surgery and work with our Regional HealthConnect team until 2015. Now we are fully retired, our sons are both married, and we have two lovely granddaughters nearby in San Diego. Thayer and I spend most of our time with family and travels. I continue to enjoy my hobby of landscape and family photography.”

1972 Robert I. Friedman of Lakeville, Massachusetts, writes, “After practicing primary care internal medicine on my own for 34 years, I joined a large medical group. That did not work out and I partially retired, but have had several jobs since then; I was a Medicare reviewer (I made about 800 house calls over a year and a half) and provided primary care in a Plymouth prison for 16 months. Now I am providing medical care for psychiatric patients in Middleboro and work in a substance abuse clinic, where I really enjoy helping my patients. I work about 20 hours per week and have plenty of time for our grandchildren and for cycling, among other things.” Russel M. Jaffe of Ashburn, Virginia, writes, “I continue to learn, grow, and unfold the next generation of clinical insights into personalized proactive predictive primary prevention practices, including a validated health appraisal questionnaire and evidence-based best outcome goal values.”

1974 Clear! Living the Life You Didn’t Dream Of Herman J. Williams, MD (MED’88)

that he could no longer pursue his lifelong dream of becoming a surgeon.

Williams chronicles his near-death experience from cardiac arrest when he was a young medical resident and his struggle to overcome sudden physical limitations, while also coming to grips with the realization

The book also emphasizes the need for Automated External Defibrillators in all public buildings as well as the lifesaving impact of implanted defibrillators.

Thomas R. Insel of Pleasanton, California, writes, “I retired from NIH after 30 years of public service to start a new life in Silicon Valley. I launched Mindstrong Health a few months ago to develop tools for digital mental health. Best part is that my two children, five grandchildren, and Deb—my partner for nearly 50 years—are along for the ride. Love living in California, 2,850 miles from the Beltway.”

Mark S. Moskowitz of Gastonia, North Carolina, writes, “I transitioned out of fulltime surgery practice in 2012 and retired fully this year. Immersed in automotive activities, I am vice chairman on the board of directors of the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America and also serve on the board of directors of Carolina Motorsports Park. I frequently act as a Concours d’ Elegance judge in North America and Europe and write regularly for Sports Car Market, American Car Collector and Hagerty Online. My new car reviews can be found at ConceptCarz.com.” Robert R. Wolff of Boston, Massachusetts, writes, “I am an attending child neurologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, where I teach residents and medical students. I was delighted when, a few months ago, fourth-year BUSM student Deena Godfrey was assigned to me on the inpatient consult service. She did an outstanding job and reinforced my faith in the excellent quality of the education our current students receive at our alma mater.”

1976 Mark S. Goulston of Los Angeles, California, writes, “My book, Just Listen, has become the top book on listening in the world. I am speaking globally on becoming a better listener to improve communication and cooperation, including training the Russian Federation in Moscow. On another note, I also host Prison Letters with Dr. Mark Goulston, an iTunes podcast.”

1978 Lillian E. Cohn of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, writes, “Thirty-nine years out and still going strong! I continue to enjoy primary care in center city Philadelphia and have been working with MDVIP now for seven-plus years. It’s been a great transition to a saner model of primary care, benefitting both my patients and me—I love practicing medicine this way. Kids are all grown up and now getting married; hope one day to have grandchildren rather than just grandcats.”

BUSM Alumni Association on Facebook CMYK / .eps

Facebook “f ” Logo

CMYK / .eps

facebook.com/alumBUSM

1981 Robert M. Lincer of Stamford, Connecticut, writes, “During many wonderful years in private practice in surgical oncology and trauma and acute care surgery, I had always been involved in surgical education and administration and with such dramatic changes in the healthcare landscape, it seemed like the right time to focus more on these areas. So in 2011, I went back to school and received an MBA in Healthcare Leadership from Yale School of Management in 2013. Definitely a different experience being back in school with kids almost as young as my children. I am now chair of surgery at Berkshire Health System in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and a clinical instructor in surgery at BUSM. We have medical and PA students rotating on surgery, medicine, and psych, and I regularly hear how the BU students stand out and are clearly well trained, which is great! It feels good to come full circle and be ‘back’ at BUSM!”

1982 Mimi I. Peak of Newport News, Virginia, writes, “Greetings! I had a great time at our 35th reunion in 2017 and hope to see you all at our 40th! I am enjoying my military retirement after 30 years as a flight surgeon for the Air Force, and have a small solo aerospace medicine practice in town. This year, my husband and I walked the Camino de Santiago (The Way) from Sarria to celebrate our lives and give thanks. Our oldest son Matthew graduated from Virginia Tech, got married, and is working at NASA; younger son Garrett is a senior at Randolph Macon College and applying to medical schools. Love to all and God bless.”

1983 David L. Walton of San Francisco, California, writes, “After 25-plus years of maternal-fetal medicine at Kaiser Oakland, I retired in January (I’m a little embarrassed to think I may be the first in my class to post a retirement in the class notes!). I have done a lot of backcountry skiing with one-way tickets to British Columbia

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

37


Alumni

CONTACT US Facebook “f ” Logo

NEWS

alumbusm@bu.edu

CLASS NOTES

1953

1964

Frank I. Marcus of Tucson, Arizona, writes, “I continue to be an active member of the cardiology section of the university and a principal investigator on an NIH grant to study a genetic disease, right ventricular cardiomyopathy. I do other research as well as participate in clinical activities.”

Lawrence A. Yannuzzi of New York, New York, writes, “More than 50 years have passed since graduation in 1964. Over 600 clinical/scientific papers, 14 books, and numerous awards in ophthalmology (retinal) have been mixed in with patient care (macular disease), training retinal fellows, research, and my expanding family (eight grandchildren). I cherish my education at BUSM and fondly recall all of my distinguished classmates and friends.”

1959 Richard I. Basch of Sarasota, Florida, writes, “I have retired from the practice of diagnostic interventional radiology after 51 years. Since becoming very active at the Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, I have been a trustee there for the last decade. We have sponsored a fine arts building and I have been awarded an honorary doctor of arts degree. I am dodging hurricanes at present and hope to enjoy our collection of studio art glass for a good while longer.”

1962 Gerald W. Hazard of Barnstable, Massachusetts, writes, “My wife Anne and I became great-grandparents thanks to our oldest granddaughter Jen!”

1969 Jerilynn C. Prior of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, writes, “At 74, I’m working as a professor (medicine/endocrinology) full time at the University of British Columbia; I continue to rise to the (many) challenges of innovative research and to learn. This past May, we celebrated the 15th anniversary of The Centre for Menstrual Cycle and Ovulation Research (www.cemcor.ca), a research and knowledge translation collaborator which I founded in 2002 ‘to reframe scientific knowledge of the menstrual cycle and ovulation in a woman-centered context.’ During this event, I gave a ‘TED-type’ talk on the ‘Preventive Powers of Progesterone.’ Our website, primarily aimed to inform and empower women (with additional information for

healthcare providers and researchers), now receives between 3,500 and 7,000 pageviews a day from more than 180 countries. In May 2019, I’m hoping to celebrate our 50th BUSM reunion with my classmates in Boston. Cheers!”

1971 Peter M. Taft of La Mesa, California, writes, “After I graduated from Boston University School of Medicine in June 1971, Thayer, my wife of 2 years, and I drove cross-country to San Diego, where I began a surgical internship at the UC San Diego Medical Center. After that, we took a two-year detour to Morocco, where I was the sole MD at Naval Communications Station, Sidi Yahia (a base of 1,800 people). As head of the medical department there, I supervised 10-plus corpsmen. Our oldest son was born in Morocco, and we returned to San Diego in 1974. I completed my general surgical training in 1979, and then joined the San Diego Kaiser Permanente (KP) Department of Surgery. Along the way, we had a second son. In 1986, I became chief of surgery and served three 6-year terms, during which time I hired the majority of our department surgeons. My own mixed GS/VS practice evolved, and in my later years I practiced only vascular surgery. I

Alumni in Print The book also emphasizes the need for Automated External Defibrillators in all public buildings

36

Boston University School of Medicine

If you have news, announcements, or creative works you’d like to share with your fellow alumni, please write to the BUSM Alumni Association at 72 E. Concord Street, L120, Boston, MA 02118 or email alumbusm@bu.edu.

also was the San Diego KP lead physician for implementing our ambulatory and inpatient electronic medical record, KP HealthConnect. I retired in 2010 but continued to do some ambulatory vascular surgery and work with our Regional HealthConnect team until 2015. Now we are fully retired, our sons are both married, and we have two lovely granddaughters nearby in San Diego. Thayer and I spend most of our time with family and travels. I continue to enjoy my hobby of landscape and family photography.”

1972 Robert I. Friedman of Lakeville, Massachusetts, writes, “After practicing primary care internal medicine on my own for 34 years, I joined a large medical group. That did not work out and I partially retired, but have had several jobs since then; I was a Medicare reviewer (I made about 800 house calls over a year and a half) and provided primary care in a Plymouth prison for 16 months. Now I am providing medical care for psychiatric patients in Middleboro and work in a substance abuse clinic, where I really enjoy helping my patients. I work about 20 hours per week and have plenty of time for our grandchildren and for cycling, among other things.” Russel M. Jaffe of Ashburn, Virginia, writes, “I continue to learn, grow, and unfold the next generation of clinical insights into personalized proactive predictive primary prevention practices, including a validated health appraisal questionnaire and evidence-based best outcome goal values.”

1974 Clear! Living the Life You Didn’t Dream Of Herman J. Williams, MD (MED’88)

that he could no longer pursue his lifelong dream of becoming a surgeon.

Williams chronicles his near-death experience from cardiac arrest when he was a young medical resident and his struggle to overcome sudden physical limitations, while also coming to grips with the realization

The book also emphasizes the need for Automated External Defibrillators in all public buildings as well as the lifesaving impact of implanted defibrillators.

Thomas R. Insel of Pleasanton, California, writes, “I retired from NIH after 30 years of public service to start a new life in Silicon Valley. I launched Mindstrong Health a few months ago to develop tools for digital mental health. Best part is that my two children, five grandchildren, and Deb—my partner for nearly 50 years—are along for the ride. Love living in California, 2,850 miles from the Beltway.”

Mark S. Moskowitz of Gastonia, North Carolina, writes, “I transitioned out of fulltime surgery practice in 2012 and retired fully this year. Immersed in automotive activities, I am vice chairman on the board of directors of the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America and also serve on the board of directors of Carolina Motorsports Park. I frequently act as a Concours d’ Elegance judge in North America and Europe and write regularly for Sports Car Market, American Car Collector and Hagerty Online. My new car reviews can be found at ConceptCarz.com.” Robert R. Wolff of Boston, Massachusetts, writes, “I am an attending child neurologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, where I teach residents and medical students. I was delighted when, a few months ago, fourth-year BUSM student Deena Godfrey was assigned to me on the inpatient consult service. She did an outstanding job and reinforced my faith in the excellent quality of the education our current students receive at our alma mater.”

1976 Mark S. Goulston of Los Angeles, California, writes, “My book, Just Listen, has become the top book on listening in the world. I am speaking globally on becoming a better listener to improve communication and cooperation, including training the Russian Federation in Moscow. On another note, I also host Prison Letters with Dr. Mark Goulston, an iTunes podcast.”

1978 Lillian E. Cohn of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, writes, “Thirty-nine years out and still going strong! I continue to enjoy primary care in center city Philadelphia and have been working with MDVIP now for seven-plus years. It’s been a great transition to a saner model of primary care, benefitting both my patients and me—I love practicing medicine this way. Kids are all grown up and now getting married; hope one day to have grandchildren rather than just grandcats.”

BUSM Alumni Association on Facebook CMYK / .eps

Facebook “f ” Logo

CMYK / .eps

facebook.com/alumBUSM

1981 Robert M. Lincer of Stamford, Connecticut, writes, “During many wonderful years in private practice in surgical oncology and trauma and acute care surgery, I had always been involved in surgical education and administration and with such dramatic changes in the healthcare landscape, it seemed like the right time to focus more on these areas. So in 2011, I went back to school and received an MBA in Healthcare Leadership from Yale School of Management in 2013. Definitely a different experience being back in school with kids almost as young as my children. I am now chair of surgery at Berkshire Health System in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and a clinical instructor in surgery at BUSM. We have medical and PA students rotating on surgery, medicine, and psych, and I regularly hear how the BU students stand out and are clearly well trained, which is great! It feels good to come full circle and be ‘back’ at BUSM!”

1982 Mimi I. Peak of Newport News, Virginia, writes, “Greetings! I had a great time at our 35th reunion in 2017 and hope to see you all at our 40th! I am enjoying my military retirement after 30 years as a flight surgeon for the Air Force, and have a small solo aerospace medicine practice in town. This year, my husband and I walked the Camino de Santiago (The Way) from Sarria to celebrate our lives and give thanks. Our oldest son Matthew graduated from Virginia Tech, got married, and is working at NASA; younger son Garrett is a senior at Randolph Macon College and applying to medical schools. Love to all and God bless.”

1983 David L. Walton of San Francisco, California, writes, “After 25-plus years of maternal-fetal medicine at Kaiser Oakland, I retired in January (I’m a little embarrassed to think I may be the first in my class to post a retirement in the class notes!). I have done a lot of backcountry skiing with one-way tickets to British Columbia

Winter 2018 | bumc.bu.edu

37


BUSM Alumni

CLASS NOTES

and Japan and am now attending community college to learn Spanish. Machiko and I are well and still in San Francisco.”

1984 David J. Sherer of Chevy Chase, Maryland, writes, “I am a blogger and video personality for Bottomlineinc.com. To access my work on medicine, health, and healthcare, enter my name in the search bar—I hope you enjoy. You can also open these secure links: https://bottomlineinc.com/?s=sherer https://bottomlineinc.com/blogs/ what-your-doctor-isnt-telling-you.”

1987 David C. Lee of Manhasset, New York, writes, “I accepted the chair of emergency medicine position at Wellspan-York in Pennsylvania; looking forward to a new adventure.”

1991 Daniel O. Black of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, writes, “Hello, classmates. After graduation, I did a residency in ophthalmology, followed by fellowships in neuro-ophthalmology and oculoplastics, before going into fulltime academic practice in Quebec City. I have seen our classmate Or Shachar a few times, but rarely interact with Boston classmates. My wife Katherine is also an oculoplastic surgeon, so dinner conversation is basically limited to eyelids. We play together in an ophthalmology department cover band, but with four boisterous kids, we don’t get out much. Give us a shout if you ever wander up north.”

1994 George A. Waters of Medfield, Massachusetts, writes, “I’m working as a staff cardiologist at Sturdy Memorial Hospital in Attleboro, Massachusetts. Starting to get excited for our 25th reunion (it’s just around the corner)!”

1995 Steven T. Olive of Center Barnstead, New Hampshire, writes, “I was recently promoted to the rank of Captain (O-6) in the United States Navy. I served 10 years on active duty and currently am the Officer in Charge of Expeditionary Medical Facility Bethesda Det F, responsible for all reserve medical assets in the state of New Hampshire. I have deployed

38

Boston University School of Medicine

three times and served on the hospital ship USNS Comfort, as well as on several destroyers and submarines in the fleet. I am an attending physician at Frisbie Memorial Hospital and the medical director of Family Care of Farmington, both in New Hampshire. My wife Rebecca and I live in the Lakes Region. My daughter attends Boston University; my son Southern New Hampshire University.” Richard Sams of North Augusta, South Carolina, writes, “I retired from the navy after 33 years of connected service and joined the faculty at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University as an associate professor of family medicine.”

1997 Suzanne F. Nabi-Tremblay of Keene, New Hampshire, writes, “Andrew Tremblay, MD, and I, both Class of 1997, were recently voted as ‘2017 Favorite Family Physicians’ in the New Hampshire-Monadnock area; this was the first year the category appeared in The Keene Sentinel Choice Awards. Since completing our residencies at The Toledo Hospital in Ohio in 2000, we’ve been employed at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, where Andrew is chair of the Primary Care Department in the Keene division. We have been married for 20 years after meeting in medical school and have three beautiful daughters.”

2007 Jamin V. Brahmbhatt of Orlando, Florida, writes, “Recently I was nominated as secretary/treasurer elect of the Florida Urologic Society, which places me on the path to president of the organization by 2020, a great honor at such a young point in my career. I’ve had the opportunity to give a TEDx talk and have been nominated for ‘Top 40 Under 40’ and multiple ‘Top Doctor’ awards. I’ve also become a television and digital media health expert for several national media outlets. None of this would have been possible without the solid foundation set by my time at BUSM.”

2011 Brandi N. Ring of Denver, Colorado, writes, “I was inaugurated as president of the AuroraAdams County Medical Society of Colorado in September of 2017.”

2012 Rebecca S. Zee of Washington, DC, writes, “I recently completed the urology residency program at the University of Virginia and am currently a pediatric urology fellow at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC.”

2013

My scholarship is a huge part of why I am able to pursue my dreams.

David R. Veltre of Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, writes, “My wife Julia (SPH’11) and I welcomed our son Charlie into the world on January 10, 2017.”

2014 Anna C. Jack of Rochester, New York, writes, “I completed my family medicine residency at the University of Rochester in June and over the last three years was frequently reminded of, and thankful for, how well trained and prepared I was for residency. I stayed on as a fourth-year chief resident and am taking full advantage of the year to expand my clinical interests and leadership skills, teach, and work on scholarly projects. In May, my husband Mike and I welcomed our daughter Lana, who joins our son Louis—they keep us very busy and very happy. If anyone happens to be in Rochester or has questions about the program, please let me know!” n

Education is a gift. Pass it on.

“By giving generously to students like me, donors express their belief

To learn more about how you can support

in the value of education and in

a student like George Massey through a

the worthiness of students. It is

planned gift, contact the Planned Giving office

a powerful feeling to be on the

at 800-645-2347 or opg@bu.edu, or visit

receiving end of this.”

bu.edu/plannedgiving.

George Massey (MED’15,’19)


BUSM Alumni

CLASS NOTES

and Japan and am now attending community college to learn Spanish. Machiko and I are well and still in San Francisco.”

1984 David J. Sherer of Chevy Chase, Maryland, writes, “I am a blogger and video personality for Bottomlineinc.com. To access my work on medicine, health, and healthcare, enter my name in the search bar—I hope you enjoy. You can also open these secure links: https://bottomlineinc.com/?s=sherer https://bottomlineinc.com/blogs/ what-your-doctor-isnt-telling-you.”

1987 David C. Lee of Manhasset, New York, writes, “I accepted the chair of emergency medicine position at Wellspan-York in Pennsylvania; looking forward to a new adventure.”

1991 Daniel O. Black of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, writes, “Hello, classmates. After graduation, I did a residency in ophthalmology, followed by fellowships in neuro-ophthalmology and oculoplastics, before going into fulltime academic practice in Quebec City. I have seen our classmate Or Shachar a few times, but rarely interact with Boston classmates. My wife Katherine is also an oculoplastic surgeon, so dinner conversation is basically limited to eyelids. We play together in an ophthalmology department cover band, but with four boisterous kids, we don’t get out much. Give us a shout if you ever wander up north.”

1994 George A. Waters of Medfield, Massachusetts, writes, “I’m working as a staff cardiologist at Sturdy Memorial Hospital in Attleboro, Massachusetts. Starting to get excited for our 25th reunion (it’s just around the corner)!”

1995 Steven T. Olive of Center Barnstead, New Hampshire, writes, “I was recently promoted to the rank of Captain (O-6) in the United States Navy. I served 10 years on active duty and currently am the Officer in Charge of Expeditionary Medical Facility Bethesda Det F, responsible for all reserve medical assets in the state of New Hampshire. I have deployed

38

Boston University School of Medicine

three times and served on the hospital ship USNS Comfort, as well as on several destroyers and submarines in the fleet. I am an attending physician at Frisbie Memorial Hospital and the medical director of Family Care of Farmington, both in New Hampshire. My wife Rebecca and I live in the Lakes Region. My daughter attends Boston University; my son Southern New Hampshire University.” Richard Sams of North Augusta, South Carolina, writes, “I retired from the navy after 33 years of connected service and joined the faculty at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University as an associate professor of family medicine.”

1997 Suzanne F. Nabi-Tremblay of Keene, New Hampshire, writes, “Andrew Tremblay, MD, and I, both Class of 1997, were recently voted as ‘2017 Favorite Family Physicians’ in the New Hampshire-Monadnock area; this was the first year the category appeared in The Keene Sentinel Choice Awards. Since completing our residencies at The Toledo Hospital in Ohio in 2000, we’ve been employed at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, where Andrew is chair of the Primary Care Department in the Keene division. We have been married for 20 years after meeting in medical school and have three beautiful daughters.”

2007 Jamin V. Brahmbhatt of Orlando, Florida, writes, “Recently I was nominated as secretary/treasurer elect of the Florida Urologic Society, which places me on the path to president of the organization by 2020, a great honor at such a young point in my career. I’ve had the opportunity to give a TEDx talk and have been nominated for ‘Top 40 Under 40’ and multiple ‘Top Doctor’ awards. I’ve also become a television and digital media health expert for several national media outlets. None of this would have been possible without the solid foundation set by my time at BUSM.”

2011 Brandi N. Ring of Denver, Colorado, writes, “I was inaugurated as president of the AuroraAdams County Medical Society of Colorado in September of 2017.”

2012 Rebecca S. Zee of Washington, DC, writes, “I recently completed the urology residency program at the University of Virginia and am currently a pediatric urology fellow at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC.”

2013

My scholarship is a huge part of why I am able to pursue my dreams.

David R. Veltre of Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, writes, “My wife Julia (SPH’11) and I welcomed our son Charlie into the world on January 10, 2017.”

2014 Anna C. Jack of Rochester, New York, writes, “I completed my family medicine residency at the University of Rochester in June and over the last three years was frequently reminded of, and thankful for, how well trained and prepared I was for residency. I stayed on as a fourth-year chief resident and am taking full advantage of the year to expand my clinical interests and leadership skills, teach, and work on scholarly projects. In May, my husband Mike and I welcomed our daughter Lana, who joins our son Louis—they keep us very busy and very happy. If anyone happens to be in Rochester or has questions about the program, please let me know!” n

Education is a gift. Pass it on.

“By giving generously to students like me, donors express their belief

To learn more about how you can support

in the value of education and in

a student like George Massey through a

the worthiness of students. It is

planned gift, contact the Planned Giving office

a powerful feeling to be on the

at 800-645-2347 or opg@bu.edu, or visit

receiving end of this.”

bu.edu/plannedgiving.

George Massey (MED’15,’19)


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Calendar 2018

MARCH 16

Match Day

MAY 3

Keefer Society Dinner Metcalf Trustee Ballroom, BU Charles River Campus

MAY 4

Dean’s Advisory Board Meeting

MAY 17

GMS Commencement 9 am MD & PhD Commencement 3 pm Track & Tennis Center, BU Charles River Campus

SEPTEMBER 21 & 22

School of Medicine Alumni Weekend

“ I have never had an uninteresting day nor gone home without having learned something.” Robert Witzburg, Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean, retires after 45 years of learning, teaching, and service.

WINTER 2018 • bumc.bu.edu

Profile for BUSM

Boston University Medicine - Winter 2018  

Robert Witzburg, MD, retires after 45 years of learning, teaching and service.

Boston University Medicine - Winter 2018  

Robert Witzburg, MD, retires after 45 years of learning, teaching and service.

Profile for busm

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