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Joan Schatz


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SARTELL COMMUNITY CENTER


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NOVEMBER/ DECEMBER 2017

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CONTENTS

GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

President’s Letter Business Calendar

8 20

Editor’s Note

Network Central

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C E L E B R AT I N G 1 7 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

GROW

32 Cover Story LUCKY 13

When they opened Meta 13 Josh and Justin Gauerke just wanted to serve their clients. Today they have a new location, a new partner, and a national footprint. PROFIT

38 Feature

IT’S CALLED NETWORKING Charm and good looks only go so far. Successful relationships take effort.

42 Special Focus GAME CHANGER

Online backing, called crowdfunding, is changing the game for startups

Special Section 48 FINANCIAL &

32

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

10 UPFRONT Valuable information designed to guide and educate

22 BUSINESS TOOLS

Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business

50 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Mary Adelman, Adleman Advertising

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Healthy moms. Healthy kids. Life’s greatest journeys begin with a little bump. Before you know it, that little bump will be Throughout your journey, you can find warm, expert mom and baby care at HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic. From little bumps to BFFs and maybe back again. Visit hpcmc.com or call 320-253-5220 to make an appointment today.

We welcome most insurance plans.

telling you about their day at school, their thoughts on peanut butter and their new best friend.


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President’s Letter In September St. Cloud Mayor Dave Kleis, invited a small delegation of community representatives to accompany him to Saint-Cloud, France to rekindle a Sister City relationship. The delegation included, from left: Ryan Daniel, MetroBus, Chamber President Teresa Bohnen, Mayor Kleis, and St. Cloud Police Chief Blair Anderson.

Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826 Program Hotline: 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com www.StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109

Who’s Your Sister?

E

arly last summer, St. Cloud Mayor Dave Kleis started talking about developing a new Sister City relationship. We already have them with Akita, Japan and Spalt, Germany. This one, Mayor Kleis said, would be in France. He invited my husband and me to be part of the local delegation that would participate in the inaugural Sister City events in Saint-Cloud (pronounced Sahn Clue), France in September. I was honored to be the business representative and jumped at the opportunity. Saint-Cloud, population 30,000, is a suburb located about nine miles west of Paris. It is one of the wealthiest cities in France. The fifth wealthiest man in France served as mayor there until recently. King Henri III of France was assassinated there in 1589. Napoleon I lived in the Chateau de Saint-Cloud. (It was a castle.) And remember Jean-Claude Killy, the famous alpine skier and triple Olympic champion? He was born there in 1943. As I prepared my trip summary, I contemplated what I had learned and why Sister City relationships are important. The global benefit is that Sister Cities share their heritage and community perspectives. It is important for communities to remember, recognize and celebrate the historical significance of such relationships. Our link with Saint-Cloud, France has faded over time. By reviving the link, Mayor Kleis hopes to revive the sense of history and heritage between our cities that were important to our past. I look forward to writing a feature article about our trip for the January/February issue of Business Central Magazine. I’ll fill in more details about the experience and why a Sister City relationship with Saint-Cloud, France makes sense. For now, I hope you enjoy Voice in Government on page12. I encountered a businessman named Luca and a young man named Frederico in Como, Italy who shared their perspectives on Italian business and employment. Ciao for now!

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

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Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Special Events Coordinator: Sheri Wegner, ext. 131 Membership Sales Specialist: Rhonda Dahlgren, ext. 134 Administrative Assistant: Kellie Libert, ext. 124 Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100 CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Main Phone: 320-251-4170 Executive Director: Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Director of Convention Sales: Lori Cates, ext. 113 Director of Sports & Special Events: Dana Randt, ext. 110 Sales Manager: Nikki Fisher, ext. 112 Social Media & Marketing Specialist: Emily Bertram, ext. 129 Sales & Marketing Coordinator: Rachel Thompson, ext. 128 Information Specialist - Administrative Assistant: Lucas Anderson, ext. 100 2016-17 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Past Board Chair Marilyn Birkland, Times Media David Borgert, CentraCare Health Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Jim Gruenke, Traut Companies Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Board Chair Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud, Board Vice Chair


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Editor’s Note

Josh and Justin Gauerke, Meta 13 with Editor Gail Ivers

I

t will probably be no surprise to learn that I enjoy words. I often underestimate their impact, but I love them just the same. In 2004 when we started the Waite Park Chamber, I was adamant that it should be called the Waite Park Division and not the Waite Park Chamber. My reasoning was that we had a Sauk Rapids Division and the two should be treated the same. Besides, there was the St. Cloud Area Chamber and that covered Waite Park and Sauk Rapids. That should be good enough. The other two were divisions. Wiser heads prevailed. One friend told me that the word division was not a very friendly word. Did I really want to create a divide between St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids and Waite Park? Another friend asked me what I was afraid of. After some hesitation, I finally admitted: “If we call them ‘chambers’ they could go off and become their own chambers of commerce.” “Well, they can do that anyway,” she said. Now that may seem like an obvious statement, but I was thunderstruck. Of course they could. It had just never entered my head that they might do so because we held on too tightly. From that moment forward they became the Sauk Rapids and Waite Park Chambers with all the rights and responsibilities of a chamber of commerce. And I do everything I can to make sure they are always treated as such. Such little words: Division…Chamber. Such a big difference.

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Have you ever noticed that some words sound like what they mean? The sluggish lethargic comes to mind. And the argumentative and fussy – and kind of silly – kerfuffle. How about detritus, which to my ear is made up of bits and pieces of syllables that should belong to other words. And then there’s discombobulate, which if you use it and it confuses your listener, you have succeeded. One of my favorite words is serendipity. I like everything about it. There is no other word that can adequately replace it. It rolls nicely off the tongue. It’s spelled like it sounds. It’s a happy word – how can you say serendipity with a frown and mean it? And, even without knowing their meanings, wouldn’t you prefer to take your chances with serendipity, rather than kerfuffle or detritus? These random thoughts about words were generated recently by a conversation with Josh and Justin Gauerke, owners of Meta 13. (See the cover story on page 32.) Naturally I asked them what “Meta” meant. I’ve heard of “metadata” on websites so I was expecting something particularly techy. “Nothing,” they told me. “We just liked the way it sounded and the domain was available.” Serendipity! Until next issue,

Joel Butkowski, Butkowski Digital Imaging

Words


Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Whitney Ditlevson, Stearns Electric Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Vicki Ikeogu, St. Cloud Area Planning Organization Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Tracy Knofla, High Impact Training Kellie Libert, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle – wording for you Brodie Miller, Rinke Noonan Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund

For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320)656-3808

WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Your Voice in Government

UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

• New at the Top

People to Know • Business Calendar • Getting Going • Top Hat Photos uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

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NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Changing Behaviors

We can’t always achieve our desired result, but we can try. Triggers offers suggestions on how to create meaningful behavioral change. Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill our efforts to improve and help us recognize when we fall short. These triggers can derail us at work and in life.”

G

Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts – Becoming the Person You Want to Be By Marshall Goldsmith and Mark Reiter, Crown Publishers, New York, 2015, ISBN 978-0-8041-4123-9

“In Triggers, Marshall Goldsmith offers a simple ‘magic bullet’ solution in the form of daily self-monitoring, hinging around what he calls ‘active questions’. These are questions that measure our effort, not our results. There’s a difference between achieving and trying; we can’t always achieve a desired result, but anyone can try. In the course of Triggers, Goldsmith details the six ‘engaging questions’ that can help us take responsibility for

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oldsmith says that a behavioral trigger is any stimulus that impacts our behavior. Within this broad definition, he says, there are several distinctions that improve our understanding of how triggers influence our behavior. They are: 1. A behavioral trigger can be direct or indirect. 2. A trigger can be internal or external. 3. A trigger can be conscious or unconscious. 4. A trigger can be anticipated or unexpected. 5. A trigger can be encouraging or discouraging. 6. A trigger can be productive or counterproductive. His research shows that “Triggers are practically infinite in number… our environment is the most potent triggering mechanism in our lives – and not always for our benefit.” We make plans, set goals and objectives, and our environment constantly intervenes.

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There are four parts in this book. 1 Why Don’t We Become the Person We Want to Be? 2 Try. 3 More Structure Please. 4 No Regrets. There are 22 Chapters. Chapter 1 addresses the two immutable truths of behavioral change. Truth #1: Meaningful behavioral change is very hard to do. Truth #2: No one can make us change unless we truly want to change. Goldsmith concludes his book (Chapter 22), with a challenge to the reader: As you close this book, think about one change, one triggering gesture, that you won’t regret later on. It could be anything as long as it represents a departure from what you’ve always done – then do it. Overcome that trigger!! Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor of Learning Resources and Services, at St. Cloud State University.

NEWS REEL CMCF HIRES, AWARDS Christine Frank joined CommunityGiving as operations and human resources manager. Frank earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of MinnesotaDuluth and a master of arts in management from the College of St. Scholastica. CMCF honored the following individuals at its Annual Dinner on Sept. 12: Linda Eich DesJardins, Eich Motor Company, ATHENA Award

Tom Mathews, Hughes Mathews Greer, Professional Award in Philanthropy

Gene Windfeldt, Preferred Credit, and his wife Sheelah, the Alex Didier Award in Philanthropy

INITIATIVE FOUNDATION AWARDS, RECEIVES GRANTS The Initiative Foundation and its Partner Funds awarded 120 grants totaling $660,720 during the second quarter of 2017. Recipients included: St. Cloud State University Opening Doors and Building Bridges: $10,000 Sauk Rapids-Rice Education Foundation: $500 for a World History Through Food project. The Xcel Energy Foundation awarded a $20,000 grant to the Initiative Foundation to support its 2017 Thriving Communities Initiative (TCI) program.


POINT OF VIEW

Business Central asks readers:

What are three things in your office that you cannot live without?”

Coffee, my mini fridge, and the charging station on my desk.”

My stand-up desk, computer and candy cup.” Gail Cruikshank • Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation.

Mark Osendorf • Xcel Energy

My laptop, the color printer, and of course the positive office atmosphere.”

My Microsoft Surface Pro, the binder with all of my project notes, and my candy drawer.” Patrick Hollermann • Park Industries

Wendy Lang • Cherrywood Advanced Living

[

[

The people I work with, our coffee machine, and the bell we ring whenever we win a new project.” Ryan Cross • Boser Construction

In January Business Central asks: What is your favorite memory of your first job?

READY TO ROCK OUT THIS NYE?

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VINCE NEIL with Lita Ford CHRIS HAWKEY Grand Casino Mille Lacs December 31, 7 p.m.

Grand Casino Hinckley December 31, 10 p.m.

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UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL ST. CLOUD FLORAL RELOCATES St. Cloud Floral plans to move its retail and corporate office from downtown to a new Midtown Square location this fall. The new centralized store will provide growth opportunities for the business and easy access and parking for customers, Rhonda Paurus, owner, said. “This location will allow us to grow our business in ways that we weren’t able to in our downtown location.”

Worlds Apart?

Whether you’re in France, Italy, or the United States, the challenges of business owners seem universal. By Teresa Bohnen

LARAWAY, WAYNE RECOGNIZED Steve Laraway, financial advisor, Laraway Financial Advisors, Inc., was recognized at Cambridge’s Premier Club 2017 which honors a financial advisor’s independent business accomplishments while delivering exemplary client service. Chris Wayne, vice president and partner, Laraway Financial, received the local Optimist Clubs’ Friends of Youth Award. Every year, the Friends of Youth Award is presented to eight individuals or groups in our area who help make children’s lives better. Wayne was nominated by the Boy Scouts of American Central Minnesota Council.

THE VEIN CENTER ADDS STAFF Tori Fiecke and Andrea Tomsche recently joined the medical team at The Vein Center. Fiecke graduated from St. Cloud Technical and Community College last year. She previously trained at St. Luke’s Health Care System in Duluth. Tomsche graduated from the University of Minnesota and St. Cloud Technical and Community College before joining The Vein Center.

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Left to right: Luca, owner of the Italian Bar Luca’s, with Chamber President Teresa Bohnen; Frederico Manara

Bar Luca’s is a classic Italian pub with a giant espresso machine nestled between dozens of half empty liquor bottles. Luca is a charismatic Italian with a big personality and wonderful laugh. He welcomed my husband and me into his establishment on our recent visit to Como, Italy. Luca spoke limited English, but we could understand one another well enough. Luca told us he is in his bar from 4 p.m. to 4 a.m. every night. My husband said, “That’s a lot of working. Do you enjoy it that much?” “Enjoy it? I work to pay my taxes! Taxes here are a crime,” Luca replied. The business tax rate in Italy is about 29 percent and individual income tax rates are progressive from 23-43 percent. There are also a plethora of other taxes, similar to the US.

Our discussion about the challenges and rewards of owning a business in Italy explained Luca’s pride and joy in his own business. Everyone who walked in got the same hearty greeting and generous pour we experienced – the Italian version of Cheers. A young man named Frederico Manara joined our conversation. I asked what he does for work and he said, “I used to be in the textile industry, but no more. I am unemployed right now. It is epidemic here for people my age. Italy has a 35 percent unemployment rate for men younger than 26.” I sent Frederico an email asking to learn more about his perspective of unemployment in Italy. Here is his reply: About the unemployment rate, I have to say that the situation in Italy is quite

critical. Italy is the third country after Spain and Greece in Europe for high-percentage of disoccupation. The situation is even more critical for the young people from 18 to 26, who have to study so many years to get a degree or a graduation and spend a lot of money for nothing. Most of the time, if you want to work, you have to be content with what you find around. You have not the possibility to do what you have studied for and what you dream of. The tax for sure is one of the problems that make it so difficult hiring someone for a job. Here in Italy we still pay some ridiculous taxes connected to things that have to do before the Second World War! And the taxation in general is extremely high. There are few services and incentives for the young people … Luckily Italy is a beautiful country for a lot of other things. We just have to hold on and hope for better days… Frederico’s mother is Danish and his Father is Italian. He is multilingual and speaks fluent English. I wondered how long he would be unemployed in the USA with those credentials. Our visit strengthened my belief that part of America’s workforce shortages can be solved through immigration. Maybe I could twist Frederico’s arm to come for a visit!


PEOPLE TO KNOW

Six Elected to Chamber Board

The following individuals have been elected to fill three-year terms on the Board of Directors of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

Marilyn Birkland Times Media (320) 255-8794

Jason Hallonquist AIS Planning (320) 252-6552

Dennis Host Coborn’s, Inc. (320) 252-4222

Kevin Johnson Sauk Rapids Chamber representative K. Johnson Construction (320) 255-9649

Thanks for the three-peat!

Mark Osendorf Xcel Energy (320) 255-8610

Bernie Perryman Batteries Plus Bulbs (320) 292-5960

Best Physical Therapy 2015, 2016, 2017 We’re humbled by the win, but thrilled by the consistency— which just so happens to be a key player in the top orthopedic care we provide. Thank you for choosing St. Cloud Orthopedics and entrusting us with you and your family’s orthopedic care and physical/occupational therapy needs. Together, we make a great team. #LiveBetter

2017

320.259.4100 StCloudOrthopedics.com

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UpFront

NEWS REEL HEARTLAND GLASS HIRES, PROMOTES Heartland Glass recently hired David Pennertz as project manager. He is responsible for managing multiple glass and glazing projects, including preparing estimates, work plans and documentation, and setting priorities. Kevin Zimmermann was promoted to inside sales and maintenance technician. In his new role, Zimmermann is responsible for building rapport with new customers and nurturing relationships with current customers while maintaining critical equipment to ensure the least amount of disruption.

JOHNSON JOINS REAL ESTATE COMPANY Scott Johnson recently joined the commercial real estate team at Coldwell Banker Commercial Orion Real Estate. Johnson is a long time St Cloud area resident and a graduate of Cathedral High School. He has been in sales, management, and business ownership since 1991.

ZIMNY NAMED TOP WEALTH ADVISOR Forbes magazine named Brian Zimny, Wheelock Investment Group at RBC Wealth Management, one of “America’s Top 500 NextGeneration Wealth Advisors.” The list of America’s Top Millennial Advisors considers professionals born after 1980 at all firms regardless of geography.

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BCCalendar GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

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NOV/DEC 2017

CAN’ T M IS S O PPO RT U NIT IES TO INF LU E NC E , PRO M OT E , A ND L E AR N . Visit StCloudAreaChamber.com for the most current and detailed calendar. SPOTLIGHT

NOVEMBER 10

AIM FOR SUCCESS – SILENCER EXPERIENCE Network with a “bang” to raise money for the “Unite for Success” Student Internship Program. This handgun experience is for all individuals no matter your experience level. The event includes networking and an educational activity where instructors assist/ teach you about different handguns. Cost is $40 and includes eye and ear protection, ammo and handguns. A light snack will also be provided. Silencer Experience: 9-11 a.m. at Tactical Advantage, 521 10th Ave. S, Waite Park

NOV 1 & DEC 6

Lunchtime Learning Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge. Meets the first Wednesday of the month, noon-1 p.m., at the Chamber office*. Registration is required: $20 for Chamber members, $30 for the general public. November 1: Sponsored by Chris Jacques, Weichert Realtors, and Roger Schleper and Jeremy Forsell, Premier Real Estate Services, with Hudda Ibrahim, Filsan Consultant, presenting “Everything About Somalis You’ve Always Wanted to Know But You’ve Been Afraid to Ask.”

December 6: “How to Use and Manage Email Effectively” presented by Brian Hart, Sandler Training, and sponsored by Rasmussen College.

NOV 7 & DEC 7

Business After Hours A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. November 7: Hosted by The Vein Center, Skin Fitness MD and Regional Diagnostic Radiology, at 1990 Connecticut Ave. S, Sartell. December 7: Hosted by St. Cloud Technical &

Community College, 1540 Northway Dr., St. Cloud.

NOV 10 & DEC 8

Government Affairs A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, 7:30 - 9 a.m. at the Chamber office*.

NOV 14 & DEC 12

NEXT – Chamber’s Emerging Leaders Offers professional development, leadership and networking opportunities for emerging leaders in Central Minnesota. Meets the second Tuesday of every month, noon-1 p.m. Cost is $195 for an annual membership. Register to Kellie, klibert@StCloudArea Chamber.com.

*For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940. The Chamber office is located at 1411 W St. Germain Street, Ste 101, St. Cloud.

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November 14: Professional development activity December 12: Annual holiday party and ugly sweater contest

NOV 15 & DEC 20

Waite Park Chamber For businesses interested in Waite Park community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. November 15: Hosted by Texas Roadhouse at Waite Park City Hall, 15 13th Ave. N, Waite Park. The meeting includes a presentation on “Volunteerism as a Business Benefit” by Lisa Braun, RSVP. December 20: Hosted by Sentry Bank at the Moose

Learners into the Workplace” by Tammy Biery, Career Solutions.

Family Center, 1300 3rd St. N, Waite Park. The meeting features a holiday party with entertainment provided by the Tech High School Singers, sponsored by Forsberg Investments & Insurance.

December 21: Hosted by BankVista. The meeting includes a networking activity.

NOV 16 & DEC 21

NOVEMBER 29

Sauk Rapids Chamber

Attracting & Retaining Employees and Customers from Diverse Backgrounds

For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register by noon at least two days in advance. Meetings are held at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids, from 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.

IN THE NEWS

TOP JOB The recent restoration and facelift of the First National Bank building of St. Cloud, a project completed by Inventure Properties and Boser Construction, was recognized as a TOP PROJECT OF 2016 BY FINANCE & COMMERCE.

For those interested in creating and promoting an inclusive business environment. 8 a.m. – 10 a.m. Registration is required: $35 for Chamber members, $50 for the general public.

November 16: Hosted by Gabriel Media with a presentation on “Helping Integrate English Language

November 29: Sponsored by DCI, Inc. at the Chamber office*

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Personal Banking Business & Agriculture Online Services Sauk Rapids 320.252.5121

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UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL QUINLIVAN & HUGHES ATTORNEYS RECOGNIZED Attorneys Dyan Ebert, Laura Moehrle and Steven Schwegman, Quinlivan & Hughes, have been named 2017 Super Lawyers. Ebert, CEO, was also appointed secretary of the Minnesota State Bar Association (MSBA). In four years, she will serve as president. She is only the second attorney in St. Cloud to serve as president of the MSBA since the association began in 1883. The only other individual was Mike Ford, also from Quinlivan & Hughes. Cally KjellbergNelson was appointed to the Minnesota Defense Lawyers Association (MDLA) Board of Directors. She will serve a two-year term on the state board that provides leadership and assistance for litigators across Minnesota. Kjellberg-Nelson was also named a 2017 Rising Star by Thomson Reuters.

SBETC CHANGES NAME As of Aug. 1, the Stearns-Benton Employment & Training Council is now Career Solutions. The new name reflects the evolving focus and standards of the organization, which continues to help the Stearns and Benton counties grow by meeting workforce needs of businesses and job seekers.

CENTRACARE RECEIVES AWARD FOR EXCEPTIONAL CARE Minnesota Health Action Group’s Minnesota Bridges to Excellence (MNBTE) program awarded 13 CentraCare Clinics awards for commitment to improving treatment of three chronic conditions that are key drivers of health care costs in the state: diabetes, vascular disease and depression.

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The Best Approach

Leaders should learn to create a balanced approach to achieve what is both urgent and important. By Greg Vandal

I

t was about 12 months ago when the leadership transition officially took place. Following my twoyear stint as board chair for the United Way of Central Minnesota, I passed the “gavel” to Chair-Elect Pat Edeburn, Granite Equity Partners. In my role as chair, I often facilitated discussions and led the board through group exercises as we shaped a course of action designed to maximize positive community impact. As I did as a teacher, a school administrator, and a planning consultant mostly in the nonprofit world, the approaches I took were intended to bring

every voice in the room into consideration before a decision was made. I was determined to engage in a process that was built on collaboration and whose ultimate purpose was the development of consensus. Not long after a board retreat I conducted in which we affirmed the strategic direction of the organization, Pat observed that there are real differences between a leadership approach borne in the public sector and his own experience in the world of private business. Pat – who made significant contributions to an early draft of this article – earned an MBA from Harvard, has extensive experience in the

private sector, and brought increased scorecard and data measurements to United Way. He has a nimble, strategic mind when it comes to setting measurable outcomes and achieving significant results. Folks like Pat are successful in the business world because they do their homework and quickly pick a direction. They attempt to define and manage the business variables that create intended change through strategic focus, measurement, and execution. At the risk of reinforcing a glaring generality, it might be suggested that public sector leadership more regularly relies on the slower

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@voxliberi.com.


process of consensus-building while private sector leadership places a higher premium on the speed of decision-making and execution. Surely, the personality of a given leader might predispose one to either consensus-style or action-oriented management. In the best circumstances, leaders should create a balanced approach to achieve what is both urgent and important. Many organizations – public, private, and nonprofit – could benefit by consciously asking whether they are acting with enough urgency to fulfill their mission. And, if so, have they built the consensus necessary to achieve results over the long term?

There are times when consensus must be secured in the private sector and there are surely instances when public institutions are moved forward because a strong leader has exerted higher degrees of command and control over organizational activity. An effective leader is most effective when there is wisdom to determine which is required in the moment. I was proud to pass that United Way gavel to Pat. Our leadership approaches might differ, but they are surely complementary in nature. More importantly, both approaches have been focused on the success of the organization we served.

IN THE NEWS

Raising Awareness

The Women’s Fund of the Central Minnesota Community Foundation (CMCF), held the second annual “Dancing with Our Stars” event in June, raising $79,000 to help women and girls in the community. The event pairs local “celebrities” with professional dance partners to raise money for local charities that the celebrities choose.

EXCEPTIONAL CUSTOMER SERVICE. INNOVATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING. At Rice Companies, we believe in building lasting relationships, providing exceptional customer service, and initiating innovative problem solving. We would be honored to discuss your next building project.

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UpFront NEW AT THE TOP

NEWS REEL RAJKOWSKI HANSMEIER HIRES, RECOGNIZED Kirstin Erickson joined Rajkowski Hansmeier as associate attorney. Erickson graduated from William Mitchell College of Law and practices in the areas of real estate and commercial law. Gordon H. Hansmeier, Paul A. Rajkowski, Kevin F. Gray, and Troy A. Poetz, attorneys with Rajkowski Hansmeier Ltd. in St. Cloud, were selected as 2017 Minnesota Super Lawyers, which recognizes attorneys who have distinguished themselves in their legal practice. Only the top five percent of lawyers in the state are named to this list. Eric S. Oelrich and Stacy Lundeen, also attorneys with Rajkowski Hansmeier, were selected as 2017 Minnesota Rising Stars. The Minnesota Rising Stars are based on peer recognition and professional achievement.

ENGELMEYER TAKES SECOND IN NATIONAL CARPENTRY COMPETITION Alex Engelmeyer, W. Gohman Construction, finished second in the National Carpentry Competition at the Annual Skills USA Championships in Louisville, Ky. This year’s national competition featured 68 carpentry competitors. Each participant was tested on individualized projects and judged on job interview skills, written test scores, safety, adherence to plans, craftsmanship, and the proper use of tools and materials to perform the required tests.

CROUSE JOINS INTELECONNECT Katrina Crouse joined InteleCONNECT, Inc. as customer service coordinator.

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Matt Varilek

President, Initiative Foundation

Age: 42 Previous employer: Chief Operating Officer, U.S. Small Business Administration What will you miss most about your previous position? Congressional oversight (just kidding…) When did you start in your current position? January 3, 2017

What are you looking forward to the most in your new position? Traveling this beautiful region to see firsthand the positive impact of the Initiative Foundation's partnerships, grant-making, lending, training and other activities. Making a difference—and seeing that difference—feels great and is a strong source of motivation for all of us associated with the Initiative Foundation. Where did you grow up? Yankton (pop. 14,552) and Tabor (pop. 413), South Dakota What are your hobbies? Chasing our energetic kids including Willa (8), Mae (6), and Rhys (2), along with fat-tire biking at Cuyuna and other great Central Minnesota trails.

Fun fact: I was a student security guard during my college years at Carleton College in Northfield. While making my rounds one winter night, I interrupted a would-be burglar who was ultimately apprehended by the Northfield Police Department—my only brush with “hot pursuit.”

TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

ROGERS AND HOLLANDS, a family-owned and operated jewelry company, 4101 W Division Street, suite A0014, St. Cloud. Pictured: Beth Putz, Brian Rath, Brian Jarl.

TRI-COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY, an independent, nonprofit animal shelter located in St. Cloud, 735 8th Street NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Todd Fritz, Kayla Koscielniak, Rick Poganski.

BADCAT DIGITAL MARKETING, digital marketing for small businesses, including SEO, SEM, social media and email, 1922 29th Street S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Michelle Henderson, Tammy Buttweiler.


www.scr-mn.com

TOP HATS: MILESTONES

Formerly St. Cloud Refrigeration

Central | Metro

St. Cloud • Twin Cities Wilmar • Alexandria 1-800-827-1642 30-year Chamber member Design Electric, commercial, industrial, and transportation services electrical contractor, 4807 Heatherwood Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Matt Knutson, Duane Koepp, Nicholas Bischoff, Doug Bischoff, Jim Schoon, Julie Forsberg.

REFRIGERATION

Nothern

Brainerd • Baxter 1-800-273-9071

HVAC

Duluth | Superior

SERVICE

1-800-827-1642

BUILDING AUTOMATION FOOD SERVICE

Southern

Rochester 1-877-399-4546 Mankato 1-800-447-3259

HUTCHINSON HIGH SCHOOL

30-year Chamber member Express Employment Professionals, provides short and long term project staffing, direct hire candidates and other human resources services, 1410 W St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Julie Forsberg, Tamara Acord, Dana Gruber, Krista Hilmerson, Jill Magelssen, Shelby Uphoff, Rachel Wilson, Bernie Perryman.

BUILDING OUR COMMUNITY

BUILDING TOMORROW TODAY

As one of the leading education construction contractors in Minnesota, we pride ourselves on making sure the schools of today meets tomorrow’s needs. We balance budget constraints with the need to be scalable, adaptable and transformational for the students and the educators who teach them.

25-year Chamber member: Fairfield Inn and Suites, 4120 2nd Street S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Matt Knutson, Laura Willard, Roger Schleper.

St. Joseph, MN | 320.363.7781 | wgohman.com

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

DESIGN BUILD

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7 //

BUILDING REMODELING

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

NETWORK

You call this networking? The Chamber Open offered food, fun, games…and golf!

Carrie (L) and Susan, ABRA Auto Body and Glass

Keeping everyone honest at “Closest to the Post”

20

Dan Stuttgen, (L) Beaver Island Brewing Co.; Jeremy Salzbrun, H & S Heating and AC; Jeff Udy, Infinite Eye Care; and Kelly McCall, St. Cloud Area Family Y.

Dave Christians, (L) Wells Fargo Bank, and Pete Cluever, Xcel Energy

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

Hosted at the St. Cloud Country Club, the Chamber Open sold out early.


NETWORK

Business After Hours at Falcon National Bank

Traci Rau, (L) Falcon National Bank; Sandy Svihel, Alpha Salon Lux Suites; Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce; Marie Lego, St. Cloud Cartridges

Troy Cameron, (L) Falcon National Bank, and Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction

Marv Soldner, (L) Soldner Business Services, and John Herges, Falcon National Bank

Chris Goering, The Wirth Center for the Performing Arts

Chamber Top Hat Ambassador Amanda Groethe, (L) Stearns Electric, and Caryn Stadther, Falcon National Bank

GROW

St. Cloud Area Leadership kicked off in September with presentations by local community leaders.

Networking 101 by Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning

Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services and chair of the Chamber’s Board of Directors

Keynote speaker Jeff Gau, Marco

N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7 //

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InSIDE THIS ISSUE: Entreprenuerism • Management Toolkit • Doing Good

BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

Tech Strategies • Economy Central by Falcon Bank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

The Path to Ruin

Beware the “Seven Deadly Management Sins” or suffer the consequences.

By Tracy Knofla

or liabilities depending upon their willingness to learn. Few things can cause the demise of a business faster than a reluctance to learn and adopt new business and management practices. This includes professional development, incorporating new technologies, and keeping abreast of new business trends. Strong businesses value a welltrained workforce.

I

t is widely held that in our personal lives we should avoid the seven deadly sins of greed, gluttony, lust, pride, envy, wrath, and sloth. These behaviors, we were taught, would lead us down the path to ruin. But did you know that there are also seven deadly sins in the world of management? Failure to avoid these sins can lead your business down a path to ruin as well! APATHY Apathy is one of the most deadly of the seven sins of management. Apathy is literally

the opposite of management. In successful businesses, management is an action verb. Management implies engagement in the activities of your business. When apathy is discovered at any level in your organization, morale and productivity suffer. Everyone should care about their jobs and want to do a good job. A strong manager works hard to keep the workforce aligned with the mission of the company. IGNORANCE Employees can either be assets

AIMLESSNESS Goals, plans, and accountability are all essential to business success. The effective supervisor ensures that all employees are aware of and working toward the achievement of organizational goals. Good managers hold all employees accountable for their roles in accomplishing stated goals and provide motivation or correction as needed. MISCOMMUNICATION Effective communication is crucial for management success. If supervisors withhold information to maintain power over employees, use electronic

contributor Tracy Knofla is the co-owner and featured consultant of High Impact Training. She has been presenting to audiences across the country for more than 25 years. 22

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

communication instead of face to face, or fail to listen actively to co-workers, your business risks certain failure. Employees thrive when they know what is going on within their organization, whether the news is good or bad. Uncertainty is not good for morale. INATTENTION Not paying attention to employee needs is truly a sin. Employees are generally very transparent. They provide multiple clues to understand their behavior. When you are attentive, you can identify those things that are motivational or problematic in the workplace. And, more importantly, act upon them quickly. NON-BOARDING This made-up word is the opposite of onboarding. The sin here happens far more often than you imagine. Many new employees are under-trained or left on their own to learn their positions. Managers should determine the appropriate content and length of an employee’s orientation and be prepared to make adjustments for individual learning styles. DATA-AVERSION Facts. Figures. Trends. “All hail


the data!” Today’s workplace thrives on the collection and analysis of data. Your gut feeling is no longer the best way to determine future trends. Just because it worked or didn’t work last year doesn’t mean it is appropriate for the future. There are hundreds of new ways to gather and interpret data that will add value to the business and help develop strategic direction. Managers must be open to all that this data has to say. When you avoid these seven deadly management sins you will have developed a workforce that is dedicated to your mission, supervisors who bring their best to the workplace, and the strong likelihood that you will enjoy great success.

CASEY’S GENERAL STORE MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

www. s t r ackcom p ani es . com Commercial Construction • Project Management • Real Estate Services

TECH NEWS

Wardrobe Malfunction Now even our clothes can reject us. Academics at Birmingham City University in the UK are developing a "CONNECTED WARDROBE" in which forgotten items will text owners to remind them that they are gathering dust. If ignored for a long time, the clothes will automatically contact charity shops asking to be recycled or offer themselves for auction on eBay. Source: The Telegraph

N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7 //

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BusinessTools TECH STRATEGIES

Stay Relevant Here are five new Facebook features you should know and use.

By Dawn Zimmerman

it will charge for this service in the future. The goal is to help businesses generate more sales. 4 Meet up with invitations

T

here are now about 3 billion active social media users worldwide, representing 40 percent of the global population. That’s astounding given that there are pockets around the world without Internet. Mobile users account for about 92 percent of those active users, according to a Hootsuite report. And Facebook, as expected, leads the pack of social platforms with the most active users – by a significant margin. Why does Facebook have such a stronghold on the market? There likely are many answers to that question. One reason, I believe, is that the company continues to innovate. It doesn’t sit back and rest on its success. It continues to explore

new features and opportunities to remain contemporary in an evolving industry. Here’s a look at just a few of the features Facebook has rolled out and what’s next: 1 Raise visibility of another creator’s post Has someone given your organization a shout out or praise and you want more people to see it? In the past, you would need to share it and then boost it. Now Facebook enables you to directly boost the post to a target audience of your choice as it appears on the original creator’s page. It’s another way that Facebook is working to help marketers leverage influencer marketing.

2 Comment with a GIF You simply type in what you want to say into the comment field on a Facebook post and Facebook creates a GIF that reflects it. GIF, formerly known as Graphic Interchange Format, is a type of file format that supports both animated and static images. This is how you get a quick click of baby doing a happy dance that repeats over and over. 3 Talk directly to customers Facebook is testing a feature that would allow businesses to talk directly with customers through What’s App. Facebook bought this messaging app in 2014. While the app is free now, Facebook has shared that

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in social media.

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Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

and planning tools Facebook is working on a new “meet up” feature that would take the online social interactions to physical connections. A notification appears in the Facebook app with a list of friends to choose from. Users then can ignore, decline, or agree to the invite. Then, a new messaging strand to make plans is initiated in Facebook for those meeting up. It’s not available in the United States yet. 5 New video platforms Facebook is accelerating its video plans with the addition of a new platform called “Watch.” It replaces the old video tab and will serve as a place where users can watch shows – either recorded or live. Users can create and track a “watch list” as well as broaden their viewing by seeing “what friends are watching.” Users can comment and react to the show or join a dedicated Facebook group for the show to continue to make it a social experience. From colored comments to rounded profile pictures, the list of new features on Facebook is long. Each provides a new opportunity for organizations to step back, evaluate their own social media strategies and explore ways to keep them contemporary and relevant.


DOING GOOD

Giving Circles // Is your charitable giving something of a bore? Try a giving circle!

I

f you’ve ever been in a book group or an investment club, then you’re familiar with the premise of a giving circle. A group of people drawn together – friends, colleagues, neighbors – who pool their time and money to make an impact with one or more charities. Models of the democratic process, giving circles give donors equal voice

in deciding where their charitable contributions go. In the process, donors connect with one another and with their communities. Giving circles influence members to give more money and to give more strategically, according to a study led by Angela M. Eikenberry, assistant professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. The study also showed

that members of giving circles give to a wide array of organizations, are highly engaged in the community, and become more knowledgeable about philanthropy, nonprofits, and the community. For more resources on starting or joining a giving circle, visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

TECH NEWS

Cyborg! MIT Media Lab's DUOSKIN uses temporary tattoos to turn skin into wireless interfaces, with the ability to connect with smartphones, transmit data, or display images based on body temperature. The product won the SciFi No Longer prize at the 2017 SXSW Innovation Awards. Source: The Washington Post

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BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

What’s in a Name? Use trademark laws to your advantage when establishing your brand.

B

usiness are often confused about the best steps to take when naming a product or establishing a brand. Here are a few tips to help you avoid exposure to liability and to better position yourself so third parties can’t use your intellectual property. Trademarks provide businesses with protection of their names and brands. Trademarks provide exclusive rights to unique words, logos, pictures or symbols which identify the source of a product or service.

By Brodie Miller

When considering a name or logo it’s important to select one that’s not already used for similar products or services. Generally, an initial search should determine whether substantially similar names or logos are already in use. Keep in mind that even though a name may not be registered, if it is already used for something similar to what you have planned, you run the risk of an infringement action against you if you use it. Minor changes in spellings, order of words,

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color or font will not lessen the risk of an infringement action. Your rights are also greater the more unique the name is. When considering a name, steer clear of those that may be considered generic or descriptive. For example Sharp® television is not as strong as Kodak® film. A common misconception among business owners is that they must register a name with the U.S. Patent and

Trademark Office (USPTO) in order to obtain rights to it. Actually, you gain exclusive rights simply by being the first to use a unique name. Registration does provide some advantages. For instance, it puts others on notice of your rights, grants you the ability to use ®, and, in an infringement action, gives you the right to obtain certain additional monetary remedies. Registration also grants you the right to exclude others

from using the same name, or a substantially similar one, in the entire jurisdiction in which you register. Registering with the USPTO covers the entire U.S., not merely areas in which you first use the unique name. Even if you do not register your product name, it’s good practice to use the name in a way that puts others on notice that you are using it as a trademark.

contributor Brodie Miller is an attorney at Rinke Noonan where he specializes in intellectual property, construction, real estate, banking and business law.

BEST PRACTICES l Use TM wherever you

use your name

l Set the name off as separate and distinct from the description of your product or service l Do not use the name itself to describe your products or services l Affix the name directly on the product l Be sure the name is on all advertisements, brochures and other items used to provide or promote the product or service.

The Choice is Yours... Choose the Best!

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Working with buyers, sellers, realtors, lenders and builders throughout Central and Greater Minnesota

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St. Cloud Area Escrow St. Cloud Manager Area Escrow Manager

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Mary Schneider Mary Schneider Melanie Walz Mary Weis Mary Weis Melanie Walz

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BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL PROJECTIONS

Cost of Living

Regional Growth

Housing, utilities keep Central Minnesota’s cost of living below average.

Central Minnesota continues to grow, although slower than originally projected

C

entral Minnesota is the fastest growing region in the state, according to the Minnesota

Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED). Since 2010 the area has experienced a population increase of more than 19,500 new residents, 4,250 in just the past year. Though population projections have been revised downward, the trends remain largely positive, according to DEED, and the region is expected to reach 457,465 residents by 2040. Because of the population growth, the region’s

T

he St. Cloud area experienced a below average cost of living during the second quarter for 2017, according to the Cost of Living Index of 253 urban areas. The composite index is based on six components – housing, utilities, grocery items, transportation, health care, and miscellaneous goods and services. The "all items" index for St. Cloud was 96.2, 3.8 percent below the national average (100.0) for the quarter. The Cost of Living Index, which is compiled and published quarterly by C2ER – The Council

for Community and Economic Research, measures regional differences in the cost of consumer goods and services, excluding taxes and non-consumer expenditures, for professional and managerial households in the top income quintile. It is based on more than 90,000 prices covering almost 60 different items for which prices are collected three times a year by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Small differences should not be interpreted as showing any measurable difference, according to C2ER.

COST OF LIVING

After averaging annual labor force gains of over 5,750 during the 1990s and more than 4,600 in the 2000s, the region has slowed to 1,000 new workers per year since 2010. Moving forward, employers will need to adapt to a tighter labor market. Central Minnesota added just over 2,100 workers from 2015 to 2016. The projected labor force change to 2030 was revised to just 3,400 net new workers, a 1.4 percent increase compared to previous estimates of 6 percent growth through 2025. The region's racial distribution remained largely unchanged over the past year, with a 0.1 percent decrease in whites to 93.1 percent, and increases of the same size among the minority races and ethnicities.

Accra Index

COMPILATION FOR SECOND QUARTER DATA FOR 2017 FOR MINNESOTA AND OTHER UPPER MIDWEST CITIES COST OF LIVING INDEX Grocery Housing Utilities Transpo- Health Misc. Goods Items rtation Care & Services

Among the 253 urban areas participating in the second quarter of 2017, the after-tax cost for professional/managerial standard of living ranged from more than twice the national average in New York (Manhattan) NY to more than 20 percent below the national average in McAllen, TX.

CITY

All Items

St. Cloud, MN 2nd Qtr

96.2 112.1 71.9 87.6 96.4 122.2 108.5

TOP FIVE

TOP FIVE

96.1

Most Expensive U.S. Cities in Which to Live

Least Expensive U.S. Cities in Which to Live

St. Cloud, MN 1st Qtr

117.4

74.5

87.7

101.9

120.8

102.7

Minneapolis, MN 104.8 104.9 103.4 92.0 107.2 101.9 109.1

a New York (Manhattan) NY

235.0

a McAllen TX

76.0

St. Paul, MN

b San Francisco CA

192.3

b Conway AR

77.8

Mankato, MN 93.5 99.9 71.3 97.4 96.8 118.8 103.5

c Honolulu HI

186.0

c Harlingen TX

78.5

Cedar Rapids, IA 95.1

94.6

d New York (Brooklyn) NY

180.2

d Richmond IN

78.7

98.0

e Washington, D.C.

153.4

e Tupelo MS

79.2

104.6

103.4

96.2 92.8

104.2

89.4 79.6

90.4

102.5 106.8

104.9

99.8

104.1 109.8

109.4

94.8

Pierre SD

99.6 98.6 114.7 95.8 93.6 99.8 90.7

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

110.8

104.0

Eau Claire, WI

28

labor force also continues to grow, albeit more slowly.


90,073*

$80M

$100M

1,151

986

December

$60M

February

November

Residential 2015 2016 2017* 2015 August #/$ #/$ #/$ St. Cloud

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

TOTAL:$47,690,073*

October April March

$40M

Home Sales C

2016

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

TOTAL:$64,832,866

TOTAL:$84,908,072

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

441

July $21,854,833 $32,774,443 $23,107,965 2017 January 0

500

Sauk Rapids 321 345 212 June $15,843,450 $22,647,287.40 $10,645,665

$80M

$100M

$600k

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

TOTAL: $138,759,578*

1000

$900k

Food and Be ST. CLOUD

Sauk Rapids 567 555 31 December $16,890,519 $15,684,403.00 $40,606,790 June

TOTAL: $150,360,393

St. Augusta

5 66 September $871,000 $0 Mar

TOTAL: 1752

St. Joseph

TOTAL: 1237

140 October $18,735,131 Apr

151 August Feb $8,057,329

$250M

11 $1,931,200

2015

71 35 $32,698,175.09 $9,574,294

July Total as of 10/8/17 Jan *St. Cloud totals are not final for 2017 at time of print June

2000

$200M

ST. CLOUD 106 50 $3,9550,295.02 $6,164,191

Waite Park

TOTAL: 1655

TOTAL: $79,916,621

$150M

Food and Bev

Sartell 35 33 24 November $11,485,611 $13,013,812.00 $11,221,688 May 2016

TOTAL: $138,759,578*

$100M

500

St. Cloud 444 464 248 2017 $94,320,804 $138,751,046 $69,261,415 July

1500

TOTAL: $1,011,008*

$1.5M

TOTAL: $1,333,423

TOTAL: $1,326,730

$1.2M

$50M

0

Commercial 2015 2016 2017* August #/$ #/$ #/$

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$0M

November October

Commercial Building Permits

2015

2015

December Total as of 10/8/17 January *St. Cloud totals are not final for 2017 at time of print.

Commercial Building Permits

2016

102 66 $9,180,779.85 $4,746,854

St. Joseph 142 186 83 February $2,293,565 $4,796,650.51 $2,876,748

$60M

2017

79 $4,720,246

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

March

78 44 $2,197,512.66 $914,425

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$40M

St. Augusta

2016

2017

$20M

April $1,552,641

500

$300k

$0M

Waite Park

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

2015

113

2016

2017

2016

2015

$0

TOTAL:$64,832,866

2015

Sartell 329 252 138 May $18,168,133 $13,311,388.85 $5,398,516

2016

2017

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

2017

July December June

November May

Residential Building Permits

$0M

908,072

COLOR KEY:

Compiled by Kellie Libert, data current as of 10/8/17

2015 2017

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

TOTAL:$84,908,072 2016

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL:$47,690,073*

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS 2017

October

$100M

$250M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

832,866

59,578*

360,393

916,621

Residential Building Permits

2017

$0

$300k

TOTAL: $150,360,393 Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

2016

May

2016

Unemployment Rates 2016-2017

2015

Apr

TOTAL: $79,916,621

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

August

September

October

F

M

A

M

1.0%

5%

December

July

J

Jan

November

June

May

$250M

Feb

April

$200M

March

December

$150M

November

$100M

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

$50M

1.5%

February

2.0%

January

6%

$0M

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com 2015

2016 - 2017 % CHANGE

J

J

$0

$300k

0.5% 0.0% -0.5%

4%

-1.0% -1.5% -2.0%

3% A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

-2.5% A

S

O

N

D

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

A

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7 //

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29


0,073*

BusinessTools

08,072

32,866

$100M

9,578*

0,393

6,621

$250M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

August

October

September

August

July

June

May

TOTAL: 1237

April

September

ST. CLOUD

October

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

D, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

September

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

lding Permits

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

September

2017

TOTAL: $1,011,008*

July

TOTAL: $138,759,578*

August July

TOTAL: 1752

June

2017

May

2016

TOTAL: $1,333,423

June

TOTAL: $150,360,393

April May

December

TOTAL: $1,333,423

Residential 2015 2016 2017 TOTAL: $1,326,730

2000

$1.5M

Stearns Co. 181 158 64 2015 Benton Co. 54 39 19

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office $0 $300k $600k $900k $1.2M Total as of 10/8/17.

Lodging Tax Dollars

December

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

November

$16.92

the median hourly wage in 2015

The total number of jobs in 2016

$1,100 The increase in average annual wages across all industries from 2015 to 2016

$2M

Learn more at BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Total as of 10/8/17.

30

October

$1.5M

September

$1M

VS.

August

$500k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

July

$0

June

2015

May

TOTAL: $1,454,374

170,160

April

2016

$17.48

The median hourly wage in 2016

The increase in payroll since 2015 March

TOTAL: $1,508,301

Central Minnesota 1.5% February

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2017

TOTAL: $1,090,850

February

BY THE NUMBERS January

January

ST. CLOUD

$1.5M

March

TOTAL: 1237

250

TOTAL: 1752

2016 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

200

TOTAL: 1655

150

1500

100

TOTAL: $1,011,008*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

TOTAL: $1,326,730

$1.2M

50

$1.5M

November Geringhoff is looking to expand its St. Cloud facility and create October up to 20 new full-time jobs with an average wage of $21 per hour. CEO Tosh Brinkerhoff said planned September renovations include the addition of a second assembly line August which would allow the company to produce draper and corn headers simultaneously. Brinkerhoff said equipment July and technological upgrades are included in the expansion, June but the manufacturing plant's footprint will not change. May Geringhoff opened in 2013. The company currently April34 full-time workers at its St. Cloud facility. employs

1000

$900k

TOTAL: 221

0

$1.2M

Geringhoff plans expansion

TOTAL: 83

TOTAL: $1,011,008*

2017 2015

$900k

500

$600k

ST. CLOUD

$600k

Total as of 10/8/17.

Food and Beverage Tax Collection TOTAL: 235

2016

$300k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions

2017

January

$0

Housing/Real Estate St. Cloud Area AssociationJan of Realtors, $150M $200Msources:$250M http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics. Total as of 10/8/17.

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

2015

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

2000

Feb

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

1500

TOTAL: $1,326,730

0

$300k

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

1000

2017

February

ST. CLOUD

500

2016

2015

2017

March

TOTAL: $79,916,621

0

2016

Apr Mar

$0

$100M

2016

2015

2015

TOTAL: 1655

Economy Central presented by


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Justin Gauerke

Josh Gauerke

32

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7


<h1>Lucky13</h1> <p>Josh and Justin Gauerke just wanted to serve their clients when they opened Meta 13. Today they have a new location, a new partner, and a national footprint.</p> <h3>By Whitney Ditlevson</h3> <h3>Photos by Joel Butkowski, BDI photography</h3>

I

n 2004, brothers Josh and Justin Gauerke learned that the company they worked for was downsizing. Digital Green planned to shift its focus, eliminating their web development division. Motivated by what the brothers saw as potential, and determined to continue providing services for their clients, they purchased a book of business from Digital Green and started a new company they called Meta 13. <h5>PHASE I</h5> “We both worked at Digital Green, and as the company divested our division, we

still thought it was a viable business,” Josh said. They approached Digital Green with the idea of continuing to provide service to existing web development clients. Digital Green agreed to sell the division to the brothers. “The process was fairly quick,” Josh said. “We met a lawyer, filed some papers to incorporate, and came to an agreement with Digital Green. Justin got about a month head start while I finished up some projects.” “We received a small line of credit from Wells Fargo,” Justin said. “Since we had a book of business and we didn’t need large amounts

of machinery to run our company, operating costs were covered with the work at hand.” “The nice thing about our business -- there is not a terrible amount of overhead other than payroll. Justin and I had saved enough to strike a deal with Digital Green to buy a few computers and have them forward department inquiries for a period of time,” Josh said. “We did get company credit cards right off the bat to pay for some services, but we didn’t have a crazy amount invested.”

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<h4>TIMELINE</h4> Fall 2004 Digital Green reorganizes, downsizing their web development division Winter 2004 Brothers Josh and Justin Gauerke offer to purchase the web development division from Digital Green Spring 2005 The Gauerkes establish Meta 13, Inc., sending out their first invoice in April 2005 May 2005 Josh and Justin officially start work in their new Meta 13 office in the 501 Building in downtown St. Cloud; Nathan Batdorf joins the company May 2007 Digital Green closes

<!--Fun fact: Meta 13 doesn’t stand for anything. The Gauerke brothers just like the sound of the word ‘meta.’ “We settled on the name Meta 13 because it was the first name of over 100 that we didn’t fight about,” Justin said.--> Originally from Wausau, Wis., Josh and Justin could have moved their web-based company anywhere. They chose to stay in St. Cloud, a place they both now call home. “When I graduated from high school, I picked a college that was far enough away from home, but not so far that I couldn’t get back if I wanted,” Josh said. “I ended up meeting a girl, falling in loving, finding work, and making St. Cloud home.” Justin, on the other hand, was working in the Twin Cities. “My early career, and much of my career development, happened at Medtronic,” he said. “I worked in the business development and reporting divisions, then IT.” Somehow Josh talked him into coming to St. Cloud to

be the project manager at Digital Green. <h5>PHASE II</h5> hen we established Meta 13, I can’t say we had a goal in mind other than to make great websites in an affordable manner for our customers and to be able to pay our bills,” Justin said. “The rest we were going to figure out as we went.” Finding the right people to fit the team proved to be the biggest hurdle, according to Josh. “We wanted people who were smart, but more importantly who wanted to work and learn with us.” Their first employment attempt didn’t go well. A programmer from Digital Green was originally scheduled to start with Josh and Justin. Except the programmer never showed

“W

up. Knowing they needed to find a new programmer quickly, they set out on an immediate search. Stressful and a bit scary, the brothers found someone who they believed would be the perfect fit and sweet talked him into joining the brand new company. “We lucked out by finding Nathan Batdorf. It took a little convincing to get him to jump in with us, but he did,” Josh recalled. “He was young, but worked hard and was a great addition to the team.” Batdorf became part owner of Meta 13 this past summer. Since they had purchased a book of business, Josh and Justin had a base of projects ready to start. “We were lucky that we had built relationships with our client base to the point that we

April 2012 Meta 13 expands their office space August 2013 Meta 13 adds a second office July 2015 Meta 13 moves to a new location at 330 Highway 10 S, St. Cloud July 2017 Batdorf becomes part owner

34

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

<h3>BUSINESS PROFILE</h3> Meta 13

330 Highway 10 South, Suite 4, St. Cloud, MN 320-230-1223 // m13contact@meta13.com // meta13.com President: Justin Gauerke Other Significant Officers: Josh Gauerke, Nathan Batdorf Business Description: Services for anything related to web development – designing, building, hosting, Search Engine Optimization, etc. Total number of employees: 11 (all in St. Cloud) Previous Year’s sales: $800k Current year projected sales: $950k


were able to cash flow really early on in the transition,” Justin said. “We signed a pretty large project in the early days that we knew would keep us fed for a while at least,” Josh said. “And we had enough random work that we never really felt totally lost.” <h5>GOING ON 13</h5> eta 13 celebrates thirteen years in business in 2018. Since it started, many things have changed, but its core remains the same. “Since starting Meta 13, we keep the same basic principle. We are still making websites, but the techniques and technologies have changed. Today we tend to work on a lot larger and more complicated projects,” Josh said. Meta 13 works on projects for pretty much anything web-related. That includes web design, static informational websites, website hosting, applications, e-commerce, email marketing, Search Engine Optimization (SEO), Search Engine Marketing (SEM), and anything else they might be able to help with. Advancements in technology keep Meta 13 on its toes. Since the company was established, there are more companies and developers which lead to more ideas, larger projects and quicker swings in industry norms. “Web development is constantly changing, which makes it exciting, but frustrating at the same time,”

M

Josh said. “We have to stay on top of changing technology when it’s right, but we also have to be careful not to grab onto things that might be gone the next day.” <h5>PHASE III</h5> ince 2005, the three-person operation has turned into a team of eleven. “We’ve had pretty steady growth year to year and we are fairly conservative with how fast we grow,” Josh said. “We don’t want to run a giant mess if possible. We really care for the people we hire and we keep growing our team and increasing revenue.” When the Great Recession hit, Meta 13 saw very little impact. “Larger companies downsized their marketing and web development divisions, but essentially they still needed people to serve them,” Justin said. “We kept waiting for the slowdown but it never came,” Josh added. “Businesses learned to survive by outsourcing instead of hiring, which meant we had work.” Eight years later the company has no plans to slow down. When asked what’s next for Meta 13, Josh outlined the ten year plan: “In six months, we will have had our holiday party. In one year, we are planning a brewery tour. In five years, we keep rolling and have our

S

<h4>PERSONAL PROFILE</h4> Justin Gauerke, 37 President of Meta 13 Hometown: Wausau, WI Education: University of Wisconsin, Stout; Brown College Work History: Business analyst, Medtronic; business analyst, Metris; project manager, Digital Green; president, Meta 13 Family: Parents: Rose and Tom Gauerke Brothers: Jason and Josh; Daughter: Stella; Significant other: Jessica Filliagi; Sons: Luca and Teo Filliagi Hobbies: Anything outdoors – hunting, fishing, biking, hiking, camping, exploring and traveling

Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: Set a goal and focus on it. Give yourself some credit when you make your goals. It’s easy as an owner of a business to always see the next thing that needs doing, fixing, changing, etc., and not always easy to celebrate your victories. Best advice you’ve received and who gave it to you: “I can’t recall an exact single piece of advice, but our cousin Paul Gauerke happened to be starting a business at about the same time as Josh and I and he provided me with a budget template that we used for our first four years of business. With that budget document, we managed to hit our projections almost spot on.”

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35


“We have a great team and we feel really good about the company we have created,” Josh added. “We have a ‘we’re all in it together’ sense.” Although it’s too soon for an official retirement or succession plan, in the not too distant future the brothers hope to gradually step out of the day-to-day operations and let their teammates handle more of those details.

<h4>PERSONAL PROFILE</h4> Josh Gauerke, 42 Title/role: I try to avoid titles – web developer/designer; secretary/treasurer I guess Hometown: Wausau, WI Education: Bachelor of Fine Arts - Graphic design, 1999 graduate of St. Cloud State University Work History: Web developer, Digital Green; owner and web developer, Meta 13 Family: Parents: Rose and Tom Gauerke; Brothers: Jason and Josh; Wife Beth; Kids: Harrison and Alex; Ahsoka the dog; Daphne the cat Hobbies: Golf and guitar Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: Do something you enjoy – it shows. Best advice you’ve received and who gave it to you: “Look both ways.” – My dad.

36

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

team members leading new team members. In ten years, we are skinny dipping at Augusta,” he joked. But in all seriousness, Justin and Josh are enjoying the company they have built, taking great pride both in their work and in their company’s impact. “It’s really hard to look that far, but I would hope moving forward, we just keep it up with our continued success,” Josh said. “For me, contributing to the community, employing people and supporting families is the most rewarding part of owning a business,” Justin said.

<h5>WORLD WIDE REACH</h5> lthough many clients are regional, Meta 13 has completed projects for a number of national and international clients. Perhaps most notable, the company designed and developed the database for The Diocese of Los Angeles. “We’ll work with pretty much anyone who has a need to be on the web, which allows us to keep our client base diverse,” Justin said. “We have clients on the East Coast, West Coast, Texas, really everywhere.” “We always talk about making one of those maps

A

with the push pins, but we never have,” Josh said. Despite such a wide range of clients, most projects are completed right from their St. Cloud office. “I tell people we’re a technology company, so if we can’t serve you without a face-to-face meeting, we’re in the wrong business,” Justin said. The customer experience is extremely important to the brothers, which means sometimes they do turn clients away. “We have come across some pretty crazy ideas as you might imagine, but we try not to get involved with something we can’t believe in,” Josh said. “We are really up front about our strengths, and in the end, we want our potential client to have a great experience. We would rather refer the business away than try to tackle something that we know they can get done better with someone else,” Justin said <h5>LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION</h5> eta 13 recently moved from downtown St. Cloud to a new location

M

<h3>Metamorphosis: Growing into its name</h3> When starting their business in 2005, their company name was pretty insignificant to Josh and Justin Gauerke. It was only after the fact that the brothers created a back story. Today Meta stands for change, or “metamorphosis,” to represent the ever-changing world of technology. Thirteen is Josh’s favorite number.


<!--“We have a great team and we feel really good about the company we have created. We have a ‘we’re all in it together’ sense.” — Josh Gauerke --> <h3>A day in the life</h3> Collaboration is king at Meta 13. Designers and programmers work side by side to complete projects and have fun. In a mix of an open-office floor plan with areas for private workspaces, Meta 13 provides an atmosphere for every stage of a project. “We work hard and we play hard,” Josh said. “We get lots of work done and we goof around. A lot.” “We like to keep it as fun and casual as we can,” Justin added. “Dogs at the office, beer in the fridge, Klask [a game] in the break room are all a-ok.” Additionally, the Meta 13 team enjoys monthly grill outs, bean bag tournaments and even an annual fishing trip down the river.

^^ Working around the "tower of power" in the old location.

off of Highway 10. Formerly housed in the 501 building in downtown, Josh and Justin were notified their office space was about to undergo a remodel, creating an opportunity for Meta 13 to look for a new location – a most welcome change. “In our former office, we had this structure in the middle of our office designed to provide somewhat of a private work space for our employees,” Josh said. “We called it the ‘tower of power.’ Staff members were also split into two different work areas.” Although they miss being in the heart of downtown, the new space offers many benefits: staff members are all in one space, the company no longer has to pay for parking downtown, there is more room to grow AND there is space for fun things like grill-outs and bean bag tournaments, Josh said. Although stressful, the move served as a positive transition for the company, according to Justin. “Finding a location and the logistics of moving people and equipment without compromising services to our customers was challenging.”

<h5>BROTHERLY LOVE</h5> he most challenging thing about owning a business, for me so far,” Josh joked, “has been working with my brother.” Not for the faint of heart, brothers as business partners can be difficult for many. Justin and Josh find a balance in working together and have used their relationship to create a successful company. “Being brothers and business partners certainly has advantages and disadvantages,” Justin said. “I think we are both able to separate our business life and personal life, which allows us to interact as business owners at work and brothers outside of work.” “We don’t punch each other like we did growing up,” Josh said, “but we occasionally disagree. We are definitely different people, but we complement each other well.” “We are forced to get along,” Justin added with a smile. Both Josh and Justin agree that as brothers, they have a certain level of trust in each other that was defined long before starting a new business. “Josh is a little more of a dreamer and visionary,” Justin said. “Generally I’m more pragmatic and calculating. It’s really a good mix of personalities.”

“T

“Justin runs the day-today operations and signs the clients while I’m more involved with getting the work done, especially the creative aspects of it,” Josh said. And when you add programmer Batdorf for the heavy technical needs, Meta 13 is a fully-oiled operating machine. <h5>THE SIMPLE LIFE</h5> rom an initial idea to a design and launch, web development can be complicated. The Gauerke brothers, however, take pride in the simple things. “My dream for Meta 13 is not grandiose. I’d like the company to be successful. I’d like to see our employees be successful. I’d like our employees to think that this is a place they can work, live and retire,” Justin said. “Agreed,” Josh said. “I want everyone to be able to make a good living, enjoy coming to work, and be able to be proud of the work they are doing.” “Knowing that something we built is supporting our families and allows us to hire more people and help them support their families,” Justin said, “that’s an amazing feeling.”

F

Whitney Ditlevson is the former communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

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Feature

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CALLED

NETWORKING Charm and good looks only go so far. Successful relationships take effort. By Mary MacDonell Belisle

By Mary MacDonell Belisle

38

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7


I

t may be pleasurable to share coffee and conversation at a traditional networking event. However, if you’re not WORKING on relationship building––going beyond simply being seen and exchanging business cards–– you’re probably wasting your time. Experts weigh-in “Building a powerful network is about creating high-quality connections with a smaller number of individuals who are truly important to you and your personal and professional goals,” Judy Robinett writes in her blog. Robinett is a startup funding expert and author of How to Be a Power Connector.

Your introductions are a valuable commodity, she explains in a “Mentor Me” podcast. “If you figure out how to add value to both parties, it’s like a ‘Wow!’ customer service experience. And people remember you. They’re very grateful and thankful, because you’ve already vetted the people. That propels you and your network up and out.” Your networking objectives should be to build a relationship before you talk business, according to Jay Allen, founder and chairman of CXO in Denver. CXO is a private collaborative organization built with the single mission of helping influential people

meet and develop relationships with other influential people. Allen’s approach is to build a network of the right people through strategic luncheon meetings. Twenty to 30 executives attend this monthly, by-invitation-only “Allen Lunch,” with Allen as facilitator. Each person kicks in $20 for food. Guests share where they work, what they are looking for, and what their hobbies are, and cards are passed. Effective networking is about building mutually beneficial relationships with the right people, according to these successful networkers. By staying focused on strategic objectives and providing a

willingness to be of help to the other guy over a period of time, you create the kind of network that can make a difference to your business. Networking is part of the selling process. Brian Hart, owner of Sandler Training, St. Cloud, believes business people shouldn’t think of networking as a sales opportunity. Being networked is important to the sales process and should be intentional. Hart recommends putting your contacts into three groups: 1 contacts most likely to generate new business; 2 contacts that may benefit your business at some time in

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Feature “The majority of people on this planet are kind and will help you if they’re asked. . . Half of us believe we’re shy, but actually, it’s only 10 percent, according to psychologists.” — JUDY ROBINETT, STARTUP FUNDING EXPERT AND AUTHOR the future; and 3 temporary contacts, centered on particular projects or specializations. “I encourage clients to make a list by name of three people they want to connect with at a meeting,” said Hart, who pointed out that the majority of people don’t plan. Sandler’s “Six Rules of Networking” help people plan: 1 hand out the business card only for good reason, making it a scare commodity; 2 develop

40

a 30-second “commercial” that focuses on results; 3 articulate a goal for every meeting; 4 “Slow down to speed up,” meaning, successful networking takes time; let the contact talk so you can ascertain the value of that person; 5 give leads to others before pursuing them yourself; and 6 speak to anyone within three feet of you. Fight those fears. Many people are intimidated

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

by networking, fearing ridicule and failure. People get nowhere without taking risks, Robinett said in a TEDx Talk in Sacramento. Failures are often better for a person than success, because of the wisdom gained through experience. Fear is the enemy. Being sincere and genuinely focused on the other person helps people make a connection. Give an honest compliment to someone. Ask

a question. “If you just practice it and practice talking to strangers, you find out they’re like you,” Robinett said on Mentor Me. “The majority of people on this planet are kind and will help you if they’re asked. . . Half of us believe we’re shy, but actually, it’s only 10 percent, according to psychologists.” “Anybody, even shy, introverted people, can learn to be good in a room,” said Stephanie Palmer, author of “Good in a Room.” Selling yourself is the other half of the networking conversation. Be prepared for questions like “What do you do?” “How did you come up with that idea?”


“What are you currently working on?” Work at countering fear with preparedness. Find the right room. The key players in your industry and community meet in places you want to get yourself into. In her blog, Robinett calls these “rooms.” Getting yourself into the right room is a four-step process: 1 identify the ecosystems that are important for your particular business and community; 2 identify the key players in those systems; 3 research where the key players appear; and 4 gain access to those rooms. Usually, this involves volunteering for events or serving on boards.

“Get involved in the community; get involved in causes,” said Kelly Zaske, whose “rooms” include involvement with the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council, American Advertising Federation of Central Minnesota, Central Minnesota Builders’ Association, Chamber of Commerce, BNI, United Way, and the Craft Brewers Conference and Brew Expo America. Zaske is co-owner, along with Jodie Pundsack, of Gaslight Creative, a marketing/ advertising agency in St. Cloud. “We try to make networking happen naturally,” said Zaske, who also shares company updates via social media, especially LinkedIn.

Social media networking works, too. Dennis Miller, banking executive at Falcon National Bank, St. Cloud, is a LION (LinkedIn Open Networker) with 10,000+ contacts. He searches, invites, links, and introduces friends, and colleagues, per their requests, all within a two-hour timeframe. There is no expectation that he knows everyone in this “giant Rolodex,” which he’s compiled over five years. “This is a totally different way of looking at sharing and linking, but rarely do people turn me down,” said Miller. “It has been very effective for me, especially with providing

information on a company prior to a cold call.” Miller adds value to a relationship by offering to help anyone who wants to use his contact list. Business people can improve their networking skills at a holiday party, an informal networking event like Chamber Connection and Business After Hours, a structured program like Business Networking International, or a high-powered “Allen Lunch.” However, it’s wise to remember that WORK is the critical part of successful netWORKING. Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance copy and content writer, located in St. Cloud and owner of mary macdonell belisle — wordingforyou.com.

TRY THE ALL NEW

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Game Changer Online backing, called crowdfunding, is changing the game for startups By Vicki Ikeogu

S

tarting a business is no easy feat, especially in the shadows of the Great Recession. From the development of an idea to the final execution, entrepreneurs need a lot of persistence – and oftentimes a substantial investment – to make their dreams a reality. But in recent years, securing the necessary capital to get ideas off the ground has become increasingly difficult. Just ask Quarks American Bento owners Adam and Lisa Schulte. “Initially when we were planning (financing for our

restaurant) we went to no fewer than 15 banks to secure financing,” Lisa Schulte said. “And it got to be a fun little game after a while because we knew that they were all going to say no. Nobody wants to finance a restaurant. It’s too high risk, it’s too new of a concept, and we had never run a restaurant before. It was like Mission Impossible to get financing for this restaurant.” But the couple was determined to open their healthy fast food restaurant and debut their concept in St. Cloud. “So, we had

Left to right: Aime and Jon Theis of Harbor Drive Hookup used Kickstarter to raise money for their first album; Adam and Lisa Schulte, owners of Quarks American Bento, explored crowdfunding as a way to help finance their restaurant. During their two Indiegogo campaigns the couple raised a combined total of $7,000.

some personal money that we used. Unsecured credit (credit cards) was another option that we used to fill in the gaps. Then it just seemed like the only other option out there was the crowdfunding campaigns.” For musicians Amie and Jon Theis, crowdfunding seemed like the right move to finance the next logical step for their band Harbor Drive Hookup: an album.

“The first time I ever heard of Kickstarter was when somebody was talking about doing an album and I thought, ‘Wow, this dude’s trying to get other people to pay for his album. That’s terrible.’ This was like five years ago,” Jon Theis said. “And then I listened to a podcast called the DIY Musician podcast and they had a couple of people on there who talked about Kickstarter and it was like, this isn’t charity. Continued on page 44.

42

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7


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Myths on Wills & Probate Busted You’ve worked hard, acquired assets that matter to you and you want to leave a legacy when you die. It’s common for individuals to create a will when they start having children to ensure their wishes are granted, but those wills are not enough to protect against what can be a costly probate process. Today’s baby boomers are seeing the effects of that personally as they experience it upon the death of their parents. “It can be a heartbreaking, confusing and stressful process,” said Jolene Klocker Schley, a trust and estates attorney at Quinlivan & Hughes.

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and take on the responsibility of handling the probate on behalf of the family. It takes time. It can be stressful to ensure the orderly collection and allocation of assets, even when there is trust between the heirs. Naming a personal representative removes the unnecessary stress on the family of having to select who should act upon your death.

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Special Focus “In the last several years there has been this cultural longing to know who the person is behind the products. With Kickstarter, people become emotionally invested with the products they are funding. They want to join the journey with you. They want to help these ideas come to life.” — KICKSTARTER’S VICE PRESIDENT OF COMMUNICATIONS JUSTIN KAZMARK

This is basically a pre-buy. And after listening to the episode I really felt like it was something that we could do.” Crowdfunding has become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional financing on the national and international scene. It’s a trend that is also starting to take hold in Central Minnesota. “It’s still pretty new,” said Brett Anderson, bank manager at Sentry Bank’s downtown St. Cloud location. “A lot of these sites really came up after the Great Recession around 2009 when banks were very hesitant to lend money.” In the years since, crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe, Kickstarter and Indiegogo have been transforming the way entrepreneurs obtain startup funds. “It’s capitalism at its finest,” Anderson said. “They have filled the gap new businesses needed to get going.” Kickstarter’s Vice President of Communications Justin Kazmark said the purpose of crowdfunding sites like Kickstarter is to help bring creative, non-traditional products to life. “A majority of people that use Kickstarter are artists and film makers,” Kazmark said. “But entrepreneurs have used it as well.” But unlike traditional financing, where a strong

44

business plan and viable profit margins are of utmost importance, Kazmark said the key to success on sites like Kickstarter lies with the story. “In the last several years there has been this cultural longing to know who the person is behind the products,” he said. “With Kickstarter, people become emotionally invested with the products they are funding. They want to join the journey with you. They want to help these ideas come to life.” Anderson believes the rise in popularity of crowdfunding is generational. With millennials coming of age to start businesses, many have begun to explore other means to get their ideas off the ground. “Crowdfunding sites like Indiegogo and Kickstarter are great short-term financial fixes to get a business started,” Anderson said. “But not so much in the long term.” That’s where traditional financing, like a bank or credit union, can come into play. The Theises of Harbor Drive Hookup used that quick burst of funding to finance their debut album “Engaged by the Harbor.” The couple set up a Kickstarter campaign last summer in the hopes of raising $3,000 in 30 days. They raised $3,550 with the support of 40 financial backers.

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

For the Schultes, the two crowdfunding campaigns through Indiegogo in both 2015 and 2016 did help raise some funds for Quarks. But it definitely was not a game changer for the restaurant. “Between the two campaigns we raised about $7,000,” Lisa Schulte said. “But it wasn’t easy. You hear about all of these successful campaigns and people are able to raise money so easily. But that’s not the case.” Both the Schultes and the Theises said crowdfunding involves a lot of marketing to a variety of people in a variety of ways if it is to be successful. “You can’t do a Kickstarter and expect to just do a video, put it on Kickstarter and sit back and just wait for the money to roll in,” said Amie Theis. “You’ve got to put in the work to get the return.” “It’s definitely worth looking into if you have a business,” Jon Theis said. “But it’s also something that you need to make sure you know what you are getting into. And make sure that you are the type of person who can do that.”

MAKING IT WORK Developing a successful crowdfunding campaign requires planning. NOT ALL BUSINESSES ARE CREATED EQUAL. The businesses that tend to do best on crowdfunding sites are those that offer tangible products. Sentry Bank Branch Manager Brett Anderson said investors on crowdfunding sites are looking for unique and specialty products. “They want to support something that is different, that catches the eye,” Anderson said. “That something might not change the world, but it sure is cool to have.” EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS. Not all crowdfunding sites are the same. Some sites, like Kickstarter, operate on an

Vicki Ikeogu is a freelance reporter

all-or-nothing scenario.

and transportation planner with

Kickstarter Vice President of

the Saint Cloud Area Planning

Communications Justin

Organization.

Kazmark said once Continued on page 46.


CLOSE UP: SENTRY BANK

SENTRY BANK’S COMMERCIAL LENDERS MEAN MORE THAN BUSINESS Independent community bank is focused on doing the right thing to help build a strong community

Mike is active in the St. Cloud Chamber of Commerce and is well known for his personal introductions at the meetings that include, “Who needs a slogan; bank with Grogan.” Ryan Holthaus, Commercial Loan Officer, has 14 years of business experience, including two years with Sentry Bank. His BA is in Business Administration. Ryan volunteers as a youth summer baseball coach and board member of the Cold Spring Area Youth Sports Association.

I

n its 112-year history, Sentry Bank has invested in hiring the right staff––trained professionals who thrive in a culture of community service. “Serving community is what we’re here for, as both business people and community members, particularly the business bankers,” says Darren Heying, CEO/President of Sentry Bank. “Our lenders understand the local

economy and are perceptive to the needs of the area businesses. They are upfront with customers, and have a professional work ethic that includes promoting the businesses they serve and striving for community success.” Doug Danielson, Senior Commercial Lender, celebrated 25 years with Sentry Bank this year. He has a total of 38 years

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in the industry, learning the business from the ground up. Doug has a BS in finance and a degree in banking. He volunteers regularly within the St. Joseph community. Michael Grogan, Senior VP/ Commercial Lender, has been with Sentry for almost four years, but 28 in the industry. He has an MBA in Business Administration.

Theresa Tschumperlin, Commercial Loan Officer, has seven years of lending experience and specializes in SBA loans. Her BA is in Accounting and Finance. Theresa is active in the Sartell Chamber of Commerce. “Our commercial lenders are not the only employees of Sentry Bank that are active in supporting the local businesses and organizations,” said Heying. “You’ll see our staff volunteering regularly––it’s who we are, and I never want that to change. We really are all about the communities we serve. If the community is strong, so are we.”•

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Special Focus

companies set a goal – the

these do take a

that invokes emotion, the

amount of money to be

percentage cut for

project won’t get off the

raised and the deadline to

successful campaigns so

ground. Amie and Jon

raise it in – then the race is

bear that in mind.

Theis of Harbor Drive

on to fund the project. If

Hookup said their unique

the project does not

THE STORY SELLS.

story behind their band –

receive the full amount

“Kickstarter is a visual

the concerts for assisted

requested in the allotted

platform,” Kazmark said.

living homes and the story

time, then the business

“It’s story oriented. You

of their engagement –

receives no funding. Sites

have to be able to

really helped them develop

like Indiegogo operate

communicate succinctly

a successful campaign.

similarly, however there is

what you are trying to

“We have a neat story,”

an option for Flexible

accomplish in order to

Amie Theis said. “And

Funding in which

have people be willing to

people love music. They

businesses can receive the

join you on your journey.”

really connect with it.”

funds donated even if they

Your product may be

do not meet their required

outstanding, Kazmark said,

goal. In addition, sites like

but without a good story

Continued on page 48.

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46

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7


CLOSE UP: ST. CLOUD FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Top-rated Results: Member-owned financial cooperative – St. Cloud Federal CU – rated top in employee and consumer surveys

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assion matters… authenticity,” says Jed A. Meyer, President/CEO. “Our staff are passionate about building genuine human connections with members, and are empowered to make a meaningful difference in members’ lives, beyond banking.”

The credit union’s 85-yearold culture of connection has flourished under Meyer’s leadership, articulated in a mission statement, vision, core values, and tagline––Bank on a meaningful difference––that employees are passionate about.

This year, employees and members nominated the organization, subsequently awarded: Winner, StarTribune’s “2017 Top 150 Workplaces in Minnesota” –––––––––––––

St. Cloud Times’ “Central Minnesota Best Of” readers’ survey ––––––––––––– “I am proud our members and our employees feel we’re on the right path,” says Meyer. •

Senior Management Team (pictured above): Jed A. Meyer, President/CEO // Pegg Gustafson, Director // Alyce Justin, COO/EVP // Mel Tody, CFO // Not featured: Sarah Mason, CAO

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Special Focus

MARKETING,

they won’t fund it. The

MARKETING,

Theises used personal

to start a business. “Some people get way too

MARKETING.

social media accounts and

wrapped up in their story,”

The “build it and they will

networks through Chamber

Anderson said. “They

come” mentality does not

Connection to drum up

forget about the for-profit

work well on crowdfunding

support for their business.

side of their endeavor. They need sales.” Anderson said

sites. Lisa Schulte said both she and her husband Adam

REMEMBER, AT THE END

the stories will get your foot

were inexperienced when it

OF THE DAY YOU ARE

in the door, but it’s the sales

came to social media to

STARTING A BUSINESS.

that will sustain the

help promote Quarks

Anderson said one

business in the long run.

American Bento. “You really

common mistake he has

“You are never going to get

need a dedicated person to

seen people make when it

anywhere with your

help manage social media

comes to crowdfunding is

business if you can’t

and crowdfunding,” Lisa

they forget the true reason

figure out the sales.”

Schulte said. If people don’t

why they started the

know about the project,

campaign in the first place:

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FINANCIAL SERVICES DIRECTORY

Central Minnesota has a wide variety of financial and professional services providers ready to help you with your investment and growth decisions. The following directory showcases a number of businesses that are available to assist you.

FINANCIAL & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

American Heritage Bank

Bremer Bank

We love dreams. But we love action even more. Where more than just money… relationships are our business.

Our business banking experts can help take your business dreams and make them an effective reality, helping prepare you for what’s ahead. Downtown St. Cloud: 251-3300 West St. Cloud: 656-3300 Sauk Rapids: 252-1938 Sartell: 255-7121 • Rice: 393-2600 Bremer.com

West St. Cloud – (320) 654-9555 East St. Cloud – (320) 257-5000 Offices also in Clearwater, Long Prairie, and Browerville. Member FDIC

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Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 7

Member FDIC © 2017 Bremer Financial Corporation.

Falcon National Bank

John Herges CEO 320-223-6300 jherges@falconnational.com www.falconnational.com

A DOOR THAT’S ALWAYS OPEN. Mine. We understand that no two businesses are alike; that’s why we offer a unique, personalized approach to business banking. If you value a dedicated staff, local decision-making, and money to loan when you’re ready to borrow, you’ll appreciate Falcon National Bank. That’s reality. Member FDIC.


FINANCIAL & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

Kensington Bank

L to R: Tim Stewart – Business Development Director, Dan Robertson – President, Jon Hall – CEO

Why Choose Kensington Bank? Smart Business Bankers. Expertise you can trust. Private Banking Approach. Building lasting relationships. Values Driven. Integrity. Respect. Excellence. Stability. Committed Employees. Making a Difference. Investing in our communities. How may we serve you?

Tim Stewart 320.407.8252 Kensingtonbanks.com St. Cloud Loan Production Office Cokato • Kensington • Herman

Minnwest Bank

Greg Hohlen SBA Lender 320 259 3342 gregh@minnwestbankgroup.com www.minnwestbank.com Streamline the SBA loan process by working with an SBA Preferred Lender. Minnwest Bank can approve loans on behalf of SBA, giving you a local facilitator who understands your business and your community. SBA loans help meet your financial needs by offering: • Lower Down payments • Flexible repayment options • Improved cash flow • Longer terms Discover the other benefits of an SBA guaranteed loan by contacting Minnwest Bank today. Member FDIC.

Sentry Bank

Stearns Bank

Michael Grogan, Theresa Tschumperlin, Ryan Holthaus and Doug Danielson

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Isaac Flenner

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Isaac and Jodi have more than 22 years of experience at Stearns Bank. We are a $2 billion, top-ranked national bank that is focused on small business and equipment financing with a long history of delivering personal customer service. When you work with Stearns Bank, you’re more than a number. Trust your finance, loan and banking needs to a bank that treats you like family and that has been in business since 1912. We work quickly to get you the funds you need and take the time to answer every question along the way. At Stearns Bank, we get the job done!

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Business Spotlight

Doing it All

Timeline

By Gail Ivers

From sculptor to planner, designer to researcher, Mary Adelman does everything she can to help her clients communicate with the world.

PERSONAL PROFILE Mary Adelman, 57 Hometown: Baxter, Minn.

1983 Adelman begins work at Rengel Printing

Education: Graduated Brainerd High School and Community College; Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Art from St. Cloud State University

1984 Adelman takes a job at DJB 1986 Adelman spends nine months working for the Buffalo, Minnesota newspaper

Family: Married 36 years to her husband Jim; sons James and Matt Hobbies: Flower and vegetable gardening: preparing salsa, pickles and jelly from wild plums and grapes; fishing; enjoying time on Pelican Lake in their 1978 mobile home and on their pontoon boat

AT A GLANCE Adelman Advertising 29846 180th Ave Avon, MN 56310-9620 (320) 597-4211 adelman@meltel.net adelman advertising.com Business Description: Adelman Advertising is a full-service agency specializing in senior housing and health care. Owner: Mary Adelman Opened: 1989 Number of Employees: 4 Chamber member since 1991

50

1980-1983 Mary Adelman works for Minnesota Shoe Company in St. Cloud while attending college. In addition to selling shoes she draws detailed illustrations of shoes for the company’s advertising materials.

1986 Adelman moves to Meyer Associates Spring 1988-Fall 1989 The owner of the Buffalo paper purchases the Shopping News, Adelman returns to work on the Shopping News.

Business Central: You’ve held a lot of jobs. Adelman: That’s how you get raises! When I moved back to the Buffalo paper they didn’t pay enough, so they gave me one day a week off instead of money. I spent that one day doing work on the side. That’s how I had a couple of clients when I decided to go out on my own. BC: What was the hardest part? Adelman: I had no idea what I was doing. I sold shoes for six years. But I think that helped because I knew a little about sales. At Meyer I would go with the salespeople when they talked to clients about their projects because it helped to have the designer there. That was an advantage for me because I knew how to work with clients before I started on

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my own. Now I do everything – writing, concept, and design. BC: What has changed? Adelman: I don’t do as many meetings anymore. I really like visiting with people. Computers have stolen that from me. Now it’s just email. On the phone I could have a little chat, but not with email! I used to run proofs out to people, but now it’s just email. I work all over the country and there are many clients I’ve never even met. I kind of miss the days of magic marker. You could do a rough sketch to show where a photo might go, where the copy and the headline would be. That gave you lots of flexibility on the final design. Now you put a stock photo into your mockup and if the final design doesn’t look like that, clients question it.

August 1, 1989 Adelman starts Adelman Advertising, taking out a second mortgage on her home to purchase a $5,000 Macintosh computer and a $5,000 laser printer. Her only clients are MCO, Avon, and what was then Goldleaf Plastics (now Aubright). 1990 Adelman hires her first employee. 1992 Karen Knoblach joins the company as production manager and remains part of the team.

Fun Fact: Adelman started work as a sculptor; her youngest son is currently a wax sculptor at Brodin Studios in Kimball


HOSPICE: HELPING PEOPLE LIVE FULLY

“Our family will forever be grateful to the CentraCare Hospice team who helped us keep Dad at home and comfortable, both physically and emotionally, until a few days before he died. The care and compassion extended to our family in this difficult time exceeded even our highest expectations.” ~Torborg Family

Torborg family photo taken Easter 2017; Lee (center) died May 30 at the age of 90. Thanks to your generous support, CentraCare is making a difference in the lives of people needing hospice care. This year, our fundraising is focused on the 1,250+ patients cared for in their homes annually by our skilled, compassionate Hospice team. While not all services are covered by insurance, CentraCare Health remains committed to providing Hospice care. Please consider a gift to CentraCare Health Foundation and join us in helping people live fully.

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November/December 2017  
November/December 2017  

St. Cloud Area Chamber Business Central Magazine