Page 1

14

Become a Boat Host! Registration is now open: bigdayatthelake.com/become-a-boat-host

June 2016 Published monthly

YEARS

Business Intelligence for the Golden Crescent: Lake Norman • Cabarrus • University City

Bus Rapid Transit

Volume 15, Number 3 $1.50

Arena business isn’t a cash cow, but it’s good

Driving home the safety in motorsports

the arena. World Champions Shane Proctor and J.B. Mauney busted many bulls at the local venue. According to the PBR web site, Proctor is currently ranked seventh in the world with $182,448 earned in 2016. Mauney, World Champion in 2015 with earnings of over $1.5 million, is currently ranked 2nd with over $117,000 earned in 2016.

By Erica Batten For a sport that got its start with bootleggers running ‘shine on the back roads of Appalachia, stock-car racing didn’t exactly begin with safety in mind. But safety has been at the forefront of sports news recently, particularly with the NFL’s woes over chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease linked to playing football. After years of denial, an NFL spokesperson recently acknowledged the link in a hearing with the House of Representatives’ Energy and Commerce Committee. There have been nearly 4,000 studies on football injuries, but only five on motorsportsrelated injuries, according to Dr. Glenn Gaston, who also serves as hand consultant for Huntersville-based Joe Gibbs Racing and Stewart-Haas Racing in Kannapolis. Safety concerns have been more obvious in the auto-racing industry. Since 1990, more than 500 drivers and crew have been killed in U.S. racing. And developments in safety have

See STEGALL Page 18

See MOTORSPORTS Page 19

It may be more on track than rail for I-77 corridor Page 2

Page4

Cabarrus County

Page 6

New Small Business Toolbox column

By Marty Price Shortly after they married, Robin and Stan Stegall began hosting professional bull riding rodeos at Stegall’s Arena. Every Sunday night, for the past 25 years, at 7 p.m., from spring to fall, the sights and sounds of a professional rodeo filled the 17 acres on Odell School Road in eastern Cabarrus County. For an $8 admission fee,

HOT PROPERTIES

Pages 20-21

Entrepreneurial issues from CPCC Page 11

Small Business Toolbox .10-11 News-e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-13 Book Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

104 Barnstable Court in Mooresville for $1 million

with children under 10 free, guests are treated to a night of family entertainment. Stan said they have a loyal, regular fan base of about 300 people with their average attendance being 500. Attendance swells to between 1,200-1,400 during the Fourth of July and Labor Day celebrations. Part of the Professional Bull Riders circuit, many famous bull riders have passed through

RECORDS Transactions Cabarrus 14 Mecklenburg 14 Mooresville 14 Foreclosures Cabarrus 15

Mecklenburg 16 Mooresville 16 Corporations Cabarrus 16 Mecklenburg 17 Mooresville 17

www.businesstodaync.com

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID WINSTON-SALEM, NC PERMIT NO. 319

hb5 is a cool way to work on your own

Stan Stegall watches as the first bull rider comes out of the chute at Stegall’s Arena

DATED NEWS - POSTMASTER PLEASE DELIVER BY 6/3

Growth vs. paying for infrastructure

Photo by Marty Price

Impact fees

Business Today P.O. Box 2062 Cornelius, NC 28031

NEWS INSIDE


Business Today

2 June 2016

Bus Rapid Transit could be best alternate route for I-77

Transit Elevated Bus is another way to look at buses as an alternative to commuter rail. Only a concept at this point, a working model was presented at the Beijing International High-Tech Expo

James W. Surane, Attorneys at Law New location 18825 W. Catawba Ave. Suite 150, Cornelius, NC 28031

Serving Cornelius for over 20 years James W. Surane, Attorney at Law Former Mecklenburg Magistrate

Deborah Pope, Attorney at Law Former Mecklenburg Magistrate

Kimberly Thaxton, Attorney at Law Real Estate Law- closings, evictions, land rezoning, impervious allocation issues | Litigation | Mediation- Breach of Contract and Divorce | Traffic | Simple Wills including Healthcare POA Uncontested Divorce | Adoption

Call for a consultation 704-895-5885

By Dave Vieser Despite new transit-oriented development along Hwy. 115 in North Mecklenburg County, it’s more and more doubtful passenger rail cars will traverse the corridor anytime soon. Norfolk Southern owns the tracks and rights-of-way, and has shown no interest in parsing its freight schedule. It means that commuters between Lake Norman and Charlotte will in all probability be riding on rubber, not metal, for the foreseeable future. But they could be riding in a new kind of bus. Scale Finance founder Dave Gilroy, a Cornelius town Commissioner, said Bus Rapid Transit provide “infinite flexibility, schedule and routing can be super dynamic and the cost is pennies as opposed to rail.” Rail goes from precisely Point A to precisely Point B with almost no variation, and reliable 19th centur y technology. “BRT is where we have to invest,” said Gilroy. What is Bus Rapid Transit, also known as BRT? The New York-based Institute for Transportation and Development Policy defines it as “a high-quality bus-based transit system that delivers fast, comfortable and cost-effective ser vices at metro-level capacities.” For I-77 a BRT would consist of special buses traveling on lanes not normally subject to delays.

To be classified as a BRT system, buses should operate for the better part of each trip on a fully dedicated right of way to avoid traffic congestion. Typically, they also have stations with off-board fare collection, station platforms level with the bus and priority movements at key signalized intersections. There are over 185 cities around the world with BRT systems, 26 in the U.S. and Canada. A strong proponent of BRT, Gilroy said Lake Norman have missed a “great opportunity over the past several years to focus our time and energy on planning a 21st centur y Rapid Bus Transit (RBT) system like the one now under way in Connecticut.” The line Gilroy refers to opened in 2015. The 9.4-mile busway connects downtown Hartford to the suburb of New Britain, running parallel to an Amtrak line for the first section and then along a former railroad right of way. Initial reaction from passengers has been ver y positive. Ridership has exceeded all initial forecasts, averaging 17,000 rides on weekdays, and increasing by some 41 percent from May to October 2015. However, can a BRT work for I-77? First of all, local officials need to agree on what type of travel lanes would be See BUSES, Page 3


Business Today

June 2016

3

The $47,476 question: What will new overtime rules do? By Dave Vieser Beginning in December, 4 million more American workers will qualify for overtime pay under new regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Labor. Under the new rules, overtime will be paid to many more workers, including those on salary. How this will impact local businesses, especially smaller firms, is still anyone’s guess. “The new overtime regulation will

BUSES

certainly provide a short-term boost for middle-class workers who haven’t enjoyed meaningful wage growth over the past decade,” said Ryan McDevitt, an assistant professor of economics at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. On the other hand, the rules may be a tough pill to swallow for business owners. “Government intervention is rarely a good thing,” noted Bill Russell,

from page 2

needed to handle the buses, even as the future of toll lanes remains in flux. Several Cornelius commissioners traveled to Washington, D.C., to meet with US Transportation Secretar y Anthony Foxx, among others, and discuss the possibility of a BRT for our region. Some details are up in the air, including whether BRT requires dedicated lanes or public access lanes. Toll lanes are not considered public access lanes, according to Gilroy, “which means that the fact that we are doing toll lanes will handicap us from getting federal funds for BRT.” Connecticut’s successful BRT relied on a combination of federal grants and state bonding to cover construction costs, with the Federal Transportation Administration paying 80 percent of the initial $560 million price tag. So the type of “lanes” which provide the ser vice will dictate how much federal and state money the project could receive. BRT is also a top priority with the Charlotte Area Transportation System. CATS CEO John M. Lewis said that the Denver and Boulder Colorado are prime examples of where BRT is working. “They have opened a BRT system on a corridor slated for commuter rail. They estimated that they would have around 10,000 daily passengers and four months into the ser vice, they are averaging almost 14,000. Bottom line: when we can begin to give people a comfortable ride and reliable mode of transportation, they will jump towards that,” Lewis said. More than $728,000 has been earmarked in the proposed 2017 CATS budget to undertake a transit options study for the North Corridor. The study is expected to take about 18 months, and should include input

from a wide range of interested parties, including NCDOT, North Carolina Railroad, and Norfolk Southern Railroad, as well as officials and the public from the area towns. BRT is sure to be a prominent subject. The result of that study, as well as the final outcome on the controversial I-77 toll lanes, should go a long way in determining whether bus rapid transit is in our future. “The Red Line would be great but probably not in our lifetime,” Cornelius Mayor Chuck Travis said. “I support Bus Rapid Transit..that’s our best option.”

president of the Lake Norman Chamber of Commerce. “It’s good for the employee short term and not so much for the businesses.” The law of unintended consequences could come into play. Indeed, the former CEO of McDonald’s, Ed Rensi, said a $15 minimum wage could convert fast food jobs into robots. “If you look at the robotic devices that are coming into the restaurant industry, it’s cheaper to buy a $35,000 robotic arm than it is to hire an employee who’s inefficient making $15 an hour bagging French fries.” Could some-

thing similar happen if the floor for overtime for salaried workers rises to $47,476 a year? In 2004, rules regarding executive and managerial jobs were loosened, resulting in many more employees, such as supervisors, becoming ineligible for overtime. Many companies then gave the workers supervisor titles, especially in fast food and retail jobs, where employees then worked more than 40 hours a week without See OVERTIME, Page 18

We’re more than a cleaning company... We’re a movement.

Janet Schultz, Owner

A thorough, detailed cleaning sets a standard, especially when safe, eco-friendly cleaning products are used.

• Doing an ordinary task at a higher level • Marketable as a franchise, employing those living with Autism • Cleaning services for small offices • Trained Staff ● Consistent cleaning

704-589-3148

www.bluejsmallofficecleaning.com

PRELIMINARY FRONT ELEVATION

PRELIMINARY SIDE ELEVATION


Business Today

4 June 2016

Rapid growth sparks discussion of impact fees

Zack Wyatt (left) and Charles Knox explored the impact fee issue in a lively Q&A discussion

By Dave Vieser Though they are currently not the law of the land in North Carolina, impact fees keep coming up in discussions about balancing growth and taxes. Charles Knox, a developer and real estate broker who founded Huntersville-based The Knox Group and Zack Wyatt, a Cornelius resident who is founder of Carolina Farm Trust, explored the issue at Business Today’s Newsmakers Breakfast in May. “It’s really not fair to make developQUOTABLE

“It’s really not fair to make developers pay for all the infrastructure improvements needed by a municipality. —Charles Knox, The Knox Group

ers pay for all the infrastructure improvements needed by a municipality,” Knox said. “While it may sound good on paper, using impact fees can actually hurt business growth, and that means fewer jobs for the economy.” Impact fees were charged by local governments to help pay for new or expanded public facilities required to serve new development. North Carolina courts ended the debate over whether developers should pay to help build schools, leaving local officials trying to figure out what to do when the pace of residential construction gets ahead of infrastructure. One of the key court cases was in Cabarrus County, another in Cary. North Carolina is a growth state: In 1950 the population was 2.4 million; in 2013, 9.85 million. During the last decade, North Carolina grew at the rate of 18 percent; the U.S., 9.7 percent. How to lay in the infrastructure is still top of mind when the NCDOT forges ahead with plans to widen I-77 in Lake Norman with the help of tolls. According to the American Planning Association, impact fees typically require cash payments in advance of the completion of development. They factor in the cost of the facility and the nature and size of the development.

To date, 29 states, including neighboring Virginia and South Carolina, have adopted impact fee enabling legislation for other than water and wastewater fees. No such legislation has been adopted in the Tar Heel State and legal experts are split on the legality of their use. “There is no specific authority to charge impact fees under general state law,” said Kara Millonzi, associate professor of Public Law and Government at UNC-Chapel Hill. “Therefore, I would advise a municipality to consult with its attorney about the propriety of

imposing impact fees.” Cornelius Planning Director Wayne Herron said he had recently spoken with David Owens of the School of Government, and his opinion is that state statute allows impact fees for parks and open space, and water and sewer projects. “That is it,” Herron said, “except for a small number of communities that have special legislation for transportation impact fees.” Transportation may be the most critical infrastructure need, as many towns in the Golden Crescent build more and more homes on previous farmlands, creating traffic woes for those tr ying to reach the high-paying jobs in Charlotte and elsewhere. Whether impact fees are acceptable legally or politically remains to be seen. For now, the outcome of vacant farms such as the Alexander Farm in Cornelius remains unknown. “They are asking $18 million, a healthy sum for that property, which I think is a bit out of line” Knox said. Wyatt would like to see the property preser ved as a working farm and use it as a hands-on educational facility. The property was listed last December. Planning Director Herron says he has had no inquiries on the site since it was listed. “Ultimately I believe the commercial real estate market will determine what a fair selling price will be,” Knox said. The presenting sponsor for the May event was Duke Energy, while cof fee sponsors included KS Audio Video and Davidson Wealth Management.

Tom McMahon of Sperry Van Ness asks a question


Business Today

6 June 2016

Cabarrus County

Photo by Marty Price

Business incubators like hb5 give young entrepreneurs a boost

“It gives you a place to go to work every day, to co-work and interact with others for a common goal.”

—Ryan McMahon,

By Marty Price After a decline in the number of startups across the country in 2014, the 2015 Kauffman Index of Startup Activity reported that new business formation rose in 2015, with 32 of the 50 states reporting

an increase. North Carolina improved its rank from 29th in 2014 to 24th last year. Start-up web developer Edgar Joya, 28, said he values his freedom most at the privately run hb5 business incubator on Union Street in downtown Concord.

“I don’t want to work with someone telling me when and where I have to work,” he said. Joya, the boss, comes and goes when he pleases, but he likes being near other entrepreneurs who are just starting out.

Enter the world of private, for-profit business incubators, also known as executive suites, virtual offices, shared space and even hot desks. Companies like Regus have turned it into not just a national business, but an international trend. The U Center in Mooresville and hb5 in Concord, where Joya has set up shop, are doing it on a local level. Joya said the energy and gung-ho atmosphere helps him. When he saw other people working at all hours, he thought, “Man they are beating me, they are out competing me.” Joya moved up to an unlimited membership. The co-working environment offers entrepreneurs an open office setting with wi-fi, printing services and “all the free coffee you can drink,” said Ryan McMahon, a partner in hb5. “It gives you a place to go to work every day, to co-work and interact with others for a common goal.” The ground floor of Hb5 has 52 feet of dry erase board lining one wall. BrainSee INCUBATOR, Page 7

iTek coming to Airport Industrial Park A large commercial printer from Charlotte is moving to a larger plant in the Airport Industrial Park in Concord. The move, expected to be completed by October, was necessitated by “significant growth,” according to iTek President John Rawlins. Thew new facility will be 50 percent larger than the current plant. “As our industry evolves, and our products and solutions have changed and advanced, demand has risen,” said Raw-

We believe that, as a true community bank, we have a unique ability and responsibility to help others soar. Our logo is a constant reminder that we aspire to make a difference every day in individuals, families, businesses and our communities. Visit us online or stop by a branch and let us know how we can make a difference for you.

uwharrie.com 800.438.6864

2344_UWB_IntroAd_5x5.5_BusinessToday.indd 1

6/16/15 2:51 PM

lins. “Our new office and manufacturing space...will support our continued growth and expansion, and provide a better work environment for current and future staff.” Concord City Council approved a threeyear 85 percent tax reduction for iTek. Mayor Scott Padgett said the city’s growing industrial base provides more support for public services. “Of course, the best benefit is good paying manufacturing jobs to help families,” he said.

FlyRight moving to spec building FlyRight Inc., a professional flight school, will move from the West Winds Business Park in Concord to a new 40,000 square foot facility in Concord Airport Business Park Phase II. The expansion, in a spec project that was developed by The Silverman Group, will add 10 new jobs. President Matt Hapgood said FlyRight plans to begin training in the new 40,000-square-foot space in September. Cabarrus Economic Development said the move will take place after a second floor in the building is completed. The company has 22 full-time employees with an average annual wage of $60,000. The estimated investment in the Fly-

Right project is $5 million, half of which qualifies for grants approved by the City of Concord and Cabarrus County, according to the EDC. Stephen Morris, chairman of the Cabarrus County Commission, said the county’s three-year incentive investment” is $44,625. In Concord, the total value of a three-year economic incentive is $30,600. FlyRight was founded by Jim Crawford and Hapgood, who have more than 40 years of combined flying experience. The company offers a variety of training programs for the King Air planes. The FlyRight project was facilitated by LeeAnn Nixon, EDC’s existing industry specialist.


Business Today

June 2016

7

INCUBATOR

from page 6

storming and co-working is encouraged. Members share their expertise and ideas freely, partnerships are formed. Much like a gym, each entrepreneur or freelancer buys a membership that fits their needs. It is only a monthly agreement, so entrepreneurs can join and adjust their usage as needs change. There is a Day Pass—Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.—for $20 a day. An unlimited cowork membership, 24 hours a day, runs $150 a month. There’s a “phone booth” for quiet conversations; a monthly membership includes four hours of time in a 10-person conference room and two hours of Podcast time in the sound room. They opened in November of 2015 in 4,200 square feet of leased space at 42 S. Union St. Once finished there will be a small gym and shower for members on the second floor, along with four or five small private offices for businesses that need a dedicated space. McMahon, 32, said he has been involved in several successful start-ups since college, honing his sales, marketing and consultant skills. When he and

four friends, wanting to find a way to work differently, kicked around the idea for a new kind of entrepreneurial environment, someone said they’ll “be five has-beens.” Hb5 was born. Although the business is ideal for start ups—with no long-term lease, utility concerns and overhead—McMahon said they are also looking for existing businesses that are passionate about growth. The goal of hb5 is to foster partnerships that will lead to bigger projects for all the members. “People bring their dreams and we work through them to see if we can make them happen,” said McMahon, “hb5 is a framework, not a money-generating ecosystem. It is more of a small business incubator.” The business currently has 10 members and McMahon expects another five to 10 will sign up this month. “Traditional work environments get traditional results. We’re trying to get atypical results,” he said. Riki and McLean Harper are the new owners of The U Center, a business incubator with professional meeting and event space as well as amenities for member companies. They also offer market-

(704) 938-3121 HilbishFord.com

Photo by Marty Price

Cabarrus County

Ryan McMahon, 32, partner and spokesman for Hb5- a new co-working initiative for small business entrepreneurs, joins Mooresville resident Edgar Joya, 28, who is starting his own freelance web development company, as he works on a project in the common working area of Hb5 at 42 Union Street South in Concord.

ing services and technology assistance including websites, mobile apps, social media setups and printing services in an ultra-contemporary 6,885 square foot building near I-77 in Mooresville. The trend suits the mind-set of Millennials like Joya. One night, around midnight, as he was struggling with how to close a sale, he

asked McMahon to check his sales pitch. The two talked about sales for more than an hour with Joya gaining a much better understanding about sales. A week later Joya was explaining how to write code for a web site to McMahon. “We all work to make each other better, “ said McMahon.

SERVING THIS AREA SINCE 1954 2016 F150 Super Cab 4x4

Straight Talk For an immediate price, call or email

Candice Thompson, our customer relations manager at CThompson@hilbishford.com

Save $8,150 Sale Price $37,750

I85N - Exit 58 (US 29) - Kannapolis


Business Today

8 June 2016

HB2 mess deepens as both sides dig in, boycotts loom

SEEING IS BELIEVING

Let The Kitchen & Bath Experts Make Your Dreams Come True www.carolinascustomkbc.com

704-658-0089

Call For A Design Consultation

By Erica Batten Politics makes for strange bedfellows, in this case a pair of North Carolina senators who spoke at the May 20 Focus Friday at the Lake Norman Chamber. Sen. Jeff Tarte, a Republican from District 41, and Sen. Joel Ford, a Democrat from District 38, largely agreed on the economic impact of HB2 and the need for bipartisan dialogue. “We are the economic engine of North Carolina,” Tarte said of the Charlotte area. “We cannot hide from the fact that this is hurting the economy.” He projected that the lost revenue as a result of HB2 could reach the hundreds of millions. Tarte also discussed how the bill might impact national perception of local NFL, AHL, NBA and other sports organizations, including NASCAR. In spite of Tarte’s insistence that the debate surrounding HB2 is complex, Ford was careful to frame the issue in terms of human rights. “I don’t think we should struggle to treat human beings wih respect,” Ford said. “To me, that’s not a struggle.” Tarte agreed that “discrimination against any human being should not be tolerated.” On the flip side, “there are certain social norms that should be expected.” As an example, he said that grown men should not be allowed in girls’ showers. The shower image rankled some audience members, who later suggested Tarte’s framing of the issue this way revealed insensitivity to transgendered persons. Arlene Berkman, founder of The Foundation for Respect Ability, a nonprofit anti-bullying program for educators, said the bill has had a significant impact on both individuals and the state as a whole. “Between the [I-]77 fiasco and this, you are setting up this state for economic disaster.” But she had plenty to say about politicians who have dug deep trenches on either side of the issue, in step with party leaders. “It was made perfectly clear by both Senators that if they overstep their territory ‘Big Brother’ is watching and distributes the punishment to keep them in line. This is crazy,” the Cornelius resident said.

Tarte, who is also a Cornelius resident, said House members had considered a number of implications of the bill, including legal ramifications and possible alternatives. Ford said, “This is where the rub happens for me: where we have special-interest issues that overshadow the entire community.” The back story here is that Ford voted for legislation that allowed NC magistrates to opt out of performing civil marriage services due to a “sincerely held religious objection.” Opponents say the legislation allows discrimination against LGBT couples. Ford was one of only two Democrats to break with their party and vote for it. So pitting him against Tarte didn’t sit well with some Democratic party leaders. He was a stand-in for NC Rep. Tricia Cotham who herself was invited, disinvited and then reinvited, but ultimately could not go toe to toe with Tarte because the Assembly was in session. Natasha Marcus, co-chair of Democrats of North Mecklenburg, said the chamber “does its best to support Republican candidates, while claiming to be non-partisan and pro-business.” “Mr. Russell’s public statements about how speakers were chosen and our questions about those changes have been deleted from a [Facebook] site that Rep. John Bradford administers. It’s the latest example of how the LKN Chamber and local Republicans use their positions of power to help each other. Regardless, business owners see the truth about HB2 and I’m confident they will reject it and those politicians who voted for it,” Marcus said. Chamber officials did not comment. Marcus ran against NC Rep. John Bradford in District 98 two years ago. The backlash against HB2 has been swift and brutal with companies like Deutsche Bank saying danke but nein danke to North Carolina. Tarte said that he’s spoken to many business leaders who support HB2 but are afraid that taking a public stance will negatively impact business. The common ground, for politicians and their constituents, may be agreeing to disagree and then focusing on other, more pressing legislation.


Business Today

June 2016

9

Will LKN Marine Commission make waves for DOT, Cintra? By Dave Vieser. In yet another twist in the ongoing I-77 toll lane saga, it turns out that the $650 million project needed the approval of the Lake Norman Marine Commission before it started. The commission’s approval is necessary because it crosses Lake Norman at the Iredell County line. The DOT has asked to be on the commission’s June agenda. However, Marine Commission Executive Director Ron Shoultz says it will be pushed to July to give commissioners more time to conduct a thorough review. Commission procedures normally require a minimum of 30 days notice for an item to be placed on a meeting agenda, but the DOT’s letter asking for placement on the June 13 in Mooresville was only dated May 20. Whether this amounts to a simple reduction in NCDOT’s high-speed race to toll I-77 or a real roadblock is anyone’s guess. The NCDOT explained it away thusly: “No construction has been done within the four areas where the I-77 Express Lanes project crosses the FERC boundary. Current construction activities in the project’s northern section are not within the FERC boundary.” FERC refers to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which ultimately oversees Lake Norman and how Duke Energy manages the lake. However, Rick Rhodes, spokesman for Duke Energy, says that any concerns voiced by regulatory agencies such as the Marine Commission are usually ironed out between them and the applicant, in this case the DOT. “We would not normally consider the FERC permit until those concerns have been addressed.” This is all about the environment, and rules and regulations that everyone else must follow, all the way down to docks and floats. Business Today and Cornelius Today were the first publications to report that NCDOT never commissioned an economic impact study for the $650 million toll plan between Lake Norman and Charlotte. Kurt Naas, founder of the WidenI-77 anti-toll group, said he wants the Marine Commission to fulfill its charter for taking appropriate responsibility for Lake Norman and its shoreline area for matters relating to or affecting public recreation and water safety. “This would include demanding a realistic environmental assessment. But given the history of this project, you’ll pardon our cynicism if this isn’t another perfunctory box-checking exercise,” he said on the wid-

enI-77.org web site. While the actual construction work has not begun, crews have been shifting travel lanes in recent weeks between Exits 28 and 36, a process which includes grinding out old lane markings. However, DOT officials say no construction work has begun in areas where they have not received federal approval. In the letter to the Commission’s Executive Director dated May 20, Virginia

Mabry, NCDOT’s manager of “priority projects,” said that “the lake is a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) licensed lake and DOT must submit a Conveyance Application to Duke Energy and receive approval before construction within the FERC boundary can begin.” The five-member commission, formed in 1969, is responsible for taking appropriate action for Lake Norman and its shoreline area on matters relating to public rec-

reation and water safety. As part of these duties the commission works with Duke Power on lake development as part of their FERC license requirements. Shoultz said that while many of the issues brought before the commission are routine in nature and handled quickly, the toll lane project was not. “I suspect the members of the commission may need more time to give this application close scrutiny.”

seems there’s something big on the horizon Climate controlled • WiFi • Secure 24-hr access Own or lease • Sizes start @880 sf

Coming May 2016

704-895-3503

www.hydeparkstoragesuites.com at the curve on Bailey Road.

“This really is the country club of storage.”

Robert Yates NASCAR Legend Harley Guy Hyde Park Unit Owner PhD in Mancaveology


Business Today

10 June 2016

Small Business Toolbox Customer Attraction/Retention:

Opportunity Ahead! Contact

Gail Williams or

Jennifer Kraftchick at

704.895.1335 about advertising opportunities

Are you doing what really matters? Part II of II I have already covered the key aspects that are important to gaining interest and the ultimate purchase from a prospective customer. These included: Convenience factors of location, accessibility and time; soundness of offerings and capabilities; track record in business; accuracy and reliability; and value for time and money spent. Getting a customer to purchase from you initially may seem like the most critical hurdle to leap over. But what most businesses fail to understand is that retaining and engaging the customer to be one that is loyal, confident, and most important, impassioned about doing business with you on an ongoing basis is the real key. This takes them from share of mind (knowing about you) to ongoing share of wallet (purchasing from

With Our Summer CD Rate Special!

1.15%

APY*

for 19 months

1.20%

APY*

for 30 months

Branches in Cornelius, Downtown Cornelius, Davidson, Huntersville and Mooresville. Now Open in SouthPark! Wilmington Branch coming soon!

BANK NEAR. GO FAR. www.aquesta.com

*Annual Percentage Yield (APY) effective as of 5/1/16 and is subject to change without notice. $10,000 minimum balance and an active checking account required. Early withdrawal penalties may apply. Other terms and conditions may apply.

704-439-4343

you repeatedly) to inquiries, questions, share of heart (caring and concerns? Do about you and becomyou handle concerns ing loyal to only you). quickly and with your The factors that are customer’s best interkey to understand in ests in mind? building and securing A Unique Experishare of heart in a cusence Engages. Cretomer include: friendliating a memorable ness; flexibility; speed experience is a criti& efficiency; a unique cal part of branding in experience; and the a business that most WOW factor. companies underesFriendliness timate the power in Means You’re Likwhich it possesses. able. The bottom line No matter what type is people want to do of business you are business with people in, a customer should SHERRE DeMAO they like. Whether this experience your busiis you personally or ness in a way they canyour employees serving the customer, not realize anywhere else, specifically how likable are you as a whole? Do when compared to competitors. How you make customers feel welcome, ap- can you make doing business with you preciated, and valued when you inter- something unique and appreciated? act with them? Are you happy to see How would you like your customers to them and do business with them, and feel whenever they interact with your are they happy and engaged with you? company? Being Flexible Is About Options. That WOW Factor Solidifies LoyCustomers appreciate a company that alty. What truly sets companies apart is willing to be flexible in doing busi- from others when it comes to customer ness with them. This doesn’t mean loyalty is when they have mastered compromising. It does mean offer- the WOW factor. What this means is ing options based on knowing the creating an experience combined with customer, or being open to options if something unexpected that literally there is a unique situation with a cus- blows customers away. This is what tomer. This could be special hours, gets customers talking to others and special payment terms, or a myriad of becoming your greatest champions in other possibilities. It is simply a mat- the marketplace. What are your comter of taking the time to truly know petitors overlooking that could make a and understand what is important to pinnacle difference to your customers? your customer and then accommodatYour customers are the life blood to ing them in a manner that is a win for your business’ longevity, stability and them while also being a win for you. vitality. Understanding that attracting Speed is Measured by Efficiency and retaining them is an everyday & Responsiveness. Communication process of earning their confidence is the key word to be understood here, and building their trust will keep them when it comes to a perception of speed happy and growing and your bottom in how you deliver what you offer to line happy and growing too. your customer. Are they being kept informed throughout the entire process Sherré DeMao is an author and founder of status and expectations? Are they of SLD Unlimited Biz Growth Inc. Debeing reassured about efficiencies be- Mao can be reached at 704.483.2941 or ing taken? Are you responsive to their sherre@sldunlimited.com.

BizGrowth 5.0


Business Today

June 2016

Small Business Toolbox

Powering your business:

Should you have a business plan or try a Business Model Canvas? “Who needs a busitime commitment, it is revisions can be expected. As this match is refined, the other ness plan? I’m already simple to change as imblocks become more apparent. Key in business, I have cusprovements are made. tomers.” That’s a freTwo key blocks, Channels, how the product will be dequent response to my starting with Customer livered, are determined. The strategies inquiry about a busiSegment(s), are gener- to build and maintain Customer Relaness owner’s planning ally used to begin. Here tionships are outlined. From these four process. A business the market or markets blocks the Revenue Streams are derived. The left side has three main blocks: plan is not required. to which the business Most businesses don’t expects to appeal is Key Activities, noting the most critical have one. Typically, identified, profiled and things that must be done and Key Rethe main reason a decision factors de- sources, listing the things needed to company writes one tailed. Depending on support the key competencies. Those is to support a funding the business and its blocks enumerate the key expense request. products or services, items resulting in Cost Structure. Key Partners are others who can Is there an ROI the market segments Thomas E. Conroy for an existing commay not just be the buy- be beneficial. The other eight blocks pany’s effort investers/users, but may also comprise a working business model ment to prepare one? include influencers and for turning a business idea into a money maker. With review and revision, Numerous studies show that busi- decision makers. nesses with a plan outperform those The second key block is “Value Prop- the BMC can help the business owner without one. Having a plan doesn’t en- ositions”. Here, the unique aspects of maintain touch with the marketplace, sure success either. In my experience, the business offering are detailed to avoiding the fate of Kodak, Blockbustowners too often focus on their prod- match what the Customer Segments er or Aeropostale. uct rather than how their product will want and value. Thomas E. Conroy, BS MBA, is create business and generate value. At this point, the Customer SegSo, how can a business owner keep ments and the value points are hypo- president of tec Strategic Partner, a the business fresh and appropriately thetical and must be tested. By testing consulting firm providing practical, strategic coaching to owners of small focused? A valuable tool is The Busi- the wants and needs of the segments businesses. He is lead counselor at the ness Model Canvas (BMC) developed and finding the value strengths, the Institute for Entrepreneurship - Small by Osterwalder and Pigneur. The descriptions in the blocks become Business Center at Central Piedmont BMC is a method of identifying and more precise. Proving the hypoth- Community College and is a frequent refining how a business will create esis is critical to the remainder of the business speaker. Reach Tom at tconand maintain revenue streams using a BMC. As with any hypothesis testing, roy@tecStrategicPartner.com. charting technique. Business Model Canvas Typically, owners only think a business plan is a formal document with a set of financial statements. The BMC is different. It is a nine block chart shown in the illustration. It is a brainstorming tool designed to prompt important questions which, when answered, lead logically to subsequent blocks. As the blocks are addressed, different scenarios are revealed which can be explored for success possibilities. Requiring minimal

Entrepreneurs

I have bought property in other states, and my closing was not conducted by a real estate attorney. Why does North Carolina require that an attorney conduct a real estate closing? Many aspects of real estate law are State specific. North Carolina has a somewhat unique system that involves a real estate attorney searching and opining on the state of the property’s title to an independent title insurance company or agency. The title insurance company then issues the title insurance commitment or policy, while the real estate attorney conducts the closing, handling of funds, and recording of the documents. A few advantages of the North Carolina approved attorney system are: 1. Cost – Involvement of an attorney in the process keeps the overall cost of the transaction down 2. Legal Representation – Attorneys are able to provide legal advice during the closing process 3. Oversight of Attorneys - Attorneys are closely regulated by the State Bar and General Statutes, and most carry malpractice insurance. 4. Oversight of Attorney Trust Accounts - Attorneys’ trust accounts are regulated by both the State Bar and the North Carolina Good Funds Settlement Act These are just a sample of the many benefits to closing your real estate transaction with an approved real estate attorney.

Contact Patrick M. Jackson President, Master Title Agency 8640 University Executive Park Dr., Charlotte

704-348-2866 www.mastertitleagency.com

11


12 June 2016

Cabarrus, Concord OK tax incentives for spec office building May 17. Three companies have formed a joint venture that will build a spec building in the International Business Park in Concord. The building, valued at $8 million, will have 75,000 square feet of space. The project, on 20 acres fronting Fortune Avenue, has been given an 85-percent reduction in property taxes for three years by the City of Concord and Cabarrus County government. The spec building is expected to be completed in about a year. The joint venture consists of The Nolim Group, CESI and CM Black Construction. “They’ve identified a need that will support future and expanded business. That is the foundation of economic development.” The building will be delivered in shell condition and ready for tenantspecific upfit. CBRE is handling brokerage duties.

NEWS - e Former prison to become distillery May 25. Southern Grace Distilleries, Inc., of Concord has announced a plan to expand production operations and move the distillery to a soon-to-be-renovated correctional facility in eastern Cabarrus County. The move into a 13,000-plus square foot dormitory of a former North Carolina prison brings a $1.5 million investment into the area and utility to what

had become a dead asset on the state books. The prison operated from 1929 until 2011. “We are excited at the opportunity to partner with the award-winning Southern Grace Distilleries to repurpose the old prison. What a novel idea,” said Tom Earnhardt, partner with Mount Pleasant Properties, which purchased the 22.4-acre former prison from the state. Earnhardt’s business partner, Dr. Allen Dobson, said, “We are pleased to partner with Southern Grace and welcome them to Mount Pleasant. Their vision for transforming the former prison site is not only innovative but will be the first step in many great things com-

Business Today

ing to eastern Cabarrus County.” Need for additional space prompted the move. Southern Grace Distilleries has developed and licensed five whiskey products in addition to Sun Dog 130, and the former prison site will allow space for production of all of these as well as an aged whiskey program. “The expansion of Southern Grace Distilleries to Mount Pleasant is going to be very good for our area. Southern Grace will bring much-needed tourism to our part of Cabarrus County and, as they grow, more jobs” said Mayor Del Eudy. Pending local, state and federal permitting and site approval, the distillery plans to be at the new location by Labor Day and will offer tours in October. While there has been some planning for a former prison to be developed in Tennessee, it appears that Southern Grace Distilleries will be the first distillery in the nation to be fully operational in a former prison. “Of all the places we considered for our expansion, this location was far and away the best one to meet the needs of our growing company,” said Southern Grace CEO Leanne Powell. “We wanted to stay in Cabarrus County, have room to expand production, start our aged-product program and provide a unique tourism experience. The prison location will allow us to do all of these things.”

Business owner recognized for support of animal welfare May 18. Robin Smith Salzman, coowner of Lake Norman Chrysler Jeep Dodge, was honored Friday at a luncheon hosted by the Humane Society of Charlotte. The annual Women for Animal Welfare Luncheon was created to celebrate the work women do to help animals. Smith Salzman began supporting the Humane Society by making a gift in honor of her mother, an animal lover. Over the past several years, she has supported the HSC through vehicle donations, event sponsorships and gifts to the Have a Heart Medical Fund. She has also included the organization in her estate planning. Molly Green, a student at Charlotte Latin School, was also recognized by the HSC for raising more than $12,000 in the last three years through lemonade stands and an annual fundraising dinner. Two hundred women were expected

Salzman, co-owner of Lake Norman Chryslter Jeep Dodge donated a 2016 Ram 3500 Promaster to Spay Neuter Charlotte

to attend the luncheon sponsored by Dr. Elizabeth Rostan of Charlotte Skin and Laser. Maureen O’Boyle of WBTV hosted the event. “It is an honor to gather with so many women in the community who are passionate about the mission of our organization,” said Shelly Moore, president and CEO of the HSC.


Business Today

June 2016

13

NEWS - e

Champions made in Mooresville

Nu-Tec will employ 15at new Mooresville plant deBotech engineer discussing the 2014 sled with athlete, Jamie Greubel.

May 23. Members of the USA Bobsled National Team worked recently with local companies A2 Wind Tunnel and deBotech, Inc. Coaches, team engineers, ride designers and builders are testing athlete positions, equipment designs and positioning in the sleds. A2 Wind Tunnel and deBotech worked with the teams leading up to the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, where Team USA won two silver and four bronze medals in the bobsled and skeleton events. Gary Eaker, owner of A2 and AeroDyn Wind Tunnel, is one of the biggest names in racing aerodynamics. A2 Wind Tunnel is a premier wind-testing facility and provides a consistent environment with air speeds ranging from 30 to 85 mph. “The team members are looking for the best aero configuration to help cut even tenths of a second off of their sled times,” said Eaker.

deBotech, Inc. is a carbon fiber and advanced composite parts manufacturer with a vast understanding of lightweight materials in the composite field. The company, owned by Hans and Jamye deBot, manufactures products for automotive OEMs, after-market performance parts, military applications and sports and leisure components. “Mooresville is known as Race City USA and because of our motorsports industry cluster there [are] numerous resources available,” said Hans deBot. “Our community’s knowledge base can give other sports a competitive edge.” “Facilities like the wind tunnel help us find every hundredth of a second, which in a sport where gold medals are won and lost by hundredths is very important,” said two-time bobsled Olympic medalist Elana Meyers Taylor. “Mooresville is always so welcoming, it’s nice to feel like you’re at the bobsled capital of the South.”

RCCC selected to participate in NASA grant competition May 18. For the second year in a row, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College was one of only ten colleges selected to participate in the North Carolina Space Grant Team Design Challenge and Competition. “This was a great opportunity for work-based learning and provided a great experience of a real division of NASA for our students,” said Zackary Hubbard, program chair for the college’s computer technology integration program. Each team designed, engineered, tested and launched a high-altitude balloon to the edge of space. Team members were responsible for conducting a specific experiment while their balloon

was in flight. The balloons were launched in Hickory and the event was open to the public and those interested in STEM, said Dr. Van Madray, dean of the college’s engineering and business technologies programs. As part of NASA’s proposal to increase science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education at community and technical colleges, the N. C. Space Grant was selected as a recipient of the 2014 Space Grant Competitive Opportunity. The grant not only provided the funding for the competition, but it also provided a $1,000 scholarship for each Rowan-Cabarrus team member.

May 12. Nu-Tec Systems plans to purchase an existing building in the Lakeside Business Park for a manufacturing and distribution operation that will create 15 full-time positions. The company’s investment is expected to be on the order of $3 million. The Gurnee, Ill.-based company manufactures private label arc welding and plasma cutting products for the automotive market. “We will manufacture and distribute a wide array of products at the Mooresville location,” said Michael Cooper, president of Nu-Tec Systems. “With our ever-evolving electronic inverter welding technology this location will

give us a competitive edge to meet our customer driven demands.” The company’s recent acquisition of H&S Autoshot Manufacturing in Canada created an immediate need for expanded production and a larger distribution center in the U.S. The company may receive a rebate up to $148,200 from Iredell County and Mooresville over a five-year period. According to a press release from Mooresville-South Iredell Economic Development, the project was made possible by Paula Sanders with New South Properties of the Carolinas, Town of Mooresville, Iredell County and Mooresville South Iredell Economic Development.

Easy As Pie

Paying your employees can get complicated. Time clocks and timecards. Earnings and deductions. Tax tables and calculations. It gets to a point where making payroll isn’t about having the money in the account—it’s about the time and expertise needed to eliminate the guesswork. Let us simplify it for you. Payroll Plus has been making payday easier for our clients for nearly 20 years. From our timekeeping solutions to online payroll submission and streamlined payroll tax process, we’re able to take the obstacles out of paying your employees, saving you time and money.

Call us to find out how managing your payroll can be as easy as eating pie. (704) 895-0777 — 19300 Statesville Rd., Suite 302, Cornelius, NC 28031

www.payrollplusus.com


Business Today

14 June 2016

On T he Record

THIS MONTH REAL ESTATE TRANsACTIONS . . . 14 FORECLOSURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 NEW CORPORATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Cornelius PARC is bringing a new 5K run/walk and fun run to the Lake Norman area! The 2016 Run to Remember will benefit the Cornelius Never Forget | 9/11 Monument, which will include a piece of steel from the World Trade Center and be located in front of Cornelius Fire Station #1. The race course will begin and end at Westmoreland Athletic Complex, and includes several segments along the McDowell Creek Greenway as it winds through the beautiful trails and around the scenic ponds at Robbins Park. The 5K race course is challenging, consists of elevation changes, and incorporates a variety of running surfaces including natural surface, gravel, pavement, and a wooden boardwalk. This family-friendly event is open to most running levels, with race divisions divided into age groups based on age and gender.

Friday, June 17 Westmoreland Athletic Complex, 8430 Westmoreland Road

5K Race start time is 6:30 p.m. Kid's Fun Run at 6:00 p.m., a short course winding around our new fishing ponds at Robbins Park Packet pick-up will be available race day starting at 4:30pm at Westmoreland Athletic Complex Strollers and pets are prohibited Cost- $35 for 5K participants, $5 for fun run (ages 5-10) Awards will be provided to the top three (3) runners in each age category, male and female. Awards will also be provided for overall under 40, masters (over 40) and grand masters (over 50). No awards will be provided for the fun run. Participants must be at least 5 years old to participate.

www.cornelius.org/parc

These are recent property transactions over $200,000 as recorded by the county Register of Deeds in Cabarrus, Iredell and Mecklenburg.

Ct., Concord

More Cabarrus Transactions online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com

Mecklenburg County 5/19/16 Cherish House LLC, Cher Taylor, 9242 Raven Wing Dr., Charlotte 28262 5/19/16 Chosen & Refined, Montressa R. Kale, 415-15 Michelle Linnea Dr., Charlotte 28262 5/19/16 Fashion Forward Foundation, Tammy L. Ramsay, 18137 Sunset Cove Ln., Cornelius 5/19/16 Flowstates LLC, Cheryl A. Nowak, 9435 St. Barts Ln., Huntersville

Cabarrus County

5/19/16 Hilsmier Company LLC, Craig Hilsmier, 301 McCullough Dr., Ste. 400, Charlotte 28262

05/13/16 $1,820,000 Harrisburg Bed, LLC to AJIT Properties, LLC, Lot 3 of Harrisburg Market, Harrisburg

5/19/16 Log On Media Strategies Inc., Jillian Tobias, 8518 Lake Pines Dr., Cornelius

05/13/16 $365,000 Meritage Homes of the Carolinas, Inc. to Sean & Deborah McClure, 2968 Donegal Dr., Kannapolis 05/13/16 $357,000 Taylor Morrison of Carolinas, Inc. to Sridhar Veeramalla & Latha Pagadala, 2586 Shoal Park Rd., Concord 05/13/16 $354,500 NVR, Inc. to William & Janice Phelps, 7339 Millstone Crl., Concord 05/13/16 $295,000 Grande Homes Co. to Sally Beeman-Mitchell, 754 King Frederick Ln., Concord 05/16/16 $253,000 Kyle & Patti Perkinson to Jodi Weddington, 254 Perrenial Dr., Concord 05/16/16 $283,000 Steven & Angel Hope to Jeffery & Jessica Reeves, 1639 Flowerfield Dr., Concord 05/16/16 $282,000 Ferlon & Linda Benton to Marla Presta-Carnes, 2659 Danbury Crl., Concord 05/16/16 $470,000 Christina Brewer to Leonard & Gerlonda Brown, 1042 Woodhall Dr., Huntersville 28078 05/16/16 $422,000 Essex Homes Southeast, Inc. to Chad & Stephanie Blount, 8518 Whitworth Ave., Harrisburg 05/16/16 $370,500 M/I Homes of Charlotte, LLC to Jordan & Victoria Littauer, 2655 Red Maple Ln., Harrisburg 05/16/16 $321,500 M/I Homes of Charlotte, LLC to Jennifer Zoba, 10547 Skipping Rock Ln., Concord 05/16/16 $296,000 James & Shirley Rockel to Nancy & Marina Capel, 3635 Brookville Ave., Concord 05/16/16 $276,000 Eastwood Construction LLC to Raina Wrightson, 3282 Kelsey Plaza, Kannapolis 05/16/16 $345,000 Joseph & Chrysanne Carlo to James & Deborah Buie, 9863 Darby Creek Ave., Concord 05/16/16 $293,000 Sachin & Swarup Pathrikar to Chandrasekhara Polisetty & Raga Dodda, 10205 Falling Leaf Dr., Concord 05/16/16 $379,000 Samuel & Lisa Adkins to Jamie & Angela Kertzie, 749 Desert Willow

5/19/16 Lowe’s Logistics & Consulting Co. LLC, David Lowe, 400 Gilead Rd., Huntersville 5/19/16 McD RE LLC, David Modlin, 14118 Harvington Dr., Huntersville 5/19/16 Pathways Center Inc., Deanna Williams, 2750 E. WT Harris Blvd., Ste. 128, Charlotte 28213 5/19/16 R&J erosioncontrol LLC, United States Corporation Agents Inc., 21556 Old Canal St., Cornelius 5/19/16 SACC Enterprises LLC, Gerald Chau, 9001 Hedge Maple Rd., Charlotte 28269 5/19/16 Sunset Consultant LLC, Brian P. Groeschel, 12829 Cadgwith Cove Dr., Huntersville 5/19/16 Tiger Tom Pistone LLC, Tom Pistone, 12536 Cladwell Rd., Charlotte 28213 5/19/16 VIP Motorcars LLC, Tesfa Lee, 6650 Ziegler Ln., Charlotte 28269 5/20/16 1Mustrdsd LLC, April Elam MD, 5002 Misty Oaks Dr., Apt. 1417, Charlotte 28269 5/20/16 ABL Consulting Group LLC, Amy B Kykins, 8208 Ballymore Ct., Huntersville 5/20/16 Baraka Financial Services Inc., Alain Bukasa, 8307 University Exec Park Dr., Ste. 244, Charlotte 28262 5/20/16 Beltran Unlimited LLC, Janice M. Beltran, 9310 Twin Trail Dr., Huntersville 5/20/16 Caliber Kids LLC, DeAnthony Hill, 5103 Elementary View Dr., Charlotte 28269 5/20/16 City Lifestyle Homes LLC, Mark Halteman, 11920 Willingdon Rd., Huntersville 5/20/16 IIG South LLC, Daniel Yancey, 1700 W. Sugar Creek Rd., Charlotte 28262 5/20/16 Jayme Avrit Inc., Jayme Avrit, 7818 Garnkirk Dr., Huntersville 5/20/16 Kingdom Window Cleaning Services LLC, Ursula Walkine, 123 E McCullough Dr., Ste. 304, Charlotte 28262 5/20/16 Prime Source Educational Services LLC, James D. Rainer, 11015 Wilburn Park Ct., Charlotte 28262 See TRANSACTIONS, Page 15


Business Today

June 2016

On The Record

TRANSACTIONS from page 14

5/20/16 RAM School-Age Child Care (RAMSACC) Inc., Nathaniel Jenkins, 11814 Sidney Crest Ave., Charlotte 28213 5/20/16 Villani Lloyd Enterprises LLC, Wendie Lloyd, 9820 Northcross Center Ct., Ste. 204, Huntersville

More Mecklenburg Transactions online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com

Mooresville

lien amount. After required notices are published, the property is sent to auction. The property then can be sold, not sold (examples: bankruptcy files or action dismissed without prejudice) or the sale postponed.

Cabarrus County 04/14/16 Billy Kirks, 100 Redbud Pl., Concord, NC, Fifth Third Bank, $100,916 04/14/16 Jalali & Markus Kerr, 1048 Hearth Ln., Concord, State Employees Credit Union, $414,000

5/17/16 KHAT LLC, Clifton W. Homesley, 330 South Main St. 28115

04/15/16 Ross & Kimberly Brashear, 7840 Woodmere Dr., Harrisburg, American Mortgage Express Corporation, $257,800

5/17/16 Luminasun Inc., Derik Baltich, 206C Joe Knox Ave. 28117

04/15/16 Heirs of Kenneth Mills, 922 Treasure Pl., Concord, Fifth Third Bank, $121,260

5/17/16 M&G Management Group LLC, Geoffrey A. Harbach, 143 Bradford Glyn Dr. 28115

04/15/16 Johnny & Elaine Price, 555 Early St., Kannapolis, Caliber Home Loans, $65,600

5/18/16 Franco’s Enterprises Inc., Carlos M. Franco, 604 N. Main St. 28115 5/18/16 phonEix LLC, Lee Larson, 153 Farm Knoll Way 28117 5/18/16 Thumbs Up Small Engine Repair Inc., Benn C. Weddington, 352 Shepherd Rd. 28115 5/18/16 Toste Construction Inc., Matt Crafton, 135 Bevan Dr. 28115 5/19/16 LX Labs LLC, Hunter Leaman, 431 Bay Harbour Rd. 28117 5/19/16 Raleigh Recovery Solar LLC, Kenny Habul, 192 Raceway Dr. 28117 5/19/16 Twin Z Company Inc., Michelle Barsosky, 122 Backstretch Ln. 28117 5/19/16 Whitley and Son Inc., Clint D. Whitley, 516-D River Hwy. 28117 5/20/16 Big Sky Investments LLC, Richard J. Lutzel, 20115 Henderson Rd., #K, Cornelius 5/20/16 JK Design Build LLC, Duane Johns, 260 Wood Duck Loop 28117 5/20/16 Mid Coast Holdings LLC, Richard J. Lutzel, 20115 Henderson Rd., #K, Cornelius 5/20/16 Northern Enterprises LLC, Richard J. Lutzel, 20115 Henderson Rd., #K, Cornelius

04/15/16 Estate of Robert C Felty, 4720 Lauren Glen St., Concord, Caliber Home Loans, $213,510 04/18/16 Meghan Wright & John Monette, 93 Georgia St. NW, Concord, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, $103,790 04/18/16 Jose Alfredo Gonzalez Figueroa & Maria Guadalupe Alba Mejia, 602 Doby St., Concord, Self Help Credit Union, $72,600 04/19/16 Jennifer Minette, 5209 Bahama Dr., Kannapolis, Bank of America, $102, 312 04/19/16 David & Deborah Bell, 6115 Ferncliff Dr., Concord, Wells Fargo Bank, $156,750 04/19/16 Jacqueline Helms, 801 Gladden Pl., Countrywide Bank, $130,500 04/21/16 Walter & Mary Mason, 1660 Songwood Rd., Concord, Bank One, $114,000 04/21/16 Jimmy & Donna Barbee, 4674 Falcon Chase Dr., Concord, Suntrust Mortgage, $120,000 04/21/16 Arthur & Stacey Ketcham, 1047 Hearth Ln. SW, Concord, Wells Fargo Bank, $379,905 04/21/16 Crystal Tindal & Wayne Arnold, 2143 Galloway Ln. SW, Concord, Nationstar Mortgage, $349,864

5/20/16 Rennert Solar LLC, Kenny Habul, 192 Raceway Dr. 28117

04/25/16 Mark & Jane Conversano, 122 Corban Ave. SW, Concord, Fifth Third Bank, $186,850

5/20/16 Southern Pacifi Enterprise LLC, Richard L. Lutzel, 20115 Henderson Rd., #K, Cornelius

04/26/26 Gregory & Amy Tolbert, 4619 Amberdeen Ct., Concord, PNC Bank, $99,470

5/20/16 Willmann Management Group LLC, Freddie L. Williams, 123 Cole Dr. 28115

More Mooresville Transactions online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com

FORECLOSURES

Foreclosure actions have been started on the following properties. Items show the date foreclosure documents became public, owners, property address, lien holder,

Beautiful Cornelius Gated Community

Olde World English style home in Shadowcreek - Brilliantly appointed home with exquisite detailing and finishes. Boasting natural privacy, fire-pit, water falls and covered screen porch with fireplace and prep-station.

21324 Olde Quarry Lane | Cornelius | $815,000 | MLS| 3165919

04/26/16 Nicole & Ted Scott, 2999 Clover Rd. NW, Concord, Nationstar Mortgage, $177,900 04/28/16 Thomas Stack, Jr., 360 Speedway Pl., Concord, Ditech Financial, $106,400 04/28/16 William & Kristen Jones, 886 Anchor Way, Kannapolis, Wells Fargo Bank, $150,850 04/28/16 Horace & Christine Smith, 5634 Fetzer Ave., Concord, Carolina First Bank, $37,125 04/29/16 Rock Hill AME Zion Church, 3620 Rock Hill Church Rd., Concord, New DominSee FORECLOSURES, Page 16

Neal A. Crites

Crites Properties, LLC Nine Year Five Star Real Estate Agent

Jan Sipe

Jan@critespropertiesllc.com 704.453.4677

704.840.4004 Neal@critespropertiesllc.com www.critespropertiesllc.com

15


Business Today

16 June 2016

On T he Record

1655 Gold Hill Road Concord NC Offered for $875,000

FORECLOSURES from page 15

ion Bank, $1,425,000 04/29/16 Andrea Ross & Terrence Coleman, 6929 Brandon Chase Ln., Concord, Round Point Mortgage, $206,196 04/29/16 Alan &Ashley Gross, 986 Ramsgate St. SW, Concord, Wells Fargo, $129,900

More Cabarrus Foreclosures online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com

Mecklenburg County 5/2/16 Adrienne D. Robinson, 5511 Chasewind Dr., Charlotte 28269, HomeBanc Mortgage $135,000 5/2/16 Roy Dawson, 5243 Henderson Cir., Charlotte 28269, Prospect Mortgage $78,347 5/3/16 Brendon O. Henderson, 3412 Green Meadow Dr., Charlotte 28269, Nationsbanc Mortgage $90,000 Enjoy viewing this “one of a kind” secluded country estate just outside the city - beautiful & quality construction w exquisite moldings, woodwork, curved staircase, indoor pool w/ retractable roof, magnificent foyer & chandelier, custom built-ins and so much more!

www.teamhoneycutt.com º (704) 721-7130

What’s precious to you is precious to us.

SM

5/3/16 Jason E. Siekierski, 6265 Branch Hill Cir., Charlotte 28213, Allen Tate Mortgage $151,070 5/4/16 Chad C. Sellers, 9944 Hyde Glen Ct., Charlotte 28262, Nations Home Funding $106,000 5/5/16 Richard & Catherine Coates, 9004 Mapledale Ct., Cornelius, Fairway Independent Mortgage $198,921 5/9/16 Deirdra Wilson, 16845 Timber Crossing Rd., Charlotte 28213, First Franklin $106,000 5/9/16 Arnold Days, 5030 Bentgrass Run Dr., Charlotte 28269, Countrywide Home Loans $130,400 5/9/16 Leiu M. McCutcheon, 3348 Mason St., Charlotte 28269, Bank of America $116,000 5/9/16 Juan Zuluaga & Clarena Gutierrez, 8351 Rolling Meadows Ln., Huntersville, American Home Mortgage $138,222 5/12/16 Sharon L. Smith, 6322 Sackett Way, Charlotte 28269, Ryland Mortgage $155,254

Auto. Home. Life. Retirement. They all matter, so wrap them all in a blanket of Nationwide® protection. We put members first, because we don’t have shareholders.SM

Join the Nation® that knows what’s important. Combine your policies and save up to 25%

5/16/16 Victor Scott & Consuela Mayrant, 11114 Greenhead View Rd., Charlotte 28262, DHI Mortgage $176,739 5/17/16 Vernon Mahatha, 5802 Hemitt Dr., Charlotte 28269, Universal American Mortgage $104,330 5/17/16 Charles & Joyce Hilliard, 9634 Kenneth Glenn Dr., Charlotte 28213, Flagstar Bank $126,918 5/17/16 Edward & Amanda Thompson, 2328 Eargle Rd., Charlotte 28269, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage $93,532

Don Carney

Ron Parks,

(704) 892-1115

(704) 548-0500

190 Jackson St. Davidson

LUTCF

9713 Northcross Center Ct. Huntersville

S

Not all Nationwide affiliated companies are mutual companies and not all Nationwide members are insured by a mutual company. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle Join the Nation, What’s precious to you is precious to us and We put members first because we don’t have shareholders are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2014 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. NPR0718AO.2 (8/14)

IO # :

6688-1

More Mecklenburg Foreclosures online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com

Mooresville 4/26/16 Maria & Edwin Fernandez, 107 Daventry Pl. 28117, Myers Park Mortgage $174,800

5/2/16 Clifford & Jennifer Graves, 184 Huntly Ln. 28115, Wells Fargo Bank $285,600 5/9/16 James & Shirley Rager, 141 Culpeze Rd. 28117, JPMorgan Chase Bank $75,000 5/9/16 Gary & Casey Steensgard, 161 Crystal Bay Ct. 28115, ABN Amro Mortgage $109,250 5/18/16 Wendi & Mark Allen, 108 Tommys Ln. 28117, Haven Trust Bank $402,000

More Mooresville Transactions online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com

NEW CORPORATIONS These businesses have registered with the N.C. Secretary of State.

Cabarrus County 5/17/16 180 Church LLC, Zachary M. Moretz, 180 Church St. North, Concord 5/17/16 K.G. Painting Inc., Kevin Gehl, 40 Winecoff Ave. NE, Concord 5/18/16 Arrabon Innovations LLC, John B. Bell Jr., 4377 Motorsports Dr., Concord 5/18/16 EC Chemicals LLC, Josef Alexander, 3319 Seven Eagles Ct. SW, Concord 5/18/16 Paskiewicz LLC, Heather Wagoner, 1101 West C St., Kannapolis 5/18/16 Racing Innovations Inc., Clay Stephens, 703 Mooresville Rd., Ste. B, Kannapolis 5/19/16 Annie’s Angels Inc., Ann E. Sharma, 537 Montgrove Pl. NW, Concord 5/19/16 G2 Property Investments LLC, G2 Tax Investments LLC, 4263 Millet St. SW, Concord 5/19/16 Jhacks LLC, Larue L. Lesley, 664 Hyde Park Dr., Concord 5/19/16 LaForce Utilities LLC, James R. Laforce, 6711 Heather Ln., Concord 5/19/16 McSwain’s Half Dozen Realty LLC, Sherry M. Ingold, 5306 Atwater Dr., Concord 5/19/16 S & J Waterproofing LLC, Samuel Jijon Moreno, 704 Barons Ridge Rd., Lot C1, Kannapolis 5/20/16 1526 Family Holdings LLC, Ronald G. Long, 1526 Dale Earnhardt Blvd., Kannapolis 5/20/16 C&D Restaurants Inc., Gina Griffeth Dickens, 7781 Gateway Ln. NW, Concord 5/20/16 Epic Technology LLC, Martin Kelvin Hall Sr., 2309 Applegate Dr., Concord 5/20/16 Giffeth Management Group LLC, Gina Griffeth Dickens, 7781 Gateway Ln. NW, Concord 5/20/16 TSW Investments LLC, Timothy Scott Wallace, 960 Odell School Rd., Concord 5/20/16 Wightman Real Estate Group LLC, Allison Wightman, 1045 Westlake Dr., Kannapolis

More Cabarrus New Corporations online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com See NEW CORPORATIONS, Page 17


Business Today

June 2016

17

On The Record

NEW CORPORATIONS

W. Sugar Creek Rd., Charlotte 28262

Bay Harbour Rd. 28117

from page 16

5/20/16 Jayme Avrit Inc., Jayme Avrit, 7818 Garnkirk Dr., Huntersville

5/19/16 Raleigh Recovery Solar LLC, Kenny Habul, 192 Raceway Dr. 28117

Mecklenburg County

5/20/16 Kingdom Window Cleaning Services LLC, Ursula Walkine, 123 E McCullough Dr., Ste. 304, Charlotte 28262

5/19/16 Twin Z Company Inc., Michelle Barsosky, 122 Backstretch Ln. 28117

5/19/16 3194 Motorsports LLC, Richard M. Buck, 4803 Poplar Grove Dr., Charlotte 28269 5/19/16 ALL Events & Consulting LLC, Lindsey Long, 18801 Fore Sail Ct., Cornelius 5/19/16 Alumalite Squeegees Inc., Timothy E. Kirkland, 301 Glenora Dr., Huntersville 5/19/16 Budget Bundles LLC, United States Corporation Agents, 11017 Dry Stone Dr., Huntersville 5/19/16 Charlotte Electrical Services LLC, Martin M. Brennan Jr., 13801 Reese Blvd. West, Ste. 110, Huntersville 5/19/16 Cherish House LLC, Cher Taylor, 9242 Raven Wing Dr., Charlotte 28262 5/19/16 Chosen & Refined, Montressa R. Kale, 415-15 Michelle Linnea Dr., Charlotte 28262 5/19/16 Fashion Forward Foundation, Tammy L. Ramsay, 18137 Sunset Cove Ln., Cornelius 5/19/16 Flowstates LLC, Cheryl A. Nowak, 9435 St. Barts Ln., Huntersville 5/19/16 Hilsmier Company LLC, Craig Hilsmier, 301 McCullough Dr., Ste. 400, Charlotte 28262 5/19/16 Log On Media Strategies Inc., Jillian Tobias, 8518 Lake Pines Dr., Cornelius 5/19/16 Lowe’s Logistics & Consulting Co. LLC, David Lowe, 400 Gilead Rd., Huntersville 5/19/16 McD RE LLC, David Modlin, 14118 Harvington Dr., Huntersville 5/19/16 Pathways Center Inc., Deanna Williams, 2750 E. WT Harris Blvd., Ste. 128, Charlotte 28213 5/19/16 R&J erosioncontrol LLC, United States Corporation Agents Inc., 21556 Old Canal St., Cornelius 5/19/16 SACC Enterprises LLC, Gerald Chau, 9001 Hedge Maple Rd., Charlotte 28269 5/19/16 Sunset Consultant LLC, Brian P. Groeschel, 12829 Cadgwith Cove Dr., Huntersville 5/19/16 Tiger Tom Pistone LLC, Tom Pistone, 12536 Cladwell Rd., Charlotte 28213 5/19/16 VIP Motorcars LLC, Tesfa Lee, 6650 Ziegler Ln., Charlotte 28269 5/20/16 1Mustrdsd LLC, April Elam MD, 5002 Misty Oaks Dr., Apt. 1417, Charlotte 28269 5/20/16 ABL Consulting Group LLC, Amy B Kykins, 8208 Ballymore Ct., Huntersville 5/20/16 Baraka Financial Services Inc., Alain Bukasa, 8307 University Exec Park Dr., Ste. 244, Charlotte 28262 5/20/16 Beltran Unlimited LLC, Janice M. Beltran, 9310 Twin Trail Dr., Huntersville 5/20/16 Caliber Kids LLC, DeAnthony Hill, 5103 Elementary View Dr., Charlotte 28269 5/20/16 City Lifestyle Homes LLC, Mark Halteman, 11920 Willingdon Rd., Huntersville 5/20/16 IIG South LLC, Daniel Yancey, 1700

5/20/16 Prime Source Educational Services LLC, James D. Rainer, 11015 Wilburn Park Ct., Charlotte 28262 5/20/16 RAM School-Age Child Care (RAMSACC) Inc., Nathaniel Jenkins, 11814 Sidney Crest Ave., Charlotte 28213 5/20/16 Villani Lloyd Enterprises LLC, Wendie Lloyd, 9820 Northcross Center Ct., Ste. 204, Huntersville

More Mecklenburg New Corporations online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com

Mooresville 5/11/16 Ocean Bluff Holdings LLC, Andrew M. Shott, 131 Plantation Ridge Dr., Ste. 200 28117 5/11/16 RJ Arena Consultants LLC, Richard J. Arena Jr., 231 Streamside Pl. 28115 5/11/16 SMP Partners Corp., Mukund Parikh, 2187 Charlotte Hwy. 28117 5/11/16 Teresa Stevens Interior Designs LLC, Teresa A. Stevens, 1745 Brawley School Rd. 28117 5/11/16 Ultra Construction LLC, Laura Weber, 168 F. Ervin Farm Rd. 28115 5/12/16 123 Notarize Me Inc., Julia M. Elliott, 121 Orchid Ln. 28115 5/12/16 CRD Construction LLC, Donald S. Hemingway, 344 Rolling Hills Rd., Ste. 201 28117 5/12/16 LNG Inc., Gary Charles Porter, 108 Montrose Dr. 28115 5/12/16 RRRB Inc., David Brent Johnson, 595 Stonemarker Rd. 28117 5/13/16 Duck Dog Kennels LLC, Eddie Bonge, 124A Fernwood Ln. 28117 5/16/16 EmPower Construction LLC, Martin T. McCann, 318 W. Center Ave. 28115 5/17/16 Bosshart Insurance Group Inc., Brendan Bosshart, 197 Wellshire St. 28115 5/17/16 KHAT LLC, Clifton W. Homesley, 330 South Main St. 28115 5/17/16 Luminasun Inc., Derik Baltich, 206C Joe Knox Ave. 28117 5/17/16 M&G Management Group LLC, Geoffrey A. Harbach, 143 Bradford Glyn Dr. 28115 5/18/16 Franco’s Enterprises Inc., Carlos M. Franco, 604 N. Main St. 28115 5/18/16 phonEix LLC, Lee Larson, 153 Farm Knoll Way 28117 5/18/16 Thumbs Up Small Engine Repair Inc., Benn C. Weddington, 352 Shepherd Rd. 28115 5/18/16 Toste Construction Inc., Matt Crafton, 135 Bevan Dr. 28115 5/19/16 LX Labs LLC, Hunter Leaman, 431

5/19/16 Whitley and Son Inc., Clint D. Whitley, 516-D River Hwy. 28117 5/20/16 Big Sky Investments LLC, Richard J. Lutzel, 20115 Henderson Rd., #K, Cornelius 5/20/16 JK Design Build LLC, Duane Johns, 260 Wood Duck Loop 28117 5/20/16 Mid Coast Holdings LLC, Richard J. Lutzel, 20115 Henderson Rd., #K, Cornelius

5/20/16 Northern Enterprises LLC, Richard J. Lutzel, 20115 Henderson Rd., #K, Cornelius 5/20/16 Rennert Solar LLC, Kenny Habul, 192 Raceway Dr. 28117 5/20/16 Southern Pacifi Enterprise LLC, Richard L. Lutzel, 20115 Henderson Rd., #K, Cornelius 5/20/16 Willmann Management Group LLC, Freddie L. Williams, 123 Cole Dr. 28115

More Mooresville New Corporations online at www.BusinessTodayNC.com


Business Today

18 June 2016

STEGALL

from page 1

Like any professional sport you have to start young, learning the basics. The youngest start on sheep-called mutton busting, then move up to ride calves, followed by steers. Once they have mastered steers , amateur bull riding is the next step. Each division’s purse is determined by the number of riders and their entry fees in each division, with 1st and 2nd place earning money and points for their ride. Bull riders pay a $30 entry fee, calves and steers pay $20 with the

mutton busters paying $10. Stegall’s adds $200 to the Open division purse only, to sweeten the payout for the pros. Mooresville resident Zach Shriver, 13, came to the rodeo on May 22 for his first time to compete in the steer riding division. He said he was named after World Champion Bull Rider Lane Frost, as his middle name was Lane, and he wanted to see if this was the sport for him. He attended a bull riding school in April, where he rode steers twice with

JUNE 21, 4:30-6:30 P.M. OPEN HOUSE

Medical Assistant Program

NEW for FALL 2016:

Ranked 8th among 51 colleges & universities in NC! 100% employability! 90%+ certification pass rates in all programs!

• CHS Educational Loan Forgiveness Program, worth $5,000!!

Financial Aid available!

• Night & Weekend Program (Traditional weekday program is also available.)

On-site state-of-the-art clinical facilities!

401 Medical Park Drive | Concord, NC 28027 | 704-403-1555 www.cabarruscollege.edu

mixed results. He stayed on his first but the second one landed on him. “I rode it to the dirt, so I was happy,” said Zach. A little nervous after going to look at the steers he said, “Those (steer) are a lot bigger than the ones at school.” Even though Zack was happy with the steer he drew, he was thrown off before reaching a qualifying time. He said that even though it is competition it has a family feel. “Other riders were letting me borrow equipment, giving me pointers and encouraging me,” he said, vowing to return the next Sunday. Robin said they started the rodeo because, “We thought it would be fun and it has been.” “It’s a family atmosphere, with lots of excitement” she said. Between the rides they have “Added attractions” for the children in the audience. Candy scrambles for the youngsters who run in the arena in search of goodies and calf scrambles where they try to grab a ribbon tied to the tail of a calf for a prize. Stan said beyond the rides, memories of some of the “Added attractions” will always entice a smile. “Bull bowling, where you line the people up like bowling pins and the last man standing wins,” he said was one of his favorite, funny memories. They have tried steer jousting, pig riding and on May 30th they were planning to have adult tricycle races. Theirs is an old fashioned businessriders, bulls and times are all handwritten. There are no credit card machines so you need to bring cash for admis-

OVERTIME

Cleveland resident Hayden Brooks, 8, asks a question about calf riding as Conner Brumley, 9, and his dad, Jason Brumley of Davidson, listen to Stan Stegall’s response while entering the calf riding competition.

sion, entry fees and the concession stand. Robin uses the computer to post the results on the internet at the end of the evening and to help promote the business. “It’s gotten bigger ever year for the last ten or fifteen years,” said Stan. “There used to be bull riding every night of the week within a 100 mile radius of here and they all played out, we’re the last rodeo around here,” he said. He credits his success with a good location, which is actually closer to Davidson- about a mile away, Sunday nights being a good night for families to come out and “Social media has been a big thing,” said Stan. Facebook, Craig’s list and the internet are joined by old fashion banners next to the roadways to advertise the rodeos. During the week the couple works alone to prepare the arena, but on Sunday’s they have 20 part time employees help them put on the event. Stan, 59, and Robin, 60, said they hope to last about 5 more years, “if the pressure to sell the land doesn’t get to me before then,” said Stan.

from page 3

additional pay. The new regulations were designed to address this, increasing the minimum salary at which a full-time salaried worker can be exempt from overtime rules from $23,660 to $47,476 annually, or from $455 to $913 weekly. The new regulations also include an inflation adjustment every three years. In announcing the new regulations, Vice President Joe Biden said, “We can’t allow folks with families to support to work long hours without being paid fairly for it.” The Obama Administration expects the change will result in either higher pay or more time off for up to 4.2 million workers who currently are not eligible for overtime un-

der federal law. So, it becomes not just a salary but also a quality of life issue, since some companies are expected to give workers more time off rather than paying overtime. But it’s not all that simple, said McDevitt. “Many businesses will experience a hit to their productivity from these new rules, as they now have to pay more for the same amount of work.” Russell agrees. “Revenues remain constant yet the cost of operation goes up requiring either a price hike to the consumer or less profit for the business. To remain competitive, management is usually faced with the prospect continued on page 19


Business Today

MOTORSPORTS

June 2016

19

from page 1

come largely as a response to these deaths, particularly that of Dale Earnhardt in 2001. After his accident and another involving a pit crew that same season, NASCAR made full-face helmets mandatory for both drivers and crew members. Many drivers also switched to the six-point safety harness. In 2002, NASCAR opened its 60,000-square foot research and development center in Concord, which focuses not only on racing tech but also on safety of drivers, crew and fans. That same year, NASCAR began using SAFER barriers at Indianapolis to help minimize damage of impact. The “Car of Tomorrow” chassis, implemented nearly 10 years ago, includes a more centralized driver’s seat and crushable material in the door frames. “I don’t think people are really very aware of all the great things that have been done in the area of safety,” said Gene Stefanyshyn, NASCAR’s vice president of innovation and racing development. “We’ll continue to empha-

size that, and we dedicate significant human and capital resources every year and continue on improving that.” When stock-car racing began in the 1940s, the very idea of safety belts and helmets was far-fetched. NASCAR made roll bars mandatory in 1952. By the 1960s, safety innovations included roll cages, fuel cells to minimize explosion risk, onboard fire extinguishers, safety liners for tires and fire-retardant uniforms for drivers. In the 1970s, window netting became mandatory. And in the 1980s, racing seats were the latest safety innovation. Crew members have been required to wear safety helmets since 2002. In 2011, NASCAR reduced the number of crew allowed over the wall from seven to six, and has more recently tightened rules about when crew members can leave the pit wall to start working on the cars. NASCAR’s managing director of research and development, Mike Fisher, said there’s a “complete system of safety” in the racing industry, starting with pre-race inspection and continuing through to comprehensive investigations of accidents and injuries. As risk of serious injury is reduced, perhaps the next generation of racing safety can focus on repetitive-use injuries that are not fatal but can affect performance and quality of life. Hand surgeon Dr. Glenn Gaston recently completed an epidemiological study tracking upper-extremity injury trends in NASCAR drivers and pit crew members. Gaston is hand consultant to Joe

continued from page 18

of cutting back hours to the employee or finding ways to automate and cut out the human element altogether.” Virtually all local businesses contacted by Business Today have adopted a wait and see attitude. “It doesn’t go into effect until December and I expect we’ll be hearing a great deal about from our corporate office between now and then” said a Lake Norman retail business manager who wished to remain anonymous since he was not authorized to speak on the subject. Robin Salzman, co-owner of Lake Norman Chr ysler Jeep Dodge, said most of the dealership’s employees are “already on hourly wages and being paid overtime so we will have

minimal changes.” Ironically, the biggest effect of the new law may be that it hurts lower-salaried workers. “I foresee younger, lessskilled workers SMITH faring the worst under this plan, because they often compensate for their lack of training by working longer hours to get the job done,” McDevitt said. “Now that kind of on-the-job training will be too costly for businesses.”

Gibbs Racing, Hendrick Motorsports and Stewart-Haas Racing. The study, conducted with physician assistant William Heisel, was a retrospective chart review of 226 NASCAR patients between July 2003 and October 2014 to assess position-specific, upper-extremity injuries and provide a comprehensive picture of musculoskeletal forces placed on the athletes. The study found that orthopedic injuries in NASCAR can be linked to the demands of each role. Changers were most at risk for hand-related injuries, while carriers were most susceptible to finger injuries. Drivers were at risk for hand-arm vibration syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome. “Each position has specific movements that could cause injury if you don’t understand how to take care of your body over time,” said Curtis Walls, sports performance coach at Chip Ganassi Racing in Concord. He works with crew to ensure that repetitive motions are addressed with appropriate stretches and strengthening exercises. An aggravating factor for pit crews is that motions are one-sided, said Ganas-

si’s pit crew coach, Shaun Peet. A jack man, for example, will plant with the same leg every time, leading to asymmetrical development of muscles on one side of the body and compensatory movements on the opposite side. So Ganassi employs trainers like Walls as well as massage therapists. They’ve also brought in efficiency consultants who, said Peet, were “aghast at the number of bad body positions in a pit stop.” Ganassi isn’t just protecting its investment here. “You’re around those guys 24/7 from February to November,” said Walls. A former wide receiver with the Pittsburgh Power, he understands that in order to create a team culture, members need to feel valued. In turn, helping athletes prevent long-term issues enhances both their physical and their mental performance. Operating outside the law was the reason for speed when NASCAR began. There’s no escaping the laws of nature, though, so research-based solutions and a holistic approach to athlete health will be paramount as auto racing continues to evolve.


Business Today

20 June 2016

Hot Properties

Prices still climbing at a healthy rate in Charlotte

104 Barnstable Court in Mooresville for $1 million

The S&P/Case Shiller Home Price Index rose .72 percent nationwide, which is great news, but the news from Charlotte is even better. Reflecting deals that closed in March, the Charlotte index of prices rose .87 percent. The Case Shiller index measures the value of residential real es-

22531 Torrence Chapel Road in Cornelius for $1.7 million

tate in 20 major U.S. metropolitan areas, from Atlanta to Washington, D.C. Charlotte real estate continues to benefit from in-migration and a tight supply. Year over year, prices were up 5.2 percent nationwide in March. Portland led the way with a 12.3% year-

over-year price increase, followed by Seattle with 10.8%, and Denver with a 10.0% increase. Charlotte was in the bottom half of the pack, with a 4.3 percent increase, but Charlotte has always been known as the Steady Eddie in the national residential real estate market. At the bottom of

the pack were Chicago and Washington, D.C., with year over year gains of 1.9 percent and 1.5 percent, respectively. Measured from the market peak in the summer of 2006 peaks, prices are down Continued on Page 21

Sunrise or Sunset? Patrick Joseph Distinctive Homes

Introduces an all new private enclave of seven large waterfront homesites

positioned on a quiet south facing point with incredible lakefront views of the main channel.

SOLD

4

3

5

SOLD 2

1 7

6

SOLD

Architecturally distinct and graceful homes designed around breathtaking waterfront views. Offered by premier award winning home builder Patrick Joseph Distinctive Homes Have coffee with the morning sun, or libations gazing at the sunset, relax on your veranda, or walk to shops and restaurants at Langtree Lake Norman off Exit 31 in Mooresville

The choice is yours‌ Contact Mike Shalvoy, principal, at 980-722-1118 or mshalvoy@pjdhomes.com

See NEW CORPORATIONS, Page 21


Business Today

June 2016

Hot Properties Continued from page 20

The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices results for March 2016

Seasonally adjusted (SA) and non-seasonally adjusted (NSA) data

March

Mar/Feb

Feb/Jan

1-Year

2016

Change

Change

Change

Level

(%)

(%)

(%)

Atlanta

127.6

1.1%

0.6%

6.5%

Atlanta

1.1%

0.8%

0.6%

1.4%

Boston

183.80

1.0%

-0.1%

4.3%

Boston

1.0%

0.7%

-0.1%

0.6%

Charlotte

136.93

0.9%

0.3%

4.3%

Charlotte

0.9%

0.1%

0.3%

0.5%

Chicago

130.01

1.0%

-0.3%

4.3%

Chicago

1.0%

0.9%

-0.3%

1.0%

Cleveland

108.05

0.1%

-0.7%

2.8%

Cleveland

0.1%

-0.1%

-0.7%

0.7%

Dallas

159.67

1.4%

0.5%

8.5%

Dallas

1.4%

0.8%

0.5%

0.8%

Metropolitian Area

Metropolitian Area

Mar/Feb Change (%) NSA

SA

Feb/Jan Change (%) NSA

SA

Denver

179.20

1.6%

1.0%

10.0%

Denver

1.6%

0.8%

1.0%

1.4%

Detroit

103.93

0.7%

0.1%

6.2%

Detroit

0.7%

0.6%

0.6%

1.1%

Las Vegas

147.13

0.7%

0.2%

6.0%

Las Vegas

0.7%

0.3%

0.2%

1.0%

Los Angeles

244.52

0.7%

0.6%

6.5%

Los Angeles

0.7%

0.3%

0.2%

1.0%

Miami

208.97

1.1%

0.1%

6.2%

Miami

1.1%

0.6%

0.1%

0.6%

Minneapolis

146.58

0.8%

-0.4%

3.9%

Minneapolis

0.8%

1.3%

-0.4%

0.8%

New York

179.19

0.0%

-0.3%

2.7%

New York

0.0%

0.5%

-0.3%

0.2%

Phoenix

157.60

0.3%

0.2%

5.6%

Phoenix

0.3%

0.1%

0.2%

0.5%

San Diego

195.29

1.5%

0.8%

12.3%

San Diego

1.0%

1.0%

0.1%

0.2%

San Francisco

223.90

2.3%

1.1%

8.5%

San Francisco

2.3%

0.9%

1.1%

1.6%

Seattle

193.02

2.4%

1.1%

10.8%

Seattle

2.4%

0.9%

1.1%

1.6%

Tampa

179.84

1.1%

0.6%

7.6%

Tampa

1.1%

1.0%

0.6%

1.0%

Washington

209.99

0.8%

-0.3%

1.5%

Washington

0.8%

0.9%

0.2%

0.6%

Composite-10

198.68

0.8%

0.2%

4.7%

Composite-10

0.8%

0.8%

0.2%

0.6%

Composite-20

184.50

0.9%

0.2%

5.4%

Composite-20

0.9%

0.9%

0.2%

0.7%

U.S. National

176.91

0.7%

0.1%

5.2%

U.S. National

0.7%

0.1%

0.1%

0.3%

Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices and CoreLogic Data through March 2016

Source: S&P Dow Jones Indices and CoreLogic Data through March 2016

10.5-12.5 percent, depending on the city. Since the bottom in 2012, prices are up 35 percent to 37 percent. Meanwhile, there’s a shortage of homes for sale nationally and locally. “The number of homes currently on the market is less than 2 percent of the number of households, the lowest percentage since the mid-1980s,” said David M. Blitzer, a managing director at S&P Dow Jones. It’s an interesting market for executive level and luxury homes. Under $1 million is hot, under $500,000 even hotter. Over $1 million, there is more inventory and it will take more patience to sell. “We continue to experience the same problem we’ve had for the past several years and that is lack of inventory and lack of good marketable inventory in acceptable price ranges,” said Neal Crites owner of Crites Properties in Cornelius. “Buyer’s today expect the best of the best and these are homes that are quickly snatched up at good selling prices. This is why sellers must make all attempts to get it right the first time.”

nifer Stewart with Allen Tate Co. The lakefront house, which has a salt water pool, a home theater and a 1,400 bottle wine cellar, is assessed at $1.6 million. The selling agent was Gretel Howell, Allen Tate Company

In Cornelius

A 7,527 square foot house at 22531 Torrence Chapel Road has sold for $1.7 million after being listed at $1.795 million by Jen-

5700 sq. feet | 5 bedrooms 6 full and 3 half baths | 4 car garage 20927 Bethelwood Ln, Cornelius | 2.8 million

In Mooresville

A 4,476 squarefoot house with a deeded boatslip and a chef’s kitchen has sold for $1 million after being listed at $1.08 million by Jodie Widaseck of Trump International Realty. The house, at 104 Barnstable Court, has a tax value of $1 million. Edward Steve Perry of Re/Max Executive Realty represented the buyers. The listing said a minimum Social Membership to Trump National was required.

Hot Properties Hot Properties is all about the deal. If you’re an agent with a high-end, closed deal, usually $750,000 and above, let us know. Email us at nebiztoday@gmail. com or call 704-895-1335.

Rare opportunity for a luxurious new home in a mature all waterfront neighborhood Offered by award winning Patrick Joseph Distinctive Homes

• Oversize Estate Waterfront Lot in exclusive Cornelius waterfront neighborhood to be completed June 2016 • Expansive outdoor verandas to enjoy the sunset • Large pool and pool house for three season enjoyment • Spacious outdoor living area for optimum lake living • Luxury wide oak wood floors, custom 10’ doors, coastal trim, inset cabinets and alder paneling in study • Awe-inspiring master suite includes sitting area and custom his and her closets and carrera marble bath and shower • Private pier Contact PJDH principal Mike Shalvoy. 980-722-1188 Photos are a completed Patrick Joseph home with similar attributes to the home under construction on Bethelwood Lane

21


Business Today

22 June 2016

Opinion

When working is a pleasure, it’s about people

I’ve been fortunate enough to hire some good people over the years, one, a production director, Nelson Bynum who stuck with me through thick, thin and thick, for 10 years and Gail Williams, the long-time advertising and marketing director of Cornelius Today and Business Today. The big news here is that Gail is one of the “50 Most Influential Women” for 2016, as reported by the Mecklenburg Times, the legal journal based in Charlotte. (Not that there is a competitive nature in the news business, but we recognized her first by giving Gail a Lifetime Achievement Award at Business Today’s 11th annual Top Women in Business Champagne Reception last year.) Gail blazed a trail for women in the advertising business, launching her career in the male-dominated Atlanta broadcast market in the 1970s. She’s

Most people start an exercise program to lose weight, gain energy and enjoy better health. And most people quit not long after they start. A better approach is to find your motivation and set goals for your health and for daily, fun movement that align with your sense of self. Behavioral scientist,

told me stories about achievement was dealing with men back in those her late husband’s 2010 stroke. It days. All I can say is paralyzed him over half of his body ugh. and affected his speech and brain “I remember function. She visited him virtually telling my first every day in a nursing home, ran prospective boss, her household and held up her part ‘I’m looking for a job of the Business Today and Cornethat I can really get lius Today operation, including an involved in, where extended period of time when I was I can grow and be away. more than just a typist.’ He looked Husband Bob Williams passed heavenward and said ‘Thank God. away in 2013. “Just putting on blindYou’re hired!’” She started ers and doing what I had to as a secretary and soon do...I discovered how strong transitioned to sales when a I really was, and what I could position opened. accomplish in the face of Gail worked for TV staadversity,” she says. tions, billboard companies That kind of determinaEditors and the Charlotte Business Notebook tion, as well as a sincere Journal during her four-decustomer-focused approach, cades-long career, as well as a shortmakes it a pleasure to go to work and lived, but good-looking publication take on big tasks. Over the course called Skirt. of the past 14 years—we officially She is currently the president of published for the first time April 1, the Lake Norman Executive Board, 2002, no jokes please—our business as well as the former president of the has morphed and withstood a variety American Advertising Federation of of challenges that took their toll on Charlotte. She’s also the official secthe newspaper business. retary of Big Day at the Lake, the allIt’s been my pleasure to morph our volunteer organization that provides business through all those changes support to Big Brothers Big Sisters of with Gail saying things like yes, sure Greater Charlotte. thing and what’s next. Gail says her most significant

Book Review: No Sweat researcher and coach Michelle Segar explains how to set up an exercise and wellness regime based on her “MAPS program” of “meaning, awareness, permission and strategy.” An expert on sustaining long-term motivation, she urges you to take on an informal, fun activity, such as walking or dancing, that you enjoy. getAbstract recommends her manual – the 2015 USA Best Book Awards’

top diet-exercise book – to anyone who wants to get and stay healthy.

Editor Dave Yochum nebiztoday@gmail.com Sales & Marketing Director Gail Williams gail.todaypubs@gmail.com Business Development Manager Jennifer Kraftchick jennifer.todaypubs@gmail.com General Manager Stephen Nance production.todaypubs@gmail.com Contributing Writers Erica Batten, Cheryl Kane, Sherre DeMao, Marty Price, Dave Friedman, Dave Vieser, Cathryn Piccirillo Sherman Phone 704-895-1335 The entirety of this newspaper is copyrighted by Business Today, LLC 2016 with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use without permission of any content is prohibited. Business Today is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Business Today P.O. Box 2062 Cornelius, N.C. 28031 BACK ISSUES Payable by VISA & MASTERCARD ONLY. $1.50 (if available); $4 to mail FAXED ARTICLES - $5 per page PHOTOS - $100 REPRINTS - Reprints on high-quality , framable stock are available, starting at $65. NEWS AND CALENDAR ITEMS Business Today is a local business publication. If you have news items, they may be e-mailed to businesstodaync@gmail.com. Business Today is published on the first Friday of every month to qualified small business owners in the Golden Crescent. SUBSCRIPTIONS May be purchased for $36. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Do you have an opinion you’d like to share? We offer a forum for ideas, opinions and dissenting opinions. You can e-mail your thoughts to nebiztoday@gmail.com or mail to Business Today at P.O. Box 2062, Cornelius, N.C. 28031.

Michelle Segar . No Sweat: How the Simple Science of Motivation Can Bring You a Lifetime of Fitness. Copyright © 2015 AMACOM, a division of American Management Association, 2015. 272 pages. ISBN-13: 9780814434857.

Your letter, or a longer opinion piece, may be edited for brevity and/or clarity. Please include a phone number.

www.businesstodaync.com


Thank you

2016

Sponsors!

• Provide a day of fun for kids in Big Brothers Big Sisters • Raise money for an efficiently run non-profit • Recruit mentors for children

ADMIRAL SPONSOR PRESENTING SPONSORS CAPTAIN SPONSORS

COMMANDERS: Law Firm of Bentz & Associates, Charlotte Eye Ear Nose and Throat Association, Dan & Donna Brown, Chris & Robbie Davis, Dixie and Mike Dean, Joshua & Kerri Dobi, John Donoghue, Carolyn & Jim Duke, The McIntosh Law Firm, Novant Health, Lake Norman Kiwanis, Park Avenue Properties, Rotary Club of North Mecklenburg, Art Sabates, Tricia & Brian Sisson, Dr. Nancy & Sen. Jeff Tarte, Allen Tate Co. FRIENDS: AlphaGraphics Lake Norman, John &

Nancy Aneralla, Chris & Sally Ashworth, KS Audio, Rod Beard, Margaret & Blair Boggs, Crafty Burg’r, John Cherry, Pat Cotham, Thomas & Ann Dutton, David Fieg, Lapis Financial, Bell & Bell Law Firm, Diane & Dave Gilroy, Dr. Akiba Green, Carol Houle, Tom Hilb, James Hicks, Martin & Cheryl Kane, Lauren Kimsey, Charles & Shelly Knoedler, Nikolai and Kristin Kruger, Rhonda Lennon, Sandy & Mac McAlpine, Maria & Kurt Naas, Vickie & Donald Payne, Robert & Ivonne Reed, Dressler’s Restaurant, Thurman Ross, Modern Salon & Spa, Troy & Della Stafford, DeVore, Acton & Stafford, Tracey & Dan Stehle, Thom & Susan Tillis, Master Title, Sharon & Woody Lois & Bob Watson, Washam, Gail Williams in honor of Bob Williams. RESTAURANTS: Alton’s Kitchen and Cocktails, The Brickhouse Tavern, Bruster’s Real Ice Cream, Mama’s Pizza Express, and Port City Club.

Supported by

and

for 12 years


UNDER CONTRACT

$3,750,000 | Waterfront | The Peninsula Pool Private Dock | Generator | 9883 sq ft

$2,149,000 | Waterfront | The Peninsula Pool | Private Dock | Outdoor Fireplace

JUST LISTED $1,950,000 | Cornelius | 1.18 acres Waterfront | Private Dock

$3,299,000 | Waterfront | Cornelius | Pool & Spa Huge Master | 3 Car Garage| 70.000lb boat lift

JUST LISTED $1,449,000 | 3.6 acres Built in 2007 | Davidson Near River Run

$3,499,000 | Waterfront | Cornelius Private Dock | 4 Car Garage

UNDER CONTRACT!

JUST LISTED $679,000 | Cornelius | Private Boat Slip Renovated Kitchen | Master on Main

$3,950,000 | Waterfront | Pool | Private Dock | Huge Covered Veranda

$899,000 | River Run | 3 Levels | Master on Main| 3 Car Gararge | Amazing Kitchen

$1,160,000 | 5261 sq ft | Waterfront| Overlook Built in 2006 | Master on Main

$370,000 - $629,000 | 3 Waterfront Lots Available

$5,400,000| Waterfront | Mooresville | Over 9000 sq ft | 1.5 acres

Lance Carlyle 704-252-0237

Jim Carlyle 704-252-3047

Terry Byars 704-728-9775

Al Strickland 704-201-7244

Tammy Godwin 704-650-0296

Traci Roberts 615-946-8708

John Roberts 704-507-4960

Terry Donahue 321-402-8543

Jim Grywalski 704-236-9899

Michael Green 704-954-4489

19520 W Catawba Ave Suite 113 | Cornelius, NC 28031 | 704-895-4676 Office | www.CarlyleProperties.com

BusinessToday - June 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you