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NOVEMBER/ DECEMBER 2015

6 President’s Letter 8 Editor’s Note 18 Business Calendar 24 Network Central

CONTENTS

GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

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C E L E B R AT I N G 1 5 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

PROFIT

40 Cover Story

CHANGING PLACES Mike Moores was a fearless motorcycle champion. He was a confident business manager. But business ownership? For Moores, that role was the scariest one of all.

46 Feature

THE BUSINESS CASE FOR WELL-BEING Worksite wellness activities can raise employee morale and customer satisfaction.

52 Special Focus DEBT

Business debt has grown more than six percent in the last year. Before you head to the bank, be sure you know the difference between good and bad debt.

Special Section 60 FINANCIAL & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

40 10 UPFRONT Valuable and important information designed to guide and educate.

26 BUSINESS TOOLS Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business.

62 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Chamber Special Events Coordinator Ginny Kroll.

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2015 Business Central, LLC

• Identity theft and your taxes

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• Tips for customer appreciation

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101,

• Take control of your email • Developing company leaders

Business Central is published six times a year

P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


Flu

Profile: Pediatrics

S

Wa ho lk- t s In’ A s W va elc i l om a b e le

First smile, first giggle, first step, first word— as a parent, watching your child reach little milestones as they grow is the biggest reward. Keeping them on the path to healthy development is ours. For us, it is a real privilege to be entrusted with your child’s pediatric care, and we personalize that care to both your child’s needs and your own concerns. So rest assured knowing that any questions— big or little —will be answered by someone who has the same best interest in mind as you. It’s the genuine care and respect we have for our patients that makes all the difference.

Clearwater Clinic 320-558-2293 Cold Spring Clinic 320-685-8641

South Campus 320-251-8181 Northwest Campus 320-202-8949

Family Medicine + OB/GYN + Pediatrics + Express Care Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation + Occupational Medicine + Surgery

StCloudMedical.com

Keeping you on the job. Midwest Occupational Medicine (MOM) is a department of St. Cloud Medical Group located in our St. Cloud south campus. So while we focus on workplace health and safety, you also get access to our full clinic services, including imaging, lab, and specialty providers. From DOT physicals, rapid drug testing, and hearing conservation programs to full worker’s compensation treatment, MOM is the answer to keeping both employees and their employers well cared for. It’s the genuine care and respect we have for our patients that makes all the difference. MidwestOccupationalMedicine.com | 320-251-WORK (9675) 1301 33rd Street South, St. Cloud, MN A department of St. Cloud Medical Group


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President’s Letter

Changes

MAIN PHONE

L

ast year at this time I was deep in negotiations for a new office for our Chamber. The Chamber’s Convention and Visitor’s Bureau was located across town and our staff hardly knew one another. Business Central Magazine was beginning its fifteenth year of publication – something extraordinary for ANY regional publication. The magazine was at a high point in its publication life cycle. With strong editorial, dedicated staff and advertisers, and sound fiscal management, we were at the top of our game. We thought. Speed ahead twelve pretty difficult months. Our relocation took more staff time than anyone counted on . . . especially me. From the time I returned from the holidays until our March 23 move, every minute of every day was filled with the details of renovation, fund raising and moving. I could probably qualify as some kind of contractor now. My regular work happened in between construction and moving meetings, after hours and on weekends. Thank goodness the legislative session was slow in 2015. Our Director of Administration, Judy Zetterlund, was right behind me tearing through details about computers and telephones and financial impacts. She did this while managing her regular work like a champion. I think she secretly wanted to pull out my fingernails. In the midst of this change, our Vice President, Gail Ivers, was going through the toughest experience imaginable. She was caring for her husband in the final months of their life together. When Tom Lanning left this world on Easter Sunday, Gail’s life was forever changed. By far, the biggest change anyone in our organization faced this year. Business Central never missed a beat. Wendy Hendricks continued selling the value of advertising at record levels. Yola Hartmann designed around her growing family, snow storms, and vacations. As editor, Gail continued to put together a magazine that was absolutely astounding, especially given the conditions under which she was working. As we finish our fifteenth year of publishing this magazine, we have exceeded the point twelve months ago when we thought we were at the top of our game. With all the changes that have occurred, I realize the way we measure “the top” changes, too. “The top” is the feeling I have when I think about getting through the last year successfully. Thank you to Judy for her patience; Wendy for her incredible sales talent and customer service focus; Yola for her continued creativity and design expertise; and, especially to Gail for everything she’s persevered through this year to maintain the standards we set for Business Central fifteen years ago. One more HUGE CHANGE this month: Ginny Kroll has officially retired after an incredible 50 year career with the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. You may still see her around the office occasionally, as we’ve arranged for her to manage the Farm Show through February. (She may be smiling brighter because she doesn’t have to get up at 5 a.m. anymore.) Thank you, Ginny, for all you’ve give the St. Cloud area business community. P.S. We wish to acknowledge the passing of Ruth Leigh, the first female chair of the St. Cloud Area Chamber’s Board of Directors, serving from 1985-86. Ruth was 91.

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Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5

|

320-251-2940

AUTOMATED RESERVATION LINE 320-656-3826 PROGRAM HOTLINE 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com WWW.STCLOUDAREACHAMBER.COM ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF PRESIDENT Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 VICE PRESIDENT Gail Ivers, ext. 109 DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 COMMUNICATIONS & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Whitney Bina, ext.130

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF MAIN PHONE | 320-251-4170 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Julie Lunning, ext. 111

SALES MANAGER Nikki Fisher, ext. 112

DIRECTOR OF CONVENTION SALES Lori Cates, ext. 113

SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR Rachel Granzow, ext. 128

DIRECTOR OF SPORTS & SPECIAL EVENTS Dana Randt, ext. 110

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Carrie Zwack, ext. 100

DIRECTOR OF VISITOR SERVICES Jean Robbins, ext. 129 2015-16 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Board Chair

Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care

Dan Bittman, Sauk Rapids-Rice School District

Dolora Musech, Batteries Plus Bulbs

David Borgert, CentraCare Health Neil Franz, Franz Hultgren Evenson, Professional Association Jim Gruenke, Mark J. Traut Wells, Inc. Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Sharon Henry, ext. 124

John Herges, Falcon National Bank Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc.

Kris Nelson, Custom Accents, Inc., Past Board Chair Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Board Vice Chair Melinda Vonderahe, Times Media Dr. Bea Winkler, retired business owner Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud


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Editor’s Note Editor Gail Ivers enjoys a few minutes in one of Mike Moores’ collectible Mustangs.

PUBLISHER Teresa Bohnen MANAGING EDITOR Gail Ivers

I

come from a family of collectors. My parents discovered early in their marriage that auctions were inexpensive entertainment and household goods. My dad’s interest was primarily around old farm tools – weights and measures, woodworking planes, hand irons, and the like. He has the most interesting collection of irons. Some have large chunks of metal in a compartment that allowed the user to heat just the piece of metal on the stove, rather than the entire iron. If you had multiple pieces of metal that fit the required space it meant you could switch out the cooled piece, replace it with a hot one and keep on ironing. A lesson in efficiency. My mom’s interests were more in glassware. She put shelves in a large picture window in the dining room and filled them with her colorful collection of vinegar cruets. When the sun shone through the window it was a kaleidoscope of color that made your heart sing. My brother is not immune to the collection bug. He has accumulated an interesting selection of musical instruments around which he has built an entire room in his house. I have benefitted from this interest a few times when he has come across old clarinets that now grace my bedroom wall. My niece, Kate, discovered collecting at an early age. Just barely able to walk

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Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5

Until next issue,

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Whitney Bina, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Julie Fisk and Melinda Sanders, Quinlivan & Hughes Cindy Fitzthum, St. Cloud State University Brian Hart, Sandler Training-St. Cloud Sharon Henry, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Tracy Knofla, High Impact Training Doug Loon, Minnesota Chamber of Commerce Betsey Lund, Lund Sauter, P.A. Attorneys at Law Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle– wordingforyou Courtney Schmidt, Central Minnesota Community Foundation Kara Tomazin, St. Cloud communications professional Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage

ADVERTISING ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/SALES Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing AD TRAFFIC & CIRCULATION Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART DESIGN & PRODUCTION Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media COVER PHOTO Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman CORPORATE SPONSOR

Photo by Joel Butkowski, Butkowski Digital Imaging

Collections

she started picking up crushed bottle caps on the street, an intriguing find to a five-year-old in the days of cans and plastic bottles. When I was in Greece I bought a beverage specifically because it had a bottle cap with Greek lettering on it. My intent was to bring it back for Kate to add to her collection. As I went through the food line, an employee took the bottle, opened it for me, and turned to throw the cap in the trash. I clutched at her shrieking, “Nonononononononononononono!!!” Our interpreter intervened, calmed the unfortunate employee, and retrieved my bottle cap. I have many collections. My favorite as a child is still my favorite as an adult: cups and saucers, preferably demitasse. Interesting, fun, beautiful, inexpensive tea cups used to be common. But with the advent of mugs, tea cups disappeared. These days it feels like a tiny treasure when I come across one that is both unique and affordable. While I have always been constrained in my collections by size and space, that’s not the case with everyone. Mike Moores, owner of J. M. Companies (see the cover story on page 40.) collects Mustangs. Mike used to collect motorcycles, but he’s decided he’s a little too old to bounce back from a spill. Since he likes motorsports, he looked for a new way to involve himself and Mustangs were the answer. Not every collection makes sense to everyone. I recently inherited a collection of nails. Drawer upon drawer of different sizes and coatings. This has me stumped. If you like nails, we should talk.

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT Wendy Hendricks, (320) 656-3808 EDITORIAL SUGGESTIONS CAN BE MADE IN WRITING TO: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.


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UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

12 Getting Going 16 New at the Top

13 It Happened When? 14 Your Voice in Government 18 Business Calendar 22 The Trouble with Business

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NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Thinking with AND When you think with AND instead of OR, you start to break down roadblocks. By Dr. Fred Hill

D

aniel Lubetzky is founder and CEO of KIND. He writes: “…by 2014 KIND had sold over a billion KIND snack bars and KIND clusters in more than 100,000 stores. The KIND Movement, which advances our social mission by performing --- and inspiring our community to perform --- unexpected kind acts, has touched over a million people.” When Daniel Lubetzky started KIND Healthy Snacks in 2004, he aimed to defy the conventional wisdom that snack bars could never be both tasty and healthy, convenient and wholesome. A decade later, the transformative power of the company’s ‘AND’ philosophy has resulted in an astounding record of achievement. KIND has become the fastest growing purveyor of healthy snacks in the country. Meanwhile, the KIND Movement --- the company’s social mission to make the world a little kinder --- has sparked more than a million good deeds worldwide. Despite

10

Do the KIND Thing; Think Boundlessly, Work Purposefully, Live Passionately Daniel Lubetzky Ballantine Books New York, 2015 ISBN 978-0-55339324-8

early setbacks, Lubetsky never lost his faith in his vision of a “not-only-forprofit” business, but one that sold great products and helped to make the world a better place. Doing the KIND thing is instilled into ten tenets that have helped KIND become a trusted and vibrant brand. These ten become the ten chapters of this book. The chapters are (1) Thinking with AND. (2) Purpose. (3) Grit.

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5

(4) Truth and Discipline. (5) Keeping it Simple. (6) Originality. (7) Transparency and Authenticity. (8) Empathy. (9) Trust. (10) Ownership and Resourcefulness. Lubetsky states that one thread that runs through his book is a revelation that he uncovered along his business and social journey --- the power of thinking with AND. His company prides itself on creating new paths and models. Instead of saying “or,” they say “AND.” At KIND, AND is not just a top-level strategy, it’s a guiding principle for every team member to use every day. They feel that when their default thinking is “AND” instead of “or,” they can start to break down the roadblocks that would prevent them from getting more out of their business and social life. KIND believes that thinking with AND transcends the workplace. Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor from St. Cloud State University

NEWS REEL ALLENSPACH EARNS AWARD Danell Allenspach, client support manager, ProcessPro, earned a Bronze Stevie Award in the Customer Service Executive of the Year category. Stevie Awards are open to all organizations operating in the Unit-ed States and presented by the American Business Awards.

LOCAL ATTORNEYS RECOGNIZED, SANDERS JOINS FIRM Dyan Ebert and Steven Schwegman, shareholders at Quinlivan & Hughes, P.A., were selected to the 2015 Minnesota Super Lawyers list. Each year, no more than five percent of the attorneys in the state are selected to receive this honor. In addition, Laura Moehrle, shareholder, and Julie Fisk, associate attorney were selected to the 2015 Minnesota Rising Stars list. They are among only 2.5 percent of the lawyers in the state to receive this honor. Melinda Sanders returns to Quinlivan & Hughes after serving as director of donor relations at the Central Minnesota Community Foundation for two years. Sanders practiced with Quinlivan & Hughes for nine years prior to joining the foundation.

BOYLE JOINS HMA ARCHITECTS Angela Boyle joined HMA Architects as an interior designer. She holds a Master of Science degree in interior design from the University of Minnesota.


PEOPLE TO KNOW

Five Elected to Chamber Board The following individuals have been elected to fill threeyear terms on the Board of Directors of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Jason Bernick, Bernick’s

REDESIGNING THE CHAMBER WEBSITE WAS NO SMALL FEAT.

(320) 252-6441 jbernick@ bernicks.com

Thelen kept us thinking like users and focused on crafting a great experience for any device. The result is everything a 5-star chamber site should be — fresh, intuitive and member focused.

Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care (320) 656-1910 aldimen@charter.net

Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University

Gail Ivers

VICE PRESIDENT

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

(320) 308-1600 bomann@stcloudstate.edu

Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services (320) 259-4554 Roger@PremierHome Search.com

Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott – St. Cloud (320) 654-1661 chriss.wohlleber@ marriott.com

Building brands that mean business. thelen.com

Strategy and design by Thelen. Programming by JDB IT.


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UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL MARCO NAMED BEST PLACE TO WORK The Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal named Marco, Inc. the No. 1 Best Place to Work for 2015. Prairie Business magazine named Marco one of the top 50 Best Places to Work for 2015 based on work environment, employee benefits and employee happiness. Great Place to Work® and Fortune name Marco as one of the 100 Best Workplaces for Women. The recognition is based on women’s assessments of the quality and fairness of the workplace. Marco was ranked #79. Microsoft’s US Small & Mid-sized Business Champions Club (SMB) named Marco the North Central Partner of the Year. The award recognizes US SMB Champions Club partners that demonstrate significant Microsoft SMB sales and yearover-year SMB revenue growth. Brian Jaenisch accepted the award on Marco’s behalf. Marco hired the following people:

(L-R) Karl Edwards, cabling

technician II; Andrea Hagberg, recruiter; Kim Hennen, IT client service support desk technician; Jeff Hortian, project manager

(L-R) Evan Oltz, purchasing

assistant; Tanya Stillwell, sales associate; Ben Swain, cabling technician I; Sarah Wenner, purchasing support The company continues to grow with the purchase of Crabtree Companies’ copier sales and service department. Marco earned the 79th spot on Chanel Company’s 2015 CRN Fast Growth 150 list, which ranks North American solution providers with significant economic growth based on gross revenue over a two-year period.

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A Slant on Serenity A little wisdom goes a long way when pursuing potential business. By Greg Vandal

S

urely, you have heard the Reinhold Niebuhr prayer: God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference. This American theologian’s actual words were a bit different from this popularized version, but the central elements remain the same. Embodied within are the powerful notions of acceptance, courage, and wisdom – values that can shape and frame a life well-lived. Perhaps, there should be a business version of serenity. The one real product that a consultant has to sell is that of time. Certainly, a successful purveyor of services must couple that time with a measure of competence. But, at the end of the day, the item that is for sale involves that most fleeting of all commodities, the moments ticking by on a clock. Over the five years of my consultation service, I’ve spent more than a bit of

that commodity in pursuit of customers to serve. There have been Requests for Proposal (RFP) to develop, and business prospects to pursue. I’ve networked and cold-called. All of this, of course, consumes the very time that might otherwise produce billable hours. Business development is, after all, an unreimbursed expense made in hopes that revenue will be produced sometime down the road. There is simply no guarantee of a return on that investment. Potential clients often feel compelled to secure multiple proposals for services. Still, RFPs are sometimes released with less than a spirit of open competition in mind. Preestablished relationships clearly exist in the marketplace, and clients can and do have their sights set on predetermined vendors. Owners/managers often feel it is prudent to “test” a desired vendor’s proposal in the marketplace by comparing it to others knowing full well that, unless something really compelling comes along, the original will prevail.

I’ve spent hours, especially in the early business years, responding to such requests only to find out later there was very little chance my proposal would be chosen. I had been invited to be a part of the comparison group, but it was more for show than for sale. Better that my time had been spent pursuing real business prospects than fulfilling the proposal quota of a potential client that was a long shot from the start. The challenge remains that more than the occasional chance must be taken. Guaranteed or not, there is no income to be earned if there is no investment to be made. A business slant on Niebuhr would clearly help: God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I should not chase, The courage to chase the things I can, And the wisdom to know the difference. Then, my own business pursuits would be better directed.

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@ voxliberi.com.


IT HAPPENED WHEN?

OCTOBER 22, 2002 | TECH EXPO

Dan Miller Jr., special agent, FBI

Technology Expo 2002

O

n October 22, Marco sponsored the Chamber’s Technology Expo at the Best Western Kelly Inn in St. Cloud. The event drew over 150 attendees. Dan Miller, Jr., special agent, FBI, presented the

keynote address “Protecting the National Infrastructure.” The event also included four breakout sessions:

__________

“Creating a Secure Environment,” presented by Larson Allen __________

“3G – The Future of Wireless Technology,” presented by Sprint PCS __________ “Selecting Web Site Technology,” presented by Rasmussen College __________ “Communicating via a

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Company Intranet,” presented by KDV Technology

Organized by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, the Tech Expo continued to grow larger every year. Thirteen years and a few name changes later, the expo has become an annual event.

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N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL SAINT JOHN’S HONORS BAUERLY

Work Begins Now

Even though the 2016 legislative session won’t convene until next March, it’s time for business to begin working. By Doug Loon

Saint John’s University selected Rick Bauerly, Granite Equity Partners, as the 2015 SJU Entrepreneur of the Year Award. The award, presented by the SJU Donald McNeely Center for Entrepreneurship, recog-nizes Johnnies who start and manage a business with entrepreneurial spirit, and practice Benedictine values in the workplace and in their lives.

UNITED WAY HIRES Stephanie Jussila joined United Way of Central Minnesota as the senior development manager. Her expe-rience includes several years in healthcare and education administration. Richard Hovre joined the organization as finance and database coordinator. Previously he worked for the Minnesota Department of Revenue.

INITIATIVE FOUNDATION AWARDS GRANTS The Initiative Foundation awarded over $409,000 in 2nd quarter grants that support organizations and projects in the 14-county region of Central Minnesota.

ESTBY RECOGNIZED Progressive Grocer recognized Becky Estby, senior vice president of human resources and organization development, Coborn’s Inc., as one of the Top Women in Grocery. Only 75 senior-level executives in the nation receive this designation annually for their vision, leadership, accomplishments and success in the supermarket industry.

T

he 2016 legislative session may be months away, but now is the perfect opportunity to connect with your legislators and explain first-hand the impact of their votes on the ability of businesses to start, change and grow in today’s global economy. You have their full-time attention and the chance to connect with them at your worksites. But first, be armed with ammunition so you can have an informed conversation. The Minnesota Chamber of Commerce 2015 Voting Record is a guide to help you evaluate how your lawmakers represented your priorities at the 2015 Legislature. Highlighted are votes on key business concerns taken during both the regular and special legislative

sessions. The votes reflect the priorities of our 2,300 members of all sizes and types across the state, and have a daily impact on business operations. The priorities are identified through an exhaustive grassroots process with our local chamber of commerce partners, including St. Cloud. Most major bills passed the legislature with bipartisan support – clear evidence that divided government can work. We advanced many of the statewide business community’s priorities, but work remains to strengthen our business climate, especially on business tax relief and transportation. We have a strong start on these priorities as we look ahead to 2016.

Legislators began the session with a nearly $2 billion projected surplus in the general fund. They adjourned, leaving more than $865 million on the bottom line for the 2016 session. To date, tax collections are higher than projected. Assuming the surplus continues, it will provide a solid foundation for passing tax relief and a long-term transportation funding bill. It’s more important than ever to deliver our message early and often. The 2016 session will be short and fast paced. Major issues like business tax relief and long-term transportation funding will be teed up and ready for action when lawmakers convene March 8. After reviewing the Voting Record, please take time to thank those policymakers who voted with the business community on our priorities. For those who did not, reach out to them and start a conversation about the impact their actions will have on your business.

You can find the 2015 Voting Record at BusinessCentral Magazine.com

contributor Doug Loon is president of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce – www.mnchamber.com.

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TOP HATS : NEW LOCATIONS, OWNERSHIP & EXPANSIONS

PineCone Vision Center, 2180 Troop Drive, Sartell. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Dr. Stacy Hinkemeyer, Dr. Nicholas Colatrella and Sheri Moran.

Sandler Training, non-traditional selling system and unique reinforcement training, 26 6th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Brian Hart and Julie Forsberg.

Alzheimer’s Association, provide and enhance care and support for all affected; reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health, 600 25th Ave. S, Suite 201, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, April Greene, Kate Selseth, and Katrice Sisson.

Granite Logistics Services, LLC/Trinity Logistics, third party logistics provider, 705 23rd St. S, Sartell. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Tom Grimsley, Pat Lynch, Kerry Herker and Shannon Templin.

Beste & Associates, financial advisors, investments, insurance, retirement planning, 30 25th Ave. S, Sartell. Pictured: Roger Schleper, James Beste, Jackie Alderman and Sheri Moran

Manpower, temporary help service, 125 33rd Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Dave Borgert, Jason Neuerburg, Karen Schwieso, Jacquelyn Carpenter, Julie Frana, Dan Bates and Jayne Greeney Schill.

Neopost, wholesale office equipment/mailing/shipping equipment, sales, service and supplies, 616 Roosevelt Road, Suite 101, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Mike Ertl, Melissa Ertl and Dave Borgert.

THE ART

Chiropractic Performance Center, a family owned wellness clinic, 2380 Troop Drive, Suite 201, Sartell. Pictured: Dr. Mark Brenner, Dr. Sara Cuperus and Shannon Templin.

an d s cience of ener g y e f f icienc y.

Xcel Energy helped the Minneapolis Institute of Arts upgrade to a new generation of LED lighting by providing rebates to offset up-front costs. Whatever your business or facility needs might be, trust Xcel Energy to help you find solutions that save energy and money. Contact an energy efficiency specialist today at 1-855-839-8862, or visit xcelenergy.com/Business. xcelenergy.com Š 2015 Xcel Energy Inc.

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UpFront NEW AT THE TOP

NEWS REEL IDA AWARDS DOWNTOWN COUNCIL International Downtown Association (IDA) awarded the St. Cloud Downtown Council a 2015 Pinnacle Award for its project “Claiming Our Community Through Collaboration,” which led to the renovation of Eastman Park and Lake George. The award represents the highest level of recognition IDA provides. Recipients are chosen for projects that exceed expectations set by the IDA in the areas of innovation, representation and sustainability.

HENDRICKS JOINS COLDWELL BANKER Wendy Hendricks joined the Coldwell Banker Commercial Orion Real Estate team. A Minnesota licensed realtor and commercial consultant, Hendricks specializes in commercial real estate sales, leasing and business brokerage. She also owns Hendricks Marketing and continues her work as associate publisher of Business Central Magazine.

Robert (Bob) Johnson, 66 Executive Director, Paramount Arts Resource Trust Inc. they did for patients and families. When did you start in your current position? My official start was January 5, 2015 but I actually started hanging out here on Dec. 15 having left CCH on Dec 12, 2014.

Previous employer: 23 years as the Executive Director of the CentraCare Heart and Vascular Center (CCH) What will you miss most about your previous position? I already miss all the brilliant and committed people and the great work

What are you looking forward to the most in your new position? The idea of learning about an entirely new field is very invigorating. I love arts and entertainment and find that it nourishes the soul and helps us to better understand our human condition. The Paramount team is great and I’ve enjoyed getting to know them better.

Where did you grow up? I grew up in Hancock, Michigan, a small town in the Keweenaw Peninsula. Great small town life, not unlike many communities in greater Minnesota. What are your hobbies? I love reading and wish I had more time. Biking and hiking are great fun and as of the last few years I’ve been planting a good size garden. Gotta love growing your own vegetables. I also bought myself a piano a couple of years ago and after some basic lessons am trying to learn to play.

Fun fact: I have a picture in my office of President George W. Bush and me at the Executive Office Building. In 1960 I sang God Bless America at the 50th Anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America in St. Paul.

ST. CLOUD HOSPITAL RECOGNIZED U.S. News & World Report ranked St. Cloud Hospital third among Minnesota’s approximately 150 hospitals behind Mayo Clinic in Rochester and Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis. The hospital’s orthopedics and gastroenterology and GI Surgery specialties also received national recognition, an accomplishment that less than three percent of hospitals earned nationwide. The Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal named CentraCare Health one of the Best Places to Work for the seventh consecutive year.

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Chamber Connection. I’m bringing people there all the time.”

Business Central asks readers: “Where is your favorite place to network?”

The unexpected places – when I’m out to dinner or socializing with friends.”

Tammy Kedrowski • Express Employment Professionals

The networking lunches Chamber Connection has been having every month.”

Paula Capes • Falcon National Bank

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POINT OF VIEW

Gail Ruhland • St. Cloud State University

The Star Celebration. It’s a little different than the monthly Business After Hours.”

Lance Barthel • Batteries Plus Bulbs

That’s easy – NEXT!”

Paul Ravenberg • Central Minnesota Council – Boy Scouts of America


DID YOU KNOW?

Passports Required

S

tarting in 2016, Minnesota travelers will not be able to use a driver’s license as ID to board domestic flights—a pretty major development considering an estimated 62 percent of Americans don’t have passports. The standard licenses from Minnesota, New York, Louisiana, New Hampshire, and American Samoa are considered “noncompliant” with the security standards outlined in the Real ID Act, which was enacted in 2005, but is being implemented in stages. Minnesota licenses are

considered sub-par because getting a license doesn’t require proof of citizenship or residency. The new rules will go into effect sometime in 2016 (the exact date has not been announced), and there will be a three-month forgiveness period, during which people using a driver’s license will be warned that their IDs are no longer valid for flights. An alternative to the passport is an Enhanced Driver’s License (EDL), the kind currently used to replace passports for travel to and from Canada, Mexico,

and the Caribbean. The Department of Motor Vehicles automatically issues a standard license, but individuals can request the enhanced license for an additional fee (currently $15). In 2009 the state legislature passed a bill forbidding the Minnesota Department of Public Safety to implement, or even plan to implement, the Real ID Act because of cost and data privacy concerns. It was anticipated that the legislature would repeal the law last year, but did not. Source: Travel & Leisure

Think OuTside The T y p i c a l ag e n c y no attitude. no runaround. Just great ideas.

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UpFront

NEWS REEL KERN JOINS CENTRACARE Rheumatologist Patrick Kern joined CentraCare Clinic – River Campus. Dr. Kern holds a medical degree from Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine. He gained several years of experience before completing his rheumatology fellowship training at the University of Kansas Medical Center in Kansas City.

ARISE HOME HEALTH CARE CELEBRATES 15 YEARS Arise Home Health Care celebrated 15 years in business this year. The organization pledged to donate $15,000, or $1,000 for every year in business, to the new St. Cloud YMCA/Area Aquatics Center capital campaign.

BREMER PROMOTES, HIRES Bremer bank promoted Curt Gainsforth to business banker vice president and team lead, and Hamilton Kruchten to client service associate supervisor. Gainsorth joined Bremer in 2005 as a community busi-ness banker and was most recently business banker vice president. Kruchten joined Bremer in 2014 as a part-time client service associate. Bremer hired the following individuals:

(L-R) Ryan Thompson, business banker vice president and team lead; Lisa Koster, business banking services associate; Steve Klaverkamp, commercial insurance specialist Compiled by Whitney Bina. For consideration in News Reel send your news release to givers@ BusinessCentralMagazine.com

BCCalendar GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

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N OV/ D EC 2 0 1 5

CAN’ T M IS S O PPO RT U NIT IES TO INF LU E NC E , PRO M OT E , A ND L E AR N . Visit events.StCloudAreaChamber.com for a detailed calendar. SPOTLIGHT

NOV. 12 & DEC. 3

Business After Hours A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. November 12: Hosted by CentraCare Health, at CentraCare Administrative Services Building, 1600 County Rd. 134, St. Cloud.

NOV. 4 & DEC. 2

Lunchtime Learning Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge. Meets the first Wednesday of the month, noon-1 p.m., at the Chamber office. Registration is required: $15 for Chamber members, $22 for the general public. November 4: Sponsored by Custom Accents Promotions & Apparel with Tonie Dickmann, Times Media, presenting “Lead Capture Pages…Tracking Your ROI.” December 2: Sponsored by Central Minnesota

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December 3: Hosted by St. Cloud Technical and Community College, 1540 Northway Dr., St. Cloud.

Society for Human Resource Management with James Morrighan, Hughes Mathews Greer, P.A., presenting “People Problems: Protecting Profits.”

NOV. 10 & DEC. 8

NEXT-Chamber’s Emerging Leaders Professional development and networking for the NEXT generation of business leaders. Meets the second Tuesday of the month, noon-1 p.m., at different locations throughout St. Cloud. Registration required: $195 for one year or $20 for the first meeting.

November 10: Presentation by Melinda Tamm, Ms. Melinda’s Dance Studio. Location St. Cloud Area Chamber office December 8: Networking activity and small group discussion at the St. Cloud Area Chamber office.

NOV. 13 & DEC. 11

Government Affairs A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, 7:30 - 9 a.m. at the Chamber office. November 13: Topic: St. Cloud & Immigration December 11


NOV. 18 & DEC. 16

Waite Park Chamber For businesses interested in Waite Park community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. November 18: Hosted by J. F. Kruse Jewelers, with a presentation on “The Father Project,” by Alanna Shoquist, Goodwill/Easter Seals MN. Location at the Moose Family Center, 1300 3rd St. N, Waite Park. December 16: Hosted by Sentry Bank at the Moose Family Center, 1300 3rd St. N, Waite Park. The meeting includes entertainment by the Tech High School singers,

sponsored by Forsberg Investments & Insurance.

NOV. 19 & DEC. 17

Sauk Rapids Chamber For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m. at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. November 19: Hosted by CentraCare Health. December 17: Hosted by BankVista. The meeting includes a holiday activity.

DEC. 4

DID YOU KNOW?

Chamber Connection Birthday Party This fun-filled event celebrates the 26th anniversary of Chamber Connection. 7:30-9 a.m. December 4: Whitney Senior Center, 1527 Northway Dr., St. Cloud. For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940. The Chamber office is located at 1411 W St. Germain Street, suite 101, St. Cloud.

DAYTA Marketing grows Brian Myres joined DAYTA Marketing as chief operating officer. Myres, who serves on DAYTA’s Board of Directors, is charged with helping improve the efficiency and effectiveness of operations. Steven Woods joined DAYTA as chief technology officer. He will develop software to enhance overall customer experience and improve internal efficiency.

Stand Tall We’ve Got Your Back Whatever your orthopedic need, St. Cloud Orthopedics strives to bring you the very best solution. That’s why we have recently expanded our spine and back care offerings with additional specialists in this essential area of care. For 60 years, we have continued to support our community by providing advanced orthopedic treatment and therapy options, and spinal care is no exception. So, to get your back on track, you can stay right here at home.

StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100 1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell

Knee & Shoulder • Joint Replacement • Sports Medicine • Hand Center • Trauma • Spine Center • Foot & Ankle • Physical & Occupational Therapy N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 //

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UpFront TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS

Trivia Ninjas, LLC, live trivia and entertainment, 1051 34th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Chad Groetsch, Angela Wortham, Tim Lyon and Beth Putz.

Contractors Choice Seamless Gutters, 212 Stratford St. W, Avon. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, Dean Lundin and Brenda Eisenschenk.

Waite Fusion, healthy food, individualized health coaching, in a fun atmosphere, 30 16th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sheri Moran, Blair Prokop, Amy DeVos, Vienna Hansen and Peg Imholte.

Water’s Edge Restaurant on Pleasant Lake, casual and fine dining, 25958 Lake Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Shari Graves, Dale Wicks and Roger Schleper.

Young Living Essential Oils, massage, facial massage, raindrop massage, body wraps, and essential oils, 107 7th Ave. NE, St. Stephen. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, Theresa Lalim and Brian Jarl.

Minnesota High Tech Association (MHTA), a non-profit association of more than 300 technology companies and organizations fueling Minnesota prosperity through innovation and technology, 400 4th St. S, Minneapolis. Pictured: Becky Siekmeier.

ClearPay Minnesota, LLC, a management consulting company that helps entrepreneurs and business owners manage the present, plan for the future, and achieve dreams, 12761 County 15, Sauk Centre. Pictured: David Borgert, Shauna Russ and Sheri Moran.

Nelson Sanitation & Rental, septic pumping for residential or commercial, and for portable restrooms including deluxe units for wedding and corporate events, 10245 Hedge Road NW, Rice. Pictured: Beth Putz, Derrick Nelson and Peg Imholte.

hello confidence... goodbye veins Physicians with The Vein Center and Regional Diagnostic Radiology:

“I have more energy at day’s end and I’m not self-conscious about what I’m wearing.” LYNN

Dr. Jody Bolton Smith Dr. Danielle Leighton Dr. Rochelle Wolfe Dr. Chadd McMahon Terri Wolfe, PA-C

Call today for a complimentary varicose or spider vein consultation.

320-257-VEIN (8346) 1990 connecticut ave s sartell, mn 56377 for beautiful results

beautifulresults.com

Brian Hart 26 8th Avenue South St. Cloud, MN • 320-224-2121 www.brianhart.sandler.com S Sandler Training Finding Power in Reinforcement (with design) and Sandler Training are registered service marks of Sandler Systems, Inc. © 2015 Sandler Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

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2015


TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS

Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar, 4190 W Division St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Katie Kunkel, Shawn Voigt and Greg Theis.

Direct Insurance Services of MN, 11 2nd Ave. N, Suite 101, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Tom Kotula, Margaret Kotula and Sheri Moran.

Epic Productions, Inc., videos for weddings, events, commercials, and training; VHS to DVD transfers, and more, 29842 156th Ave., St. Joseph. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, Aaron Chalich and Tauna Quimby.

JJS Property Management, Inc., apartment rentals, 3105 1st St. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, Michelle Notch, Roxie Knowles, Katie Kukacka, Alissa Anderson and Brenda Eisenschenk.

Steffes Group, liquidation and management of agriculture related assets, 24400 MN Highway 22 S, Litchfield. Pictured: Scott Anderson, Randy Kath and Shawn Brannan.

DeFoe Consulting, a management consulting firm dedicated to helping small to mid-sized companies grow their businesses profitably, 15230 Barley Road NW, Royalton. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Joe DeFoe and Peg Imholte.

Cook Counseling Services, providing counseling on a variety of issues in Central Minnesota, offering in-home therapy, 606 25th Ave. S, Suite 209, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kelly Cook and Jayne Greeney Schill.

Myres Consulting, LLC, guiding top performance for companies, executive, non-profits and governmental units through a thoughtful and participative approach to change, 7491 86th Ave. SE, Clear Lake. Pictured: Beth Putz, Brian Myres and Brian Jarl.

Choose a leader in the industry! 158.74% 5yr Growth

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Roofing, Sheet Metal, 24/7 Service, Maintenance, Inspections, Waterproofing, Composite Panels

320-252-1608

612-333-1481

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UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

Stop Talking!

Taking time to hone your communication skills will help you be a more effective and successful business leader. By Kara Tomazin BE RESPECTFUL. No matter what type of message or who the audience, treat people with respect. You may have bad news to share or be communicating with a group that doesn’t share your point of view, but if you strive to create a positive interaction, your chances for success are greater.

E

ffective business communication is important regardless of your profession. Business people need to be skilled communicators who know how to tailor a message for the intended audience, which medium to use to deliver it, and how to be sure it was received as intended. BE CONCISE. Simple and concise are always better than complicated and confusing. Good business communicators know how to get to the point quickly and make sure information is delivered clearly. If you have a tendency to overtalk an issue, collect your thoughts in advance and streamline your message. This will help you present

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your information with more confidence and help keep people tuned in. USE A CONVERSATIONAL TONE. Effective communicators craft their messages with a personal, engaging and conversational tone. Being conversational doesn’t mean you should be informal or glib; you still need to be professional. A conversational tone will help show your recipients that you welcome their interaction. BE TRUTHFUL. Don’t sugarcoat bad news. We sometimes have a tendency to withhold information out of fear or to save face. Your audience, whether it’s employees, customers or the public,

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5

will resent the fact that they didn’t get the whole truth in the first place. When the omitted facts become public – and they always do—you will look worse than if all the facts had initially been disclosed. DON’T DELAY. It is critically important to deliver bad news without unreasonable delay. You may want to hold off on sharing bad news hoping that things will improve. Such delays are costly, as conditions can continue to worsen. Additionally, a communication delay can lead to rumors, speculation and false information, which in turn lead to anxiety and lack of confidence by staff and customers.

USE COMMUNICATION TOOLS APPROPRIATELY. With the abundance of communication tools now available, it’s more important than ever to choose the correct method for both your audience and your message. Email is great, but sometimes all the specifics can’t be addressed in this medium. If this is the case, pick up the phone. Some messages need to be delivered in writing or in a face-to-face conversation. SEEK TO UNDERSTAND. Good communicators seek out those with opinions, positions, backgrounds and experiences different from their own. Showing a willingness to learn about and understand others’ views not only shows respect, but shows you are genuinely interested in those you are communicating with. This is especially true in diverse groups. Language and cultural barriers may create challenges, but by


asking questions you will put yourself in a position to understand. STOP TALKING. Effective communicators are familiar with the quote: “We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.” This is important advice. When someone else is talking, give that person your undivided attention. Avoid trying to think of the next point you want to make. Being an active listener shows the other person you value what they have to say. Good communicators are good listeners.

FOLLOW UP AND FOLLOW THROUGH. When you have crafted your message and shared it appropriately, ask if the message was received as you intended it. Are there questions you hadn’t anticipated? Is a follow-up communication necessary? If so, learn from the process and make improvements for the next time. Effective communication requires follow-through to ensure both understanding and action. Kara Tomazin is a St. Cloud-based marketing, communications and

TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS Powerhouse Outdoor Equipment, top quality power equipment, 207 E Cedar Street, St. Joseph. Pictured: Greg Theis, Craig Wolf, Kristin Wolf, Mark Gramke, Michael Boeckmann & Inese Mehr Steve Gottwalt Consulting, LLC, dynamic communications, public policy and insurance solutions that make a difference, 1753 Cottonwood Circle, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Steve Gottwalt and Peg Imholte. United States Postal Service, 100 1st St. S, Room 117, Minneapolis. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Stefanie Kirschbaum, Alisha Head and Brenda Eisenschenk.

digital media professional.

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UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

NETWORK

2015 Chamber Open at Blackberry Ridge Golf Course…a time for networking and business promotion.

Randy Kath, Steffes Group (L); Dan Stuttgen, Dickey’s Barbecue Pit; Jeremy Salzbrun, H & S Heating & A/C; Lance Barthel, Batteries Plus Bulbs

HealthPartners’ Missy Fowler (L), Julie Devore, Nichole Anderson, and Greg Bockrath; Jenifer Odette, Brandl Motors (L) and Mackenzie Posch, Blackberry Ridge

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Beth Putz (L) and Kris Nelson, Custom Accents Promotions and Apparel

2015 Chamber Open Committee: Tanya Johnson, ABRA Auto Body & Glass; David Christians, Wells Fargo Bank; Marilyn Birkland, Times Media; Dan Anderson, Miller, Welle, Heiser; Ginny Kroll, Chamber of Commerce; and Todd Rothfork, Bernick’s

Dana Randt (L) and Nikki Fisher, St. Cloud Area Convention & Visitors Bureau


Tim Jensen, Miller Auto, (L); Jason Bernick, Bernick’s; and Teresa Bohnen, Chamber of Commerce

Scott Ralph, Frontier Communications (L); Matt Lingle, Tri Communications Security Service; John Koshiol, Now IT Connects; Brian Musech, Batteries Plus Bulbs

Waite Park Chamber Meeting

NETWORK

Waite Park Chamber After Hours at Liberty Insurance

Amanda La France, Remedy Beauty + Body (L); John Kron, Signmax; and Rachel Lolmasteymaugh, FaceTime Business Resources

Jason Neuerburg, Manpower (L), and Stephen Dolence, AFLAC

Kristen Berreau, American Door Works, (center, front) chair of the Waite Park Chamber, leads everyone in a group selfie at the Waite Park Chamber meeting in September.

Top Hatter Jayne Greeney Schill, District 742, and Tiffany Mason, Texas Roadhouse

Sarah Forystek, American Advertising Federation and Thelen Advertising, (L) and Diane Larson, Copper Corte Office

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BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

28 31 36

Tech Strategies Doing Good

30 Management Toolkit 32/34 Entreprenuerism

Economy Central by Falcon Bank

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RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Stolen!

A few simple steps can help you prevent identity theft this holiday season. By Whitney Bina 2.Comparing receipts to your billing statement. 3.Not leaving credit cards or receipts lying around. 4.Watching your credit cards during all transactions and getting them back as quickly as possible. 5.Keeping a record of your account numbers in a safe place. 6.Never signing a blank receipt. Credit card skimmers are great for small businesses, Justin said. However, anyone can purchase a credit card skimmer and easily swipe your credit card information into their portable devices without you realizing it happened.

I

dentity theft claims one new victim every two seconds, or 1800 individuals every hour. Every year, 16.5 million individuals, nearly seven percent of the U.S. population, fall victim to identity theft. As the holidays approach risk of identity theft increases. How can you protect yourself this shopping season? John Justin, community service officer, St. Cloud Police Department, provides these tips.

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Credit Cards Identity theft risk via credit cards increases every year along with the popularity of credit and debit cards. Protect yourself from potential theft by: 1.Adding fraud alerts and pin numbers to credit cards.

Mail Mailboxes serve as prime targets for identity theft criminals. Bills, credit card statements, and other personal information can easily be taken from a mailbox. Last January, several mailboxes in Central Minnesota were targeted. Offenders were looking for W-2 forms, Justin said. “Be mindful when it comes to your mail,” he continued. “Get mail out of your mail-

boxes as soon as possible. If you live on country roads, consider using a post office box.” The red flags on mailboxes unintentionally serve two purposes: They not only let mail carriers know when there is outgoing mail, but also inform criminals that potentially personal information is available to them. Justin suggests dropping outgoing mail in a blue postal box to eliminate this threat. Internet Protect yourself on the internet when shopping online. 1.Install security software on your computer. 2.Delete temporary internet files after you complete transactions. 3.Look for secure shopping sites (https://) and the padlock on the bottom right of your screen. 4.Never respond to “spam” or suspicious emails. Today’s smart phones easily allow offenders to take photos of documents and information they need without physically stealing anything,

contributor Whitney Bina is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

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GREDE FOUNDRIES | SAINT CLOUD, MN

FOCUSED ONTHE FUTURE

Justin warned. Eighty six percent of victims will never realize their identity was stolen. If you believe your identity has been stolen, report it to the police department right away. For more information on protecting yourself from identity theft, or for steps to take if your identity has been stolen, visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT

GOING GREEN

Water Power Waves, tides, and ocean currents represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource that could provide clean, affordable energy to U.S. homes and businesses across the country. The Energy Department recently awarded $7.4 million to develop advanced components for wave and tidal energy systems. Advancements in marine and hydrokinetic technologies will help companies design and manufacture devices that will effectively and sustainably harness increased amounts of renewable energy from marine environments.

REAL ESTATE SERVICES 320.251.5933 | 888.678.7225 | StrackCompanies.com

www.scr-mn.com REFRIGERATION HVAC SERVICE BUILDING AUTOMATION Formerly St. Cloud Refrigeration

Central | Metro

St. Cloud • Twin Cities Wilmar • Alexandria 1-800-827-1642

Northern

Brainerd • Baxter 1-800-273-9071

FOOD SERVICE Duluth | Superior 1-800-827-1642

Southern

Rochester 1-877-399-4546 Mankato 1-800-447-3259

WENDY HENDRICKS

COMMERCIAL CONSULTANT BUY | SELL | BUSINESS BROKERAGE

Source: U. S. Department of Energy

C: 320.293.6379 | O: 320.251.1177 | wendy@cbcorion.com | www.cbcorion.com N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 //

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BusinessTools TECH STRATEGIES

Goal Setting

Your social media efforts will be more effective if you take time to plan for 2016? organization. Then, dabble in another tool that could further help you achieve your specific business goals for 2016. Who you’re trying to reach and why will dictate what tool makes the most strategic sense.

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hat will your social media strategy be for 2016? Whether you’re just starting out or have a solid presence, creating a strategy for the coming year will enable you to take social media farther for your organization. It does not have to take extensive time. But it does take some intention. Take these five key steps to craft your social media strategy and action plan for 2016: Set measurable goals. Take the time to answer your WHY. Outline the specific organizational goals you’re hoping to achieve through the use of a given social media

tool. These should reflect your organization’s goals for the coming year. If you’re organization is interested in gaining more women ages 34-44 as customers, set a goal of building a following of that same demographic on social media. Choose a tool that matches your goals. From Facebook and Twitter to LinkedIn and Instagram, they all have delivered solid results for businesses. But they all are not for everyone. Choose one tool you’ll focus on in the coming year. If you have a solid Facebook presence, set new goals to grow and better leverage it for your

Create a content strategy. If you do not know what you want to say, you’re going to have a hard time saying it. Identify three questions you want to answer on social media – or three key messages you want to reinforce. Then, develop a content plan on how you can deliver it. Focus on the value you’ll bring. Social media provides an opportunity to validate your expertise and provide ongoing interest for what you’re selling. Building and engaging a following depends on the information you share. Spend some time here to get it right and make it easier to execute later. Set usage guidelines. Make it clear up front how your organization will use the tool. Know the best practices and set posting parameters related to how often, when and with what elements. On Facebook, that may mean posting five times a week. On Twitter, that could be a rapid-fire approach during key events. On LinkedIn, it may be a certain number of blog posts published a month.

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in social media.

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Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5

By Dawn Zimmerman

Go beyond the quantity to set quality expectations, too. Posts with images expand their reach by up to four times and micro-videos gain more engagement than a traditional post. Determine how many posts should have each of the key elements and then make sure the team has the tools to execute. That may mean arming them with new smart phones, selfie sticks or video editing software. Keep score. Identify key metrics to monitor each month – and celebrate success. For Facebook and Twitter, start with the number of followers, reach, and engaged users and review the top 5-10 performing posts. Look for trends. This will help you determine what content is most valuable to your followers and should be repeated. On LinkedIn, pay attention to the number of new connections, number of prospects in those connections, and even how published posts are performing. Use the information to make better decisions each month and refine your strategy along the way. One of the best moves you can make is start the year with a big, yet attainable, target, such as doubling your followers to 5,000. This will help set the pace for the year and keep you focused on achieving results month after month. Social media rewards boldness. What may sound crazy now could easily be what you’re celebrating at year-end.


TECH NEWS

TIME TRACKING Is it important to track your time at work? If you’re billing on an hourly basis, the answer is a resounding: Yes! Do you like tracking your time? Odds are the answer is a resounding: No! If this sounds like you, check out Due, a simple, yet exhaustive tool that helps you track time easily. And if you have a particularly annoying client, it can track your time down to the second so you’re paid for every unhappy moment. Source: Small Business Trends

Atomically precise manufacturing

PAY AS YOU GO

What the term “nanotechnology” really refers to is atom-by-atom production. The end result is extraordinary improvements in manufacturing all things, because machinery, infrastructure, and other systems would be more productive and less expensive. One possible benefit could be far cleaner energy, such as liquid hydrocarbon fuels produced using hydrogen from water and carbon from recycled CO2. Source: The Futurist

Some small-business owners who have switched to mobile credit card readers say the devices save them money, are simple to use, and provide a way to accept credit cards at trade shows and events. But do your research – there are a variety of services available all with their own unique advantages. Source: Digitaltrends.com

To explore some of the options visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Stand Up For Yourself First

The best way to stop inappropriate behavior in the workplace is to address it.

By Tracy Knafla

your conversation with Herb to document your conversation as well as his reaction. Document any changes in behavior after you’ve spoken to him.

C

ongratulations on getting the job you wanted! As you have been settling in and contributing to your team you realize that your co-worker, Herb, makes jokes about women in the workplace and has even used your name in these jokes. Everybody says Herb is harmless, and yet, you do not appreciate these “jokes.” He has recently started to bump into you and subtly rubs up against you as he walks behind your desk. Herb’s behavior is creating an uncomfortable situation for you. If allowed to continue, it might lead to a workplace harassment complaint. The definition of harassment, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is: Unwelcome conduct that is based on race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. Harassment becomes unlawful where 1) enduring the offensive conduct becomes a condition of continued

30

employment, or 2) the conduct is severe or pervasive enough to create a work environment that a reasonable person would consider intimidating, hostile, or abusive. (eeoc.gov) While this behavior is concerning, you really don’t want to make a big deal out of it. You just wish Herb would stop. So, what can you do to curtail Herb’s behavior before it gets to be too much? Try these approaches. Be Courageous Take Some Action While it might seem easier to do nothing, you actually open the door to a continuation of the behaviors and provide tacit consent by not addressing the issues. You also teach Herb that his actions have no consequences. He will continue telling sexist jokes and may increase physical encounters with you. If you

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5

don’t address this problem it will get bigger to you. It will cause a build up of frustration and resentment which may impact your productivity and professionalism. Taking some action will require courage on your part, but you will feel empowered by this choice. Talk to Herb When you do, be firm and clear about the behaviors he exhibits that are problematic for you. Ask him politely to stop making jokes that include you and to please keep a professional distance from you physically. Give him a couple of specific examples to illustrate your point. Make notes to insure that you say everything that you need to say. Try to remain non-emotional. Do not attack him either personally or professionally. Stick to the facts! Make some notes following

Maintain Your Professionalism Don’t let your frustration change your work ethic. Take the high road. You will feel better doing this. It will also help you if you have to make a formal complaint about Herb in the future. Resist the urge to gossip about Herb or your situation. However, you might try to see if any others are experiencing the same reaction to Herb. Know Your Company’s Harassment Policy and the Federal Law Familiarize yourself with the Employee Handbook which should include information on reporting harassment, if necessary. If the behavior escalates, you will need to report it to the appropriate company representative to be in compliance with the federal law. Try to resolve a situation with your co-worker as soon as you can. Often, other people don’t realize the impact of their actions and will be apologetic and cooperative. If they are not, know that the law provides direction and support to help create a more positive work environment.

contributor Tracy Knofla is the co-owner and featured consultant of High Impact Training. She has been presenting to audiences across the country for more than 25 years.


DOING GOOD

THE DONATION TREE

Photos courtesy of ProcessPro.

Supporting a local charity puts the employees at ProcessPro in the holiday spirit.

E

ach year the ProcessPro Events Committee discusses local non-profits that could benefit from a partnership

of awareness building and donations. Last year ProcessPro selected Anna Marie’s Alliance, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing safe shelter, support and referral services for battered women and their children. ProcessPro focused their campaign on supplying Anna Marie’s with items from the organization’s holiday wish list, such as toiletries, toys, and bedding for families in need. Interested employees were able to tour Anna Marie’s facility. The company encourages participation through

companywide emails, setting up a donation tree, providing a friendly reminder by the employee entrance, and committing to match each donation through corporate dollars. “During the holidays our staff enjoys teaming together to give back to our local community,” according to Katlyn Weisert, ProcessPro’s HR generalist. “Anna Marie’s is an outstanding non-profit with strong roots in helping our community to prosper, which is an important part of our corporate culture at ProcessPro.”

At the end of the campaign, the company – including employee contributions and company match – donated about $1600 in items, gift cards, and general supplies to Anna Marie’s Alliance.

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BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

Talking Price

Learning when to talk price can mean the difference between closing, or losing, the sale. By Brian Hart

H

as this ever happened to you? You had great discussions with a prospect, took lots of notes, and developed the proverbial “killer presentation.” You started to deliver the presentation, and your prospect gave all kinds of positive signals: encouraging body language, words of approval, that kind of thing. Things seemed promising. Then you got to the final slide, the slide everything else was supposed to justify: the price. And all the positive signals stopped cold. The meeting ended without a commitment. The prospect

The Season

SPARKLES at Ciatti’s

had to think about it, had to check the numbers, had to do any number of things other than say “yes” or “no” to your pricing. You left without any timeline. The deal died. What happened? You made a classic mistake. You saved the money discussion for last. Have the money discussion before you present Once you have uncovered pain that you can successfully address, you must discover the prospect’s expectations or limitations regarding investing in your product or service. Why

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32

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would you save that discussion for your final slide? Doing so only produces the perfect opportunity for a “Let me think it over” moment. Many salespeople feel uncomfortable discussing money issues. The discomfort is most often the result of early childhood messages, primarily received from parents. These messages were most likely appropriate when they were conveyed. Today, as a sales professional, you must recognize that talking about money is an integral part of selling. Rather than delaying it until the end, the investment discussion must take place before the presentation.

Having a strategy and a prepared set of questions can help ease discomfort (for you or your prospect). The most direct strategy for uncovering a prospect’s budget situation is simply to ask. For example, ask: “Do you have a budget set aside for this purchase?” Or, “Is this project funded?” If your prospect’s answer is “Yes,” ask follow-up questions to learn more. “In round numbers, what are you thinking?” Or, “Perhaps you can give me a ballpark idea of the amount you’ve allocated.”

If your prospect’s answer is “No,” or there is a reluctance to share budget information, test the waters using thirdparty stories. Describe one or two similar projects you completed for other clients and the investment ranges for your examples. Then, ask your prospect if making a similar size investment would be comfortable. Qualified prospects only If, after all that, your prospect still won’t share any budget information with you, you’re not

ready to present anything. Such individuals have disqualified themselves from your sales process. Instead of investing lots of time, energy and resources and setting up a presentation that won’t close, make “Let me think it over” a thing of the past. Disengage politely. Work with a qualified prospect who will discuss budget issues directly, and who will commit to giving you a clear “Yes” or a clear “No.” Your closing numbers and your personal income will improve as a result.

contributor Brian Hart is the owner and president of Sandler Training in St. Cloud, specializing in sales, management, and leadership training and development. He can be reached at brian.hart@sandler.com

49th Annual

Feb 23 - Feb 25, 2016 | 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. River’s Edge Convention Center 10 South 4th Avenue • St. Cloud, MN

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BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

Divorcing Your Business Partner Dissolving a partnership is easier if communication lines stay open. when it is insolvent. It will be much easier to have a meeting of the minds on important issues prior to an owner expressing their interest in leaving the business entity.

W

hen you ventured into business with a friend, family member, or other individual, it seemed like a good idea. Now, after the business has evolved, you realize the partnership’s longevity is limited. Business partnerships dissolve for a number of reasons. Perhaps one of the owners has decided they want out, perhaps the business’ financial affairs demand a reduction in the number of owners, or perhaps you and your business partner no longer see eye-to-eye. Whatever the reason, it’s important to focus on maintaining the operation of the business during a business partnership divorce. Plan in advance for dissolution of the partnership: Whether you are just starting a business

partnership or have been working together for a number of years, it is never too late to draft an agreement for dissolving a partnership. Often referred to as a Buy-Sell Agreement, it should address important factors like capitalization and control of the business and partnership. A well drafted Buy-Sell Agreement should include a plan-of-action detailing the process for buying out another owner’s ownership interest, what events may trigger the mandatory or permissive buyout of another owner’s interest, and how the value of the departing owner’s interest will be determined. The vast majority of business owners eventually part ways for one reason or another; dissolutions can occur when the business is financially sound and

Signs that the partnership may not be working: Indications your business partner wants out may be subtle. A business partner who repeatedly fails to attend necessary appointments or meetings, complete tasks, or make decisions may be signs of increasing loss of interest in the business. If your goals and your business partner’s goals regarding the business no longer align, it might be time to go separate ways. Open Communication: The partnership dissolution will be much easier for all parties involved if the lines of communication are kept open. Schedule a time to meet to discuss the timeline for dissolution, how assets and debts will be divided, and how employees or other stakeholders will be informed of the dissolution. Ending your business relationship with a partner can be stressful, but avoiding telephone calls or emails will offer no benefit. As much as possible, remember that not all business partnerships can sustain the challenges of business owner-

By Betsey Lund

ship and that in many situations the decision to leave a business partnership is a professional decision and not necessarily a personal decision. Dividing the Business’ Assets and Debts: Although most of the business’ assets and debts, including the entity’s name, will be owned by the business entity itself, divorcing business partners may need to discuss whether one owner will depart taking certain assets, debts, inventory, or personnel with him or her. Generally speaking, disagreements over the monetary value of these items are the most common. Overall, the main focus during the partnership’s dissolution should be on maintaining the operation and success of the existing business. Open, clear, and consistent communication with employees is critical as employees have a right to know what they should expect, and what will be expected of them, during the dissolution process. Although the process can be stressful, having a well drafted agreement that anticipates the partnership’s dissolution can be extremely beneficial when the time comes. Maintaining lines of communication among business partners and with vendors, stakeholders, and employees is critical to surviving a business divorce.

contributor Betsey Lund is an attorney and shareholder with Lund Sauter, P.A. Attorneys at Law in St. Cloud, MN, working in the areas of business law, employment law, and estate planning. You can find her online at www.LundSauter.com.

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SMART BUSINESS: HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic

Be Well@Work

HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic— Wellness Coaches Dani Berg and Greg Bockrath as simple as losing five pounds to reduce the risk of diabetes. It might be learning new cooking techniques using less sodium for blood pressure issues, or practicing yoga poses to reduce stress in the workplace. “We help by showing them the most effective path and empowering them for success.” Worksite Wellness Healthy employees mean a more productive workplace and lower medical costs. HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic provides worksite wellness services that keep employees feeling and working their best. Berg and Bockrath partner with

the same personalized approach in the business environment as they do with individual clients, the wellness coaches assess the existing culture and work with employers to design a plan that meets the organization’s goals and employees’ needs. “If a business employs five or five thousand, we can provide services and support that improve employee health, engagement and retention,” says Bockrath. “Whether at a worksite or in the clinic, we deliver personalized support, motivation, and education to empower people to improve their overall health and live more productive lives.” •

NO TWO PEOPLE ARE ALIKE. “WE GET TO KNOW OUR CLIENTS AND HELP THEM START WITH REALISTIC, DOABLE GOALS.” – DANI BERG

“I

t’s never too late to start” is the motto of HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic wellness coaches Dani Berg and Greg Bockrath. This dynamic duo of worksite wellness help area people and businesses become healthier and more productive. Both are certified health and wellness coaches, personal trainers, and worksite wellness specialists. But don’t let the titles fool you.

They’re real. They’re honest. They care. “Life isn’t one-size-fits-all,” says Bockrath, “and neither is personal wellness.” No two people are alike. “We get to know our clients and help them start with realistic, doable goals,” Berg explains. Often small, simple changes bring big results. Therefore, each client receives a wellness plan tailored to fit his or her unique situation. It may be

employers to provide services ranging from in-clinic screenings and wellness coaching to on-site clinics, delivering convenient, confidential health care where employees are most likely to use it—at work. HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinic offers a comprehensive menu of options from which employers can select a single service or multiple services to best address their needs. Well@ Work services may include: health and wellness education, fitness activities, nutrition counseling, one-on-one coaching, biometric screenings, and health fair booths. Using

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worksitehealth

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BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Healthy Communities

Many groups are working to improve the economic health of Central Minnesota, but how do we know if it’s working? By Cindy Fitzthum

“C

ommunity Economic Health” seems to be a big buzz phrase these days. Looking at it from the Greater St. Cloud Community Pillars perspective, it is defined as covering the economy, housing, safety, education, wellness, infrastructure, arts, community engagement, and a green environment. How can we, as individuals and collectively, help create and contribute to our community to help it prosper and become more vibrant? How do we work, live and enjoy life in Central Minnesota? It appears we have many individuals and organizations

IF YOU GO

that want to create a prosperous society here and have a healthy, economically viable community. We know we are doing good work and working towards beneficial goals. However, have we ever considered how we are measuring our effectiveness? Who decides if a community is “healthy” or not? Paul Mattessich of Wilder Research explains the difference between process and outcome while evaluating community health. Process can be simply tracking the organization’s activities (number of individuals trained, for example) versus outcome

BOWLING ALONE

which looks at the intended effect and if it improved the community, residents’ behavior, or social economic benefits in some way. For example, let’s take a closer look at the St. Cloud community as a whole regarding housing and attempt to measure impact through a model. Mattessich explains that the inputs of the community development effort, such as the resources and materials, need to be considered first. Regarding housing, St. Cloud has organizations such as Place of Hope and the Human Rights Commission that provide these. Then, one must examine the activities and the tangible things an organization(s) did. For example, we could consider the number of people that received Section 8 housing vouchers or the availability of affordable housing units in the St. Cloud area. Third, immediate and quantifiable outputs are tabulated. Finally, one can look at both short and long term outcomes. The community can now answer questions such as: Did the number of housing units needed for low-income or felon-friendly individuals increase? Did zoning laws change to better accommodate

the resources needed for people experiencing homelessness? A great example of citizens coming together to discuss and measure their community’s health happened in Seattle during 1992. Over 100 citizens came together to ask “How does anyone know whether a community is getting more or less sustainable?” After many meetings and committee discussions, they came up with 99 indicators to assess their community’s health, including; • Hours of work at median wage required to support basic needs • Growth rate of the region • Percentage of employment concentrated in top ten employers • Voting turnout at primary elections

There are many ways to measure a community’s health in our democratic society, but one must assure the proper assessments and measurements are being taken to identify the “right” things. It takes a group of individuals willing to come together to determine the proper, measurable outcomes that will improve the quality of life for everyone. Cindy Fitzthum is director of economic education at St. Cloud State University.

Are you interested in learning more about community wellness and how it impacts you? Then you’ll want to attend the 54th Annual St. Cloud State University Winter Institute, February 10-11, 2016 at the Kelly Inn. The keynote speaker is Dr. Robert Putnam, author of the best-selling book Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. Focusing on the Winter Institute program theme of “Community Wellness,” Dr. Putnam will discuss his new work, Our Kids: The American Dream In Crisis. The Winter Institute will again feature the popular Economic Outlook and a panel of local business representatives discussing the regional economy. The Winter Institute is sponsored in part by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. For details visit StCloudStateUniversity.edu/WinterInstitute

36

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5


April $879,943

80

St. Augusta

March

St. Joseph

February

600

$600k

Sartell

174 November $3,531,780 May

30 $3,600,047

Waite Park

90 October $4,377,148 Apr

84 $7,151,019

St. Augusta

11 September $6,945,494 Mar

7 $202,027

St. Joseph

78 August Feb $3,102,294

TOTAL: 1139*

409 $7,465,381

TOTAL: 1429

December $12,027,944 June

91 $1,234,635 58 $3,838,723

2013

111 $1,664,753

300

Food and Be ST. CLOUD

82 $3,783,078

347

2015 $66,942,215 382 $12,054,227

Food and Bev

16

$3,159,832 2014 ST. CLOUD 82 $12,120,414 1 $12,000

2013

80 $7,332,041

2015

July $0 Total as of 10/8/15. *2015 Jan totals are cumulative up-to-the-month data.

1500

$100M

48

Sauk Rapids

1200

$80M

397 $57,715,070

TOTAL: 1411

TOTAL: $968,234.07*

$1.5M

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

TOTAL: $69,784,925.00*

425

$87,075,891 July

900

$900k

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

$60M

September

St. Cloud

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$40M

241 $12,696,170

2014

Commercial 2013 2014 2015* #/$ #/$ #/$ August

Commercial Building Permits

$20M

176 $1,353,832

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

$0M

128 $1,702,322

October

TOTAL: $69,784,925.00*

2013

100 $4,437,367

November

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2014

99 $3,327,830

300

224 $9,714,950

January December 0 Total as of 10/8/15. *2015 totals are cumulative up-to-the-month data.

Commercial Building Permits

2015

116 $1,803,560

771

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Waite Park

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

$15,972,348 2015 0

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$80M

291 $8,129,708

2015

$70M

438

2014

$60M

447 $19,206,069

May $11,560,121

2013

$50M

382

June $18,539,531

December

Sauk Rapids

November

$80M

1209 $26,145,498

October

$70M

1227

July $18,425,316 January

300

$40M

September

$60M

February

St. Cloud

0

$30M

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

$20M

ST. CLOUD

$300k

$10M

August

$50M

2015

2014

2013

$0 $0M

July

March

TOTAL: $54,435,063

2013

June

Residential 2013 2014 2015 2013 August #/$ #/$ #/$

October April

May

TOTAL:$45,521,578*

Sartell

2014

April

$40M

March

$30M

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

$20M

Home Sales C

2014

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

TOTAL: $54,435,063

TOTAL: $62,358,547

2015

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$10M

2015

July December June

November May

Residential Building Permits

$0M

September

COLOR KEY:

Compiled by Sharon Henry, data current as of 10/8/15

2013 2015

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

TOTAL: $62,358,547 2014

Home Sales C

21,578*

$80M

2015

October

TOTAL:$45,521,578*

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

358,547

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

435,063

0M

925.00*

,621.69

$120M

,554.11

Residential Building Permits

$120M

$300k

June

$79,916,621.69 Sources: Building departments for the following cities:TOTAL: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph. 2014

May

2014

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

2014-2015

2013

Apr

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

Unemployment Rates

August

September

October

F

M

A

M

1.0%

December

July

J

Jan

November

June

May

$120M

Feb

April

$100M

March

$80M

December

November

$60M

October

September

$40M

August

$20M

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

$0M 7%

1.5%

February

2.0%

January

8%

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com 2013

2014-2015 % CHANGE

J

J

$0

$300k

0.5%

6% 0.0% -0.5%

5%

-1.0% -1.5%

4%

-2.0%

3% J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

J

J

-2.5% A

S

O

N

D

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

A

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

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37


1,578*

58,547

35,063

$80M

BusinessTools

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

October

August

September

August

July

June

May

TOTAL: 1139*

April

September

ST. CLOUD

October

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

lding Permits

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

D, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

September

2015

TOTAL: $968,234.07*

July

TOTAL: $69,784,925.00*

August July

TOTAL: 1429

June

2015

May

2014

May

TOTAL: 1411

600

$600k

300

350

70

May

168

118

53

37

April

49% 1500

$1.5M

246

of small business owners have integrated mobile technology into their business strategy

––––––––––––––––––––––––

Residential 2013 2014 2015* TOTAL: $1,326,730.36 Stearns Co. 2013 Benton Co.

of small business owners July national believe the economyJuneis in a recovery or expansion

August

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office; $0 $300k $600k $900k $1.2M http://thething.mplsrealtor.com/ Total as of 10/8/15. *2015 totals are cumulative up-to-the-month data.

$1.5M

March

of small business owners February say Minnesota’s economy January is stronger than the national economy

TOTAL: 1139*

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

71%

September

TOTAL: 1429

2014 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

250

December

TOTAL: 1411

200

$1.5M

72% 1200

150

TOTAL: $968,234.07*

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

100

$1.2M

Minnesota small business owners are more optimistic November about the national economy than their counterparts across the country. In Minnesota… October 900

$900k

50

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

300

$300k

Optimistic Outlook

TOTAL: 316

0

$900k

BY THE NUMBERS

TOTAL: $968,234.07*

2015 2013

$600k

Total as of 10/8/2015. *2015 totals are cumulative up-to-the-month data.

Food and Beverage Tax Collection TOTAL: 221 ST. CLOUD

$300k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

TOTAL: 155*

2014

January

$0

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

2013

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

1500

2015

1200

Feb

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

900

ST. CLOUD

600

sources: St. Cloud Area AssociationJan of Realtors, $60M Housing/Real $80M Estate $100M $120M http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics

2015

2014

2013

February Mar

300

2014

Apr

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

0

April March

2015

2014

2013

2013

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

June

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

$0

M

M

25.00*

21.69

54.11

$120M

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––––––––––––––––––––––––

62%

of small business owners maintain a social media presence Source: 2015 U.S. Bank Small Business Annual Survey

––––––––––––––––––––––––

Lodging Tax Dollars IRS Collection is piloting an initiative to make

TOTAL: $1,454,373.86

early contact with employers who may be falling behind in their payroll taxes. When it appears an

2014

employer may owe a balance at the end of the TOTAL: $1,336,559.26

quarter, revenue officers will be in contact before the quarterly payroll tax return, Form 941, is due.

2013

The goal is to address payroll tax issues before $0

$300k

$600k

$900k

$1.2M

$1.5M

they become unmanageable. Source: IRS

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Total as of 10/8/2015. *2015 totals are cumulative up-to-the-month data.

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Economy Central presented by

December

November

October

September

August

Managing Taxes

July

June

May

April

March

February

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2015

TOTAL: $1,014,640.68

January

ST. CLOUD


Paula Capes

Debra Grant

Jessica Bitz

Kendra Berger

Caryn Stadther

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CHANGING

PLACES

Mike Moores was a fearless motorcycle champion. He was a confident business manager.

But business ownership? For Moores, that role was the scariest one of all. BY GAIL IVERS / PHOTOS BY JOEL BUTKOWSKI, BUTKOWSKI DIGITAL IMAGING

W

hen Mike Moores signed the papers to buy JM Oil, everything changed. And nothing changed. He’d been around the business most of his life. He had worked in it since he was 12 years old. He had done practically every job from sweeping floors, to delivering fuel to working with bankers. He’d essentially been running the company for several years. He knew and understood the business. But that had been his father’s business. Now it was his. “The day I signed the papers was the scariest day of my life,” Moores said. “Now it was up to me to help my dad get the money out of the business he had built so he could retire. It was up to me to make sure employees were paid…that vendors were paid…that buildings were maintained. It didn’t matter that I’d been running the business for six or seven years. Suddenly I was responsible.” Friend and business consultant Don Johnson told him nothing had actually

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changed. It would be business as usual. But Moores knew that wasn’t entirely true. “The ten years we worked the succession plan with my dad were much harder than the years before when I was just running the business,” Moores said. “Much more stressful. It’s easier to second guess everything – am I doing the right thing for the company…for myself…for the employees…for my dad. I know some people can buy a business and they don’t seem to feel anything changes, but it did for me.” Admitting to any sense of fear can come as a surprise when one learns that Moores was a world-class motorcycle road racer: five-time local champion at the Brainerd International Raceway and two-time national champion. He has 20 broken bones to prove fear is not generally part of his vocabulary. For Moores, working at JM Oil was his fall-back position. Like the son of many entrepreneurs, Moores worked for his dad on weekends, summers, and holidays. After graduating high school he attended St. Cloud State for a few years, taking business classes and working around the company. But the siren’s


Jim Moores, Founder, retired J.M. Companies

Brian Laudenbach, Vice President J.M. Companies

Mike Moores, President & CEO J.M. Companies

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“I woke up in the hospital. Life was going 150 miles per hour and overnight it stopped dead. It

makes you think.

Then, while I was recovering, one of my best friends was killed in a race. I had fully planned

on racing again until that happened.” –MIKE MOORES

BUSINESS PROFILE J. J. M.M. Companies, Companies, Inc. Inc. 1222 1222 Kuhn Kuhn Drive, Drive, St.St. Cloud, Cloud, MNMN 56301-9193 56301-9193 Phone: Phone: (320) (320) 443-6620 443-6620 Fax: Fax: (320) (320) 443-6621 443-6621 Email: Email: brian.laudenbach@ brian.laudenbach@ jmcompanies.net jmcompanies.net Website: Website: superamerica.com superamerica.com President President and and CEO: CEO: Mike Mike Moores Moores Vice Vice President: President: Brian Brian Laudenbach Laudenbach Management Management team: team: Scott Rademacher, Scott Rademacher, general general manager; manager; Sara Sara Bye, Bye, director director of retail of retail operations; operations; Mike Mike Schabel, Schabel, director director of loss of loss prevention prevention and and facility facility maintenance; maintenance; Keven Keven Kiloran, Kiloran, controller; controller; and and Anna Anna Strand, Strand, office office manager manager Ownership: Ownership: Mike Mike Moores Moores hashas majority majority ownership; ownership; Brian Laudenbach Brian Laudenbach has minority has ownership minority ownership Business Business Description: Description: J. M. J. M. Companies Companies is aisCentral a Minnesota Central Minnesota convenience store convenience operator with store 22operator SuperAmerica with 22 SuperAmerica convenience stores convenience and four off-sale stores and liquor four stores. off-sale liquor stores. Number Number of of employees: employees: Approximately Approximately 200 200 Sales: Sales: $18 $18 million million

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call of the motorcycle was too strong and he left school to join the racing circuit. “I love motorcycles,” Moores said. “My dad gave me a dirt bike when I was 12 years old, much to Mom’s horror. I rode it all the time.” By 16 he was racing. Then he got hurt. “After that I started racing street bikes,” he said. In the late 1980s and early 1990s he followed the national pro circuit, doing well enough to support himself. “When I was home I’d be working in the business. At the time I didn’t think of it, but racing was pretty good training for running a business. Racing taught me budgeting. Taking care of sponsors. Promotion. In a way, I was running a small business.” In 1992 he had a serious accident in Ohio. “I woke up in the hospital. Life was going 150 miles per hour and overnight it stopped dead,” Moores said, smacking his hands together. “It makes you think. Then, while I was recovering, one of my best friends was killed in a race. I had fully planned on racing again until that happened.” While Moores recovered from his injuries he spent his days working at JM Oil. “I was enjoying the work and learning the business. My dad started talking to me about my plans for the future and how that might fit in with the business.” Moores was surprised. He had never planned to go into the business. He had never worked there seriously or thought in terms of business ownership. The adrenaline rush of racing was what he sought. “My dad said, ‘You don’t have to do this Mike. I can sell the business. You can go buy

a motorcycle shop.’ He never pressured me to buy the company.” But as Moores thought about, it started to make sense. “I like motorcycles, but I thought, why would I do something I know nothing about? I know nothing about running a motorcycle shop, though I love being around them. On the other hand, I’d held every job in the company so I knew what people were dealing with -- I understood what Tim the truck driver did, I understood what Mary in accounting did, I understood what Steve in dispatch did. I’d learned this business from the ground up, so buying it started to make sense.” The transition wasn’t exactly rocky, but it had its challenges, according to Moores. As he became more intimately involved in the leadership of the company, his father started to step away. “He’s a very hands-off manager,” Moores said. “I’m a lot like that, too, and I’m sure I learned it from him. But there were times I would go in and say ‘Dad, what do you think about this?’ And he’d say, ‘Mike, do what you think is best. If you make a mistake, you make a mistake. It’ll be fine.’ And we made some mistakes.” One of those mistakes was building a convenience store at the intersection of I-94 and Country Road 75, behind McStop. “That’s the only one of our stores that we built from scratch,” Moores said. “You can look at all the projections, review all the metrics, do all the necessary due diligence, and that doesn’t mean it’s going to work.” When the store did not perform at the anticipated level, they sold it. That experience soured them on new building projects. “A ground-up station is expensive,” he said. “It’s hard to get it to cash flow. Over the years we’ve been able to find enough stores available for sale. It’s easier to have confidence when you look at real numbers rather than estimated projections.” One of the lessons Moores learned from the failed new-site construction effort, was that they needed to have a plan. As he took over more and more responsibility for running the business, he found that he was trying lots of different things without much structure behind the decisions. His dad noticed it, too. He hired the company’s long-time accountant, Don Johnson, to serve as a consultant and work


When Jim first came to St. Cloud in 1977 the price of #2 fuel was 17.6 cents per gallon. Then, the price didn’t change but maybe once a year. Invoices had to be figured out by hand as there were no portable calculators then.

FUN FACT

TIMELINE 1975 – James Moores moves to St. Cloud and starts JM Oil as a commissioned agent for the Amoco Oil Company. His initial clients are primarily homes, farms and construction sites, with a limited number of gas stations. He has sales of approximately $500,000 and two employees. The company is located in east St. Cloud. 1980 – Mike Moores begins working in the business by sweeping floors and loading trucks; JM Oil expands into lubricants, positioning the company for growth. 1983 – JM Oil purchases their first convenience store on West St. Germain Street in St. Cloud

1990 – Mike Moores wins two AMA National Road Racing Championships. 1992 – Mike Moores is in a serious road racing accident. He begins working at JM Oil and starts discussing succession plans with his father.

1984 – Jim Moores purchases Mobil Oil Company’s interest for the St. Cloud area and relocates the operations to Southway Drive in St. Cloud.

1998 – JM Oil builds a convenience store near McStop. The store does not perform to expectations and they sell it in 2001. 2000 – Jim Moores retires; Mike Moores begins a 10-year buy-out plan of the business; the company has sales of $75 million, approximately 100 employees, and 10 convenience stores.

1995-1996 – JM Oil purchases the Tasto’s Amoco on Division Street in downtown St. Cloud where Sentry Bank is now located and the JM Central station across from Tenvoorde Ford. 1986-1988 – Mike Moores attends St. Cloud State University, then leaves school to compete in Motorcycle Road Racing on the AMA National Circuit.

1995-1998 – JM Oil purchases five more convenience stores; the company has sales of about $50 million and approximately 70 employees. Brian Laudenbach joins JM Oil to focus on growing the retail sector of the business.

Bulk oil plant, 1975

2012 – JM Oil sales approach $120 million, with 200 employees, and 18 convenience stores. Mike Moores sells the wholesale operation to Lube Tech. JM Oil, now called J. M. Companies, Inc., relocates to 1222 Kuhn Dr., St. Cloud.

2014 – J. M. Companies drops their proprietary SpeedStop Gas & Goods brand and converts all of their stores to SuperAmerica franchises. 2015 – J. M. Companies owns and operates 22 SuperAmerica stores, four off-sale liquor stores, and two strip malls. In addition to the 18 SA stores in St. Cloud, the company has stores in Foley, Pierz, Pequot Lakes and Jenkins. They employ over 200 people and have annual sales of over $85 million.

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with Moores to help him learn to manage the business. “I credit my dad with recognizing there was a need for more coaching and guidance and he wasn’t the person to do it,” Moores said. One of the first things Johnson and Moores did, was entice former employee Brian Laudenbach to return to JM Oil. “Brian had worked here for a couple of years,” Moores said. “He wasn’t able to do quite what he thought he would so he left. As we started growing the convenience stores, Don and I went after Brian and brought him back. It’s the best thing I could have done.” “Don taught us,” Moores said simply. “When I took over the office, I wanted to do everything. Don said ‘Why are you doing the day-to-day work? You should be big picture.’ That was something I needed to learn. I found out that if you put your trust in the people who are working in the company, they will come through. It may not work elsewhere, but it works for us.” Johnson also helped Moores and Laudenbach put together plans. “’Don’t just jump around.’ he said. That’s kind of how we got caught up in the store by I-94,” Moores explained. “Don would say, ‘Plan your growth or you can grow yourself right out of business.’ We were headed that way – growing with no plan. He really helped us learn how to manage the company – and that went on for five-six years.” The company’s strategic plan helped drive them in a new direction. Jim Moores was involved in the ownership of the first convenience store years ago. Located on West St. Germain Street in St. Cloud, JM Oil supplied the fuel to the store and when the opportunity to buy in occurred, Jim Moores took it. Between 1995 and 1998, JM Oil moved from owning one C-store to five or six. Moores and Laudenbach saw that their true growth was occurring in convenience stores. “There were lots of mergers and acquisitions happening on the wholesale side of the business,” Moores said. “We were competing against companies that were six to eight times larger than us.” For two years Moores looked for wholesale operations to buy. “There weren’t that many to choose from, and the few that were out there weren’t interested,” he said. Lube Tech had been in regular contact with Moores about purchasing JM’s wholesale business. In 2012 Moores accepted their offer. “It was a tough decision,” Moores said. “We were selling off almost half of our business

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PERSONAL PROFILE

Michael Moores President & CEO, J. M. Companies Age: 48 Hometown: Born in Wayzata; resident of St. Cloud since 1975 Education: Some college Work History: Worked at JM Oil since 1980 learning the business from the ground up Family: Son, Colby Moores, 20 Hobbies: Motorcycle racing and leisure riding, golf, Muscle Car collector Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: You cannot do everything yourself, so hire good people and allow them to do their jobs. Best business advice I’ve received: “Don’t be afraid to take a chance or make a mistake. That’s how we all learn and grow.” From my dad, Jim Moores.

Mike Moores likes speed Mike Moores still owns a dirt bike. But these days you won’t find him riding it against the competition. “It’s just too hard on a person,” Moores said. Instead, keep an eye out as he passes you on the road in one of his collectible Mustangs. In 2009 Moores saw a Mustang at Tenvoorde Ford in St. Cloud and decided he wanted one. Then there were two. Then three. Pretty soon, he owned five with a sixth one on order. The physical demands of motorcycle racing require the stamina of youth. Not so with Mustangs. “It’s something I can do,” he said. “I can putz with them, take them to car shows….I was looking for something in motor sports that I could do long term. That sort of thing gets in your blood.” Does that mean his racing days are over? Moores hesitates at the question. Maybe? But the Brainerd International Raceway is an old friend. And after all, that sort of thing gets in your blood.


PERSONAL PROFILE

Brian Laudenbach Vice President, J. M. Companies Hometown: Sartell Age: 54 Education: Graduate of St Cloud Technical High School; two-year sales and marketing degree and oneyear technical sales degree, graduating in 1983. Dale Carnegie and Wilson Learning sales courses graduate. Work History: Owner of Audio Concepts retail store in Alexandria from 1983 -1987. Direct sales for Skoglund Outdoor Advertising (now Lamar) 1987-1994. Joined JM Oil in 1995. Family: Married to Monica for 30 years; daughters Robin, 27, and Paige, 25. Hobbies: Life at my lake home in Hackensack, fishing, and all the time I can get with my family, and an MLB lover. Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: From Don Johnson, my mentor and consultant to JM for many years: “The only thing constant is change so remain flexible, have a compulsion for closure, and don’t wait for all the lights to turn green because you’ll never get anything done.” Best business advice I’ve received: From my dad, Jack, when I was a kid: “A job worth doing is a job worth doing right.”

“Don would say, ‘Plan your growth or you can grow yourself right out of business.’ “ –MIKE MOORES

with no guarantee that the convenience stores would be able to stand on their own. We thought they could, but we didn’t know for sure.” “I was all for it,” Laudenbach said. “In wholesale the suppliers were hounding us to grow. In retail you can have just one store or you can have 22 stores and as long as they’re profitable you can do very well. Wholesale took lots of time. Once it was sold we could focus our time and attention on running a first class retail operation.” It was easier for Laudenbach. Since the beginning his focus had been on retail operations. Moores’ training and heart belonged to wholesale. “It was the history of our company,” Moores said. “My dad started the business as a wholesale company and I was concerned about how he would feel. He was sad, but he understood why we did it. And he knew it had to be my decision.” With the wholesale business went people Moores had known and worked with for 20 years. “I cared about them and I didn’t know what the sale would mean for them. Now it’s turned out well for us and it turned out well for them, too. That helps me know I made the right decision.” “The biggest business decision we’ve ever made was selling the wholesale,” Laudenbach said. “The second biggest was switching from SpeedStop to SuperAmerica.” In December 2014, JM Oil, now J. M. Companies, completed a transition from their proprietary convenience store brand of SpeedStop to the SuperAmerica franchise. Despite the time and effort they had put into it, the SpeedStop brand never developed the traction that Moores and Laudenbach had hoped for. “When you’re a Conoco, or a BP, or a Texaco, people think of you as a gas station first,” Moores said. “They don’t know what to expect when they go inside. You could be a full service convenience store, or you

might have a counter where you sell candy bars. When people see SuperAmerica they know what they’re getting. If we wanted to be recognized as a true convenience store we had to make a change.” “Our first SuperAmerica wasn’t branded BP or SA,” Laudenbach said. “It was a SpeedStop. But the profits weren’t there.” Laudenbach started working on SuperAmerica to let J. M. Companies brand one of their SpeedStop stations as SA. The numbers improved immediately. So he started working on a second store. “When we hit seven SuperAmericas, SA wanted us.” Now at 22 convenience stores, most in the St. Cloud area, the company’s strategic plan calls for a focus on process improvement rather than growth. “We’re reluctant to add stores in outstate Minnesota,” Laudenbach said. “We have four outstate stores now and they are more challenging than our St. Cloud stores because you can’t be there on a regular basis. Our focus now is on fine-tuning and improving our current operations.” A big part of that focus is on people. Both Moores and Laudenbach cited staffing as their biggest challenge. “The staff and their decisions and behavior dictates what kind of customer service is provided,” Laudenbach said. “We can’t be in every store every minute. We have some formidable competition coming into this area and we need to focus on being the best we can be.” “You need to keep good people,” Moores said. “I’m lucky to have the people I do have. Many have been with me for 15 years. People here have opportunities and I’ve seen them grow and succeed. I like that. I want to have a good, successful business that provides good jobs. I think we’re doing that.” Gail Ivers is the vice president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and managing editor of Business Central Magazine.

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Feature

The Business Case for Well-being Worksite wellness activities can raise employee morale and customer satisfaction. By Mary MacDonell Belisle

C

onsistently working 10-12 hours a day, skipping lunch, taking work home, not using vacation days–– behaviors like these are making American workers unhealthy, chronically ill, and worse. Employers are experiencing lower productivity, absenteeism, and higher health insurance expenditures. In St. Cloud, businesses and organizations have decided to promote employee health through workplace wellness programs, with a growing emphasis on the broader concept of workplace well-being. According to the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH),

“Poor employee health is correlated with an over 50 percent decrease in overall productivity, costing companies nationally an estimated $225.8 billion annually, or $1,685 per employee per year.” Minnesota spends almost $6 billion yearly on excess health care due to obesity and tobacco use alone. A Milken Institute study cites chronic diseases as reasons for a whopping $1.1 trillion in lost productivity. By 2023, says Milken, the seven chronic diseases (cancer, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, heart disease, pulmonary conditions, and mental disorders) will cost Minnesota $57 billion in lost

productivity and $16.8 billion in treatment expenditures. “Integrating exercise, nutrition awareness, and other good-foryou practices is the cornerstone of preventing chronic disease and reducing health-care costs.” Minnesota businesses are responding. About 55 percent of employers with 100 or more employees now offer some type of health promotion program, according to a 2012 MDH survey. In addition, 87 percent of all worksites surveyed said they were open to initiating worksite wellness policies. Is this a passing fad? Greg Gack, executive director of the St. Cloud Area Family YMCA,

doesn’t think so. “I would call it a growing passion for businesses. It takes multiple years before you see the return on investment (ROI). We’re learning that employers are backing off from the ROI and looking at worksite wellness as the right thing to do.” MDH noted the annual ROI for worksite wellness programs is $3-$6 saved for every $1 spent after about two to five years. Craig Erlichman, business development director at Rejuv Medical, has noticed most companies he’s dealt with have a true concern about giving employees benefits, but ROI also comes into play. “Happy employees equal better employees equal a better bottom line,” said Erlichman. Worksite wellness activities can raise employee morale and customer satisfaction, improve staff recruitment and retention, and help the community become more attractive for employers and the workforce. The Greater St. Cloud Workplace Well-Being Initiative is a collaboration of more than 130 local businesses led by CentraCare Health, St. Cloud State University, and the Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation (GSDC). This new community health improvement effort is made possible through a $525,000 grant from the CentraCare Health Foundation, which is helping

contributor Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance copy and content writer with mary macdonell belisle–wordingforyou. She helps individuals, businesses, and nonprofits choose their words wisely and effectively. Her website is: www.wordingforyou.com.

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GALLUP-HEALTHWAYS

GSDC introduce the GallupHealthways Well-Being 5 Index® to businesses over three years. The index highlights five elements of well-being: (1) Purpose (2) Social (3) Financial (4) Community and (5) Physical. The initiative provides companies with a structure, mentors, resources, and ways to measure their efforts and enhance wellness activities already underway. Investment in the Whole Person Park Industries, St. Cloud, has renewed its focus on the importance of well-being activities, said Kelly Hansen, human resources director,

whose responsibility is to champion “Park Well.” Three Park Well committees organize wellness efforts. “Live Well” concentrates on making it rewarding to work at Park Industries by coordinating company meetings, appreciation events, recognition, etc. “Give Well” encourages employees to give to the community through United Way donations, Day of Caring activities, and Park’s Midnight Run for homeless youth. “Be Well” addresses career health and wealth. Guest speakers cover topics like identity theft, retirement saving, lifting techniques,

Well-Being 5 Index® Purpose

Physical

Social

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Community

Financial

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47


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Feature WELLNESS RESOURCE

Community Resources

Professional resources are available for companies to consult when crafting their worksite well-being programs.

M

elissa O’Connell is a Wellness Coalition of America (WELCOA) certified coach and the YMCA’s corporate wellness coordinator. She helps companies plan wellness activities, including walking “step challenges,” on-site seminars, fitness classes, and 1-on-1 fitness coaching, covering all five aspects of well-being. Because family health affects employee health, the YMCA develops family events, sponsored by businesses committed to employee well-being. For example, the Bernick’s Family Fitness Series of four seasonal events, sponsored by KCLD radio, Times Media, and Bernick’s have

organized Anderson Trucking’s “ATS Trail Run” and CentraCare’s “Wishbone Walk/Run.” “We want to create a wellness package that makes sense, fits the budget, offers unique benefits to that particular company, and we want to make sure that people participate,” said Chad Johnson, corporate wellness coordinator for Rejuv Medical. Rejuv concentrates on getting a baseline wellness reading for all involved employees then creating a fun competitive event where success benchmarks can be tracked. Of course, prizes provided by the contracting companies are awarded to winners.

Bob Feuling has been awarded the MLBA Board Member of the Year for 2014 Liquor, Beer & Wine is all we do!! There’s One Near You!! ********************************* Westside Liquor offers the best selection of Beer & Craft Beer, Wine & Liquor in the State ********************************* Our temperature controlled atmosphere offers the freshest products at everyday low prices. *********************************

6 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! 8 AM - 10 PM Monday - Saturday Albertville.................... 763-497-7789 Little Falls.................... 320-632-2582 Rice.............................. 320-393-4513 St Cloud...................... 320-259-7740 Sauk Centre................. 320-352-5920 Waite Park................... 320-253-9511

Visit our web site at: www.westsideliquor.com

Bob & Linda are also owners of other businesses in Sartell: Liquid Assets, MacKenzie’s, Westside Learning & Events Center and The Pantry

L o o k i n g fo r a p la c e to h o ld y o u r e v e n t ...Yo u h a v e fo u n d i t h e r e ! Westside Learning and Event Center is great for showers, breakfast or lunch business meetings, staff education meetings, anniversaries or any type of party you are doing. We also hold various many of our own events you are encouraged to attend.  See our website for details. www.westsidelearningcenter.com or call 320-257-5097

Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am - 3:00 pm Sunday Closed

MacKenzie’s is your place to find everything you need to enhance your unique style. Stop in today and look through our exclusive designs, hand picked just for you! We get in new items every week and only get a couple of each to ensure the items you are buying are original. 1091 2nd Street South, Sartell, MN 56377 | 320.259.7713

48

More than just a coffee house. Come for the coffee, bakery goods, homemade soup, paninis and more We have FREE high speed wireless internet service, outdoor patio seating and a very comfy atmosphere.

Mon thru Thurs, 6am - 9pm Fri, 6am - 7pm Sat, 7am - 4pm Sun, 8am - 4pm

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From delicious gourmet foods and effortless baking mixes, to useful and unique kitchenware, you will find what you need in The Pantry. Whatever you are looking for, our friendly staff can help you find just what you need. 1001 2nd St S, Suite 200, Sartell, MN | 320-281-3447

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5

Lifestyle Wellness at Fitness Evolution helps companies implement and maintain wellness programs through the efforts of Wellness Coach Cassandra “Cass” Revermann. “We partner with organizations to offer staff discounts and affordable access to the fitness center,” said Revermann. In addition to providing onsite personal trainers and private “boot camp” services to companies, Lifestyle Wellness provides weekly healthy content for company wellness newsletters, support groups for tobacco cessation, and digital fitness assessments to individuals.


“Poor employee health is correlated with an over 50 percent decrease in overall productivity, costing companies nationally an estimated $225.8 billion annually, or $1,685 per employee per year.” –Minnesota Department of Health (MDH)

and more. Park Industries also provides career training at the St. Cloud Technical & Community College. “If it weren’t for the employees, Park Industries would not be where we are today,” said Hansen of the company’s 270 employees. “It’s important to give back to them, to see that the whole person is taken care of and invested in.” “Years ago, when we did a Medica Shape-Up Challenge, they taught us about holistic

health and about spirituality and the need for time to reflect,” said Mardi Noyes, Catholic Charities’ human resources director. “We’ve held onto that philosophy.” Today Catholic Charities has the “Wellness Challenge” for its 560 employees. This competitive and fun initiative is comprised of Shape-Up Walks, lunch ‘n’ learn sessions, and what Noyes calls a massive day-long health fair, averaging 15 to 20 vendors.

In the past, Catholic Charities has had some difficulty defining exactly what its employees want from a wellness program, observed Noyes. She’s anxious to see what the results of the Well-Being 5 Index survey will reveal for the 2016 initiative. “Well-being is about the entire person, and United Way is known for helping thousands of people through the amazing programs we support throughout the community,” said United Way Executive

Director Jon Ruis. “We are also committed to improving the well-being of individuals and employees who work for our corporate partners. Through giving, volunteering, and teambuilding activities, United Way provides opportunities for our community to get involved and get connected.” For a complete list of sources used in this story visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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SMART BUSINESS: SPECTRUM

Spectrum Business Enterprise Solutions

Delivering Secure, Reliable, Customizable Networking Solutions to St. Cloud Area

Rob Eveker, Director of Sales, Enterprise & Strategic Markets.

S

t. Cloud area business owners, like those nationwide, are experiencing a dramatic shift in business technology needs. Many are juggling to accommodate customer and employee connectivity, regulatory challenges, and competitive markets—while maintaining efficient day-to-day operations. “Leading this technology shift, Spectrum Business Enterprise Solutions, a division of Charter Communications, is committed to helping local business leaders advance the next level of business technology,” says Rob Eveker, Director of Sales, Enterprise & Strategic Markets. “We’re here to partner with our customers to help them quickly and easily adapt to the ever-changing demands of their businesses.”

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The latest waves of technology also bring new regulations designed to mitigate risk of cyber attacks and fraud. Complying with the regulations introduces further technology needs and connectivity requirements. For example, in October, the new EuroPay MasterCard and Visa (EMV) standard takes effect. Banking institutions, restaurants, and retailers will shift from magnetic strip credit cards to chip-and-pin cards, requiring point-of-sale (POS) upgrades which further stress bandwidth and performance.

“WE’RE HERE TO PARTNER WITH OUR CUSTOMERS TO HELP THEM QUICKLY AND EASILY ADAPT TO THE EVER-CHANGING DEMANDS OF THEIR BUSINESSES.” – ROB EVEKER, DIRECTOR OF SALES, ENTERPRISE & STRATEGIC MARKETS.

From BYOD to POS: Trends Drive Technology Shift Gone are the days of a simple customer phone call. Today’s tech-savvy customers want 24/7 broadband connectivity and multiple platforms in which to do so. Businesses and employees are embracing bring-your-own-device (BYOD) work environments and cloud-based applications. While these technologies often dial up employee productivity and increase ROI, the multiple mobile devices strain existing networks.

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These trends, while innovative and productive, give business owners cause for concern regarding the shelf life of their existing bandwidth and infrastructure. Businesses need more sustainability, flexibility, and capacity from their network resources than ever before! Spectrum Business Invests in Infrastructure Spectrum Business continues to invest in expanding and enhancing its fiber optic network. “We take pride in our backbone of fiber infrastructure,” says Eveker. “We’re constantly upgrading to offer the fastest speeds and highest reliability.” This means local customers are able to exceed their current business demands, and have the ability to easily upgrade capacity as their business needs evolve. This infrastructure, along with a collaborative team-based customer support system, sets Spectrum Business apart from the competition. Spectrum Business delivers the most robust, highly reliable, and

affordable Gigabit Internet services in the region. Parent company Charter Communications services an estimated 30.5 million families and businesses in 29 states. Charter is proud to serve the St. Cloud area, and to be one of the largest technology employers in the region. Best In Class Customer Support It takes a team of committed professionals to deliver advanced, complex, customized networking strategies to clients of all sizes. The Spectrum Business teambased approach begins with an account executive and sales engineer working closely with CIOs and IT departments to customize solutions and design technical applications.

Spectrum’s army of locally-based engineers and installation technicians—both highly trained professionals with approximately 95 percent attaining Cisco certification— lay the foundation for the optical-based, gigabit-capable network. “We have a robust support system with each individual striving to provide best in class customer service,” says Rick Danna, Spectrum Business Sales Manager. “From the initial meeting, we bring our customers an entire team with one goal in mind—100 percent customer satisfaction.” Accountability is another critical component of the Spectrum Business model that sets it apart from the competition. Because Spectrum

Business owns and manages the entire network, they are able to immediately take responsibility and solve any service issues as they arise. Spectrum Business maintains Service Level Agreements (SLAs) at 1 gigabit per second rates, which is quickly becoming the standard for rapid data transfer speed. “We call it ‘the three-ones (1-1-1),’ with one gigabit per second, one number to call, and one dedicated team of experts,” Danna explains. Fiber-Based Solutions for St. Cloud Spectrum Business continues to support the current and future needs of its expanding St. Cloud area customer base. “The vibrant St. Cloud area business community is growing at a tremendous pace,” says Eveker. “We are honored to be a part of this community and take our role in supporting its growth seriously. Spectrum Business is here to stay and will continue to provide robust fiber optic infrastructure that will carry the community’s needs well into the future.”

Rick Danna | 612-280-5633 Sales Manager - Major Accounts

For more information on Spectrum Business Fiber and Enterprise Solutions, please contact:

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400 Sundial Drive | Waite Park, MN 56387

www.business.spectrum.com

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Special Focus

FINANCE

DEBT By Whitney Bina

Business debt has grown more than six percent in the last year. Before you head to the bank, be sure you know the difference between good and bad debt. don’t assume they know what’s going on with your business. “When substantial changes occur, contact your financial team immediately,” Schueller said. “Industry-specific changes occur every day making it impossible to keep up with every change for every client.”

B

usiness debt in the United States totaled $12.2 trillion in the first quarter of 2015. That’s up 6.6 percent since 2014, according to the Federal Reserve. It’s no secret businesses depend on debt to start-up and move companies forward, but too much debt leads to trouble. Before reaching for the next round of credit consider these tips for managing business debt.

DO form relationships with a financial team Consider creating a network of advisors to help make business decisions and troubleshoot problems. Successful owners establish relationships with public accountants, personal bankers, financial advisors and other community resources to move their companies forward. “We want to become our clients’ most trusted business

contributor Whitney Bina is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

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advisor,” Steve Schueller, Schlenner Wenner & Co., said. He warns against making major decisions without consulting your accountant first as those decisions could impact your financial or tax situation. “Keep an open dialogue with your business banker,” Mike Grogan, Sentry Bank, said. “Get together on a quarterly basis to go over your financial statements and ask important questions.” DON’T assume they know what’s going on in your industry However close you are with your financial team,

DO take out new debt to move your business forward Healthy debt exists. “If you anticipate an increase in revenue or need to purchase a new piece of equipment to make your company more efficient, take out extra debt,” Schueller said. “If you don’t invest in your business, the competition will run right past you.” Debt used to fund profitable growth and expansion, a new facility, or new equipment is healthy, Grogan echoed. Ultimately, this type of debt makes your business more money. DON’T take on too much unhealthy debt “Debt taken on to pay off other debts is unhealthy,” Schueller said. “Also, debt against disposable items that lose value quickly should be avoided unless you have a plan in place to pay it back quickly.” “Credit card debt that is not paid off in full each month is unhealthy,” Grogan said. “Don’t use credit cards to finance your business. Try to meet needs with existing working capital,” he advises.


“High interest rate credit cards are easy to obtain but hard to pay back.” DO plan, plan, plan Before reaching for easy credit, consider the outcomes carefully. “Always look at the interest rates and the means by which you plan on paying debt off,” Schueller said. “Debt might be necessary, but establish a plan for paying it back.” Grogan suggests using a debt/equity ratio of 3:1. “Too much debt reduces your flexibility, especially when unforeseen circumstances arise.”

Adventures in Finance Christine Panek, Central Minnesota certified public accountant, created a new product focused on financial learning for children and teenagers. Financial Adventure provides monthly hands-on activities to increase knowledge of earning, saving, spending and sharing money. Panek wants to reach children and teenagers now so they avoid making wrong financial decisions that lead to future financial trouble. Financial Adventure journeys are designed for three age groups: 1. Piggy’s: 5-7 years 2. Kids & Teens: 8-18 years 3. Teens Advanced: 13-18 years Parents log onto FinancialAdventure.com to purchase a subscription. Every month, their household receives a packet of tools and activities to teach kids and teens about banking, checking and savings accounts, credit and debt, the economy and more. The website also offers relevant financial information to help parents promote financial literacy with their children. Visit FinancialAdventure.com for more information or to subscribe.

The road to success. Since Larry Logeman bought Executive Express in 2005, the company has been on a fast-track to growth. Larry has grown Executive Express from a small local operation with a few vehicles and employees to a regional transportation enterprise. Along the way, he’s worked with Farmers & Merchants to finance his ambitions. At Farmers & Merchants, we’ve built a reputation for supporting local businesses through fast, local decision-making. And we’re excited to work with entrepreneurs like Larry, whose drive to make a difference is a lot like our own. If you’re ready to start or grow your business, we’re eager to listen.

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Special Focus DOING GOOD

BUSINESS SMART PHILANTHROPY Creating a giving plan can help businesses do well by doing good.

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hilanthropy is an integral part of a healthy community; it makes change happen. Philanthropy also makes good business sense. The biggest challenge to increasing your business’ charitable activity is knowing where to start. If you are a business owner, you are probably bombarded by requests for donations, usually from wonderful organizations that need your support with a fundraising event or capital campaign.

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By Courtney Schmidt

Some businesses find themselves trying to say “yes” to all. Some hold part of their donation budget in reserve, wondering about requests yet to come, and then find themselves at the end of the year not having donated as much as they would have liked. Adopting a donation plan can help you reach your philanthropic goals, and make a positive impact on your community and your business. The first step in adopting a plan is deciding what causes


are important to you or your organization. Are you interested in helping end homelessness? Do you feel passionate about providing scholarships to local students? Looking at where your passions and those of your employees lie, and what makes sense for your particular business, will help frame your plan and fuel your charitable giving. The next step is deciding how your giving will be distributed. Is it on a first come, first served basis starting on January 1? Will you take applications? Can anyone just stop by and request a donation? Will requests need to fit within some criteria you establish? Would setting up a fund at the Community Foundation or Initiative Foundation, out of which your donations are made, streamline your giving? Establishing a distribution plan ensures that your time won’t be wasted and those requesting a donation feel validated in their request. Here are a few examples of how local businesses have approached charitable giving. The Bernick’s Family Foundation established an annual grant round where they take requests from organizations that are focusing on youth and education and health and fitness. Bernick’s strategy is to ensure that their grants are going into communities where Bernick’s operates. “Bernick’s wants to see the communities we serve grow and prosper and we know our charitable giving is making a difference in people’s lives,” according to Jason Bernick, director of corporate affairs at Bernick’s. The Quinlivan & Hughes law firm takes a little different approach to charitable giving.

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Special Focus

The law firm promotes giving back by encouraging its attorneys and staff to volunteer with organizations in the community. The firm then tries to support these same organizations by sponsoring their fundraising events and campaigns. Members of the firm will often

DID YOU KNOW?

make individual donations, but submit them in the name of Quinlivan & Hughes. If your business wishes to be more strategic and systematic in its approach to charitable giving, ask how others handle it, or call one of the local foundations to learn of other resources.

St. Cloud is lucky to have such an involved and supportive business community, and philanthropy is an important

part of that. With a strategic charitable giving plan, your business can do well by doing good.

contributor Courtney Schmidt is the donor relations coordinator at the Central Minnesota Community Foundation.

Accessible Capital Small business owners are confident that they can access capital when

they need it, according to a recent survey. The results include: // Small business owners are 93 percent confident that they can access the capital they need to grow their businesses.

// Generating ideas for growing their business is the single biggest thing that keeps small business owners up at night.

// Almost two-thirds have created a formal growth plan to take their businesses to the next level. Source: American Express OPEN Small Business Growth Pulse survey

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Whether you need to finance a new venture or expand your existing business, our trusted advisors will focus on finding a solution to fit your needs.

St. Cloud Medical Group

Dr. Ellen E. Brown M.D. Obstetrics and Gynecology 320-529-4731 •• www.stcloudmedical.com r. Ellen E. Brown is the most recent addition to the growing Obestetrics and Gynecology department at St. Cloud Medical Group. She received her Doctor of Medicine Degree from Wright State University School of Medicine, Dayton, Ohio. Dr. Brown completed her OB/GYN residency at Wright State University/Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton, Ohio. Dr. Brown has twelve years experience caring for women of all ages as an OB/GYN physician. She joins a staff of four OB/GYN doctors and one Nurse Practitioner at St. Cloud Medical Group, and is currently taking appointments and new patients.

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Purchase a 1/3 Square ad or larger and For more information call Wendy at 320.656.3808 get aHendricks FREE Listing (an $800 value) or whendricks@BusinessCentralMagazine.com Listing includes a photo and edit* Deadline: November 20, 2015 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com TO ADVERTISE

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SMART BUSINESS: QUINLIVAN & HUGHES, P.A.

Quinlivan & Hughes Board Members (l-r): Ron Brandenburg, Dyan Ebert and Steve Schwegman.

4 Steps to Selecting an Attorney That’s Right for You I

t’s not unusual to need legal services from time to time throughout a lifetime. So which firm should an individual or business turn to for quality legal representation? Follow these steps to ensure you get the representation you need and deserve.

1 Identify Your Legal Issue and Available Legal Services

Two names,

The process of selecting an attorney begins with identifying your specific legal issue. Once determined, begin to search locally for attorneys who handle those types of matters. A local firm has the benefit of being able to use

its experiences working within the local legal community to help achieve desired outcomes. 2.Evaluate Experience

Learn more about the attorneys you have identified. Most firms have websites in addition to traditional advertising. Issues to examine include: how long has the attorney been practicing; what types of cases has the attorney handled; and what additional knowledge or experience does the firm have that can help your case? Finding a firm that can support varying needs can save you time, money and provide peace of mind.

one law firm you can trust

3.Consider Personality

Studies indicate that the personality of an attorney is as important as the attorney’s experience. Talk to people who have used the firm or who serve with the attorney on a business, community or professional board. Your goal should be to find an attorney with whom you are comfortable, both personally and professionally. 4.Choosing the Attorney

Once you’ve received a recommendation from people whose opinions you respect, schedule a meeting with the attorney. Prepare by making notes about your issues and gather

supporting information to bring with you so you can present your legal problem in the clearest manner possible. This will also allow you to focus your attention on evaluating the responses the attorney provides about your case. After meeting with the attorney, you will be able to determine if the firm has the experience to handle your case. You should be confident and comfortable working closely with this attorney and firm. It is important that your attorney has explained what is involved in your case, and that you understand the proposed fee. All of these factors will help determine if the attorney is a good fit for you.

For over 90 years, two names have been synonymous with quality legal representation in central Minnesota. Quinlivan and Hughes. TodayQuinlivan our & Hughes is a full service law firm with experience in Insurance Defense and Business firm has grown to 20 attorneys practicing with proven success in nearly Litigation, Professional Liability claims, Business, Commercial and Non-Profit Organizations; every aspect of law. From business and employment, to trust and estate planning, to representing clients in personal injury and business related Employment and Labor; Health Care Compliance; Personal Injury and Workers Compensation; awsuits, there are two names you can trust for all of your legal needs. Quinlivan and Hughes. Real Estate; Tax Law; and Wills, Trusts and Probate areas of the law. With over 90 years serving

Now located in a new location in the heart of St. Cloud. the legal needs of the St. Cloud area, the firm is large enough to support a wide variety of needs, 320-251-1414 quinlivan.com 1740 West St. Germain Street, St Cloud, MN 56301

Names1/3 page Ada.indd 1

but local and small enough to give each client customized personal attention.

12/12/14 8:48 AM

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SMART BUSINESS: SENTRY BANK

Sentry Bank’s Tradition of Excellence Continues with A+ Rating

Independent community bank is one of the nation’s Top 200 Healthiest Banks

T

he banking industry has recognized what their customers have always known––Sentry Bank does banking right. This is stated humbly because their goal has never been to win awards. Instead, Sentry has simply worked to do the right thing by their customers and the communities they serve. President Darren Heying took the reins of Sentry Bank in January, doubling down on the bank’s record of making sound business decisions in the best interest of both the bank and the community. How does Sentry accomplish this? Here’s a short list: • Received 2015 Healthy Bank recognition by DepositAccounts. com, an unbiased comparison website, for deposit growth, capitalization, and two industry standards: Texas Ratio and Texas Ratio trend • Fulfills customers’ needs and builds relationships in Central Minnesota • Offers competitive products and services with a friendly, personal touch • Serves small local communities from four convenient, easily accessed locations • Manages with the oversight and expertise of local owners who are established business leaders “Sentry Bank is constantly looking to improve the

Darren Heying, CEO/President

“I AM PROUD OF OUR BANK’S HISTORY, AND LOOK FORWARD TO ITS FURTHER GROWTH AND FUTURE CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUR COMMUNITY.” – DARREN HEYING, CEO/PRESIDENT products we offer customers.” They have upgraded their Online Banking and Bill Pay, and now offer in-house mortgage loans. “This means you don’t have to worry about us selling your mortgage to another bank,” says Heying. “You make payments directly to us, and if you have any questions, you speak directly to the person who set up the mortgage. This personal touch is very important.”

Sentry Bank

Four Convenient Locations:

320-363-7721 mysentrybank.com

St. Joseph, St. Cloud West St. Cloud Downtown St. Stephen

Sentry Bank has been a part of the Central Minnesota community for over 110 years. Throughout, they have worked with local businesses to help them grow. Sentry has also been an active civic member, spearheading local initiatives that have helped make this a great place to live. “The development and growth of our communities is vital to our success, and our integrity is of the utmost importance,” says Heying, born and raised in Central Minnesota. “We always strive to do the right thing for the health of our bank and the well-being of the people and communities we serve.”

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Bryan ___________Wellner, AVP Mary Skuza, Compliance Officer

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Ryan Holthaus, Commercial Lender


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SPECIAL SECTION:

American Heritage Bank

FINANCIAL SERVICES DIRECTORY:

CDS Financial Services, LLC

Brian Chance Hooper CPA, CFP®, PFS TM, AAMS®

Wealth Manager (320) 235-3311 •• chooper@cds-financial.com www.cds-financial.com Where more than just money… relationships are our business. Small businesses rely on advisors to help them make the best possible decisions. Central Minnesota has a wide variety of financial and professional services providers ready to help you with your investment and growth decisions. The following directory showcases a number of businesses that are available to assist you. Take a look, and when you find one that fits your needs, give them a call and see how they can help you grow your company.

West St. Cloud – (320) 654-9555 East St. Cloud – (320) 257-5000 Offices also in Long Prairie and Browerville

CDS Financial Services, LLC is an independent firm dedicated to providing experienced guidance on all aspects of wealth plan management. Our experienced team will work with you to identify your personal needs and values, then implement and monitor a plan designed to help you pursue financial independence. Our wealth management strategies include: retirement planning, investment planning, education planning, tax strategies, estate planning, business strategies, insurance, risk management and gifting strategies. Call us at (320) 235-3311 to schedule a free, no-obligation consultation and discover how we can help you pursue your financial goals. Securities offered through LPL Financial, member FINRA/SIPC. • There is no guarantee that an investment strategy will yield positive outcomes. Investing involves risk, including loss of principal.

Member FDIC

Central Minnesota Credit Union

Plaza Park Bank

Proviant Group Proviant Group

Travis Moore

Jim Schleper

Branch Manager 888.330.8482 travism@mycmcu.org myCMCU.org

Executive Director of Business Banking NMLS #769488 jschleper@plazapark.com 320-257-3305 •• www.plazaparkbank.com

Central Minnesota Credit Union is a full-service, not-for-profit financial cooperative. Earnings are returned to members through better rates and lower fees.

“We are locally owned and managed, which makes a difference—each week we’re making decisions that we feel are best for our clients. Business owners like knowing that the people making the decisions all live and work in our community. Each of us at the bank has a genuine desire to do what is best for you (the client) and I think that comes through in how we conduct business.”

When you plan ahead for your financial future, you’re better prepared to live the life you want. That’s why we’re here. We’re Proviant Group — a team of experienced advisors that can help you define your unique financial financialjourney. journey. So when you finally arrive, you dream. youcan can be ready to live your dream. Call us, or start your journey at ProviantGroup.com.

Our St. Joseph branch features extended drive-up hours: M-T 7:00 am – 6:00 pm Friday 7:00 am – 7:00pm Saturday 8:00 am – Noon

Visit Jim in our Waite Park location today!

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320.6654. 54.66715 • proviantgroup. .proviantgroup.com 320. c om 1765 Roosevelt Rd. St Cloud, MN Ameriprise Financial cannot guarantee future financial results. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2014 2015 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.


Farmers & Merchants State Bank

Greg Hohlen

Eric Peterson Commercial Loan Officer (320) 252-5121 eric.peterson@fmpierz.com fmpierz.com Farmers & Merchants State Bank offers an array of business loan options. Eric and our commercial lending department are dedicated to providing the best in timely service to complement our highly competitive products. Our products are flexible and we’ll strive to meet your individual needs. We offer lines of credit, equipment & asset financing, commercial real estate & construction loans as well as an SBA loan program.

SBA Lender 320-259-3342 gregh@minnwestbankgroup.com www.minnwestbank.com

John Herges

Minnwest proudly carries the SBA preferred lender distinction. That honor alone, given to SBA’s best lenders, carries it weight in gold when you need financing options. Because of our SBA status, we can fast track your SBA loan application.

Stearns Bank

President and CEO 320-223-6300 jherges@falconnational.com www.falconnational.com A DOOR THAT’S ALWAYS OPEN. Mine. We understand that no two businesses are alike; that’s why we offer a unique, personalized approach to business banking. If you value a dedicated staff, local decision-making, and money to loan when you’re ready to borrow, you’ll appreciate Falcon National Bank. That’s reality. Member FDIC.

Sentry Bank

Isaac Flenner

Darren Heying, Doug Danielson & Mike Grogan

Vice President 320-258-5720 IsaacF@stearnsbank.com www.stearnsbank.com Isaac has been with Stearns for 10 years focused on Commercial and SBA lending across Central Minnesota and beyond. As a nationwide Preferred SBA Lender, Stearns offers FastTrack loans $350,000 or less approved in hours, loans up to $5 Million in days! Stearns is a $1.9 billion, top-ranked national bank focused on small business and equipment financing with an established history delivering outstanding customer service and local decisions. Isaac strives to deliver on our trademark slogan: We get the job done! When not at work, Isaac enjoys playing golf and spending time with his family.

Falcon National Bank

Minnwest Bank

Commercial Lending Team 320-363-7721 Doug.Danielson@mysentrybank.com Darren.Heying@mysentrybank.com Michael.Grogan@mysentrybank.com Since 1904, Sentry Bank has been locally owned and operated, which means we are able to make decisions quickly. Being an SBA Preferred Lender allows us to provide you with more options to get you the funding you need when you need it.

Serving the legal needs of the St. Cloud area for over 90 years.

quinlivan.com

Member FDIC

320-251-1414

1740 West St. Germain Street St Cloud, MN 56301

EQUAL HOUSING

LENDER

• Business • Commercial • Non-Profit • Insurance Defense • Business Litigation • Employment & Labor • Real Estate • Professional Liability • Personal Injury • Workers Compensation • Wills/Trusts • Tax Law • Health Care Compliance

U.S. Small Business Administration

N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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Business Spotlight

Retired & Admired

1987

After 50 years, eight moves, and four presidents, Chamber Special Events Coordinator Ginny Kroll is saying good-by…almost.

<<Kroll celebrates 25 years at the Chamber

Chamber Special Events Coordinator Ginny Kroll retired Oct. 1

By Gail Ivers

Business Central: How did you end up at the Chamber of Commerce? ______________ Ginny Kroll: I took a secretarial course offered by the State of Minnesota. Part of their service was to set up job interviews for us. I interviewed at Northwestern Bank, St. Cloud Credit Bureau, and the Chamber of Commerce. I decided whoever called first, that’s where I was going. The Chamber called first. BC: What was your biggest challenge? ______________ Kroll: Learning. I didn’t know anything when I started. I didn’t know anything about business, anything about St. Cloud. I had no idea what a chamber of commerce was. I was scared to death to talk to people. I didn’t know my way around St. Cloud, just my own

62

Circa 1970

neighborhood. I didn’t know how to give directions. Glenn (Carlson, Chamber president at the time) told people he didn’t think I would make it. I heard about that, and I thought, Oh, yes I will! BC: How have things changed? ______________ Kroll: We only had four employees and there was no Convention and Visitors Bureau. Sauk Rapids had their own Chamber, they weren’t part of St. Cloud. There was no Waite Park Chamber. We didn’t do any training, we didn’t do the golf outing, and we had, maybe, 500 members. We used an “Address-OGraph” to label letters. We used to have a Retail Division. On Presidents’ Day our office would be full of cherry pies. The retailers would tell us how many cherry pies they wanted, we would

Business Central Magazine // N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5

Fun Fact: “I played the drums in my husband’s old time and country western band in my earlier days. It was not my thing. He thought I had musical talent. Hmm, glad that gig is over!”

order them, then the retailers would pick them up and give them away to their customers. There were cherry pies everywhere!

PERSONAL PROFILE

BC: What are you going to miss? ______________

Retired: Sept. 30, 2015

Kroll: I’m going to miss all of you. All the people. All the businesses. All the volunteers. If people don’t belong to the Chamber, they should. Where else are you going to make these kinds of connections? When I think of where I was at when I started – I didn’t know anything! And now I’m the historian, the go-to person when people have questions. You need historians, but fresh faces are good, too. I love what I’m doing. That’s why it’s taken so long to make the decision to retire. But I won’t be leaving entirely! I’m still going to staff the Farm Show through 2016.

Education: Graduated from Technical High School; graduated from a 20 week secretarial certificate program offered by the State of Minnesota

Virginia “Ginny” Kroll, 69 Special Events Coordinator St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Start date: Feb. 1, 1965 Hometown: Grew up in St. Cloud, currently lives in Sauk Rapids

Work Experience: The Hay’s Theatre in downtown St. Cloud; St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Family: Married to her husband Tom for 46 years; two adult children: Arnel who is in the Army currently stationed in Korea and Emely, who lives in Hawaii and is studying to be a clinical psychologist Hobbies: Crafts, gardening, playing Bunco and 500; belongs to a homemakers group – “I get program ideas from the fun things we do at the Chamber.”


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November/December 2015  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine

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