Business Chief Asia Magazine – March 2019

Page 1

ASIA EDITION MARCH 20 19 asia.businesschief.com

City Focus

BANGKOK

The world’s most visited city

A technology transformation

Tallest skyscrapers in ASIA

Managing Director Luca Martin on the company’s supply chain transformation

TOP 10

KTM GROUP: ACCELERATING INTO ASIA

DIGITAL DISRUPTION OF INSURANCE



FOREWORD

W

orld-renowned motorcycle

to us about its expansion strategy,

manufacturer KTM Group is

the importance of its Filipino identity,

setting its sights on conquering the

and its goal of becoming a global

Asian market. Laura Mullan sat down

industry leader.

with Luca Martin, Managing Director at KTM Asia Motorcycle

We also spoke with Singapore Life

Manufacturing, to discuss

about its digital transform-

how the firm’s supply

ation journey and the

chain transformation has

disruptive technologies

laid the foundations for

driving customer

success on its latest frontier. “We are working with some

Luca Martin, MD at KTM Asia

centricity in insurance. For this month’s edition,

partners in Asia to develop

we explore the vibrant Thai

a supplier rating platform

capital of Bangkok, as well as

where each supplier can log in, create

the region’s tallest buildings.

a profile and get feedback about their performances,” Martin says. “I think

Don’t forget to also check out our

this digital approach is important for

in-depth company profiles on AXA,

the future of procurement.”

Paidy, and Anheuser-Busch InBev.

Jollibee Food Corporation has

Enjoy the issue!

established itself as one of the world’s

Marcus Lawrence

fastest-growing quick service

marcus.lawrence@bizclikmedia.com.

restaurant companies. The firm spoke a s i a . b u s i n e s s c h i e f. c o m

03



ASIA EDITION EDITOR IN CHIEF

MARCUS LAWRENCE MANAGING EDITORS

ANDREW WOODS OLIVIA MINNOCK

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CONTENTS

10 KTM ASIA:

Accelerating towards the Asian market with supply chain excellence

32

JOLLIBEE FOODS:

conquering the world stage

42 SOF T WARE ENABLING 5G


REINVENTING UPSKILLING FOR THE FOURTH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION

52

62

74 City Focus

BANGKOK

OPEN DATA ADDRESSING WORLD HUNGER — SOLVING THE AGRICULTURAL CRISIS FOR A MORE SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

84


CONTENTS

98

AXA Group

116

136

Singapore Life

MLC Life Insurance

150 Paidy


198 National Heart Foundation of Australia

162

216 University of Western Australia

The Caravel Group

180

232

AB InBev

Wyndham Destinations


10

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

KTM GROUP

ACCELERATING TOWARDS THE ASIAN MARKET WITH SUPPLY CHAIN EXCELLENCE WRITTEN BY

LAURA MULLAN PRODUCED BY

CHARLOTTE CLARKE

a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com

11


KTM

LUCA MARTIN, MANAGING DIRECTOR AT KTM ASIA MOTORCYCLE MANUFACTURING INC., REVEALS HOW THE FIRM IS READYING ITS SUPPLY CHAIN FOR ITS NEXT FRONTIER: ASIA

I

f you’re a motorcycle enthusiast, KTM Group will be a company firmly on your radar. Offering everything from trailblazing street

bikes to dirt-shredding motorcycles, KTM has earned its reputation as Europe’s largest motorbike manufacturer and now, on the road ahead, it has 12

its eyes firmly set on a new horizon: Asia. One integral player at the heart of this expansion is Luca Martin, Managing Director at KTM Asia Motorcycle Manufacturing Inc. Martin is a seasoned professional when it comes to two-wheeled vehicles: he started his career as a mechanical engineer, specifically working on vehicle engine development where he used artificial intelligence (AI) to optimise mechanical components. His next career move saw him at Ducati. “I helped to create the complete supply chain of Ducati in Asia from scratch,” Martin recalls. “We had to find new suppliers, develop new components locally to optimise the factories out there.” This was no mean feat, but Martin helped to establish Ducati’s Asia presence and therefore when KTM Group readied itself to enter the Asian market, Martin was an ideal candidate for the job. MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

13

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KTM

“ WE STARTED PRODUCTION FOR BOTH LOCAL AND EXPORT MARKETS JUST OVER A YEAR AGO AND WE ARE ALREADY PRODUCING MORE THAN 7,000 UNITS A YEAR”

14

— Luca Martin, Managing Director at KTM ASIA Motorcycle Manufacturing Inc MARCH 2019

As part of this ambitious strategy, the company forged a US$2mn joint venture with Ayala Group’s offshoot Adventure Cycle Philippines Inc and a new subsidiary, KTM Asia Motorcycle Manufacturing Inc. (KAMMI), was born. Today, the company produces bikes such as the KTM 200 Duke and RC 390 at its state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Laguna, right in the heart of the Philippines, offering the perfect springboard for KTM Group to enter Asia. “We started production for both local and export markets just over a year ago and we are already producing more than 7,000 units a year,” enthuses Martin. “We have big hopes for the Southeast Asian market.” Tackling a new location is a challenge for any firm, but with its strong local partnerships, KTM Group has been able to hit the ground running. “Thanks to Ayala’s support, we’ve been able to start production in a very short time: we’ve been able to move from a startup to a scaleup company,” Martin observes. “They really helped us establish strong relationships with local suppliers and this is one of the key advantages of setting up this joint


S U P P LY C H A I N

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘KTM FACTORY RACING 2019 DAKAR RALLY REVIEW | KTM’ 15 venture.” As one of the largest and

suppliers are used to working in the

most diversified business groups in the

automotive segment and they’re used

Philippines, Ayala Corporation is

to helping manufacture millions of cars

present in markets including real

every year. Our challenge is to help the

estate, banking, telecommunications,

supplier understand that by working

water, power, industrial technologies

with a well-known brand, there’s more

and more. This has allowed KTM

opportunity to grow. In the long term,

Group to gain a deep understanding of

we hope to increase our more and

the Philippine market.

more bikes.” In doing so, KTM Group is

Entering this new market was a

not only helping to meet the burgeon-

challenge from a supply chain per-

ing demand for its motorbikes, it’s also

spective as it meant developing a new

helping to boost the local economy

network from scratch. However, this is

and generate employment for more

a challenge that KTM Group has taken

Filipinos. “Many of our suppliers are

head on. “Many Asian companies and

small- and medium-sized enterprises a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


KTM

16

(SMEs),” explains Martin. “By working

working with some partners in Asia to

with us, they get the chance to grow

develop a supplier rating platform

not only in terms of revenue, but also in

where each and every supplier can log

terms of qualities and process.”

in, create a profile and get feedback

Always keen to race ahead, KTM

about their performances. I think this

Group has also sought to digitalise its

digital approach is important for the

supply chain. “We’re finding new ways

future of procurement.” Data is

to get in contact with suppliers,” Martin

probably one of the most powerful

says. “In the past, we used to get

tools that supply chain professionals

hundreds of emails every day with

have today, however whilst technology

different company profiles and most of

is set to disrupt the sector for good,

the time I simply didn’t really have the

Martin affirms that a human approach

time to physically go through all these

is also vital. “If we want to build a very

potential prospects. Now we are

strong relationship with suppliers, I

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

17

E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Luca Martin Turnaround CEO with 10+ years of experience in the automotive business. Developing high-quality business strategies and plans ensuring their alignment with short-term and long-term objectives. Leading and motivating directors to advance employee engagement, developing a high performing managerial team. Setup of operational and financial goals, informing and advising Board members, managing the organization’s resources, promoting the enterprise to its stakeholders, recommending a proper budget, with an emphasis on cost savings. Start-up approach on new operations. Business angel and startup mentor/investor.

a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


KTM

1953

Year founded

€1.14bn Approximate revenue 2016

HQ

18

Mattighofen Austria

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

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KTM

Twice the power, Twice the possibilities

LEARN MORE

www.vpic-group.com | pndat@vpic-group.com


S U P P LY C H A I N

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘THE JOURNEY OF A LEGENDARY BRAND HUSQVARNA MOTORCYCLES’ 21 think it’s important that we visit them. We need to create a face-to-face relationship,” he asserts, “but at the same time, I think that digital platforms can help buyers be more productive because they can count on reliable data to select suppliers.” As well as developing a new supply chain, KTM Group also had to contend with the challenge of getting the right talent and expertise on board, however when your brand is one associated

“ THANKS TO AYALA GROUP’S SUPPORT, WE’VE BEEN ABLE TO START PRODUCTION IN A VERY SHORT TIME: WE’VE BEEN ABLE TO MOVE FROM A STARTUP TO A SCALEUP COMPANY” — Luca Martin, Managing Director at KTM ASIA Motorcycle Manufacturing Inc

with adrenaline and speed it seems that finding employees who are passionate about the product isn’t too a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


Proud to be part of.

Creating value for all.

Creating value by combining the power of innovation and product quality and passionately creating world class solutions catering to two wheeler, passenger cars, commercial vehicles, construction and agricultural machines and rolling stocks. Visit us at: motherson.com

wiring harness rearview mirrors moulded plastic parts and assemblies injection moulding tools moulded and extruded rubber components modules and systems machined metal products cutting tools aluminium die casted products sheet metal parts thin film coating metals IT services wireless power hot stamped parts

KTM Engine Factory in Mattighofen

MARCH 2019

• •


S U P P LY C H A I N

difficult. “We’re lucky that we produce a product which you could call an entertainment product so you can tell talent, ‘Look, if you are passionate for the motorcycles, we are producing one of the best that you can find in the market’,” says Martin. “This is a very valuable retention tool. A lot of KTM employees are passionate about motorcycles or are even professional riders. On the other hand, we do believe that this isn’t the only thing we offer. We also try and onboard local

“ KTM GROUP HAS RECORDED RECORD VOLUME PRODUCTION EIGHT YEARS IN A ROW” — Luca Martin, Managing Director at KTM ASIA Motorcycle Manufacturing Inc

23

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KTM

“ IF WE WANT TO BE SUCCESSFUL ABROAD, WE NEED LOCAL TALENT”

24

tion, the Asian market will play a key role in its future growth strategy. “KTM Group has recorded record volume production eight years in a row. Every year we’re producing more and more bikes and in 2018, we saw a total sales increase of about 10% to 261,000

— Luca Martin, Managing Director at KTM ASIA Motorcycle Manufacturing Inc

well-known brands for off-road in

people who believe in our values. If we

equipment manufacturers) but the

want to be successful abroad, we need

future growth of KTM Group cannot

local talent because only they can help

be as strong without Asia.”

KTM better understand the local culture.” The Philippine plant is KTM Group’s

motorcycles. KTM is one of the most North America and in Europe we are now one of the biggest OEMs (original

KTM Group’s reputation precedes it. To disrupt the Asian market KTM Group

third manufacturing facility, with its first

will undoubtedly rely in on its race-

located in its home country of Austria

proven success. Its distinctive orange

and the second in India. In selecting

motorcycles have crossed the winning

Asia as a key market, Martin contends

line at 18 Dakar Rallies in a row and

that as the group ramps up its produc-

KTM racers have gained 281 world

KTM Board of Directors

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

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KTM

26

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

CO MPAN Y FACT S

• 281 world championship titles up until now • 18 consecutive wins at the Dakar Rally • Europe’s biggest motorcycle manufacturer • Total sales 2018 increase of about 10% to 261,500 motorcycles

27

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KTM

“ WE TRY TO TRANSFER WHAT WE’VE LEARNT FROM OFFROAD IN TERMS OF PRODUCT QUALITY AND EASE OF MAINTENANCE AND BRING THAT TO OUR STREET BIKES. WE ALWAYS WANT TO BE ON TOP OF TECHNOLOGY” — Luca Martin, Managing Director at KTM ASIA Motorcycle Manufacturing Inc

28

championship titles up into now. Martin wants to bring this same world class quality to Asia. “We want to show the Asian market that KTM represents

We always want to be always on top of

quality and more importantly, we’re

technology.” KTM Group has also

ready to race. We want to bring this

shrewdly kept track of emerging trends

racing spirit to Asia and we truly believe

in the motorcycle space. For instance,

there will be a bright future for big bikes

whilst the firm noticed a dip in demand

in this market.” The firm won’t just rely

for superbikes they tapped into the

on its legacy though: it’s keen to invest

growing uptick for smaller bikes.

in new innovation so that it can create

“This was a strong move by KTM,”

the best race machines in the market.

notes Martin. “We focused on smaller

“One of our biggest competitive

displacement bikes but our competi-

advantages is that we try to transfer

tors didn’t.”

what we’ve learnt from offroad in terms

Just as consumer demands are

of product quality and ease of mainte-

shaking up the market, the rise of

nance and bring that to our street bikes.

electrification could always change the

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

29

motorcycle market for good. “We are

a challenge but with the right partner

now in an era of new mobility,” Martin

we will be able to prepare for this shift.”

asserts. “We truly believe that sooner

Looking ahead, the future is bright

or later they will be a move to electric

for KTM Group. The firm has cemented

motorcycles. We have been developing

its position as Europe’s largest

off-road electric bikes for many years

motorbike manufacturer, and now

already. We’re seeing a shift in that

Asia’s motorheads need to look no

direction and we want to be part of this

further if they want to get their hands

movement.” This market swing won’t

on a high-quality race machine.

come without its challenges though. Whilst the weight of a battery may only slightly alter the performance of a car, it can “completely change the handling of a bike”, according to Martin. “This is a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


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LEADERSHIP

JOLLIBEE FOODS:

conquering the world stage

32

FILIPINO FAST FOOD COMPANY JOLLIBEE FOODS CORPORATION SPEAKS TO BUSINESS CHIEF ABOUT THE COMPANY’S INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION STRATEGY WRITTEN BY

MARCH 2019

MARCUS LAWRENCE


33

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LEADERSHIP

F

ilipino fast food company Jollibee Foods Corporation (JFC) has enjoyed a meteoric rise since its birth as an

ice cream parlour in 1975. As of this year,

Jollibee’s internationally recognised brand has a foothold in several markets around the world, including the US, Canada, the UK, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Brunei and Qatar. The firm operates 14 brands and 4,300 outlets across 20 countries, and its ambitions have yet to lose any momentum. Its aggressive expansion programme saw a year of milestones in 2018, with Jollibee opening its first European restaurant in 34

Milan and later breaking ground in Macau, London, Toronto, and New York’s Manhattan. Jollibee also opened its hundredth Vietnamese store in early 2018, making it one of the country’s fastestgrowing restaurant chains. JFC spoke with Business Chief to discuss the roots of this success, the sustained policies that continue to strengthen its brands, and its plans for the future. “Our dream has been getting bigger – we wanted to become the biggest in the Philippines and once we achieved that, we wanted to become the largest in Asia,” JFC says. “When we became the largest Asian restaurant company in the world, we sought to dream bigger. Today, our dream is to become MARCH 2019

“Today, our dream is to become one of the top five restaurant companies in the world” — Jollibee Foods Corporation


35

one of the top five restaurant companies

expansion. Jollibee itself is a tried and

in the world.” The firm’s expansion

true brand with a menu that has demon-

model is currently focused on three key

strably accrued loyal fanbases in each

markets: the Philippines, the US and

of its operational territories. This brand

China. Despite being the largest restau-

strength is then augmented by market-

rant chain in the Philippines, Jollibee

specific acquisitions. “In China, we

recognises huge potential for growth

acquired the Yonghe King brand whose

in its home country having penetrated

soy milk and youtiao are well loved by

only 10% of its municipalities. Meanwhile,

its patrons,” the company says. In the

the US and China offer the largest and

US, in tandem with plans to open more

most lucrative markets in the world.

Jollibee outlets, the firm acquired

JFC’s efforts are consolidated under

Smashburger which competes as a JFC

the company’s two-pronged expansion

subsidiary in the emergent ‘better burger’

strategy: brand acquisition and brand

market. As it gears up to launch a new a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


LEADERSHIP

36

“We provide holistic learning and development opportunities, industry-competitive rewards and recognition, and we build an inclusive culture where people feel respected and valued” — Jollibee Foods Corporation

residing overseas. Jollibee says on its website that “It is more than home for them”, referring to the familiarity Filipino customers enjoy in the firm’s international outlets. Word of mouth is a potent marketing tool in regions with a Filipino presence, particularly in the 34 US stores strategically located to capitalise on high Filipino populations, and Jollibee augments the good faith of its compatriots with targeted marketing campaigns and focus groups among local consumers. While its core products remain the same across its operational markets, Jollibee offers region-specific additions to its menu to better cater to local tastes, such

Mexican concept, JFC has teamed up

as the Saigon Chili Chicken offering

with Rick Bayless, seven-time James

in Vietnam, and Chicken Burgers in the

Beard awardee, to develop the project.

US. To ensure the values and quality

The firm cites value creation amongst

the company strives for are upheld by

its acquired brands as one of its most

franchisees, JFC conducts values

significant successes. “For example, in

integration programmes which ensure

the Philippines, we’ve practically made

its outlets are driven by the same

all our acquired brands strong leaders

business practices that have spawned

in the segment,” JFC says.

the company’s successes. “We also

In terms of Jollibee, JFC’s flagship brand, its success with international expansion has been compounded by the loyalty of Filipino customers MARCH 2019

ensure that there is always a venue for open communication,” JFC adds. The company does not forget the industriousness and determination of


37

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LEADERSHIP

38

MARCH 2019


39

1974

Year founded

1,000+

Approximate number of locations globally

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LEADERSHIP

its workforce when detailing the factors that have bred the company’s continued success. “Where we are today is the product of the collective hard work of our employees and stakeholders,” JFC says, and the firm backs this faith in its staff with a dynamic talent management strategy. “This means we provide holistic learning and development opportunities, industry-competitive rewards and recognition, and we build an inclusive culture where people feel respected and valued,” JFC 40

explains. The firm structures its roles to enable employees to find success, its staff undergo functional and leadership development programmes throughout their time with the company, and a fast track development programme is in place to develop and retain the top talents that join the firm. Naturally, expansion is only as effective as a company’s ability to remain up to date with emergent technologies and trends in the industry. Digital transformation is at the forefront of JFC’s strategy for remaining current, and the company is investing in the expertise to identify and action the strongest method for enhancing its business MARCH 2019


practices with digital technologies. “In the future, we see half of our sales coming from online orders,” JFC says. While the firm’s online sales remain relatively small for the time being, it is confident in the growth and strong performance of its current offering and predicts huge potential in its upcoming ramp up of online deliveries. With regards to the biggest challenges facing the company today, the company says building capacity underlines much of the work it is doing to optimise its operations. With such rapid growth, to the tune of 465 store openings in 2017 alone, JFC recognises that its internal infrastructure must be reinforced to handle the boost in operational volume. “Our challenge is meeting the demands in terms of supply chain, logistics and building our stores, and there remains vast opportunities for growth,” it says. “We need to invest in our commissaries and add warehouses to keep supplies closer to the stores, and we are continuing to expand our store network aggressively so location is also key to meet the demand.”

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41


TECHNOLOGY

42

SOFTWARE ENABLING 5G Folke Rosengard, Head of Business Development, Nokia Software, explores how 5G serves as more than just an answer to the burgeoning IoT and digitalisation landscape WRITTEN BY

MARCH 2019

FOLK E ROSENGARD


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TECHNOLOGY

W

e at Nokia believe that we are in front of one of the biggest upsides in the whole telco industry in a

long time, thanks to the digitalisation trend

and the Internet of Things (IoT). IoT will add a massive amount of new connections; and the digitalisation trend creates a growing demand for a multitude of diverse connections including use cases with high bandwidth, low latency and ultrahigh reliability. 5G is the ideal solution to respond to this demand, however 5G is much more than simply a new Radio Access Network (RAN) 44

generation. It comes with sophisticated software that affects all parts of the network, including how service providers operate the network and how they offer profitable and compelling services. It is a whole new business system that enables service providers to respond to the massive demand fuelled by the IoT and digitalisation trend in a profitable way. 5G requires a tight connection between network, operations and business with all the systems and processes working together to deliver and monetise the 5G use cases for consumers and enterprises. Software is the key for realising 5G capabilities in an efficient way. Technical capabilities such as dynamic slicing of mobile networks and a serviceMARCH 2019


45

“ 5G is the ideal solution to respond to this demand, however 5G is much more than simply a new Radio Access Network (RAN) generation” — Folke Rosengard, Head of Business Development, Nokia Software

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TECHNOLOGY

“ We believe ‘Cloud Native software’ is a fundamental principle for software of the 5G era” — Folke Rosengard, Head of Business Development, Nokia Software

based architecture to enable multiple and diverse use case requirements based on agile, flexible and real-time digital fabric are critical for telcos to maximise and exploit 5G capabilities. Network providers must have a strong digital fabric that’s built on applications with five key characteristics:

01. INTELLIGENT Analytics and machine learning in everything are critical to manage an ever-growing volume of data. Great experiences are the ones that are personal, contextual and fast. These

46

rely on the ability to augment human intelligence with machine learning and analytics. They use the data to provide a 360-degree view of the experience and decide what actions will produce the best outcomes.

02. AUTOMATED Manual processes are too slow to handle the big data explosion. As such, intelligence workflows and bots should push automation to extremes to ensure we can drive insights to action with efficiency and speed using closedloop fundamentals.

MARCH 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘5G IN ACTION’ 47

03. SECURE

05. OPEN

With more of our lives online, customers

It’s unlikely that service providers will rely

must know they can trust their provid-

solely on one infrastructure vendor or

ers to handle their data. The new digital

partner, one revenue-sharing relation-

fabric must include security in its

ship or service. Applications must be

foundation to provide customers with

multi-vendor, open and lightweight -

the highest level of protection in the

and the complexity of the network must

digital world.

be removed or abstracted. 5G will enable a range of new use

04. CLOUD-NATIVE

cases with a variety of specific require-

To respond with agility at a better cost

ments. To support each use case in an

point, software needs to be built for the

optimal way, security capabilities will

cloud, from both the technological and

need to be more flexible. For example,

consumption-model perspectives.

security mechanisms used for ultra-low

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TECHNOLOGY

48

latency, mission-critical applications may

We believe “Cloud Native software�

not be suitable for massive IoT deploy-

is a fundamental principle for software

ments where devices are inexpensive

for the 5G era. There are many benefits

sensors that have a very limited energy

of cloud native software for telcos,

budget and transmit data only occa-

including more efficient use of cloud

sionally. Another driver for 5G security

resources, operational simplicity and

is the changing ecosystem. Long-Term

horizontal scalability. Proven by

Evolution (LTE) networks are dominated

massive scale companies such as

by large monolithic deployments―each

Google, Twitter and Netflix over years

controlled by a single network operator

of use, horizontal scaling or adding

that owns the network infrastructure

more containerised applications within

while also providing all network

a cluster, enables providers to provision

services. In contrast, 5G networks may

the processing capacity they need to

be deployed by a number of special-

process data quickly.

ised stakeholders providing end-user 5G network services.

MARCH 2019

Managing and reducing the complexity, while keeping operation costs under


49

control, can only be achieved through

Today, automation is popping up

injecting intelligence and automation

almost everywhere in the network,

into the transformation process. As 5G

and “closed loops” are considered

extends beyond radio technologies,

silver bullets for killing complexity.

deep into the cloud, across mobile and

A recent study by Nokia Bell Labs

transport layers, it will be paramount

concluded that closed-loop automa-

to combine data from RAN and non-

tion can only work in combination with

RAN sources and introduce machine

a new architecture and – even more

learning-enabled automation to create

important – an implementation master

algorithms for use cases that operate

plan. The full benefit of automation can

across all these data sources.

only be realised if it’s done in concert. a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


TECHNOLOGY

Small benefits can be – and are being – realised with tactical, domain-specific automations, but those benefits can only be maximised if harmonised and orchestrated across all domains. As non-telco companies digitalise their own product offerings, new opportunities will emerge for telcos and service providers. With the new network characteristics of 5G and cloud resources sitting close to customers, these companies will be in a position to offer capabilities no 50

IT cloud service provider can match. Software helps communication service providers to reinvent themselves as digital service providers. A key in this transformation is to recognise the need for far greater agility with frictionless business and

“ With the new network characteristics of 5G and cloud resources sitting close to customers, these companies will be in a position to offer capabilities no IT cloud service provider can match” — Folke Rosengard, Head of Business Development, Nokia Software

MARCH 2019


51

operational adaptability. In other words,

product management, customer experi-

digital service providers need to act in

ence management, network and service

and capitalise on windows of digital

operations, care and monetisation.

time. To operate in digital time, service providers need a holistic and real-time view of what’s happening with business and operations to determine the next best action to take – this applies for all areas of operations from marketing to a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


PEOPLE

52

REINVENTING UPSKILLING FOR THE FOURTH INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION With Industry 4.0 underway, Nick Lazaridis, President of EMEA for HP Inc., explains how ultimately it’s the people behind the screens and machines who enable digital transformation NICK LAZARIDIS, PRESIDENT OF EMEA FOR HP INC WRITTEN BY

MARCH 2019


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PEOPLE

54

T

oday’s world moves at a mind-

steps to build the organisation of the

blowing rate, and it’s only going

future. More than any that have come

to get faster. Emerging technolo-

before, the fourth Industrial Revolution

gies like IoT, 5G, artificial intelligence and

holds the opportunity for businesses

3D printing have heralded the fourth ind-

everywhere to transform their impact

ustrial revolution and proven their pote-

on employees and, by extension, society.

ntial to change the status quo. But it’s

Looking back, the advent of new

down to us as business leaders to tran-

technologies has often been associ-

sform our workforces and equip them

ated with resistance and fear because

to make the most of this opportunity.

of the impact it might have on work-

There is a need for real innovation

forces and ‘business as usual’. The

and change across every market and

reality is that these new technologies

sector. It’s no longer just about gaining

are not a threat to work, but an oppo-

a competitive advantage, but taking

rtunity to automate the routine, repetitive

MARCH 2019


55

or low value tasks and apply valuable human resources to more creative and complex challenges. Just as the PC changed the way we work, as well as the skills needed to get the job done, we are entering a new chapter of change that will surpass those before it in size, scale and scope. The fourth Industrial Revolution has the potential to create new, technologically-driven value en masse - but getting there calls for a human-centric approach and investment in people. It will look different to every business and

“ The Fourth Industrial Revolution has the potential to create new, technologically-driven value en masse – but getting there calls for a human-centric approach and investment in people” — Nick Lazaridis, President of EMEA for HP Inc

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PEOPLE

“ A truly diverse representation of backgrounds, experiences and opinions helps challenge the status quo and allow new ways of thinking” 56

— Nick Lazaridis, President of EMEA for HP Inc

the extent of reinvention will vary, but there are some commonalities as to how we can build the skills of our organisations for the future.

MANY HANDS MAKE BRIGHT WORK The obvious business case for diversity is that it is key to attracting the best talent and engaging employees. But it goes further than equal representation and fair opportunities. A truly diverse representation of backgrounds, experiences and opinions helps challenge the status quo and allow new ways of thinking. Real diversity of thought is becoming essential in the global economy, not just to attract the best talent but to integrate broader cultural understandings and add fresh perspectives and processes. When you pair this with inclusive workplace culture, people feel more comfortable in bringing their true selves to work and their ideas to the table.

LEARN AS IF YOU WILL WORK FOREVER A real investment in learning and development is crucial to recruiting and developing a highly-skilled, future-ready workforce. Within the MARCH 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘HP DEVICE AS A SERVICE (DAAS) PROACTIVE MANAGEMENT’ 57 technology sector, there’s an urgent need to diversify the STEM talent pipeline and bring new thinking to the fields of science that will shape our tomorrow. They are crucial cornerstones of the fourth Industrial Revolution – and it’s only by ensuring fair opportunities and representation that we can consider them to be truly innovative. The opposite is also true, however. Across all industries, there is a growing focus on ‘soft’ and social skills, particularly around communication and emotional intelligence. These are the skills that bolster creative thinking and a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


PEOPLE

complex problem-solving – the concepts that translate into a blueprint for services and solutions of the future. eLearning platforms and self-paced programmes have changed the way we can acquire and develop skills at work, but in order to engage employees in a shared mission those competencies must be underpinned by a culture of collaboration, knowledge and growth.

LEADING THE WAY So how do you lead an organisation 58

to transformation? Transform the leadership of the organisation. Put simply, business leaders must embody the values of the change they want to make. HP itself was reinvented as a multibillion-dollar start-up, and we’re seeing our strategy pay off – but would be nothing without the strong and motivated teams behind the business. I’ve always tried to stick to my leadership principles to help create and foster that culture. Managing cycles of innovation and regular organisational change are part of the job, but more substantial transformation and reinvention need vision, role models and commitment to MARCH 2019


59

successfully bring a workforce on the journey. Transforming an organisation and building skills requires everyone to be open to change. Leadership teams need to lead the charge with wholehearted commitment and investment in their development, to set the best example for their organisation. If we are to believe that the only constant is change, then there will always be a new skills gap to tackle. Build a foundation for an organisation that’s open to change, committed a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


PEOPLE

60

“ This may well be a technologydriven revolution, but ultimately it is the people behind the screens and machines who make the change” — Nick Lazaridis, President of EMEA for HP Inc

MARCH 2019


to learning and continuously improving, and not afraid to fail along the way, and you will build the basis for tomorrow’s industry. This may well be a technology-driven revolution, but ultimately it is the people behind the screens and machines who make the change. As someone who has spent their career reinventing in a rapidly changing world, I’ve seen how it’s possible to transform an organisation with positive impact for people and planet. Technology might change the way things are done, but it is squarely within our power as the leaders of industry to think creatively and solve the challenges of tomorrow.

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S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

62

OPEN DATA ADDRESSING WORLD H U NGE R — SOLVING THE AGRICULTURAL CRISIS FOR A MORE SUSTAINABLE FUTURE WRITTEN BY

ANDRÉ LAPERRIÈRE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, GODAN

MARCH 2019


63

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S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

64

T

oday, hunger is bringing suffering to over 795 million people across the

economically undeveloped nation. Â The threat of an agricultural crisis is

globe. Those affected currently do

very much a reality across the globe.

not have access to enough food to live

Crippling costs, poor weather condi-

sustainably. Although a majority of this

tions and disease outbreaks have hit

population are based in the world’s

landscapes, farmers and businesses

most vulnerable regions, this does not

hard over the years and the potential

contain the issue within borders as

impacts can be tenfold. The UK for

food security issues are also residing

example, has suffered from record

in some of the most developed nations.

high temperatures, reported outbreaks

The UK is reportedly one of the most

of foot and mouth disease and is also

food insecure nations in the European

in the midst of an uncertain trading

Union, and it is by no means an

future as Brexit looms. In Africa, where

MARCH 2019


“ O PEN DATA CAN PL AY A CRITICAL RO L E IN HEL PING TO ACHIEV E THE SUSTAINABL E D EV ELO PM ENT G OAL S PRO PO SED BY THE UNITED NATIO NS” — André Laperrière, Executive Director, GODAN

water conservation issues, malnutrition

example of these issues. The conti-

and hunger are still pertinent, climate and

nent’s farming industries have been

weather are one of the principal causes.

suffering due to the lack of shared

The agricultural industry is a volatile one,

information and data, most small-scale

from either ends of the globe. We are

isolated farmers in rural African

continuing to experience the struggle

communities are missing out on new

to meet the growing demands of the

and improved methods and best

consumer, to combat the fluctuation in

practices of farming and agricultural

supply, the instability of markets and

processes. This issue, married with the

the lack of investment in the agriculture

water contamination crisis affecting

industry in many nations.

sub-Saharan Africa - where only 16%

The agricultural crises in countries across Africa present a notable

of the population have access to clean water and have no access to critical a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com

65


S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

information relating to water quality or weather data -demonstrates how there is the significant need for access to Open Data to help bring about an end to the crisis, save lives and create a more sustainable future. Open Data has developed alongside technological advancements throughout the years. However, its potential impact on the agricultural space has rarely been considered a key solution to solving the food crisis. The potential for the use of Open Data to combat food issues can and should no longer

66

be ignored; not only because of the relevant historical data and the potential to increase production it can provide, but its usefulness in monitoring water supplies, anticipating changes in the weather and also sharing crucial information across borders so that nations can learn best practices from each other and prosper. Through the use of satellite data, remote sensing and mapping, farmers, businesses and consumers in the agricultural industry can harness the most relevant and useful information to improve and adapt practices, make better decisions and ensure sustainMARCH 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘ANDRÉ LAPERRIERE AT SWAT4HCLS CONFERENCE, ANTWERP, 3-6 DECEMBER 2018’ 67

“T H E R E I S S T I L L A LO NG WAY TO GO BE F O R E OPE N DATA ACCESS IS GLOBALLY ACCEPTED AND UTILISED” — André Laperrière, Executive Director, GODAN ability. Increasing access will trigger

Esoko, presents a prime example of

innovations that will bring both

the benefits of Open-Data access to

agriculture and nutrition to the next,

the industry by illustrating how mobile

higher level of impact, improving

phone technology can be integral to

efficiency, yields, competitiveness and

allowing farmers and their buyers to

ultimately increasing food security

access Open Data to obtain informa-

across the world.

tion to improve access to markets and

The Ghana-based organisation,

encourage fairer pricing based on a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

68

shared feedback. By utilising Open

and thousands of families. Those using

Data to collect data on a national scale,

the technology can both collect and

the technology solution TradeNet was

input data regarding the selling price of

born, enabling farmers to share and

basic commodities, such as the prices

access data through SMS with

of seeds and fertilizers and send daily

customers and other farmers. This

updates to farmers through SMS. Thus,

data is obtained through existing

the farmers can determine their input

channels such as weather data

costs, increasing their selling profit by

channels and other basic technology,

utilising the information made available

to enable a self-sustainable business

to them. Now, more than 350,000

model combining data, farmers,

farmers have joined the Esoko platform

customers, markets/ dealers and

in 10 countries in Africa and it contin-

phone companies on an open system

ues to expand.

to benefit the livelihoods of hundreds MARCH 2019

In the West, countries such as The


“FOO D SEC URIT Y ISSU E S ARE AL SO RESID IN G IN SO ME O F T H E MO S T D EV ELO P ED N AT IONS ” — André Laperrière, Executive Director, GODAN

69

Netherlands are also benefitting from

In the south, the ‘digital divide’ has

the offerings of Open Data as more

played a huge role in agricultural crises,

web applications aiming to improve

as large industrialised farms are

accessibility to Open Data are unlock-

becoming more cost efficient and

ing valuable data related to historical

competitive, while the small traditional

weather patterns and food consump-

farmers are gradually bringing

tion data, accessible to those involved

themselves out of the markets. This is

in agriculture and the environment.

due to the large industrial farms/

Similar to the organisation in Ghana,

wealthy countries and businesses that

these applications are also user-gener-

already make efficient use of data to

ated, allowing farmers and those in the

improve techniques, products, market

agricultural sector to input data for all

access, rapidly increasing their

participants to see, allowing best

competitiveness in the world markets.

practices to be shared and adapted.

Open Data can play a critical role in a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

helping to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals proposed by the United Nations. Open Data can help foster economic growth and job creation, improve efficiency and effectiveness of public services by allowing the cross fertilization and synergy of different industries, sectors and governments leading to new practices, new equipment and new technologies that in turn, lead to better yields and the stimulation of private and public economies. 70

This will in turn, improve government transparency, citizen participation and accountability through the sharing of data across communities and borders. Â However, there is still a long way to go before Open Data access is globally accepted and utilised. This drive and determination for it to be a success needs to be welcomed by respective governments and organisations across the globe and pushed to the top of the agenda. With the correct approach and implementation methods in place, Open Data can have a high economic and social return on investment for MARCH 2019


“ N OW, MO RE THAN 350,000 FARMER S HAVE JO IN ED THE ESO KO PLATFO RM IN 10 C O UN TRIES IN AFRICA” — André Laperrière, Executive Director, GODAN

71

countries all over the globe and in all stages of development. Areas in Africa, Latin America, Asia and Europe have already demonstrated how increased access to data can help develop economies and farming practices, taking a significant step forward to achieving sustainability and solving the hunger crisis.

a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


9 –10 April 2019

Part of

Held in Conjunction with

Marina Bay Sands, Singapore

Automation | Digitalisation | Standardisation The impact of new technology on ports & terminals cannot be underestimated. Stay competitive, attend TOC Asia…

Container Supply Chain Keynote Address ONE (Ocean Network Express) Jeremy Nixon Global Chief Executive Officer

Delivering a 2019 liner industry update, future supply chain cost considerations & digitalisation developments

The Asia Trade, Container & Business Outlook Alphaliner Tan Hua Joo Executive Consultant

Bloomberg Intelligence Rahul Kapoor Senior Analyst - Asia-Pacific Transportation

Cargill John McCauley Vice President Transportation and Logistics

Hapag-Lloyd Lars Christiansen Senior Managing Director – Asia,

Port of Tanjung Pelepas Marco Neelsen CEO

Drewry Han Ning Director

Trade Wars

Intelligence

Protectionism

Alliances

Challenges

Opportunities

Defining the Ports of the Future: Fusing the Physical & Digital Worlds Acardis Jonathan Beard Head of Transportation & Logistics - Asia

Royal Haskoning DHV Jereon Overbeek Senior Project Manager - Maritime & Waterways

Seaport David Wignall Chairman

Colombo International Container Terminals Catriona Jayasundera General Manager

Smart Ports

Port Community

Collaboration

Digital

AI

Big Data

Price: USD $1,350 / Cargo Owners & Shipping Lines go free


Your Delegate Experience Container Supply Chain Conference

TECH TOC Conference

PSA or Port of Tanjung Pelepas Port Tours (Monday 8 April)

Port Technology Exhibition

Evening Networking Reception (Tuesday 9 April)

Lunches & Coffee Breaks

Conference Programme Automation, Digitalisation & Standardisation: Next Steps for Container Supply Chains APRIL Group Indranil Sen Head - Supply Chain Management

Nestle Norman Pridipraj Geramia Global Strategic Sourcing Manager – Logistics

CargoX Igor Jakomin Chief Operating Officer

New York Shipping Exchange Don Chen Managing Director – Asia

Toll Group Darren Tan Head of IT for Global Logistics

Port of Rotterdam Martijn Thijsen Digital Strategy Transformation & Business Development - Containers, Breakbulk & Logistics

Transformation

Big Data

Technology

E-Commerce

Digital

Blockchain

Protecting your Assets & Operations: Cyber Security, Illicit Trade & Wider Supply Chain Risks Supply chains are always under constant siege from disruption across the region and around the world. An issue for the maritime industry is how it looks to deal with existing and emerging criminal cyber-attacks. This session will feature a panel of shippers.

Disruption

Counterfeit

Risk

Cyber Crime

Technology

Disruption

Start-ups

Innovation

Start-up Disruption in Ports & the Supply Chain This session will highlight opportunities in port innovation and how collaboration between start-ups and major industry players can bring about pivotal impact. PortXL start-up founders will present their technologies and tackle tough questions.

Book Your Place Today


CITY FOCUS

BANG City Focus

74

Business Chief examines Thailand’s lively, vibrant capital and the most widely visited city in the world WRITTEN BY

MARCH 2019

MARCUS LAWRENCE


GKOK a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com

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CITY FOCUS | BANGKOK

76

K

nown by locals as Krung Thep, the City of Angels, Bangkok is one of the world’s most vibrant and exciting cities. As the capital,

financial hub and a key port of Thailand, Bangkok is both a major tourist destination and the nexus of Thai business, with nine of Thailand’s 10 largest firms headquartered in the city. Meandering through the city is the Chao Phraya River, defining Bangkok’s layout much like London’s River Thames. Bangkok’s 50 districts are split by the river, with 35 on the east bank and 15 on the west.

MARCH 2019


77

Bangkok, according to Mastercard’s

colour, it is no surprise that people flock

Global Destination Cities Index, was

to its wondrous sites. At its heart is the

2017’s single most visited city in the

official home of Thailand’s monarchy,

world with 20.05mn visitors, and it is

the Grand Palace, an incredible com-

set to retain the crown in 2018 with

plex of architectural masterworks

a projected growth of 9.6%. Not only

from Wat Phra Kaew (Temple of the

is Bangkok the world’s most prolific

Emerald Buddha) to the Chakri Maha

city for tourism, but its estimated growth

Prasat (Grand Palace Hall) whose

in tourist figures is comfortably the

façade ingeniously blends Thai and

second largest of Mastercard’s Top

European styles. According to Heinz

10, behind Istanbul at 19.7% and leading

Duthel in Duthel Thailand Guide III, the

Kuala Lumpur at 7.5%. With its wealth

Chakri Maha Prasat was designed

of culture and ubiquitous splashes of

and constructed by English architect a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


CITY FOCUS | BANGKOK

‘The enormity of Bangkok’s range of spectacles, entertainments and culinary delights is set to ensure it remains the world’s most popular tourism destination for years to come’

78

MARCH 2019


CLICK TO WATCH : ‘BANGKOK VACATION TRAVEL GUIDE’ 79 John Clunich and his assistant Henry C.

in Chatuchak, with gas and oil behe-

Rose who had been hired by King

moth PTT headquartered in the

Rama V after meeting them on a trip

district. PTT is the only Thai company

to Singapore and Java in 1875.

in the 2018 Forbes Global 2000 to

The most ardent shopaholics would

rank in the top 500 at #156, posting

struggle to find a more diversely

a market value of US$50.9bn. Other

stocked labyrinth of retail outlets than

giants of Thai business situated in

Bangkok’s Chatuchak Weekend

Bangkok include conglomerate

Market, said to be among the world’s

Charoen Pokphand Group, cement

largest markets with over 8,000 stalls

and building material producer Siam

divided into 27 sections. Shoppers can

Cement Group, Thai Oil, Thai Beverage,

find an eclectic assortment of goods

and Thai Airways.

including ceramics, books, antiques,

A historic manufacturing hub thanks

pets, food and furniture. Retail is not

to the size and strength of its port,

the only thriving business to be found

Bangkok remains the home of myriad a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


CITY FOCUS | BANGKOK

manufacturing firms. Siam Cement Group established Bangkok’s first cement production facility in 1913, while textiles and clothing make up a considerable portion of manufacturing operations in modern Bangkok. Shoe manufacturer Pan Group operates the largest shoe factory in Thailand and also lays claim to being one of the biggest in the world, and is a leading producer of polyester, nylon, and polypropylene threads. PDK has also based its factory operations in the city. While famous for its traffic, Bangkok is well-equipped for rapid travel between its 80

major locations and landmarks. Connecting the city is the Bangkok Mass Transit System, known as either the BTS or the Skytrain, an elevated train network with 35 stops across two lines and around 700,000 daily passengers. While the Skytrain rolls above the city, beneath it lies the Metropolitan Rapid Transport (MRT) underground network, ensuring tourists and locals alike have a means to beat the congestion on the roads. For the rail-averse, Bangkok’s once prevailing mode of transport, the tuk-tuk, remains a must for tourists keen to soak up the city’s culture, while the capital’s increasingly iconic, colourful cabs often cost a similar amount for those happy to sacrifice speed for comfort. Finally, its intricate network of waterways feeding into and pouring from MARCH 2019


81 the Chao Phraya River offer a host of boat rides, tours, river taxis, and private cruises. Many view travelling by water as the definitive means of exploring the sights and sounds of Thailand’s City of Angels. Outside the excitement of the city proper, any visitor would be remiss to forego the floating markets nearby. Damnoen Saduak, the most popular floating market in the country, offers the busiest experience, frequented by locals and tourists alike, as the historic tradition continues to form a significant part of rural Thai life. Here as with other floating markets near Bangkok, such a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


CITY FOCUS | BANGKOK

Currency

Baht 1972

Year founded

9.4mn

Approx. population Nearest airport 82

26km Don Mueang

MARCH 2019


as Khlong Lat Mayom and Amphawa, the food on offer caters to every taste, including exquisite local seafood, fried bananas, succulent fruits, an array of noodle dishes, and Thailand’s internationally renowned aromatic curries. Perhaps Bangkok’s single most famous feature is its thriving nightlife. Away from the adult-themed entertainment of Soi Cowboy, Patpong, and Nana, there is no lack of stunning rooftop bars, high-class nightclubs and vibrant cocktail bars across the full spectrum of liveliness and tranquility. Famed for its inclusive and tolerant attitudes to the LGBT community, Thailand’s capital offers perhaps the definitive selection of gay night-time attractions in Southeast Asia with highlights including the three-level DJ Station, the Babylon complex of men’s saunas, gyms, pools, and restaurants, and the word-of-mouth Trasher events to name but a few. The enormity of Bangkok’s range of spectacles, entertainments, and culinary delights is set to ensure it remains the world’s most popular tourism destination for years to come.

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T O P 10

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MARCH 2019


TOP 10 TALLEST BUILDINGS IN ASIA The Asia-Pacific region contains nearly three-quarters of the 50 tallest skyscrapers in the world. Business Chief ranks the 10 tallest buildings in the region, according to data from the Skyscraper Center WRITTEN BY

HARRY MENEAR

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85


T O P 10

10

86

Petronas Twin Towers

1,483ft (452m)

Completed in March 1996, the Petronas Towers are located in the Malaysian capital of Kuala Lumpur and are both 1,483ft tall. From the towers’ completion until 2004, the structures were the joint-tallest buildings in the world. The buildings each contain 88 floors, which are used for commercial office space and tourism. www.petronastwintowers.com.my

MARCH 2019


09

87

Vincom Landmark 81 1,540ft (469m)

Located in Ho Chi Minh City in the South of Vietnam, Vincom Landmark 81 stands 1,540ft tall with 81 floors above ground and four below. Designed by architecture firm Atkins, the building was completed in 2018 at a cost of US$123mn, according to Tekla. The structure’s design was “Inspired by the image of bamboo – a traditional plant symbolising strength and unity.” Landmark 81 is a mixed-use development, containing 450 hotel rooms, serviced rental apartments and retail stores. http://vincom.com.vn/vi/tttm/vincom-center-landmark-81

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08

88

International Commerce Centre

1,588ft (484m)

Completed in 2010, the International Commerce Centre in Hong Kong is the third-oldest building in the top 10. Standing 1,588ft tall, it is the tallest building in Hong Kong and the sixth-tallest building in China. The building is made up of 108 floors above ground and four below. The Commerce Centre contains a mixture of commercial office space and hospitality developments, notably the Ritz-Carlton, Hong Kong hotel. www.shkp-icc.com

MARCH 2019

Photo Š Sun Hung Kai Properties Limited

T O P 10


07

89

Shanghai World Financial Centre 1,622ft (494m)

Standing 1,622ft tall, the Shanghai World Financial Centre is made up of 101 floors above ground, with three below. Construction is reported as costing $1.2bn, taking 11 years to complete. According to the Skyscraper Centre, “the project was put on hold in 1995 after the completion of the foundations. When revived in 1999 the height and base dimensions were both increased from the original.� Currently, the Centre is the second-tallest building in Hong Kong. www.swfc-shanghai.com

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06

90

TAIPEI 101

1,667ft (508m) Designed by CY Lee & Partners, TAIPEI 101 sits in the heart of

Taiwan’s capital city and was completed in 2004. Standing 1,667ft tall, its shape evokes the form of a Chinese pagoda. According to the Skyscraper Centre, “the façade of the tower features doublepaned green glass curtain walls that are highly reflective and block solar heat gain by 50%. Other sustainable features include energy efficient luminaries, custom lighting controls, low-flow water fixtures, and a smart Energy Management and Control System.” www.taipei-101.com.tw/en/index.aspx

MARCH 2019


Photo © KPF

05

91

CITIC Tower 1,731ft (527m)

Completed in August 2018, the CITIC Tower, also known as the ‘Zun’ because of its similarity to a traditional Chinese ceremonial vase of the same name, stands 1,731ft tall and is the youngest skyscraper on the top 10 list. Designed by the Beijing Institute of Architectural design, in conjunction with Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, the CITIC tower is Beijing’s tallest building and the heart of the city’s new business district. www.kpf.com/projects/citic-tower

a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


04

92

Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre

1,739ft (530m)

Standing 1,739ft tall, the Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre is the tallest building in the city and the third-tallest in China. It was completed in 2016, designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, and contains 111 floors above ground, with five below. According to the Skyscraper Center, “the building employs a number of energy efficient tools to reduce its environmental footprint. In addition to its strong multi-level connections to public transportation, the use of high-efficiency chillers and heat recovery from the water-cooled chiller condensers all contribute to the building’s sustainability.”

MARCH 2019

Photo © WSP

T O P 10


03

93

Lotte World Tower 1,823ft (555m)

The only building from South Korea in the top 10 list, the Lotte World Tower is the fifth-tallest building in the world, measuring 1,823ft tall. The structure contains 123 floors, with 260 hotel rooms, and was completed in 2016. The Lotte World Tower was also designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, and “contains retail components, offices, a 7-star luxury hotel, and an officetel. Officetels, common in South Korean real estate, offer studioapartment-style accommodations for people who work in the building and often feature certain services found in hotels, such as furnishings, a security desk, and gym access.� The top 10 floors of the building are set aside for public use, featuring an observation deck and a cafe. www.lwt.co.kr a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


T O P 10

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MARCH 2019


02

Ping An Finance Centre

1,965ft (598m)

Designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, the Ping An Finance Centre is located in Chinese industrial hub Shenzhen. Completed in 2017, the building is 1,965ft tall, making it the fourth-tallest structure in the world. The Ping An Centre has 110 floors above ground and five below, the majority of which are dedicated to office space, a hotel, a conference centre, and retail installations. It is also the headquarters of Ping An Insurance company. www.kpf.com

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T O P 10

01

Shanghai Tower

2,073ft (631m)

The tallest building in Asia is the Shanghai Tower, which was completed in 2015 and stands 2,073ft tall. Designed by San Francisco-based architecture firm Gensler, the tower has 128 floors above ground and five below. The Shanghai

96

Tower is located next to the Shanghai World Finance Centre, which is 451ft shorter than its neighbour. Yeti Construction and Development own the Shanghai Tower, which cost an estimated $2.4bn to construct.

www.gensler.com/projectsshanghai-tower

MARCH 2019


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MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

AXA’s Move to the Cloud: a customer-driven technology transformation

WRIT TEN BY

OLIVIA MINNOCK PRODUCED BY

A LE X PAGE

e uro pe .busi ne ssc hief. com

99


AXA

Ash Shah, AXA Group’s Global Program Director for the insurance giant’s Move to the Cloud, discusses the technology transformation as part of AXA’s ambition to become a customer-driven, tech-led organisation

“W

hen we undertake a transformation, we do it on a truly global scale with technology at the forefront as one of the enablers,”

comments Ash Shah, Global Program Director of leading insurer AXA’s Move to the Cloud initiative. 100

This is no mean feat, with the insurer serving 105mn clients across a vast footprint of 62 countries. To aid its technology transformation, AXA has undergone a significant company-wide IT restructure. “We have an ambition to be an innovative, customer-driven, tech led company and we’ve enhanced and modified our IT organisation to support and drive that ambition,” Shah explains. “Technology has become more intrinsic in our business and it’s no longer just a support function – it’s the key enabler for us to continue to innovate and move forward as an organisation.”

‘INNOVATIVE, CUSTOMER DRIVEN, TECH LED’ As a composite insurer, AXA covers many lines of business including health, life, property and casualty insurance. The French multinational currently spans a mix of growth areas and established markets, MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

101

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From Inspiration

to Innovation


TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : AXA GLOBAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR ASH SHAH ON TRANSFORMATION ACROSS GEOGRAPHIES 103

and has a significant legacy of looking

standing – all aimed at promoting

after customers at those times when

innovation and collaboration and

they need it most. Shah, who assumed

showing, through colourful posters

his current role just six months ago, is

and games areas, that insurance is far

already a familiar face in Paris where

from an old-fashioned career choice.

AXA is headquartered. Counted among

AXA’s staff are adapting well to

its numerous locations is the spectacu-

the new working environment which so

lar new Java building which offers a

much investment and thought has gone

true reflection of AXA’s ambition to

into. Colleagues do not have a strict

modernise a business often seen as

dress code – with some stating this

traditional. The office itself boasts

makes them feel more valued for their

open space, natural light, and flexible

skills and output than their appearance

options allowing colleagues to work

– and have plenty of opportunities to

independently or as a group, sitting or

socialise by playing pool or enjoying a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


Building an ecosystem? Connect the dots. “Your journey to cloud must navigate pitfalls and opportunities that are unique to your business. We support you in imagining and delivering your cloud journey and making it run�. Eric Meistermann, Deloitte Partner in charge of AXA Group


TECHNOLOGY

“ We foster a strong change management process where we make sure we communicate, evangelise and onboard our colleagues in all parts of the organisation” — Ash Shah, Global Program Director – Move to the Cloud, AXA

coffee together. Shah joins us at this new

We measure compliance, performance

Paris office having spent three days with

and KPIs at both a centralised level and

AXA’s Dubai Gulf business discussing

a local entity and business level,” says

the company’s transformation across

Shah. “It’s also important to understand

that region. “It’s pushing all parts of our

the various cultures AXA operates in

organisation into that journey and bring-

and the pace and size at which they can

ing them onboard. It takes time and effort

make changes.” For example, AXA’s

and engagement – but once you do that,

companies in growth markets will focus

you can see the end results. We’re moni-

on establishing a presence while

toring, and can see we’re making good

well–established entities might focus

progress now,” he enthuses.

on innovation to remain competitive.

In its ambition to become tech led, sectors and geographies with both

A GLOBAL, CUSTOMER-CENTRIC TRANSFORMATION

a strong global vision and local knowl-

Currently, one of AXA’s key areas of

edge. “Usually, we have a central team

development – and the element for

but we listen to the requirements and

which Shah is responsible – is its ‘Move

needs of our different business units and

to the Cloud’, whereby the business will

make sure they are a part of that journey.

come away from legacy technology

AXA is pushing technology across all

a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com

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TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : GLOBAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR ASH SHAH TALKS THE IMPORTANCE OF PARTNERS AT AXA 107

and store and manage data on private

allows an organisation to innovate. “It

and public clouds. This is a key strategic

gives us business agility, flexibility and

initiative which AXA is taking on for two

speed to market which is much harder

key reasons. “One is that we want to

in traditional IT methods. In addition,

modernise and update our technology

the cloud enables the collaboration

infrastructure,” says Shah. “The second

that is so key to a global business. As

is that we really want to exploit new

we deploy something in one country,

technology innovation – such as artificial

we can replicate that quickly in multiple

intelligence (AI), chatbots and image

countries,” Shah explains. “We therefore

recognition – which we wouldn’t be

end up with a consistent product which

able to do with our existing systems

we can enhance and change – and those

and processes.”

changes can be rolled out across numer-

For Shah, and for AXA, a key feature of cloud technology is the speed at which it

ous entities and organisations far more quickly than in the past.” a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


AXA

“ The relationship we build with our suppliers – and I would call them partners rather than suppliers – is very important to us” — Ash Shah, Global Program Director – Move to the Cloud, AXA

108

Why is AXA undertaking such a significant investment? “Firstly, it’s for

to be able to respond to this change in a customer-centric manner.”

customer experience. We deal with

Every technology investment AXA

customers through an omnichannel

makes involves extensive thought into

process: they need to have consistent

how it will impact the customer. “We

experience.” For example, customers

make sure there’s really a business

may wish to deal with a claim over the

driver and value for what we’re investing

phone and then switch to live chat.

and innovating in. We then start with

“We need to be able to receive data and

a proof of concept, idea and trial before

respond to it in all manners, shapes and

we really push something.” AXA’s cloud

forms. Customers today are expecting

program is a prime example of this. “We

a different experience of working with

have to build new features, new products

a global insurer,” Shah adds, citing

and new ideas onto the platforms.

omnichannel as a key driver. “We need

There we have the voice of the customer

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : GLOBAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR ASH SHAH – HOW AXA MOVED TO THE CLOUD 109

to drive the demand and the prioritisa-

“We foster a strong change management

tion process. Then their voice is heard.

process where we make sure we

They drive the change agenda.”

communicate, evangelise and onboard our colleagues in all parts of the organi-

A TEAM EFFORT

sation,” says Shah. “That’s one of our

With the agenda driven by customers, it’s

key success factors in implementing

important that each and every member

a lasting change.”

of AXA’s 160,000-strong colleague base

This is not always easy given that AXA

is on board in order to promote the best

is dealing with new technologies and

service to every customer. Managing

working across a plethora of different

a significant change, and the shift in

locations, but Shah maintains that it’s

culture it brings, across such a mam-

possible with a combination of training

moth organisation is vital to make things

and open communication. This is not

work all the way to the end customer.

just looked at in terms of individual jobs, a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


AXA

but in terms of the key part each employee plays in AXA’s journey as a global organisation. The transformation so far has not just been successful in terms of IT, but far beyond this, including the people and culture at the company. “We have an extensive change training program for all of our colleagues where we’re working extensively to make sure they are all aware of what the cloud journey is, what AXA is undertaking, and why. It’s also important the program has the sponsorship of our management committee, and it is discussed and agreed – which then helps cascade the information and messages 110

around our program.” AXA’s move to the cloud involves not just thousands of employees, but a network of strong partners too – and all must be aware of the company’s long-term vision. “We are not technical experts in all domains and areas we’re undertaking as part of our move to the

“ The cloud gives us business agility, flexibility and speed to market which is much harder in traditional IT methods” — Ash Shah, Global Program Director – Move to the Cloud, AXA MARCH 2019


111

cloud journey,” Shah admits. “So the

Other important delivery and consult-

relationship we build with our suppliers

ing partners include Capgemini and

– and I would call them partners rather

Deloitte who are also supporting AXA

than suppliers – is very important to

on this journey.

us.” AXA has worked with some of

Shah makes it very clear that AXA

the biggest names in tech as part of

isn’t just buying off-the-shelf solutions

maintaining a secure yet efficient cloud

but is growing alongside each of its

transformation – from IBM with its

key partners in a sustainable relation-

private cloud provider to AWS and

ship. “We’re undertaking a multiyear

Microsoft Azure for its public cloud

commitment. They’re on this journey

journey. Innovation projects have also

with us.” Another element the above

been supported by Google Cloud.

names have in common is famously a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


AXA

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MARCH 2019


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secure service – something which is paramount for any organisation, but especially within the insurance industry. “A few years ago, the reason people didn’t move to the cloud was security. Now, organisations are actually moving to the cloud due to the security provided by the likes of IBM and Microsoft Azure. They have some of the best security experts out there. Their business is built on secure, trustable platforms – they would be out of business if their platforms were not secure.” Handling the kind of sensitive data AXA deals with on a daily basis means security is something Shah and his team don’t take lightly. “We need to ensure we have robust processes on our side. We are selective with what we put into the cloud, especially from a compliance and regulatory purpose. Cybersecurity is one of the key drivers of this program,” Shah explains, adding that the global insurance behemoth has a strong legacy to maintain. “Our brand value is particularly important – when you’re buying insurance, you’re also buying a trusted brand.”

A FUTURE IN THE CLOUD Following AXA’s success on its journey to the cloud thus far, Shah believes that other organisations will follow suit – or risk being left in the dust. “Cloud technology is going to a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com

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AXA

AXA GROUP

€98.5bn Approximate revenue

1982 Year founded 166,000 The approximate 114

number of AXA employees

significantly disrupt the insurance

sations, such as AXA, concerned

sector, and the insurance value chain,”

about the rise of fintech and in-

he predicts. “Cloud technologies and

surtech startups – but Shah believes

Insuretech partners will look at

these shouldn’t be perceived as

different parts of the value chain and

a threat. “Parts of our value chain will

come up with innovative ideas about

continue to be disrupted by cloud

how they can accelerate a certain

partners, innovators or insurtech

process – such as claim notification or

companies who will come in with

risk modelling.”

solutions and ideas which don’t have

Across the finance and insurance

the resistance to change that larger

spheres, the rise of technology

organisations have to deal with,”

leaves many more traditional organi-

he comments.

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

gies through our AXA Next organisation.” Along Shah’s journey to cloud transformation across the globe, the change will need to be continuously driven at all levels. “Hopefully we’re getting to a point where this communication and buy-in is becoming one of our key success factors. We measure that through KPIs. We’re at the point where we’re starting to become successful in promoting our program and moving forward with the migration– but we still have a long way to go.” Indeed, Shah cites the pace at which his team has accelerated buy-in across AXA. “In the last three of four months, we’ve seen more momentum than we saw in 15 months. That in itself is quite rewarding. We’ve seen the adoption and deployHowever, an insurer like AXA which

ment of lots of our applications on the

is prepared to innovate and stay at the

cloud. Momentum is building and it

forefront of new technologies can

will just get better and better.”

only stand to benefit. “We need to embrace this as an organisation, look at our value chain, and see where we can utilise insurtech organisations to streamline, to be more efficient, more innovative, faster, and to deliver the change our customers are looking for. We work with and invest in startups where we can leverage their technoloa si a .busi ne ssc hief. com

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TECHNOLOGY

117

Disrupting insurance with flexible technology architecture WRIT TEN BY

DA LE BENTON PRODUCED BY

A LE X PAGE a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


SINGAPORE LIFE

Singapore Life disaggregates insurance products through flexible and efficient digital architecture

I

n 2014, insurance company Singapore Life was built on a simple belief: that the world needed a better life insurer which used technology to

provide a superior experience for the customer. In the years since, Singapore Life has grown significantly. Through the company’s acquisition of Zurich Life Singapore’s expansive insurance business portfolio in 118

2018, Singapore Life continues to push the boundaries of technology in financial services. As it navigates the digital revolution in financial services, through sound investment and technological innovation, the company has built an architecture that enables greater flexibility and technology implementation while keeping the customer at the heart of its operations. “We are not a fintech that creates intellectual property purely through technology,” says James Shanahan, Chief Operating Officer (COO) at Singapore Life. “Instead we put that technology to use in a way which brings a unique business model to life.” That business model, something that truly separates Singapore Life from other leading financial institutions worldwide, is centred on “disaggregating the traditional product in order to bring greater flexibility and ultimately a better buying experience and pricing for the customer”. As technology continues to disrupt the traditional and MARCH 2019


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SINGAPORE LIFE

“ What we see are business models built on big systems and platforms that are very inflexible and typically reflect a cost-driven approach and this translates into a rigid, fixed sales approach and impersonal market offerings” — James Shanahan Chief Operating Officer, Singapore Life

now archaic means of buying and selling financial products, Shanahan believes that this has shone a light on what is a fundamentally broken market. “What’s broken isn’t the uptake of technology, it’s actually the attitude towards technology and the flexibility in how you sell financial services,” he says. “What we see are business models built on big systems and platforms that are very inflexible and typically reflect a cost-driven approach and this translates into a rigid, fixed sales approach and impersonal market offerings.” Singapore Life disaggregates the product MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

and breaks them down into multiple levels: product configuration, service orchestration and market offering. At the product configuration level, Singapore Life’s back end functionality allows the company to build products as wide-reaching as possible in terms of defining or limiting parameters. This takes into consideration as wide a number of possibilities as possible, such as different currencies or interest rates. “Why should there be market specific limits at the back end? “, asks Shanahan. The middle layer, service orchestration, is key to facilitating Singapore Life’s market offering. “This model allows for much lower costs and breaks down some of the complexities of the process,” says Shanahan. “Once a product is set up and the service configured, the offering can then serve multiple markets. It makes the front end very flexible because what can be offered is orchestrated in that middle layer.” Given various different mediums which customers use to access financial services, such as mobile applications, online portals or third-party platforms, Singapore Life’s back end functionality allows the front end delivery model to operate almost unconstrained. “None of the front end changes the back end product configuration. It’s all about the customer journey and their experience at the front end,” he says. “We’re able to produce or work with a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com

121


— Walter De Oude, Founder & CEO of SingLife, and happy customer & friend of Contemi since 2014


Contemi was founded in 2001 to design, build and robustly scale the complete IT systems for a start-up insurer in Scandinavia. From the initial mock-up and proof-of-concepts, to building the insurers own scalable core, accounting and claims systems, and managing the IT platform as the insurer grew leaps and bounds. Ever since then, Contemi have worked successfully with many start-up insurance operations in Scandinavia and Asia. Both stand-alone entrepreneurial pursuits as well as new business setups for

larger, mature insurers. For most we have built and managed their respective IT platforms and acted as key IT partner over the years, as they have gone “from zero to hero”. It is a Contemi specialty. We started working with Walter de Oude and his team at the SingLife design and proof-of-concept stage in 2014, and today still work with SingLife on delivering key pieces of the IT platform. We enjoy thoroughly working with SingLife and hope to do so for many years to come as SingLife’s success continues.

If you are looking to start something new in insurance – could be a new business line, a new partnership, a new distribution channel, a new claims process, a new eco-system integration and customer engagement model, etc – and you are now thinking about the underpinning IT solution - please do give us call on +65 8695 4219 and let’s talk about it. No promises, but let’s see if we can’t help put a bit of thunder into the IT part of your project.

www.contemi.com


SINGAPORE LIFE

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MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

C O N T E M I — A S T R AT E G I C PA R T N E R S H I P

Contemi, a global leader in next generation IT solutions and supporting customers through digitialisation journeys, has been a key strategic partner of Singapore Life since the beginning. For Shanahan, the relationship between the two represents the way in which Singapore Life truly values its partners. “There are several aspects that we deeply value with Contemi,” he says. “First, their proactive and deeply supportive culture, which lies at the heart of all our key relationships. Secondly, they understand our business and they add value to our thinking and our solutioning and our designs constantly. Thirdly, the technical skills and knowledge and, increasingly, experience, arising from Contemi’s home in Vietnam.” It is this third part in particular that highlights Contemi’s role in the growth of Singapore Life. Shanahan notes that the education system, culture, work ethic and competitive landscape in Vietnam is rapidly transforming, giving rise to what Singapore Life believes is a “powerful new force in technology, particularly in software development”. Contemi is integral to the company’s architectural, design, development, testing and rollout capabilities, participating and collaborating in the

entire product lifecycle. “Sustainability in any friendship arises from mutual contribution to the relationship,” says Shanahan. “For SingLife, we work hard to contribute to all our friendships. For Contemi we experience their contribution continuously and proactively and we benefit from their insights and experiences.” Contemi has taken the lead role in developing Singapore Life’s direct and advised portals. Every customer of Singapore Life engages with the company through these portals, as do its advisors, and so Contemi allows the company to innovate and to improve both the portals and the customer and advisor relationships. “Our policy serving is accessed via our portals in the first instance, meaning that an increased portion of customers’ needs are performed directly by customers and advisors in their portals,” says Shanahan. “We are continuously expanding the capabilities of the portals so that the experience is maintained at a worldclass level and so that customers and advisors access the most efficient solutions for their needs. We very much look forward to Contemi continuing in this role as we expand into new business lines and geographically.”

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SINGAPORE LIFE

“Singapore Life’s architecture is designed in a way that removes the restrictions that are inherently built into the traditional ‘fully integrated’ sales process” 126

— James Shanahan Chief Operating Officer, Singapore Life an unlimited variety of front ends that

what it believes has been missing from

connect to the orchestration, in order

the financial services landscape, which

to service multiple markets, regardless

is the flexibility to adapt to the custom-

of medium, language, geography, buying

er’s needs rapidly, to offer services

customs or other channel characteris-

which reflect contemporary pricing and

tics. Singapore Life’s architecture is

crafting experiences that delight their

designed in a way that removes the

customers, ultimately resulting in better

restrictions that are inherently built

financial outcomes for all stakeholders.

into the traditional ‘fully integrated’

“We are not so arrogant as to expect

sales process.”

people will only buy product X through

Removing the historical rigidity of

an app, or through partner X’s site or in

developing and selling financial services

only one way,” says Shanahan. “We

allows Singapore Life to reconceive its

want to allow all our partners, our own

business operating model and to deliver

teams and others in our ecosystem to

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

127

invent new sales experiences, channels

operating model leverages the concept

and mediums and be able to interact

of its emerging platform economy and

with us via an API layer at the orchestra-

the network effects which are becom-

tion level. We don’t profess to have the

ing evident amongst Singapore Life’s

definitive answer as to the best way to

customers and its ecosystem.

sell financial services; instead, we

“We have constructed a platform that

strive to enable as much flexibility as

it is incredibly flexible and operates

possible and to allow exploration and

at a cost which is at least an order of

discovery to lead us to better outcomes,

magnitude lower than prior solutions. In

all the while building a capability which

previous generations it was not possible

compounds the speed of that discov-

to enjoy tiny incremental cost of distribu-

ery over time.”

tion while deploying high flexibility and

The financial strategy underpinning Singapore Life’s unique business

rapid iteration,” says Shanahan. “Our operating model delivers this and further a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


THERE’S A NEW

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FOR ENQUIRIES CONTACT JASON MORRISSEY, Partner +65 6220 8383 Singapore • Kuala Lumpur • Manila • Hong Kong • Shanghai • Brisbane • Sydney • Canberra • Melbourne • Auckland


TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : SINGAPORE LIFE WELCOMES ZURICH LIFE SINGAPORE 129 allows us to consider multiple low cost,

importance. As Shanahan notes, the

high volume back ends which expand the

technology platform cannot operate in

scope of services our customers enjoy,

isolation and so Singapore Life invests

while new geographies and partnerships

in its operating model by bringing in

can be explored rapidly and without

partners to create further flexibility,

architectural complexity via front ends.”

managing the operating model via

Ultimately the platform economics

a governance approach which fully

bring about an increasing productivity gain over time, delivering on and

leverages its open ecosystem. He describes Singapore Life as the

continuously strengthening Singapore

‘architects’ that oversee the design, the

Life’s unique business model promise.

funding and allocation of capital, and

Technology is key to achieving

the company’s roadmaps, the distribut-

increased productivity throughout the

ing 100% of its development and back

company and its ecosystem, but the

office operations to create an ecosys-

operating model is perhaps of greater

tem of the likeminded. “The idea is that a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


SINGAPORE LIFE

we don’t want ‘vendors’ or someone who’s just trying to sell us something,” he says. “We also don’t want partners, which simply implies a level of seniority. What we really want are friends.” Shanahan continues: “When we say, ‘open ecosystem,’ it’s an ecosystem of people who are like minded when it comes to achieving our vision, who’ve got each other’s back, who are simpatico in their understanding, and whose incentives, both emotional and professional, are aligned to the same goals.” In bringing this open ecosystem to life, Singapore Life can drive robust and rapid changes in both the organisation and the 130

industry. To this end, Singapore Life works closely with local and international partners such as Amazon, GrowthOps, Ranosys, Sapiens and LogiGear to develop, test and implement leading-edge software solutions to accelerate the company’s growth. “The most important thing for Singapore Life is working with companies that can enable an extreme level of flexibility, to bring in new and different resources as well as different types of skillsets,” says Shanahan. “We then end up with organisations that we’ve effectively grown with – people that believe in our philosophy, our vision,where we’re trying to get to.” GrowthOps in particular has been a key driver of growth for Singapore Life, having worked with the company since April 2017. MARCH 2019

“ With our architecture powering growth, it’s now time for Singapore Life to come of age and step into adulthood in terms of our standing as a regional champion” — James Shanahan Chief Operating Officer, Singapore Life


TECHNOLOGY

Singapore Life engaged GrowthOps as a technology advisory partner to improve its infrastructure, cloud security, compliance and business continuity. In Oct 2017, Singapore Life officially went live with its client portal and high net worth online offerings. Since then, GrowthOps has been working in partnership with the company in five areas: cost optimisation, security, reliability, performance and operational excellence. “Singapore Life engaged us to develop a robust technology infrastructure that could be leveraged to provide financial solutions directly to its clients,” says Jason Morrissey, Partner, GrowthOps. “GrowthOps is excited to be involved in the expansion story of a digitallyfocused financial services company, and our teams look forward to further developing our relationship in 2019 and beyond.” At the very heart of every decision that Singapore Life takes, be it operations, finance or technology, is the customer. In the financial services space, the customer can take on many forms and in order for Singapore Life to deliver the very best for them it needs to understand how the contemporary customer behaves. In Singapore, the modern customer is time-poor and this has seen companies look to tap into this market by creating mobile applications in order to bring them insurance and other financial products. Singapore Life a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com

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SINGAPORE LIFE

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SINGAPORE LIFE

134

recognises that while this can bring

Singapore Life is an incredibly

success, it’s not representative of the

ambitious company. By early 2019

customer experience that Singapore

the company was valued at over

Life seeks to provide. “The key for us is

US$200mn and had achieved profit-

observing that time-poor state and

ability in its first full year of operation,

thinking how we can build a smooth,

making it Singapore’s fastest growing

compelling and attractive experience

life insurer. With a wholly flexible and

for that customer,” says Shanahan.

incredibly unique architecture in place,

“There are so many apps in the market

the sky is well and truly the limit. As

now I couldn’t possibly tell you which one

‘the next generation’ financial services

is going to ‘win’. We want to experiment,

company, what does the future hold

use our flexibility and other capabilities

for Singapore Life? The company has

to discover what works for customers

outlined its ambitions to expand into

in real life.”

the ASEAN market, to significantly

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

its strong business plans and push to enter new markets and rollout additional lines of business. From the outset GrowthOps has worked with Singapore Life to ensure the technologies are in place to support the company’s goal of becoming a preferred Singaporean financial services company.” For Singapore Life, this goal will be achieved by keeping the customer at the heart of its operations. “Our intention is to fill the more holistic financial services needs of individuals and to continue to work with our ecosystem to bring new and wonderful things to our expanding markets,” says Shanahan. “With our architecture powering growth, it’s now broaden its insurance portfolio and

time for Singapore Life to come of age

to expand to other financial services,

and step into adulthood in terms of our

using its operating model, licence and

standing as a regional champion.”

rapidly expanding capital base to renovate and reinvigorate financial services. It will achieve this with the help of those key partners. “GrowthOps works closely with Singapore Life’s management team and is supporting the company’s digital expansion in Southeast Asia,” says Morrissey. “Moreover, GrowthOps is further enhancing Singapore Life’s technology infrastructure to support a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com

135


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MLC LIFE INSURANCE Undergoing a digital transformation in the insurance sector WRITTEN BY

SEAN GALEA-PACE PRODUCED BY

ALEX PAGE

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MLC LIFE INSURANCE

Sarv Girn, Chief Innovation and Transformation Officer of MLC Life Insurance, discusses how his company is embracing technology amid a digital transformation in the insurance industry

W

ith digital transformation having an increased impact across all industries, it’s become paramount that companies

continuously monitor their operations to ensure 138

they are providing the best possible service to their customers. For Sarv Girn, Chief Innovation and Transformation Officer of MLC Life Insurance, the experience of the customer is considered key. With a 133-year history and considered the oldest start-up in Australia, MLC Life Insurance has substantial experience in the insurance sector. Having transitioned from NAB ownership to joining the Nippon Life Group of Companies, Girn believes that the change in ownership has allowed MLC Life Insurance to progress its customer experience significantly. “It actually ploughs investments back into the customer offering. The ethos within MLC Life Insurance is that we ensure we put the customer first and investments aim to create platforms for advisers, group funds and end policy holders that are truly customer centric,” says Girn. “That MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

139

makes us quite unique given Nippon’s background, because with the investment in new technologies it’s clear we are really serious about our customers. I believe that is what gives us an edge and it shouldn’t be underestimated.”

UTILISING TECHNOLOGY As customer demands continue to change, it is important that companies respond and adapt to the latest digital trends in order to stay competitive with industry rivals. From first-hand experience, Girn believes he has an a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


MLC LIFE INSURANCE

“ We’ve introduced LifeView for our group customers which is a platform we offer to superannuation funds and it’s been very important to us” 140

— Sarv Girn, Chief Innovation and Transformation Officer

MARCH 2019

effective understanding of what customers expect from a life insurer. “The demands of the customer have changed because customers expect everything to be done online now. Three years ago, I had a nasty fall where I broke my ankle and ended up in hospital,” explains Girn. “At the time, I was part of another life insurance company and having to make a claim wasn’t easy. I couldn’t really load all the documents up online and I had to physically go around to a GP, surgeon, and the hospital to get documented proof that I’d been injured, which on


TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘LIFE UNCHANGING — BROOKE WOULDN’T CHANGE A THING’ 141 crutches is no easy task. What

insurance needs online and, should

customers are really expecting is to

they need to make a claim, to be able

log on to a portal, load up all the informa-

to track its progress,” says Girn. “This

tion about their claim electronically,

has been great for members because

track it and get paid automatically.”

claims can go straight through for

With customer requirements in mind,

assessment without the need for lots

MLC Life Insurance has implemented

of manual paperwork. The portal also

a new platform called LifeView, which

offers an integrated experience for

will make the insurance and claims

trustees and administrators, providing

experience easier for members of

superannuation funds with transparent

superannuation funds. The platform is

view of the claims process.”

designed to help improve member engagement, automating processes

TRANSITIONING TO THE CLOUD

and decreasing response times.

Having moved to the cloud under two

“It allows members to manage their

years ago, MLC Life Insurance has a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com




MLC LIFE INSURANCE

144

“It’s extremely important to innovate because our customers are tech-savvy and expect to be able to conduct their business online. However, we do leverage the broader Nippon Group and look at what are other life insurers in the group are doing” — Sarv Girn, Chief Innovation and Transformation Officer

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

migrated its services and transformed

philosophy, Girn believes that it’s vital

its infrastructure to ensure it produces

to innovate and utilise partners to

the best possible service. Girn affirms

achieve results. “It’s extremely

that any such transformation is difficult

important to innovate because our

to achieve. “Any migration to the cloud

customers are tech-savvy and expect

or to a new system is complex. It takes

to be able to conduct key elements of

careful planning and because we didn’t

their business online. However, we do

actually have a previous system: we

leverage the broader Nippon Group

had to start off from scratch. Every use

and look at what other life insurers in

of cloud needs to be managed from

the group are doing,” he says. “It’s also

a risk perspective, so it’s important

vital to keep in touch with our custom-

that we make sure we understand the

ers in order to gain a better under-

operational aspects of that outsourcing

standing of what issues they have. I’m

and look at how we’re managing and

a firm believer that it doesn’t really

monitoring it.”

matter who you work for, it matters

With innovation considered a key component of MLC Life Insurance’s

who you work with – so for us, having partners out there where you can pick

E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Sarv Girn Following the acquisition of MLC Life by Nippon Life from Japan, Sarv is responsible for leading the business transformation to re-establish MLC Life as Australia’s leading and most trusted life insurance company. This includes delivering the most advanced digital and process infrastructure in the insurance sector so as to create great customer experience across the group and retail insurance channels.

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MLC LIFE INSURANCE

1886

Year founded

1,650

Approximate number of employees

HQ

Melbourne Australia

146

up a phone and say ‘we want to try this

objectives and there’s a win-win for both

experiment, can you help here?’ is the

sides. If you have a partner that is

key to innovation.”

always trying to sell you something you

In order to ensure that MLC’s

don’t need, then it isn’t really a partner-

success is sustained, Girn points to the

ship,” he explains. “The trick is to find

development of key partnerships with

joint objectives because if you’ve got

Indian multinational IT provider Tech

a partner who’s doing a great job

Mahindra as well as Salesforce, TCS,

implementing your platform and it’s

Infosys, Microsoft and Oracle and

truly strategic, then you can help them

affirms that effective partnerships have

grow in another part of the company.

been an important component to the

It’s primarily about understanding the

transformation. “I think a partnership

objectives of each other, because if the

works well when you’ve got joint

objectives aren’t aligned, it’s never

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

147

going to be successful, no matter how

around for a long time. Our purpose is

hard you try.”

‘a promise for life’, and considering we’ve been in operation since 1886, we

FUTURE PLANS

want to stay around for a long time to

With sustainability at the forefront of

come. It’s sustainability in a financial

MLC Life Insurance’s strategy, Girn

sense, but it’s also vital for us to stay

believes it’s important to stay relevant

relevant to the community. We’re trying

to customers and respond to their

to become more sustainable in offering

demands on a consistent basis. “We

propositions like health and wellbeing

have to ensure we’re not just effective

when customers are considering life

when dealing with customers, but

insurance,” explains Girn. “If my life

efficient internally as well because we

insurer can tell me that I’m eating the

need to make sure we’re going to be

wrong things or not exercising enough, a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


1

3 2

4

5

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TECHNOLOGY

“ We have to ensure we’re not just effective when dealing with customers, but efficient internally as well” — Sarv Girn, Chief Innovation and Transformation Officer

149

and refer me to a gym or a physio, then

mation. We also want to look at some

I’m going to be more likely to stay fit.

really advanced analytics to better

If they keep me healthy and fitter, then

understand our customers’ require-

I’m going to like them and they’re going

ments,” he says. “We’re now entering

to become more sustainable. I believe

a period where we can use machine

that helps to re-define life insurance,

learning and artificial intelligence (AI) to

because a life insurer is primarily a health

analyse customer behaviour and data

and well-being company.”

with their consent and offer a proposi-

Looking to the future, Girn aims to

tion that meets their needs.”

continue to prioritise customers in order to thrive in the life insurance market. “We’re extending our platform even further to our advisers and Group customers to enable further transfora si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


Using technology to grow in Japan

150

WRIT TEN BY

SOPHIE CHAPM AN PRODUCED BY

A LE X PAGE

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

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PA I D Y

As Paidy builds its status in Japan, the payment company’s CTO talks to Business Chief about ITS digital disruption journey

T

he Japanese startup was founded in 2008, but despite having been present in the nation’s fintech industry for over 10 years,

Paidy’s expansion became most prominent in the past few years. “Definitely over the last three years we have seen tremendous growth – consumer growth, merchant network growth, and growth in 152

our consumer spaces, such as active users on the platform,” reveals Houston Ross, Chief Technology Officer at Paidy. Since 2017, the company has expanded by more than 200%, and is now currently one of the largest online payment businesses in Japan. The firm offers cardless payments using only an email address and phone number – the accessible, frictionless payment method does not require a credit card nor application. “To summarise, we take the risk out of online transactions. The Japanese use the term “mendokusai” which means troublesome. So, we remove the mendokusai in terms of facilitating payments online,” states Houston. As well as being a technology-driven business, Paidy’s values centre around its workforce. “Paidy’s main core values are discovery, diversity and inclusion,” Houston says. The firm employs around MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

153

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PA I D Y

154

“ The government has said that by 2020, 40% of all transactions should be online. Now that’s an opportunity to acknowledge” — Houston Ross Chief Technology Officer, Paidy

MARCH 2019

120 members of staff of 28 different nationalities. “So, diversity is really important to us, in terms of how we operate in trying to collectivise that diversity and then funnel it into the innovation that we use to power our company. I think that’s one of our core values,” Ross continues. With its diverse workforce, the company is able to introduce a range of new ideas and cutting-edge concepts. The business claims to be at the pinnacle of technology-adoption, which allows it to simplify


TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : INSTANT YOU (PAIDY INC.) 155

Japan’s payment options. In order to

to encapsulate an experience right now

remove complexities and mendokusai

focused on the payments. And of

from purchasing, the payment network

course, the technology that we utilize

has adopted artificial intelligence (AI)

underpins that.” As the company’s CTO,

and machine learning. “I think at the

Houston is ensuring Paidy’s relation-

core of what we’re doing, we’re talking

ship with technology continues to

about financial risk management. So,

develop. “I’m responsible for engineer-

our ability to process that data and

ing, products, Infosec and operations,”

analyze it daily at the transactional level

notes Houston. When joining the

is key to our business,” says Houston.

company last year, having previously

“For us, digital transformation is the

worked at Nationale Nederlanden and

engine that underpins our ability to

AXA Life Insurance, the CTO decided

remove that mendokusai. We’re trying

to isolate his firm’s security function. a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


Make Every Customer Interaction Count Create innovative & delightful customer experiences with programmable communications. www.nexmo.com | sales@nexmo.com |


TECHNOLOGY

“When I arrived at Paidy, security was

factor to our technology operations as

a part of our engineering operations.

well our consumers and invoices. We

One of the first things I did was pull it

run our business in the cloud on AWS

away from engineering and set it on

Stack, and there are other services like

its own course,” claims Houston.

Circle-CI that we’re leveraging as well

There are several risks to consider within the fintech industry, with the P2P platform addressing operational risk,

because they’re on our continuous integration.” The network is becoming increasingly

cyber risk, and risks within underlying

popular in Japan as it is revolutionising

technology. As the business grows,

the industry and targeting both the mass

Paidy is adopting partnerships with

market and business. “The relationship

companies such as Nexmo and AWS.

between users and merchants is critical

“We work with partners like Nexmo,

to every interaction, and everyone

which targets SMS messaging – a key

involved is having to build trust.In that

E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Houston Ross Houston Ross recently joined Paidy as the firm’s Chief Technology Officer. Prior to October last year, Houston was positioned as the Chief Operations Officer for Czech Republic and Slovakia at Nationale Nederlanden, as well as being a Board Member. The innovation-focused executive has also worked for NN’s Life Insurance Company as the Vice President, Chief Operations Officer, and Chief Information Officer, as well as AXA Life Insurance Japan as the Chief Technology Officer. Houston graduated from Barrington University in 2001 with a Bachelor of Science and the University of Liverpool in 2007 with a Master of Business Administration degree.

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PA I D Y

2008

Year founded

100+

Approximate number of employees

158

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

159

a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


PA I D Y

“ Diversity is really important to us, in terms of how we operate in trying to collectivise that diversity and then funnel it into the innovation that we use to power our company” 160

— Houston Ross Chief Technology Officer, Paidy

CLICK TO WATCH : PAIDY, HOW TO VIDEO (JAPANESE LANGUAGE)

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

we want to introduce additional new products for our company,” Houston says. With opportunities on the horizon, such as the Olympics being held in Japan in 2020, Paidy aims to take advantage of its surroundings. “The government has said that by 2020, 40% of all transactions should be online. Now that’s an opportunity to acknowledge,” continues Houston. The biggest challenge for Houston within his role is enabling the business’s growth: “With the scaling on a vertical side and the scaling on a horizontal side, on one hand you’re trying to build a foundation where you can grow, and space, Paidy says ‘look, we take the

the other is adding additional revenue

risk.’ The merchant is assured they will

and value streams to that ecosystem.

be paid by the consumer, as we accept

My personal challenge is how do you do

the consumer risk and trust that they

both at the same time whilst continuing

pay us,” explains Houston. “Then we

to expand.”

make it a whole lot more seamless, we make it frictionless, and we remove mendokusai for the merchant as well as for the consumer.” “Our primary goal is around growth, from both a vertical and horizontal perspective. The vertical perspective is to expand from 2mn Paidy consumers to 5mn in 2019. As for horizontal growth, a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com

161


162

A TECHNOLOGY TRANSFORMATION SPANNING THE CONTINENT WRIT TEN BY

CATHERINE S TURM AN PRODUCED BY

MIK E SADR

MARCH 2019


ASIA

163

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C A R AV E L G R O U P

Chief Operating Officer, Angad Banga discusses how digitisation has disrupted the shipping industry

M

aritime transport remains a significant linchpin in the world’s economy. With more than 90% of goods and services travelling

via this route, global sea trade remains a significant driver in the delivery of high-quality products and services. Headquartered in Hong Kong, The Caravel Group, taking its name from 15th century trading vessel, ‘the caravel’, has played a key role in the 164

facilitation of global seaborne trade, with strategic locations situated in China, Cyprus, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. While the group is no stranger to increasing competition across the shipping industry, changes in requirements from industry participants, increasing and changing regulatory regimes and pricing pressures have created a seismic shift in expectations from the industry, with digitisation expected to be the driver of change. “What makes us unique is our range of qualities: from our agility and spirit, our entrepreneurial drive, integrity and transparency in our operations, as well as our diverse set of business operations across the value chain, which allows us to provide integrated solutions. We are a large company, with the energy MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

165

of a start-up,” comments Chief Operating Officer, Angad Banga. “It is critical for the organisation to drive change, using the business initiatives we create and build over time.” Guaranteeing value-added services will be the main differentiator for any business and Banga is keen to embrace and implement new IT and operational technologies (OT) which will demonstrate excellence, each and every time. As an example, The Caravel Group’s Ship Management division, Fleet Management Limited, which is one of a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


The Caravel Group partners with Symantec to defend cyber threats

Businesses are increasing annual spend on cyber security more than ever before. As threats become more advanced, The Caravel Group (TCG) has introduced multiple layers of threat protection across its operations. Supporting organisations, governments and people to secure their most important data, TCG partnered with leading cyber security provider, Symantec.

CONTACT US DL-OD-Hongkong@symantec.com

A market leader in the field, the business delivers integrated solutions across all endpoints, and has strengthened TCG’s cloud and infrastructure capabilities, deploying effective, scalable solutions.


Symantec has a wide range of security products. They are the market leader to provide integrated Cyber Defence solutions and rapid delivery to the cloud.” - Angad Banga, Chief Operating Officer, The Caravel Group

A strategic partnership

A secure solution

By partnering with Symantec, TCG has accelerated their journey to the cloud with flexible endpoint detection and response (EDR) technology. The results are significant: Incident responders now quickly search, identify, and contain impacted endpoints, both on premises and in the cloud, then integrate all incident data and actions into existing SOC infrastructures and Symantec Endpoint Protection (SEP) environments.

Optimising assets and lowering operational costs were the biggest sellers for TCG, where Symantec’s technologies were deployed in minutes, with no impact on the end-user experience. “Security solutions from Symantec have changed the way we deal with threats." says Banga. "We are now also implementing Symantec IT AssetManagement to centralise all our resources.”

By successfully onboarding Symantec email cloud security products to eradicate the threat of spam, malware, and trojans, its Target Attack Analytics (TAA) and Dynamic Adversary Intelligence has seen the implementation of cloud-based artificial intelligence algorithms and machine learning, allowing TCG to adapt to new attack techniques automatically and gain greater insight into attacker and technique. Not only that – by increasing visibility, Symantec also delivers great automated playback capabilities to TCG, bringing the skills and best practices of its most experienced security analysts to the table, lowering costs at every opportunity, existing SOC infrastructures and Symantec Endpoint Protection (SEP) environments.

Symantec IT Management Suite integrates with SEP Cloud, extending the visibility of endpoints to include modern devices and operating systems. Reducing the cost of managing servers, desktops, laptops and thin clients from a centralised location, the solution reduced end-user downtime and maximised IT efficiency. Additionally, by ensuring real-time compliance across TCG’s IT assets and overall operations, Symantec’s IT management suites centralises and simplifies patch management. Symantec’s Cloud-enabled management functionality in IT Management Suite puts the security of Windows and Mac users firmly at the forefront, even when they are disconnected from the corporate network. In-depth reports also offer smarter, faster decisions which ensure endpoints are protected.

For additional information, please visit www.symantec.com or connect with us on Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin. Copyright ©2018 Symantec Corporation. All rights reserved. Symantec, the Symantec Logo, and the Checkmark Logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Symantec Corporation or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners.


C A R AV E L G R O U P

the largest and preeminent third-party ship management firms with over 500 vessels under management, has been a key division which has embraced new digital tools. Catering to cargo ship owners worldwide, including bulk carriers, oil, gas and cargo carriers, chemical tankers and more, Fleet Management’s longstanding expertise in technical and management services has been enhanced with innovative software to drive operational efficiency in delivering exceptional end-to-end, 168

value-added solutions to its clients. Banga notes that its ship management system has the ability to provide close to real-time data to clients, something which was previously unavailable. “The maritime industry is one of the oldest modes of transport, and has gone

“ Organisations will need to understand the value of technology, how to use it and to actually innovate, using technology as a driver” — Angad Banga, Chief Operating Officer, Caravel Group MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

169

through several stages of technological

which helps us begin the process of

revolution throughout history. We

digitisation. It means certain applica-

expect to see another impressive shift

tions and certain tasks can be com-

in the near-future. The industry is not

pleted on ships without the network

necessarily considered innovative,

problems we previously encountered.

but is actually hugely complex. Each

Over time, this should hopefully lead

vessel requires a high level of technical

to a higher degree of automation – at

expertise to able to manage it – not just

sea, but also within the offices.”

the engineering and crew itself but also

In the trading of industrial dry bulk

the IT systems and OT systems which

commodities, the group’s Resources

we provide,” he explains. “More and

division has become a key staple for

more ships are getting connectivity,

the steel and energy sectors. Its three a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


World-Leading Cyber AI


The Caravel Group Case Study Industry

Maritime

Business Background

Resources

Asset Management

Headquartered in Hong Kong, the Caravel Group is a diversified global conglomerate that provides maritime services, strategic asset management, and trading solutions across the industrial dry bulk value chain.

Challenges Detecting never-before-seen threats at an early stage

Containing fast-moving attacks before they do damage

Gaining complete visibility across complex digital systems

Autonomous response to in-progress threats

100% visibility via the Darktrace Threat Visualizer

Results Real-time detection of novel attacks and subtle insiders

Challenge

Solution

Benefits

As cyber-threats gain in speed and severity, the Caravel Group recognized the importance of cultivating an adaptive and resilient security posture that can keep pace with a rapidly evolving threat landscape. In particular, the business was determined to deploy a cyber AI solution that can autonomously detect and respond to novel threats at an early stage, before they have time to disrupt critical operations, or exfiltrate sensitive data.

To address these concerns, the security team deployed Darktrace’s Enterprise Immune System, which installed in under an hour and immediately started learning the normal ‘pattern of life’ for every user and device in the business. By continuously learning and adapting its understanding of ‘normal’ in light of new evidence, Darktrace’s cyber AI can detect never-before-seen threats that would otherwise go unnoticed.

With Darktrace AI deployed across its entire digital enterprise, the Caravel Group now has 24/7 autonomous protection against advanced cyberthreats. Through Darktrace’s Threat Visualizer, the security team has complete visibility of every user and device and can investigate emerging threats in real time.

With Antigena defending our network around the clock, we can finally prioritize strategically important activities while Darktrace’s AI works in the background to contain the threats that get through. Angad Banga, Chief Operating Officer

“The Enterprise Immune System immediately notified us of cyberthreats that our other tools missed,” commented Banga. “Darktrace’s AI has enabled us to rapidly investigate threats before they have time to escalate into a crisis.” The Caravel Group subsequently deployed Darktrace Antigena, Darktrace’s autonomous response solution. By enforcing the normal ‘pattern of life’ for a given user or device, Antigena works by taking surgical, measured action to contain in-progress threats, limiting damage and stopping their spread in real time. “With Antigena defending our network around the clock, we can finally prioritize strategically important activities while Darktrace’s AI works in the background to contain the threats that get through,” commented Banga.

“Darktrace provides us with actionable intelligence in a few clicks and can identify legitimate threats amid the noise of our complex digital business,” remarked Banga. “With Darktrace, our security team and executives can be confident that cyber-threats that get past the perimeter will be identified and contained before they do damage.”

Darktrace’s Enterprise Immune System is the only solution on the market that can detect and respond to neverbefore-seen threats in real time. Angad Banga, Chief Operating Officer

w


C A R AV E L G R O U P

“ More and more ships are getting connectivity, which helps us move into the digital space. Certain 172 applications and tasks can be completed without the network problems we previously encountered” — Angad Banga, Chief Operating Officer, Caravel Group

main subsidiaries – metallurgical, carbons, and ores and alloys – are safely transported as a result of the group’s robust supply chain and logistics capabilities. Nonetheless, as the need for global shipping services continues to escalate, technology has seen a steady rise in demand – something which Caravel has been keen to tap into by taking a greater look at the high volumes of data accumulated across the group, in order to drive greater value and access further opportunities. “Much of the data is not captured at source in a systematic manner. When the data is collected, it’s not being effectively utilised, which leads to the question of ‘is the business intelligence there?’ ‘Is there a sufficient level of resourcing?’ There are some companies doing it but I think it’s at an early stage. This is a key area of focus for The Caravel Group. We will be using several tools to enhance data visualisation and modelling through machine learning,” adds Banga. “We already have some of these initiatives underway, and hopefully, these will be a foundation for enabling future generations of tools that are developed to service our clients. Organi-

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

173 sations will need to understand the

stores, the new app has led seafarers

value of technology, how to use it and

to join the business quicker and make

to actually innovate.”

an immediate difference, boosting

Although technology has grown “in leaps and bounds” and accelerated the transformation of businesses globally,

engagement and seafarer retention levels in the process. “We can scan a seafarer’s passport

he adds the group’s integrated, pas-

which is then sent back promptly,”

sionate workforce and client-led focus

Banga says. “Previously, it was a fully

is its biggest asset. Blending technol-

manual process, so this has reduced

ogy, creativity and training has therefore

delays in the process. Through the

seen the business build a new applica-

app, users can submit their application,

tion which has fully digitised the seafarer

which provides two options: a quick

experience across their 500 vessels,

application and a full application.

even before they have joined. Acces-

The quick application is where you

sible through Android and Apple

can apply straight away with minimal a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


C A R AV E L G R O U P

C OMPA N Y FA C T S

• The Caravel Group takes its name from 15th century trading vessel, ‘the caravel’ • Catering towards bulk carriers, oil, gas and cargo carriers, chemical tankers and more, the group’s longstanding expertise has been enhanced with innovative software to drive operational efficiency 174

• Caravel has sought to look at the high volumes of data accumulated, in order to drive greater value and access further opportunities • Blending technology, creativity and training has seen the business build a new application which has fully digitised the employee experience • With the number of security breaches rising each year and expected to hit US$6trn annually by 2021, security has therefore become a key driver for the group

requirements, and we can actually start conversations with seafarers looking to apply to us. The full application is a more detailed application where you put all your certifications and take photos of your details, and this information is then uploaded to our proprietary crew management database allowing our on-boarding teams to reduce their manual processes and focus on the value-add aspect to hiring high quality seafarers. It supports those who are interested in joining, and we have received positive feedback both from

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

175

the community and the industry,” he

2021, according to Symantec, security

adds. Following its success, the group

has become a key driver for the group.

is now rolling out similar technologies

“While the industry continues to

to transform its quality management

shift, it is essential for us build a digital

systems, utilising tools such as iPads

fingerprint in the industry, but to also

to fully mobilise its inspection and

build the IT foundation needed to

audit processes.

have a good security in place,” he adds

For Banga, implementing such

thoughtfully. “We have a number of

technology has proved highly benefi-

partners on board to support us in the

cial, yet he is cautious not to introduce

delivery of end-point protection. Tech-

new technologies “just for technology’s

nology enables us to further this vision.”

sake”. With the number of security

Symantec has been one such partner

breaches rising each year and damage

which has been instrumental in the

projected to hit US$6trn annually by

transformation of the group’s digital a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


C A R AV E L G R O U P

£2bn Approximate revenue

1,000 Approximate number of on-shore staff

176

20,000 Approximate number of off-shore staff

MARCH 2019


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C A R AV E L G R O U P

“ I think Symantec’s strength is their ability to be able to operate without needing continual updates every time” 178

— Angad Banga, Chief Operating Officer, Caravel Group

security from an IT perspective. “Our relationship with Symantec

robust email protection. Previously, the group received a high volume of

started with advancing our digital

malware, which has been reduced

protection, where we explored a

significantly since we implemented

number of products in the security

Symantec’s solution.

space which would help us protect

“I think the biggest strength is their

our end-points. We had limited defense,

ability to be able to operate without

but by expanding our partnership

needing continual updates every time.

further, we have embedded a strong

In some scenarios we need to have a

level of protection,” he explains.

managed anti-virus product that doesn’t

“By implementing tools from Symantec, we can now guarantee MARCH 2019

just simply scan for viruses, but really protects the end-point device from


S U P P LY C H A I N

179

external effects. Other products do

dynamic, world-class service to clients

similar things, but Symantec was very

worldwide. With its ewntrepreneurial

satisfactory from a result perspective.

spirit, its diverse portfolio and strong

Following the implementation of the

relationships with clients, partners and

Symantec solution, the number of spam

its stakeholders, the business will

emails stopped in a month was up to

remain agile and responsive to various

15% of total emails received.�

market trends as the shipping industry

As the group continues to pioneer

endures and thrives.

new markets and trade routes, it will look towards the use of new digital tools and partnerships in order to remain a key player in the market and deliver a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


180

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

AB InBev: Investing in a sustainable future WRIT TEN BY

CATHERINE S TURM AN PRODUCED BY

CHARLOT TE CL ARK E

a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com

181


ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV

With an ambition to remain the number one brewer 100+ years from now, AB InBev’s sustainability goals have led to a global transformation of its operations

R

enowned as the largest beer producer worldwide, AB InBev’s global reach and passion for innovation

has seen the business implement new sustainable solutions. Launching its most ambitious sustainability goals yet in March 2018, encom182

passing smart agriculture, water stewardship, circular packaging and climate action, the business continues to look at ways to secure its position as a leading brewer 100+ years from now. AB InBev knows it can’t solve all of its sustainability challenges on its own and is working alongside technology startups, governments, NGOs, local businesses and universities, notably through its recently launched 100+ Accelerator Programme. Partnering with people who are passionate about solving environmental challenges and building sustainable solutions, areas of focus include improving the livelihood of farmers and the strengthening of the supply chain to take its efforts to new heights. “The launch of the 100+ MARCH 2019


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ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV

“ Our approach is rooted in the communities where we live and work, and we are well positioned to support entrepreneurs who are tackling local challenges”

184

— Diane Wauters, Sustainability & Agricultural Development Director, APAC

MARCH 2019

Accelerator builds on our sustainability goals and acts as a way to fast-track our progress. It is a way for us to partner with companies that can deliver breakthrough advancements in water stewardship, farmer productivity, responsible sourcing, green logistics and more,” explains Diane Wauters, Sustainability & Agricultural Development Director, APAC.

SMART AGRICULTURE Implementing its Smart Agriculture 2025 goals, AB InBev is focusing on upskilling, connecting and financially empowering its direct farmers in over 15


S U P P LY C H A I N

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘100+ 2025 SUSTAINABILITY GOALS’ 185 countries. In India for example, through

programmes, which educate farmers to

the use of data, technology and key

adopt best practices. “With this pro-

insights from the field, the SmartBarley

gramme we aim to drive change and

team is supporting around 4,000

build a sustainable future for us and for

farmers in boosting farmer productivity

our farmers with a truly 360 approach

and environmental performance. By

impacting not only the farmer margin

actively engaging local farmers, R&D

but also water usage reduction through

specialists have sought to improve

better irrigation practices, health &

crop quality and introduce new barley

safety, nutrition and women empower-

varieties, while agronomists have worked

ment,” adds Wauters.

with farmers in the implementation of

“Our approach is rooted in the comm-

crop management practices to enable

unities where we live and work, and we

them to achieve optimum crop yields.

are well positioned to support entre-

All of this work is fully underpinned

preneurs who are tackling local challeng-

by AB InBev’s SmartFarmer training

es. Partnering with KisanHub – a crop a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV

186

intelligence platform – in the context of

its watershed around high risk sites,

the 100+ Accelerator in India will help

improving water usage and driving

us reach our goal of having 100% of

initiatives to impact the surrounding

our farmers digitally connected faster

watersheds. With more than 884mn

and with better results – which is our

people in the developing world lack-

constant drive,” explains Wauters.

ing access to clean water, water stewardship and building strong rela-

WATER STEWARDSHIP

tionships with like-minded partners

As part of its water stewardship goals,

and suppliers has become a vital area

AB InBev has prioritised the impact of

of focus.

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

“We have sought to reduce our water usage, checking all water sources to ensure complete security. Working alongside local authorities and partnering with organisations, such as the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and The Nature Conservancy (TNC) will also enable us to truly impact our watersheds,” says Wauters. “In India for example, we are part of a few water roundtables, such as the CEO Water Alliance (CEWA),” she says. “It’s very exciting to create water alliances with other companies sharing similar concerns on our

187

water crisis so that we can act and have more impact together. How do we tackle a water crisis? We can only impact our watershed if we work with strong partners in the field, all sharing the same goal to measurably E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Diane Wauters After working in finance for six years in China on various water treatment plants and completing her MBA at Columbia Business School, Diane joined AB InBev’s global procurement team. She is now leading sustainability & agricultural development for the Asia Pacific region

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E X ECU T I VE P RO FI LE

Terry Yao After working in procurement for nine years in national companies, Terry Yao joined AB InBev APAC procurement team. He is now leading sustainability, innovation & SVC in ABI China.

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

improve water quality and quantity,”

“It is a privilege to leverage our resourc-

she adds.

es, capabilities and the scale of our

Leading Australian brewer Cascade

operations to help our communities by

of Carlton & United Breweries (CUB),

pausing beer production to produce

part of the AB InBev family, has sought

clean, safe drinking water for those

to support those affected by natural

affected by natural disasters” says VP

disasters in Queensland, Australia by

Procurement & Sustainability (APAC)

providing free canned drinking water

Jan Clysner.

to those in need. In partnership with the Palaszczuk Government and not-for-

CIRCULAR PACKAGING

profit organisation GIVIT, the relief

Removing 100,000 tonnes of packag-

programme was launched at CUB’s

ing material globally in 2016, AB InBev’s

Yatala Brewery, the largest brewery in

commitment to follow its goal language

Australia. Following its success, the

on returnable and recycled content has

company has now committed to the

seen the business develop robust relation- 189

programme for the foreseeable future,

ships with suppliers, local governments

whereby the business will store up to

and partners. Ramping up the percent-

100,000 cans close to Yatala Brewery

age of recycled materials across its oper-

in case of natural disasters, such as

ations, Wauters points out how China’s

wildfires or cyclones, guaranteeing the

‘recycling ban’, forming part of the cou-

health and safety of local communities.

ntry’s Blue Sky/National Sword

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ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV

programme, led to a waste crisis in

six-packs at the Cascade brewery

Australia. However, this ban actually

– which part of our journey to remove

helped accelerate conversations around

all plastic among its breweries in the

how to best dispose of paper, plastics

future,” says Clysner. Previously,

and glass, as the country exported

more than one million plastic six-pack

over 3% of its recycling to China,

ring packages were leaving CUB each

amounting to 1.25mn tonnes in 2017.

year, leading the business to look at

“To counteract this growing conc-

ways to reduce the volume of unre-

ern around plastic, CUB has started

cyclable materials across its brew-

to remove the plastic rings on its

ing activities.

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MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

“A lot of what we do in sustainability

ers, leveraging common goals and

is linked to our relationship with our

sharing best practices around the

suppliers. If we want to increase our

world,� says Wauters.

glass recycled content, our percentage of renewable electricity or reduce

CLIMATE ACTION

our carbon emissions across our

With the aim to utilise 100% renewable

supply chain, we partner with our

electricity sources, AB InBev has fully

suppliers. We cannot achieve our

transformed its operations from the

sustainability goals on our own. We

inside out. Implementing new value

drive change together with our suppli-

strategy agreements and investing in

191

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MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

“We cannot achieve our sustainability goals on our own. We drive change together with our suppliers, leveraging common goals and sharing best practices around the world” — Diane Wauters, Sustainability & Agricultural Development Director, APAC new technology to reach a 25% reduc-

ate renewable electricity. The installa-

tion in carbon emissions across its

tion is 15MW, and the annual output is

value chain, the business has em-

15,000Mwh renewable electricity,”

braced new partnerships to take the

explains Terry Yao, Associate Procure-

business on its next phase of growth.

ment Director of Sustainability.

Located at one of the biggest brew-

Taking advantage of solar energy

eries in APAC, Putian Brewery is home

produced in Australia, CUB has also

to the largest on-site solar projects

signed a 12-year Power Purchase

across the brewing industry in the en-

Agreement with global renewable

tirety of Asia Pacific. Onsite, the rene-

energy provider, BayWa. The duo will

wable electricity generated could

provide 74,000 MWh renewable energy

achieve approximately 20% of total

to more than 7,000 homes, where

brewery usage. “In China, for example,

energy will be sourced from its solar

we are working on solar projects and

farm in Mildura, Victoria. Additionally,

have asked our suppliers to build solar

the venture will create over 300 constru-

panels on our buildings. We have

ction jobs and long-term opportunities

covered 150,000 square meters of

in the maintenance of the solar farm.

the rooftop in solar panels to gener-

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193


ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV

C O M PA N Y FACT S

• AB InBev has upskilled, connected and financially empowered 50,000 direct farmers in over 15 countries • AB InBev has partnered with agricultural software-as-a-service provider, KisanHub to undertake a pilot which has connected 1000 out of 3600 farmers in India

194

• With more than 884mn people in the developing world lacking access to clean water, water stewardship and building strong relationships with partners and suppliers has become vital • Implementing new value strategy agreements, AB InBev has invested in new technology to reach a 25% reduction in emissions as part of its climate action goals • One of the biggest breweries in APAC, AB InBev’s Putian Brewery is home to the largest on-site solar projects across the brewing industry in the entirety of Asia Pacific. • Solar panels will be placed on the roofs of each CUB brewery in Australia, which will reduce its impact on the environment

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

India by having the first brewery in Asia

is increasingly invested in meeting its

Pacific to run 100% on renewable elec-

sustainability goals. As premium brands

tricity for Budweiser production since

grow in popularity and demand, the com-

last March. “It’s very exciting to be the

pany will continue to drive innovation

first movers in our industry, leading by

and healthy competition across the bre-

example to ensure not only we reach

wing industry. Yao underlines this:

our Climate Action goal by 2025 but

“I believe in sustainability, doing the right

also inspire other companies to follow

thing and taking the business in a new

the same path,” explains Clysner.

direction. Our work will impact the city,

To take its climate action goals even

local communities and the country. I beli-

further, solar panels will be placed on

eve premium brands will be on the rise

the roofs of each CUB brewery in

in the near future. People will become

Australia, which will reduce its impact

more willing to tune into brands who are

on the environment. All sites will remain

taking more care of the environment.”

connected to the grid, with potential

Wauters is also keen to highlight AB

access fed back into the system,

InBev’s aim to leave a long-lasting and

ensuring maximum efficiency.

meaningful legacy. “With the size of our

As people’s attitudes towards sustainability continue to shift, AB InBev

company, it’s amazing the impact we can have in the world,” she says pass-

E X E CU T I VE P RO FI LE

Jan Clysner Before leading Procurement and Sustainability at AB InBev APAC, I had the opportunity to do several Procurement roles in the company. These roles not only gave me the opportunity to build knowledge and experiences in several categories across the world, but also provided me the perfect platform of continuously learning

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ANHEUSER-BUSCH INBEV

196

“ I believe in sustainability, doing the right thing and taking the business in a new direction. Our work will impact the city, local communities and the country” — Terry Yao, Associate Procurement Director of Sustainability

MARCH 2019


S U P P LY C H A I N

ionately. “Sustainability is not just a trend, it’s our business and here to stay. It’s by leveraging our people and through our incredible strength at achieving results that we get to shape the future of the communities in which we live and work.” Clysner concludes by sharing his passion for sustainability. “In a region like Asia Pacific, each country has its own challenges, its own opportunities and we have the passionate people and scale to capture those. But we also recognize we cannot do this on our own, hence our 100+ Accelerator where we reach out to others to help us on our journey. At ABInBev we’ve been dedicated to sustainability for years, but now we are going further – with goals that will have measurable, positive impact on our communities.”

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198

National Heart Foundation of Australia:

an agile technology transformation WRIT TEN BY

OLIVIA MINNOCK PRODUCED BY

MIK E SADR

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

199

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H E A R T F O U N D AT I O N O F A U S T R A L I A

CIO Shane Riddle explains how bringing in an agile approach and developing a single view of the customer will drive the charity’s vital operations forward

W 200

ith heart disease the biggest single killer of Australians, the National Heart Foundation of Australia is leading the

charge to change this frightening statistic – from fundraising and research to providing vital awareness and information about preventative health, the 60-year-old charity won’t be stopping any time soon. In fact, it is undergoing a significant technology transformation to enable its 250+ strong team to serve customers and the Australian public even more effectively. Sharing the organisation’s vision of an Australia free of heart disease is Shane Riddle – a CIO named among the top 50 in Australia – who joined on a temporary basis but decided to stay at the inspiring non-profit. “I got in very quickly and hit the ground running,” he recalls. His main objective as leader of the company’s IT operations was to help the National Heart Foundation deliver on its key objectives. While the previous team had been MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

201

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H E A R T F O U N D AT I O N O F A U S T R A L I A

“ You’re working with people who want to make a difference, and we try to do everything for everyone” 202

Shane Riddle CIO, National Heart Foundation of Australia

MARCH 2019

focused on “keeping the lights on,” Riddle’s role evolved in the same way the CIO remit has across all industries: to create an organisation enabled by IT. With traditional elements such as the service desk and security functions outsourced, Riddle and his team now focus on ensuring the entire business meets its yearly objectives – through technology. Moving technology to a strategic function within the Heart Foundation meant the IT team to undergo a reorganisation which reflected what was going on within the business as a whole. The


TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘LIGHTHOUSE HOSPITAL PROJECT - DAMA’ 203 foundation operated in a federated model

Drive, then moved to 365, SharePoint,

across Australia with business functions

Microsoft Teams, and eventually the

in each state, but technology has

full range of Microsoft Productivity tools.

assisted in bringing the organisation

Riddle mentions managing teams in

together to promote collaboration and

a charity can be very challenging,

efficiency. One example of this was the

where people are particularly passion-

organisation’s move to the cloud, which

ate about their end goals. “You’re work-

Riddle took control of upon joining the

ing with people who want to make

organisation. “They were getting

a difference, and we try to do every-

bogged down,” he comments.

thing for everyone – which sometimes

“I assumed the role of project manager

dilutes what we’re trying to do,” he

working with our vendor to ensure

comments. “Our One Heart Strategy

everything was done in a timely manner,

is all about placing focus on areas that

from testing to getting us on the cloud.”

have the greatest impact.” Moving to

First, the foundation migrated to One-

the cloud was key to unifying the a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


H E A R T F O U N D AT I O N O F A U S T R A L I A

204

foundation’s business process and the

every aspect of the business. It was

way it engaged with customers. “The

also important not to view technology

previous work practices, the way we

as isolated from the people at the heart

collaborated, the way we engaged with

of the charity. “Technology was one

customers and stored our data all

component, but there was also the

represented our old business model –

organisational process and culture.”

it was disjointed, to survive as an

Conducting a high-level analysis,

organisation in a very competitivity

Riddle concluded that developing

environment, we needed to change.”

a project to provide a “single view of

Riddle therefore had to think

the customer” was the best way

carefully about whether any one

forward in this newly tech-enabled

technology would actually solve the

company. In a charity sense, custom-

organisation’s problems before installing

ers are usually donors to the organisa-

it, and made evaluations based on

tion, but Riddle stresses that there are

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

actually 52 different types of customer

point in their lifetime in order to deliver

served by the National Heart Founda-

something at the appropriate time with

tion – and it was important to under-

the appropriate message, material,

stand all of these, from various internal

product or service – whatever that may

perspectives. Initially, he recalls, “We

be.” Riddle’s development of this vital

had a very short view of what we call

platform took five stages, the first of

a customer typically using only a financial

which was a discover stage. This

lens – the lifetime of a donor averaged

involved creating a “roadmap” of how

about seven years. That’s great from

information and data was obtained, why it

a point of view of understanding

was collected, as well as how it moved

donor patterns, but donors are only

across the organisation and used.

one of those 52 definitions,” he explains.

The second phase involved understanding who the customer was. “Why

“I wanted to create a platform where we engaged with our customer at every

do they choose to engage with the Heart Foundation? What is our point of

E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Shane Riddle Shane Riddle became CIO of the National Heart Foundation of Australia in February 2017, having come onboard the previous year as National ICT Manager. Prior to joining NHF, Riddle held roles at IBM, The Warranty Group and BIG4 Holiday Parks of Australia. Riddle holds a Master’s in Business Administration and Management as well as qualifications in Human Resource Management. He specializes in IT Management, Business Transformation and Program Management, and was named among Australia’s CIO50 in 2017.

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Digital Transformation = Strategic plan + Tealium The National Heart Foundation (NHF) has one main goal, to bring to life their vision of an Australia free of heart disease. This vision started with a strategic plan to position the organisation for a data-led future and included undergoing a significant technology transformation to enable its team of 250+ to serve customers and the Australian public even more effectively with an execution strategy that delivered both short term and long-term benefits for the NHF.

Tealium now sits at the heart of the single customer view strategy enabling programs like the Heart Age Calculator and campaigns such as the recent “Serial Killer” campaign to have an impact well beyond the campaign or program.

“These programs and campaigns drive traffic to our website where we can provide a personalised experience for each person using Tealium technology. Having 52 different types of customers being able to personalise is really difficult, but One of the first tasks newly appointed CIO, Shane also really important so we remain relevant. We Riddle of the NHF, tackled was building a data want to be engaging customers on a lifetime and technology foundation that would empower the journey about staying healthy, exercising and NHF to unify disparate datasets within the organi- being heart smart, not just when they have a sation and be able to think and act smarter using heart episode, which was the traditional apthat data. proach,” stated Riddle. “I wanted to create a platform where we engaged with our customer at every point in their lifetime in order to deliver something at the right time with the most relevant message, material, product or service – whatever that may be,” said Riddle.

The Tealium technology includes the Universal Data Hub which collects and correlates online data that is then enriched and segmented in real time according to NHF determined variables. It is then triggered for action through any of the marketing channels and vendors, including With 52 different types of customer, this focus on email, SMS, website, retargeting or call-centre. the customer and a ’single customer view’ re“The digital marketing team loves quired technology that was agile, flexible, and powerful enough to funnel all the datasets, that we’ve done the hard work augment that data, and help to activate the to make the data accessible and resulting insights. “Tealium provided not only the technology to unify and action data in real-time but also became a business partner as passionate about our objectives as we were,” commented Riddle. “We were entering a new space when we engaged with Tealium so they were fantastic about taking us on that journey as well – their implementation and the support they offer us as we go through that learning curve has been fantastic.”

ready for action,” – said Riddle.

The National Heart Foundation is now able to live and leveraging their data-led future in real time thanks to Tealium!


We are proud to partner with the National Heart Foundation of Australia and other nonprofits around the world

Get nonprofit offers from Microsoft Microsoft.com/nonprofits


TECHNOLOGY

“ I wanted to create a platform where we engaged with our customer at every point in their lifetime”

involved examining business processes to find a product that would deliver on all the needs that had been uncovered so far. “A lot of that informed the business case and our request for proposal (RFP) for various vendors,” he explains. “We had a closed selection where we identified key vendors across the industry that we felt would be able to deliver, or had insight to deliver, what

Shane Riddle CIO, National Heart Foundation of Australia

we were trying to create.” Of 15 nominat-

difference? What are they looking for

three that were then challenged to

when they come to us?” This involved

create prototypes. This lengthy process

deep analysis, understanding what the

outlines Riddle’s approach to vendors.

business did, and examining its customer

“I’m fairly tough in trying to negotiate

base until those 52 different definitions

something that works for us,” he says,

were formulated. “When creating a single

qualifying: “I understand the business

view of the customer, it’s important to

they’re in as well, so it has to be fair.

understand the context of the customer

I think when you’re truthful with your

for internal users,” says Riddle,

business partners, and you say ‘we want

“because when we create something

this, but this is what we can afford or are

and then introduce it, we need to

capable of at this point in time, but we

represent what they see as their

want to bring you on the journey and

customer. That is important.”

we can see the growth aspect,’ partners

ed vendors, 10 put forward a proposal which were narrowed down to a final

The third stage – at which point

buy into that and it’s mutually beneficial.”

Riddle had to gain approval at board

To complete this undertaking, the

level to move past – was “very much

National Heart Foundation needed the

getting down into the weeds.” This

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TECHNOLOGY

211 to assist with this transformation.

allowing us to focus on what the

Microsoft for the company’s cloud

business needs,” Riddle adds. “They

migration, as well as Microsoft Azure

look after the back office operating our

has been utilised for the development

service desk and offer additional support

of the Single View of the Customer

as needed across our infrastructure,”

platform. Riddle outlines its scalability

he explains, reiterating the way his

and access to Azure Services which

team’s role has gone from “keeping the

allowed prototyping, working towards

lights on” to thinking about how technol-

a full solution, growing the environment

ogy can truly drive change across the

and services as needed. As this has

organisation. Another vendor which

grown, the organisation has also been

was an integral part of forming the

utilising Data#3 as a Microsoft

Single View of the Customer platform

Preferred Partner to navigate the

is Tealium – perhaps the best example

intricacies that come with building out

of the vendor management strategy

a complex environment. “Brennan IT

embraced by Riddle. “We were

also play a very big part in actually

impressed by their buy-in because not a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


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212

“ You need bottom-up buy-in because you’re looking at people’s processes, and change management is a key component of this” Shane Riddle CIO, National Heart Foundation of Australia

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

only did we interview them, but they interviewed us to see if their business was suitable to what we were trying to achieve. I got a lot of comfort out of that,” he comments. “We were entering a new space when we engaged with Tealium so they were fantastic taking us on that journey as well – their implementation and the support they offer us as we go through that learning curve has been fantastic.” With vendors and products selected, the fourth phase NHF went though was development and implementation, bringing in BAs, developers, data scientist, testers and even an Agile coach to ensure the technology transformation ran smoothly among staff, too. This laid the path for the currently ongoing final stage – “taking all those learnings we went through in phase four and actually doing something about that.” For Riddle, getting passionate people on board with the changes the organisation was experiencing – in terms of bringing customers to a single point as well as unifying the organisation itself – was key in managing the significant culture shift involved in any technology transformation. “You need bottom-up buy-in because you’re looking at people’s processes, and change management is a key component of this. You’ve got to be aware of how it impacts them and how they are involved in the whole process,” he explains. “I try and understand the emotional life cycle people go through with change,” Riddle adds. “Another aspect is when you communicate with a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com

213


H E A R T F O U N D AT I O N O F A U S T R A L I A

people, people like different mediums – some like written word, others like face to face. Some like to be in a group and sit back and listen, others like it to be more intimate or a one-on-one discussion. I try to build all those aspects in and communicate on a level people actually want to receive so they take in what I talk about.” At the foundation’s Melbourne office, the IT team is located in the centre of the building, which Riddle believes symbolises its place at the heart of the business as well as 214

encouraging people to ask questions and understand what they do. For Riddle’s team, communication

“ We’ve built a new platform with which we can totally engage the customer, and start measuring how they’re choosing to engage with us” Shane Riddle CIO, National Heart Foundation of Australia MARCH 2019

involves gathering together every morning for a few minutes, a part of the Agile philosophy he’s brought in. “People talk about what they did yesterday, what they didn’t get through and what they’re going to do today. That gets communication working across the team – people can chime in if they hear of a roadblock and offer suggestions. Other groups have now started to pick up on that as well and for me that was encouraging as I didn’t want to push


TECHNOLOGY

215

Agile. It was more about introducing it

start dynamically understanding their

to staff, showing how it’s used so peo-

behaviour, and dynamically changing

ple get serious about it and want to try.”

the way we approach that through

Across the whole country, as a newly

the variety of media and information

unified and tech led organisation, the

we supply, tailoring it back to what their

foundation is all set to relaunch with

need is at any particular time.”

what Riddle calls a “revitalised” brand. “With single view of customer, we’ve built a new platform with which we can totally engage the customer, and start measuring how they’re choosing to engage with us,” he explains. “Ultimately, we want to have an individual conversation with those people, so we can a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


216

Transforming the student experience through digital innovation WRIT TEN BY

CATHERINE S TURM AN PRODUCED BY

MIK E SADR


TECHNOLOGY

217

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UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

One of the most renowned academic institutions for research and development innovation, The University of Western Australia has invested in new digital tools to transform the student experience

T

echnology has opened up new opportunities across the education sector. Students are no longer

content with traditional ways of working, but are looking for learning tools which seamlessly blend technology and creativity to 218

promote engagement and deliver new ways of thinking. Projections show the e-learning market worldwide is forecast to surpass US$243bn by 2022, leading institutions to turn towards innovative education models and develop student-focused solutions which work to provide personalised support wherever possible. Situated on the outskirts of Perth, with a second campus in Albany, The University of Western Australia (UWA) is the oldest educational institution in the region. The university houses competitive spirit founded on collaboration, with many illustrious alumni to its name. Former Prime Minister of Australia, Bob Hawke, former CEO of British

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

219

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UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

“ I decided to enter higher education, which I feel is an opportunity to provide something to the community. It also helps to shape the way that future leaders will come into the world” — Warwick Calkin, Chief Digital & Information Officer

Airways, Sir Roderick Ian Eddington, as well as Noble Prize winners have all studied here and gained international acclaim. “A bunch of people from the university have made a difference to the world, not just to their local community,” reflects UWA’s Chief Digital & Information Officer, Warwick Calkin. “The indigenous people that lived in this part of Australia, the Noongar people, came to this area for learning. They bought people to this part of the world and taught them here, so it was actually a university way

220

before it was a university, so to speak. However, the education sector has changed significantly. The days of having someone stand at the front, and ‘chalk and talk’ no longer appeals. Students are used to having something far more dynamic, far more interactive, and want tools that give them the ability to exchange ideas. “A lot of students don’t necessarily come to the lectures in person and just look at the lectures online and the bits which are most important to them. Technology has enabled students to actually receive education in a different way and not necessarily on campus.” MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘PROFESSOR DAWN FRESHWATER – NEW UWA VICE-CHANCELLOR’ 221 Working in a number of industry

students from China, India, Singapore

verticals, from telco’s, utilities, finance

and Malaysia in particular, he found

and mining, moving into the education

that even locating the application form

space would seem a surprise move, but

on its website to be a frustrating process.

Calkin, wanted to build a career which

Not only that, prospective students

he felt would hold greater purpose.

then had to print off the 15-page PDF

“I decided to enter higher education,

form which was solely accessible in

which I feel is an opportunity to provide

English. Once completed, the required

something to the community. It also helps

forms had to be sent via the mail, placing

to shape the way that future leaders will

further delays. Those who completed

come into the world.”

the form incorrectly, or if supplied

Calkin has often sought to ‘walk in the shoes’ of the students, even from the very start of the application process. With high numbers of international

images were blurry, had to redo the process all over again. “By the time they eventually got an offer from us, which was sent via a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

C O M PA N Y FACT S

• UWA has sought to implement cloud software to protect up to six petabytes (PB) of research data, which previously sat in a outsource data centre

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• UWA’s new digital support mechanism allows students to designate family members or friends to be alerted if they miss a tutorial or assignment, or if they haven’t been on campus for a period of time • The University of Western Australia (UWA) is the oldest educational institution in the region • The university houses competitive spirit founded on collaboration, with many illustrious alumni to its name

snail-mail, there’s a good chance that they had an offer from another university,” he laments. By identifying key pain points, Calkin has worked to digitise the application process. The time taken to complete the required forms has been reduced to 20 minutes, where applicants can now also receive an electronic offer within five working days. Additionally, applicants can now pay online via credit card. “We’re the first of all the highest ranking (GO8) universities in Australia that issue an electronic letter. Everyone

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

else still does it with a paper offer,”

an experience where they value me,

says Calkin. “You start looking at the

they respect me and they’re going to

things which you just expect to be

treat me as a customer.”

there and work, and yet these people,

Recognising that students demand

who are our customers, we weren’t

technologies promoting convenience

treating them with the same respect.

and accessibility, Calkin has worked

We were saying, ‘Well, if you want to

alongside the students themselves. He

come here, you’ll work it out. You’ve

received support from the Student

got to be smart enough to work it out

Guild to build digital tools, such as the

to come here in the first place.’

ability for students to locate friends on

As a consumer, if it’s that hard to

campus, receiving reminders around

consume something, you start thinking,

key events and information regarding

‘is this the experience that I want to put

assignments. Partnering with Involvio

myself through? I should go and have

has also seen students gain access to

E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Warwick Calkin was appointed Chief Digital & Information Officer for the UWA in 2017. Warwick has over 30 years’ experience in IT. Prior to working in the Higher Education sector, Warwick worked in Senior IT leadership roles in a number of industry verticals such as Mining, (CIO of South32, CIO of BHP Potash, CIO of BHP Diamonds) Telecommunications (General Manager of Platform Services for Telstra), as well as roles in Utilities, Software Development, and Wagering & Gaming. Warwick has worked in more than 20 other countries around the world including New Zealand, Australia, the Netherlands and Canada. He is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and is a Non-Executive Director of a Not-for-Profit organisation, Carers WA.

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TECHNOLOGY

“ We are working with Pure Storage, who have provided a platform that is used partially for the research side. All the files that were previously on disks and servers are now sitting on that platform, which enables some incredible performance and analytics” — Warwick Calkin, Chief Digital & Information Officer

some friends on campus at this time who you can meet for lunch’. It’s pretty intuitive,” notes Calkin. “A QR code is also built into it, so if students forget to bring their student ID, they can still buy lunch at the cafeteria. It’s all these practical things which we’re trying to make as easy as possible. One thing a student will never lose is their mobile phone.” Even the safety of its students has been considered. UWA’s new digital support mechanism allows students to designate family members or friends to be alerted if they miss a tutorial or assignment, or if they haven’t been on

a platform which provides real-time

campus for a period of time. If there

information via their phone or laptop,

was a serious incident, students can

such as the classes a student has that

also be sent a push notification.

day, including a map and directions if

Despite such innovations, it is easy

required, all in a bid to deliver a student

to disregard the fact that large volumes

experience which is personalised,

of personalised data are routinely

highly mobile and digitally connected.

stored on a daily basis. Protecting this

“The technology will prompt students

data has become a critical area for

with things like, ‘You’ve got one subject

Calkin, but with a digitally savvy

this morning and another this after-

student-base, he has developed an

noon with a gap of three hours in the

essential way for students to guaran-

middle, so here are some events that

tee that their data can be stored and

are on campus that you may be

shared through an ‘opt in’ feature, which

interested in attending’, or ‘you have

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225


THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

“The feature on the mobile application, Transparent Mode, is defaulted to be off, so students have to switch this on. Once they opt in, we can track where they’re going and what they’re doing,” he says. “The reason to turn it off is, to protect their right to privacy. If they say they want to know where their friends are, they can then do so. The data is associated with Involvio’s base in the cloud which has tight security around it. Approximately 60 universities in the US are also using this technology.” 226

Even travelling to and from the university is set to be revolutionised, with autonomous vehicles being deployed to support students’ travel across campus, which would work to protect them from the harsh

looking at the community that supports

40-degree heat in the summertime.

us and to engage more effectively, and

“We trialled this autonomous vehicle

in some areas, partner up to deliver

to look at how can we can transport

innovations which everyone can benefit

people around campus, but also looked

from,” observes Calkin.

at the broader context of incorporating

Throughout its expansive digital

this into the public system. We’re

investment, from student focused

working with the Department of

technologies to its extensive research

Transport to try and work out how to

capabilities, UWA has sought to

take this forward. There’s a lot of

implement cloud software to protect

things we are looking at more broadly

up to six petabytes (PB) of research

than just the university itself – we’re

data, which previously sat in an

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

227

outsourced data centre. Bringing the

used partially for the research side.

data back on site, situated in two data

All the files that were previously on

centres on campus, the university is

disks and servers are now sitting on

set to undertake a 12-month project

that platform, which enables some

to work alongside librarians and sift

incredible performance and analytics,�

through large volumes of data, identify

depicts Calkin.

ownership, and decide whether it should

Technology has reshaped the way

be retained or archived, with the aim to

we interact, engage and communicate,

house a complete catalogue of relevant,

yet UWA has taken this a step further.

high quality data.

Home to one of the largest indigenous

“We are working with Pure Storage, who have provided a platform that is

art collections in the southern hemisphere, the university is exploring the a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


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TECHNOLOGY

229

use of augmented reality (AR) and

the Year, implementing a trading room

virtual reality (VR) to offer a cultural

which would replicate becoming a trad-

experience quite like no other. While

er on the floor, dealing with situations

UWA is looking to build a school of

in real-time. Receiving feeds from the

indigenous studies to celebrate this

market, students could initiate and pull

work, strict guidelines regarding where

trades and see the results.

such work can be shown remain. VR

With facilities dotted everywhere,

will therefore enable this work to be

Calkin has recently undertaken

displayed, where students can gain

a study with UWA’s Director of Campus

a greater understanding of Australia’s

Management to develop a campus

rich history.

master plan, looking at the university

Catering towards its business

from both a digital and physical

students, in 2018 the university was

perspective to ensure it remains one

awarded the Education Project of

of the most advanced educational a si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

institutions in the world. The first focal point is being urban, which UWA has achieved through its location, just outside of Perth. Second is green space, which the university has been committed to maintaining throughout its inception. Thirdly is history, which UWA has in spades. “The last one is density and Oxford and Cambridge University were faced with similar challenges,” he explains. “While Cambridge elected to carry on sprawling, Oxford elected to consoli230

“ The education sector has changed significantly. The days of having someone stand at the front, and ‘chalk and talk’ no longer appeals. Students are used to having something far more dynamic, which gives them the ability to exchange ideas” — Warwick Calkin, Chief Digital & Information Officer

MARCH 2019

date with a smaller footprint but with a higher density. We’re looking at going down this route and create an environment which is more collaborative. The notion of teaching in a box is disappearing, and has become a lot more experiential.” Long-term, Calkin believes that new technologies, such as blockchain, will even lead to the introduction of bespoke degrees, where students will build their own degrees, and complete modules at various universities


TECHNOLOGY

231

worldwide. New technologies will

one you know recommends you. “It’s not

be able to then authenticate a user’s

just about saying that we’re good. I want

credentials across a number of

them to be able to walk away from here

different universities. For UWA,

and feel like they had the best experience

however, what is its long-term aim?

they possibly could, which we are

“That’s easy,” Calkin concludes,

committed to consistently achieve.”

without missing a beat. “Success is that our students leave here and they say it was an awesome experience. What’s the best form of advertising? It’s word of mouth. It is the strongest and most powerful form of reinforcing that something is good, where somea si a .busi ne ssc h ief. com


232

Technology transformation to personalise the guest experience WRIT TEN BY

CATHERINE S TURM AN PRODUCED BY

MIK E SADR

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

233

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W Y N D H A M D E S T I N AT I O N S A S I A PA C I F I C

Providing exceptional experiences across the travel and tourism sector. Director of IT Clive Hawkins discusses how Wyndham Destinations Asia Pacific continues to ‘put the world on vacation’ through digital innovation

N

o longer a luxury for the few, the travel and tourism sector has become fiercely competitive. With so many options on

offer, shared vacation and timeshare models are 234

growing in popularity. Renowned as the largest vacation ownership and exchange company worldwide, Wyndham Destinations Asia Pacific has sought to streamline its services and provide an experience like no other. Having experienced steady growth across the Asia Pacific region, the business is set to open a new office in Clark, the Philippines, where up to 160 staff will move to its new premises in mid-2019. Harnessing a corporate and global mission to ‘put the world on vacation’, Wyndham’s extensive footprint now spans the entirety of Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and southeast Asia, encompassing close to 60,000 owner families. To support its continued growth, increase its accessibility, convenience and ongoing appeal, its digital infrastructure has been significantly transformed. MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

235

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W Y N D H A M D E S T I N AT I O N S A S I A PA C I F I C

Senior Director of IT, Clive Hawkins, explains that it has been essential for Wyndham to make its services not only practical, but intuitive to engage its diverse audience and remain a leading player in the market. “If you look at Amazon’s shopping cart system, it’s not an attractive site but is very efficient and easy to use. I think that people put far too much investment into the aesthetics of a site rather than functionality, which is key. However, personalisation is now very 236

important. You’re not going to get very

MARCH 2019

“ I think voice is really going to take off. You’ve got the Amazon Echo, Google Home, Cortana with Microsoft and Siri with Apple. If you don’t adapt to innovation then you get left behind” — Clive Hawkins, Senior Director of IT


TECHNOLOGY

CLICK TO WATCH : ‘WYNDHAM DESTINATIONS OUR WORLD IS YOUR DESTINATION’ 237 far with marketing campaigns which

redundancies and manage applica-

are purely shotgun approach. You

tions without having to pay increased

need to tailor that message and

maintenance costs.

understand who your target audience really is,” he says candidly. Taking a deep dive into Wyndham’s

“We invested in Salesforce and built a fairly large marketing tool with them. This went live last year and since then

digital capabilities, Hawkins has

we’ve been gathering speed and

developed key partnerships with

moving more and more systems into

technology leaders in order to trans-

Salesforce,” says Hawkins. “It’s an

form its service offerings. Building on

effectual tool and has been very

its longstanding relationship with

beneficial from a speed perspective

Salesforce, the company has deployed

because we’re not redesigning and

its Platform as a Service (PaaS)

building security platforms and menu

technologies, enabling Wyndham to

structures because everything is

centralise its services, remove any

already there. We’re using our centrala si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


W Y N D H A M D E S T I N AT I O N S A S I A PA C I F I C

ised database as a repository, where we’ve got prospects, owners, staff and suppliers all stored there.” The partnership has led to an improvement of “at least 66% in overall efficiency,” where everyone “can now see the benefits.” Following its success, Wyndham is now undertaking user acceptance testing (UAT) for a campaign management engine, which will enable the business to ‘slice and dice’ its leads within the database. “We have roughly nine million leads who we 238

contact, but this will allow us to segment them based on different criteria, which we have also built in Salesforce,” adds Hawkins. “One of our biggest challenges was

comprehensive data, which can be manipulated to make it work for us.”

that our lead database comes from various different sources and often a

SEAMLESS CONNECTIVITY

lead for us may be a phone number

Hawkins is not only seeking to overhaul

and a first name. We then might have

Wyndham’s service offerings, but

another record that is for T. Smith and

onboard new technologies to ensure

a different phone number, but then we

operational efficiency and gain an

could have another record for Tom

edge over the competition. Taking a

Smith and an email address, with no

closer look at its back-end services

way to link those people and under-

and IT service desk, robotic process

stand it is the same person. Then a

automation (RPA) is being explored as

fourth record may come in that links

a means to boost quality assurance

the previous three and we can gain

rates, particularly in areas which house

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TECHNOLOGY

239

E XE CU T I VE PRO FI LE

Clive Hawkins | Senior Director of IT After a successful career as a Developer building a variety of solutions (including a sports package for the Mediterranean Games 1991), Clive moved into project management in 1992. Clive joined Wyndham in September 2006, and has managed the IT Team for the past 10 years. Currently responsible for the Asia Pacific region. Major successes of the IT team during this time include: Seamless head office relocation, introducing Salesforce as a development platform, design and implantation of DNC solution, implementation of an online sales system, expansion of offices into China, Thailand, Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines, maintaining a strong security stance, introducing a digitalized automated loan decisioning solution.

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“Agiles Australia with OurMate AI is proud to be a Strategic technology partner for Wyndham Destinations for their AI Voice and Software needs. We are privileged to add value to Wyndham’s Time share and Resorts AI initiatives through phases of development and implementation”.

Agiles Australia is a Young Queensland based Software Consulting and Technology house transforming its client’s business with Innovative AI products and best-in-class IT Solutions.

ourmateai.com | www.agiles.com.au OurMate@Agiles.com.au | Info@Agiles.com.au


TECHNOLOGY

“ Agiles is a small start-up company and have been very easy to work with. They’re an exciting bunch and they’ve got other ideas that they’re trying to get off the ground” — Clive Hawkins, Director of IT

system to one supplied by Canadian telecoms giant Mitel will also bring a multitude of advantages. Set to complete in March this year, the multifaceted project presently covers up to 650 staff, tackling relatively complex interactive voice response (IVR) systems per department, multiple HUNT groups (used to enable the distribution of phone calls from a single telephone number to a group of several

a number of repetitive tasks with

phone lines), integration with diallers

multiple touchpoints. Expanding its Cit-

and much more.

rix platform and replacing desktops

“Having a new phone system will

with thin clients (or lightweight

bring new tools, such as linking mobile

computers) will also promote accessi-

and desk phones. Staff can answer via

bility and reduce ongoing maintenance

desk or mobile, and transfer the call

costs across the business.

from one to the other. It’s a nice feature

Understanding that end-users are

for management teams who move

demanding seamless connectivity

around. We will also be able to offer the

across its hotels and resorts, Wynd-

callback facility to callers,” says

ham has also partnered with Australia’s

Hawkins.

largest telecommunications operator, Telstra, in order to install fibre connec-

TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION

tions at multiple sites across the

From mobile apps to wearables,

country, as well as backup 4G technol-

technology continues to disrupt

ogies. This has greatly improved the

traditional industries and ways of

corporate network connectivity as well

working and has led to a significant

as the guest experience in resorts.

shift in consumer expectations.

Furthermore, upgrading its phone

Making the decision to fully digitise the a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com

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W Y N D H A M D E S T I N AT I O N S A S I A PA C I F I C

$5bn+ Approximate revenue

2000

Year founded

2000+

Approximate number of employees

as well, which is quite a slick beast. Aesthetically it’s an attractive system and is used by the sales team so had to be somewhat intuitive so that they would enjoy using it. A sales rep or consultant will also be on hand to provide support.” Believing voice control technology to be part of the ongoing evolution of traditional keyboard and touch screens, Wyndham has collaborated with Agiles Australia in the development of its first voice chatbot. This will very shortly be accessible through the Wyndham app, end users can gain information

processing of sales contracts, Wynd-

regarding their Club, where its

ham has sought to provide ultimate

capabilities will become further

flexibility and accessibility to its end us-

personalised as it becomes increas-

ers. “Invariably, if someone buys a

ingly utilised. “Agiles is a small young

timeshare ownership from us, 50% will

startup company and have been very

also borrow money from us as well.

easy to work with. They’re an exciting

The sales contract is therefore not just

bunch and they’ve got other ideas that

a deed of sale, but an application for a

they’re trying to get off the ground in

loan, which is incredibly detailed,”

the Australian market place,” adds

explains Hawkins.

Hawkins.

“We have not only digitised the

“I think voice is really going to take off.

contract but have automated the loan

You’ve got the Amazon Echo, Google

decision process. Through the use of

Home, Cortana with Microsoft and Siri

tablets, we use DocuSign to digitally

with Apple, and they’ve all become

capture the signature for the contract

stronger and stronger. If you don’t

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

243

adapt to innovation then you get left

will launch phase one of its voice box,

behind and if you follow the curve and

which houses fairly simple questions

you’re at the back end of the curve your

and answers regarding Wyndham’s

investment is going to be very similar,

service offering. However, phase two

but people will think, ‘Well about time’

(set to go live in Q3) will enable the

or, ‘You’ve finally caught up.’ Whereas,

technology to provide more granular

if you don’t want to be on the bleeding

data, such as an owner’s available

edge, but want to be somewhere near

credit, loan balances and monthly

the front, if you can be one of the first

payment amounts. Lastly, phase three

people to deploy innovation in your

will focus solely on providing excep-

particular vertical then people are

tional hospitality.

impressed and view the company not only as progressive but vibrant.” Set to go live imminently, Wyndham

“You’ll be able to say, ‘I need another pillow’ and the voice box will say ‘Have you tried looking in the cupboard above a si a .busi ne ssc hief. com


W Y N D H A M D E S T I N AT I O N S A S I A PA C I F I C

244

C O M PA N Y FACT S

• Wyndham Destinations has sought to streamline its services and provide an experience like no other

the bed?’ If not, we’ll be able to send a message to housekeeping and say,

• Witnessing steady growth across the Asia Pacific region, the business is set to open a new office in Clark, the Philippines in early 2019

‘guest in room 123 needs another pillow,’

• Wyndham’s extensive footprint now spans the entirety of Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and South East Asia, encompassing close to 60,000 owner families

such as the best places to eat nearby

and we can tell them that a pillow will be bought to their room shortly. We’re also hoping to interface it with the internet so guests can ask questions, and so forth,” explains Hawkins.

EXPERIENCES LIKE NO OTHER Another area being worked on, and will hopefully be live before the end of 2019, is beacon technology. When

MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

accordingly throughout their stay,” says Hawkins. Looking towards the growth in Chinese tourism both inside and outside of the Asia Pacific region, Wyndham has also embraced digital payment options, such as Alipay and WeChat pay, as digital and mobile wallets are becoming the leading payment methods in the region.

INSPIRING INNOVATION While the business has embraced new technologies, securing such services has become the single biggest risk across Wyndham’s digital a timeshare owner arrives at a club hotel

infrastructure. Housing a global

or resort, Bluetooth beacons will be

security platform, the business is

able to sync with their mobile phone

continually looking to ensure all data

and alert the front desk staff. Once the

remains protected. Hawkins uses

technology recognises the owner,

Marriott Hotel and Resorts’ recent

bespoke information can be provided,

news as a prime example to explain

such as cultural landmarks, places to

that “you can never be fully secure,

visit and much more.

but to always look at ways to remain

“It’s increasing the owner experience, is a great opportunity and increases

ahead of the curve.” “Because they’re in the same vertical,

efficiency. The same happens when

it’s a wakeup call if we needed it,” he

they walk through reception, where

says thoughtfully. “We’re always fighting

we know who they are, which room

with end users because everybody

they are staying and so can be greeted

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W Y N D H A M D E S T I N AT I O N S A S I A PA C I F I C

and be on social media, and all of these things are risk vectors that. From an IT perspective, we’ve got to be mindful. They say that the average penetration takes at least 12 months to spot. It took Marriott four years, but it’s not unusual and is in fact very, very common. You then have other things to worry about, such as shadow IT, where people in the business – for all the right reasons, are not necessarily doing the right things and placing vulnerabilities out there which need to be eradicated.” This has no doubt fed into Wyndham’s 246

consistent commitment to develop its employees and equip them with the necessary tools to not only inspire innovation, but take the business to new heights. Recently recognised as one of the Best Employers for Diversity by Forbes, the business has looked to support local communities on a global scale. Hawkins has recently explored a possible partnership with Griffiths University in southeast Queensland in a bid to provide project-based internships to local students as a key example. “We’ve previously held internships where people have worked here for 12 weeks, but these project-based internships will last as long as the project. We would propose some interesting ones which would be ‘nice to MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

“Personalisation is now very important. You need to tailor that message and understand who your target audience really is” — Clive Hawkins, Director of IT

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W Y N D H A M D E S T I N AT I O N S A S I A PA C I F I C

have’, but if they are unsuccessful it’s not something that we would have otherwise invested in,” he says. Building such partnerships with educational institutions would enable students to gain significant experience and an understanding of the industry, and the controls and project practices Wyndham has in place, providing advantages for all. “I was hoping that we could run also series of projects with the same interns. The longer that someone’s 248

with us the more they have to offer,” adds Hawkins. “They’re able to understand the business, and if they are working on multiple projects, they can see how they cross correlate. From a university perspective, it’s a good feature which they can advertise. From the student perspective they get real life experience and some of them may get a job at the end. Even if we don’t have an opening, we can give a good reference for a job somewhere else. The benefit to Wyndham as a company is that students can work on ideas, which otherwise may not come into fruition.” Such is the success of Wyndham’s IT MARCH 2019


TECHNOLOGY

transformation, Hawkins was officially recognised as Senior Employee of the Year at the end of 2018, alongside Employee of the Year and infrastructure manager, Brad Byrne. A prestigious award within the Wyndham Destination Asia Pacific company, such acknowledgement reflects Hawkins’ continued desire to remain at the top of

“Increasing the owner experience, is a great opportunity and increases efficiency” — Clive Hawkins, Director of IT

his game, while adopting best practices and building a culture that thrives on innovation. Wyndham will remain focused on providing personalised vacations, with numbers steadily increasing each year. Strengthened through collaboration and bringing new ideas to the table, Wyndham will soon be on its next phase of growth, where technology will fully underpin further possibilities to fully ‘put the world on vacation.’

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Why is the best digital strategy a human one?

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