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Injuries happen fast.

Now your care does too. OrthoDirect at St. Cloud Orthopedics is your new route to same-day specialized treatment. Be seen at our clinic as quickly as possible! From sprains and broken bones to dislocated shoulders and torn ligaments, the very best treatment for your injury is right within reach. And timely treatment means quicker recovery.

Same-day appointments for urgent orthopedic injuries. 8:00 am – 5:00 pm • Monday – Friday Walk-ins welcome!

Call 320>257>STAT for any urgent injury or accident— we’ll assess your situation and make a same-day appointment for you with one of our specialists. When you come in, we’ll care for you with a specialized plan based on your specific needs.

StCloudOrthopedics.com 320›257›STAT Faster treatment, better outcomes. Hands down.

Now open at St. Cloud Orthopedics! 1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell


Master Craftsmen. Beautiful Results. Nothing beats the beauty of natural stone. Every piece holds its own unique pattern and texture. But poorly installed stone can be a nightmare. At Artistic Stone & Concrete, our master craftsmen understand the complexities of proper setting techniques for natural stone.

Our craftsmen have product knowledge from the quarry to the fabricator. They are experienced in engineering and architecture as well as have an artistic eye for bringing out the stone’s natural beauty. The result is a beautiful focal point that will last a lifetime.

artisticstoneandconcrete.com

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320.363.7781


6 President’s Letter 18 Business Calendar

March/April 2015

CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

PROFIT

40 Cover Story

BUSINESS AS USUAL

8 Editor’s Note 26 Network Central

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C E L E B R AT I N G 1 5 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

40

Christy and Grant Gilleland plan to grow the family business by focusing on the mission and vision that guided the company to its current success.

46 Feature

A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE From urban planning to consumerism, sustainable business practices touch every part of our lives…and impact your bottom line.

50 Special Focus MAKING A MOVE

If you’re relocating your business remember the three Ps: Planning, Partners and Positivity

51 Special Section COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION

10 UPFRONT Valuable and important information designed to guide and educate.

28 BUSINESS TOOLS Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business.

54 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Dave Toeben, Insight Insurance Services

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2015 Business Central, LLC

• 2015 “Getting Started In Business Guide”

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• Tips for digital marketing

110 Sixth Avenue South; P.O. Box 487,

• Using YouTube • Generating leads

Business Central is published six times a year

St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


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DOT Exams We understand the need to keep your drivers safely on the road. Our nationally certified physicians provide DOT exams in accordance with federal regulations.

Also available: • Drug screening

• Pre-placement exams

• Audiograms

• Surveillance exams

• Respirator clearance

• Workers’ compensation injury care

Karyn Leniek, MD, MPH Board certified in Occupational Medicine and Preventive Medicine

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT Nicole Anderson

320-203-2450 Nicole.E.Anderson@hpcmc.com | hpcmc.com/occmed

This service is available to all companies. HealthPartners insurance is not needed.


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President’s Letter MAIN PHONE

|

320-251-2940

AUTOMATED RESERVATION LINE 320-656-3826 PROGRAM HOTLINE 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com WWW.STCLOUDAREACHAMBER.COM

On the Move

ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF PRESIDENT Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104

A

s our Chamber grows, so does our commitment to meet the needs of our members in the best way possible. Last spring, with our lease renewal a year away, our Board of Directors decided to explore location alternatives that would make our Chamber even stronger. I contacted Chamber member and local property owner Jim Knoblach, who had expressed interest in working with us in the past. Jim had a unique opportunity at The Professional Center, 1411 W St. Germain St. He invited us to look at the property, whose last tenant was an orthodontist. It was difficult to picture what might be possible, but there were benefits that fit our needs perfectly. First, and foremost, the

of it.) No more feeding

programs, the space will be

ability to co-locate the

parking meters or collecting

available to members when

Chamber offices with our

yellow love notes from the

not in use by the Chamber

Convention and Visitors

SCPD from our volunteers’

or CVB.

Bureau (CVB), joining

windshields.

––––––––––––––––––––––

staff and regaining the

––––––––––––––––––––––

Enhanced visibility on

efficiencies of co-location

Space for a larger, more

West St. Germain Street.

we enjoyed 15 years ago.

versatile conference room. In

––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––––––

addition to accommodating

Dedicated, private and more

FREE parking!!! (And LOTS

larger groups for our training

convenient restrooms.

Design of the space began. With the walls framed up we could see the potential. The painful process of choosing paint and flooring, determining placement of the electricity and data ports, and the hundreds of other renovation decisions were challenging, but helped me develop a whole new set of skills. We are completing a capital campaign in March, ensuring that your membership investment dollars remain dedicated to providing programming and events that help make your business successful. Thank you to those who chose to contribute to the renovation fund conceived and led by John Herges of Falcon National Bank. Your decision to support our new facility is independent of your membership dues and our annual operating budget. Shortly after this Business Central arrives in your mailbox, we will be in our new facility. Please be patient, as we anticipate the finishing touches may take some time. Watch for an open house later this spring, when we will have a beautiful, fully completed facility of which we hope every member will be proud. We now have a Five Star Facility to match our Five Star Accreditation status! I look forward to meeting you soon at the NEW Chamber office.

VICE PRESIDENT Gail Ivers, ext. 109 DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 SPECIAL EVENTS COORDINATOR Virginia Kroll, ext. 105 COMMUNICATIONS & WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Whitney Bina, ext.130

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Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Sharon Henry, ext. 124 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Cindy Swarthout, ext. 100

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF MAIN PHONE | 320-251-4170 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Julie Lunning, ext. 111

SALES MANAGER Nikki Fisher, ext. 112

DIRECTOR OF CONVENTION SALES Lori Cates, ext. 113

SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR Dana Randt, ext. 110

DIRECTOR OF SPORTS & SPECIAL EVENTS Kelly Sayre, ext. 128 DIRECTOR OF VISITOR SERVICES Jean Robbins, ext. 129

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Carrie Zwack, ext. 100

2014-15 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Board Vice Chair

Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care

Dan Bittman, Sauk Rapids-Rice School District

Dolora Musech, Batteries Plus Bulbs

Dave Borgert, CentraCare Health Neil Franz, Franz Hultgren Evenson, Professional Association Jayne Greeney Schill, St. Cloud Area School District #742 Jim Gruenke, Mark J. Traut Wells Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

MEMBERSHIP SALES SPECIALIST Jaime Buley, ext. 134

John Herges, Falcon National Bank, Past Board Chair Dennis Host, Coborn’s Inc.

Kris Nelson, Custom Accents, Inc., Board Chair Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Dr. Earl Potter, III, St. Cloud State University Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services Melinda Vonderahe, Times Media Bea Winkler, Pine Cone Pet Hospital Chriss Wohlleber, Le St. Germain Suite Hotel


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Editor’s Note

My Favorite Car

M

y first car was a 1972 Chevrolet Nova that I bought from my Dad for $1. It was orange — flame orange — with a black roof and black vinyl interior. You could say it was distinct. I had a lot of adventures in that car. One summer, while I was still in college, my boy friend and I went to the Minnesota State Fair. We were driving home at midnight when we heard an unnatural rattle and the “check engine light” came on. We pulled off the freeway and found a phone booth. (This was pre-cell phone days.) We were two hours away from my parents and 30 minutes away from his parents. He refused to call them for assistance. I was furious. Finally, frustrated beyond speech, I called my parents. My dad talked me down and told me I had to insist that my boy friend call his parents. By 3 a.m. I was finally settled in their spare bedroom. My mom always said that was the beginning of the end for that boy friend. By far my greatest adventure involved the radio in that car. It had a radio antenna embedded in the front windshield. At some point along the way my dad had the windshield replaced. After that the radio never worked properly. No doubt you can imagine how the conversations went with my dad: Me: “The radio doesn’t work.” Dad: “Of course it does.” Me: “No it doesn’t.” Dad: “It never worked.” Me: “Yes it did.” Dad: “The radio has gone bad.” Me: “It went bad at the same time you replaced the windshield?” Dad: “It never worked in the first place.” Me: “Yes it did.” And on and on.

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Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5

PUBLISHER Teresa Bohnen MANAGING EDITOR Gail Ivers ASSOCIATE EDITOR Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

One day, while I was interning at the St. Cloud Hospital, I noticed a Harmon Auto Glass store on my route. That was where my dad had gone to replace the window in my Nova. I drove over there and explained my situation to the service advisors. I assured them that I did not expect them to replace the window. I just wanted to prove to my dad that I was right about the antenna. They understood and found a matching window. They unplugged my antenna, ' plugged in the new antenna and Voila! Music flooded into my car. Ha! A sweet “I told you so”. You may think that this was my favorite car because it was my first. Or maybe because it was a Chevy. (No doubt Christy and Grant Gilleland of Gilleland Chevrolet would like to think that’s the reason! See their story on page 40.) Or maybe because it was orange. Not so. This is my favorite car because the antenna didn’t work. Because the antenna didn’t work I took the car to Harmon Glass in St. Cloud to prove a point to my dad. One of the men who waited on me that day invited me to go to the Benton County Fair with him...and later to spend my life with him. That was 32 extraordinary years ago. And that was one special car. Until next issue,

King Banaian, St. Cloud State University

Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Bill Blazar, Minnesota Chamber

Tracy Knofla, High Impact Training

Whitney Bina, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Sharon Henry, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University

Jocelyn Kortan and Joe Westerlind, Mahowald Insurance Betsey Lund, Lund Sauter, P. A. Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle wordingforyou John Pepper, Freelance Writer Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage

ADVERTISING ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/SALES Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing AD TRAFFIC & CIRCULATION Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART DESIGN & PRODUCTION Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media COVER PHOTO Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman CORPORATE SPONSOR

110 Sixth Avenue South P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION CONTACT Wendy Hendricks, (320) 656-3808

PS: In the interest of full disclosure... this is not an actual picture of my car. But it could be!

EDITORIAL SUGGESTIONS CAN BE MADE IN WRITING TO: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.


StCloudMedical.com

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UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

12 18

Voice in Government Business Calendar

14 Getting Going 16 20 New at the Top 24

It Happened When? The Trouble with Business

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NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Dream Big

NEWS REEL

Whether at work or play, our thoughts mold who we are and who we will become. By Dr. Fred Hill

J

ames Allen was born in 1864; he died in 1912. He was a 19th Century businessman, who, at age 38, left his employment to spend his time contemplating and writing. Writing for nine years he produced 19 works. As A Man Thinketh was his most famous work. It was published in 1902. It is one of my treasured books. My particular copy was published in 1960. There are several editions of this classic book and it is easy to find. James Allen’s Foreword to this book reads: This little volume (the result of meditation and experience) is not intended as an exhaustive treatise on the much-writtenupon subject of the power of thought. It is suggestive rather than explanatory, its object being to stimulate men and women to the discovery and perception of the truth that they themselves are makers of themselves by virtue of the thoughts which they choose and encourage…

DID YOU KNOW?

As A Man Thinketh, by James Allen, The Peter Pauper Press, New York, 1960, ISBN 10:0880880376

The book consists of seven chapters. They are: Thought and Character, Effect of Thought on Circumstances, Effect of Thought on Health and the Body, Thought and Purpose, The Thought Factor in Achievement, Visions and Ideals, and Serenity. Here are a few of his beautiful thoughts from throughout his book: A man is literally what he thinks, his character being the complete sum of all his thoughts.

Man is a growth by law, and not a creature by artifice. Man is the master of thought and the molder of character. Thought and character are one. Circumstances grow out of thought. The body is the servant of the mind. Clean thoughts make clean habits. Thought must be linked with purpose. Achievement comes as a result of one’s thoughts. The dreamers are the saviors of the world. Dream lofty dreams, and as you dream, so shall you become. Calmness of mind is one of the beautiful jewels of wisdom. A man becomes calm in the measure that he understands himself as a thought-evolved being. Selfcontrol is strength. Calmness is power. Allen’s 19 works illustrate the use of the power of thought to increase personal capabilities. Think about reading this one. Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor from St. Cloud State University.

Northland Capital showcased

Northland Capital Financial Services was showcased in a nationally televised production called Manufacturing Marvels on the Fox Business Network. The program highlighted the Northland Capital brand, its services, and the company’s commitment to providing business capital with integrity, commitment and excellence.

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PETERS, ORBECK RECOGNIZED Karly Peters and Kate Orbeck, ProcessPro, received Bronze Stevie Awards for Women in Business. Peters was awarded in the Woman of the Year – Advertising, Marketing & Public Relations category. Orbeck was awarded in the Employee of the Year – Business – All Other Industries category. The Stevie Awards for Women in Business represent the world’s top honors for female entrepreneurs, executives, employees and the organizations they run.

CENTRACARE ACQUIRES LOCAL CLINICS, HIRES Adult & Pediatric Urology (APU) joined CentraCare Health as CentraCare Clinic – Adult & Pediatric Urology. APU is the largest full-service urology clinic in Central Minnesota. Central Minnesota Neurosciences (CMN) also joined CentraCare Health. CMN serves patients in need of spine and brain care. Katie Murray, RN, CNP, joined CentraCare Clinic – Big Lake. Murray completed her nursing degree at the College of St. Benedict and her master’s degree in the nursing and family nurse practitioner program at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

METRO BUS HIRES, PROMOTES Metro Bus recently hired Paula Mastey as director of finance. Tom Cruikshank was promoted to managing director of operations and planning. Cruikshank has worked for Metro Bus since 1990.


Jeff Gau CEO Marco, Inc.

smarter technology Technology is a different animal. It can be expensive, overwhelming to keep up with and hard to wrap your head around. Yet it’s critical to the success of your business. That’s why choosing the right technology provider is so important. Marco puts the power of top-notch technology expertise to work for your business. We’ll help you choose the right technology and keep it running smoothly day in and day out. Our performancedriven approach empowers you to make the most of your technology investment. That’s working smarter. Learn more and get empowered at marconet.com.

marconet.com

#mpowering

taking technology further


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UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL MARCO PROMOTES, RECEIVES RECOGNITION

Hiring Minnesota Heroes Connecting employers with veterans contributes to a vibrant economy. By Bill Blazar

Marco, Inc. announced the following promotions:

(L-R) Jonathan Warrey, COO

Steve Gau, vice president of sales Fritz Wensel, senior director of IT sales

(L-R) Trevor Akervik, senior

director of managed services Kurt Meemken, manager of software solutions Mike Welling, director of managed IT services

(L-R) Tyler Ebnet, copier sales

manager in Cedar Rapids, IA Clint Dorgan, production systems sales manager Michael Tomsche, copier sales manager in Rochester Spencer Hulsebus, copier installation manager in St Cloud The company received 2014 Elite Dealer recognition by ENX magazine and The Week in Imaging, a print and online publication for dealers and resellers of office technology, solutions and services. North Dakota Young Professionals named Marco the 2014 Best Place to Intern and runner-up for the 2014 Best Place to Work. The awards honor businesses investing in young professionals through valuable internship opportunities. Marco engineers Clay Ostlund and Nick Thompson completed their Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) certification in Brussels, Belgium. This designation is accepted worldwide as the most prestigious networking certification in the industry.

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H

iring Minnesota Heroes, a new program of the Minnesota Chamber, encourages employers to develop and implement programs focused on hiring military veterans. Veterans are a valuable and underused portion of our state’s workforce. Approximately 381,000 veterans live in Minnesota. Their talents and leadership experiences bridge the entire spectrum of knowledge, skills and abilities. We recognize that Minnesota has a variety of organizations dedicated to helping veterans get ready for work. What’s lacking, however, is an equally well-organized initiative aimed at Minnesota

employers. The Minnesota Chamber is ideally suited to fill that need. Our staff connects with hundreds of employers each year. Our statewide network of local chamber partners has the pulse of their local business communities. We are ready to recruit employers, help them adopt veteran hiring goals, and then, most importantly, meet those goals. Hiring Minnesota Heroes addresses two needs important to maintaining a vital state economy: 1.Our state needs workers at all skill levels. The Minnesota demographer estimates that the growth rate for our workforce will decline and slow to a trickle through 2030. Businesses statewide are already reporting difficulty filling the openings they need to develop and grow here. 2. Hiring Minnesota Heroes will help the men and women who have served our nation start or resume their careers in Minnesota. The unemployment rate among veterans is higher than the state’s overall rate, and the percent that has stopped

looking for work is about twice that for the state as a whole. Hiring Minnesota Heroes identifies three steps for employers: Prepare: Evaluate your current plan, and then brand yourself as military friendly. _________ Recruit: Engage your community in the search with an initial goal of hiring one veteran each year. _________ Empower: Enhance your work environment; celebrate your military personnel on Veterans Day. We will learn from and thank those companies that are already fullspeed ahead on veterans hiring initiatives. We will publicize their initiatives and ours, showing how it’s benefitting the profitability, productivity and leadership development within organizations. Many companies have the will to create a military hiring initiative, but due to various operational challenges, fall short in carrying it out. Hiring Minnesota Heroes is here to help.

contributor Bill Blazar is interim president of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce. Former State Senator Ted Daley is overseeing Hiring Minnesota Heroes. He has more than 20 years of military, legislative and policy/issue advocacy management. You can contact him directly at ted.daley@mnchamber.com.


Cure your ouch FROM THE COUCH

CentraCare eClinic is a convenient way for Minnesota residents age 2 to 65 to receive treatment for common health conditions. For just $25*, eClinic is available to treat: • • • • • • •

acne athlete’s foot cold/canker sores or fever blisters cold, sinus infection or sore throat constipation and/or diarrhea diaper rash (pediatric) eczema or dermatitis

• • • • • • •

female bladder infection hay fever/allergies heartburn or reflux influenza/flu prevention pink eye

See web site for full list of conditions treated

ringworm selected medication refills

After completing an online interview, you will receive a treatment plan from a CentraCare provider within 60 minutes between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily. Visit centracare.com/eclinic to get started. * Plus cost of any prescription. You are only charged if your condition can be safely treated online.


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UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL ST. BENEDICT’S SENIOR COMMUNITY HONORED St. Benedict’s Senior Community received a Community Partnership Award for the Intergenerational Program with Clearview Elementary school in St. Cloud. The program connects 4th grade students to residents at St. Benedict’s Senior Community twice a month to spend time together reading books, doing arts and crafts, and sharing stories. The Community Partnership Award recognizes the efforts of Care Providers of Minnesota members to create partnerships with community groups or organizations outside of the care profession, which improve the quality of life for senior living residents.

A Business Aversion to Taxes Paying your taxes with a check or by payroll deduction may amount to the same thing, but it doesn’t feel that way. By Greg Vandal

KOSEL RECEIVES LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD Tom Kosel, director of government relations, Minnesota School of Business, part of the Globe Education Network, received the 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Minnesota Career Colleges Association (MCCA). Kosel has served as the MCCA legislative chair since 2000.

EXECUTIVE EXPRESS HIRES, ADDS STOP LOCATION Executive Express added a new stop location at the EZ Stop in Royalton, bringing their total stop locations in Minnesota to 42. The company also hired the following people: Jaime Forcum, Minnesota assistant branch manager; Josie Luebesmier, office coordinator/ human resource administrator; and Bill Howe, drive team leader.

HEARTLAND GLASS PROMOTES TORGERSON Heartland Glass Company has promoted Ryan Torgerson to general manager. Torgerson started at Heartland Glass in 2001 and has held various roles including sales, estimator, and project manager.

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I

t was in the 1970s, several decades removed from today, when my wife and I first felt the tribulations of taxation. We were saving dutifully for that dreaded down payment on a starter home. At year-end, when we got our taxes done for the very first time as a married couple, the preparer turned out to be the bearer of bad tidings. It seemed we owed about the exact same amount in state and federal taxes as we had squirreled away for a house. I well remember my youthful indignation, unfairly directed at the accountant, over having to

spend our savings on taxes. I also remember going in to the school business office – we were both teachers back then – and changing our standard deductions so that the “proper” amount was taken out of each paycheck. I did not again, as a school employee, find myself having to write a check to the government when income tax time came around. And, a kind of “out of sight, out of mind” mentality probably settled in over the ensuing years. Flash forward four decades. I now make a living as an independent contractor. In consulting work for private and public sector clients alike, I submit statements and draw compensation unencumbered by standard deductions and the like. The first time I had to write a check for the estimated quarterly income taxes I owed was a real eye-opener. Arguably, over time, the same percentage of my income was “spent” on taxes when I made payment through payroll deduction. Somehow, though, it didn’t feel the same then as when I now have to send funds directly from my business

account. The rational mind would suggest that either method of payment has the same net result. But the emotional response I have when writing checks on a quarterly basis, sometimes in amounts that could otherwise fund a nice vacation or pay for something for the business, is simply quite different. For most of my adult life, personal earnings were realized through a tax-supported industry, the public schools. I often heard complaints about perceived high taxes to fund those schools, and the gripes seemed to come most vehemently from the owner/manager sectors of the business community. I knew that, proportionately, my tax investment equaled that of the complainers. But I didn’t understand then that the physical act of issuing a check from hard earned funds for which there are often competing interests is simply different than having those same dollars taken before they are really even noticed in the first place. Perhaps, that is at least a part of where tax aversion is born in the business community.

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@ voxliberi.com.


PEOPLE TO KNOW

Brenda Eisenschenk

InteleCONNECT, Inc. ____________ (320) 257-7400 brenda@inteleconnect.net Chair, Top Hatters

____________

The Top Hatters are the Chamber’s ambassadors, welcoming new members, congratulating members who have expanded or relocated, and serving as greeters and hosts at Chamber events.

Erik Hanson Thrivent Financial ____________

(320) 253-4382 erik.hanson@thrivent.com Chair, Chamber Connection

____________

Chamber Connection is the premier networking event for businesses in Central Minnesota. Hosted by a different Chamber member every Friday morning, Chamber Connection attracts 120 -150 people each week to network and share information about their businesses, all for the price of $1 at the door.

USE US

Dan Anderson Miller, Welle, Heiser & Co., Ltd. ____________

(320) 253-9505 danderson@mwhco.com Chair, Chamber Open

____________

The Chamber Open is an annual networking event for all Chamber members. Volunteers organize the day’s activities, sell sponsorships and help the day of the Open. This year the Chamber Open is Monday, August 10 at the Blackberry Ridge Golf Club.

Caryn Stadther Falcon National Bank ____________ (320) 968-6300 cstadther@ falconnational.com Chair, VIP Committee

____________

The VIP (Value Information Promotion) Retention Committee calls on Chamber members to share information about coming events, inquire about membership satisfaction, and encourage businesses to take full advantage of their Chamber membership.

Bonnie Rodness

Holiday Inn & Suites and Holiday Inn Express ____________ (320) 253-9000 brodness@histcloud.com Chair, St. Cloud Area Chamber’s Convention & Visitors Bureau Advisory Board

____________

The Chamber’s Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB) is dedicated to promoting the St. Cloud area as a premier visitor, sporting, and convention destination and to encouraging community improvements that benefit residents and increase the economic impact of visitors.

for energy efficiency information.

Whatever business you’re in, Xcel Energy’s team of energy efficiency specialists can help you save energy and save money. Contact them at 855-839-8862 or visit ResponsibleByNature.com/business. ResponsibleByNature.com © 2015 Xcel Energy Inc.

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www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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UpFront IT HAPPENED WHEN?

NEWS REEL

March 1993 – Welcome Visitors!

ST. CLOUD OVERHEAD DOOR CO. ANNOUNCES NEW NAME, RECEIVES RECOGNITION St. Cloud Overhead Door Company, including locations in Willmar, Brainerd and Alexandria, unite under a new name: American Door Works. The new brand intends to unify operations and build a stronger connection between both consumers and staff across different markets. The company recently received recognition as the 2015 Door Dealer of the Year by the International Door Association. An awards ceremony is scheduled for April 15th in Indianapolis, IN.

New “Welcome to Saint Cloud” sign near Highways 15 and 23. Circa 1993.

V

isitors who take exit 167B from I-94 to Highway 15 and head north toward St. Cloud, are greeted with a large sign: “Welcome to Saint Cloud.” For those who grew up in the St. Cloud area, it might blend in as you drive past. But in March 1993, the sign

was still a new addition to the St. Cloud community. In 1993, the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce’s Hospitality Division had big plans for St. Cloud. As step one, the division erected the “Welcome to Saint Cloud” sign near the intersection

In 2015, the sign remains just off Highway 15 heading north to St. Cloud

Hughes Mathews Greer, P.A. is pleased to announce that

John F. Mathews

has become a shareholder of the firm.

John F. Mathews is a 1999 Cathedral High School graduate, a 2003 graduate of St. John’s University, and a 2010 graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School. He is a third-generation attorney in the law practice established by his grandfather, Fred Hughes, in 1934. John practices primarily in the following areas of law: business (including corporations, limited liability entities, and non-profits), transactions, intellectual property, real estate, land use, and trust and estate planning.

622 Roosevelt Road, Suite 280 Saint Cloud, Minnesota 56301 hughesmathewsgreer.com 320.251.4399 Attorneys@hughesmathews.com W

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POINT OF VIEW

of Highways 15 and 23. The committee planned to erect four more signs just like it around St. Cloud over the next few years. Unfortunately, the project became sidelined after the first sign went up. In addition to the Chamber’s Hospitality Division, some notable community members who helped with the initial sign were: Sam’s Club; Cold Spring Granite Company (now Coldspring); Scenic Sign Corp.; Tom Dietman, Dietman Sanitation; Dundee Nursery; and Voigt Construction.

Business Central asks readers:

“What is one way you decompress after work?”

Play with my dog.”

I like to go to my sitting room and sit on my blue couch that I got from Gypsy Lea’s.”

Fred Durand • Upper Lakes Foods

Jenifer Odette • Brandl Motors

I love to cook.”

Emily Bertram • HatlingFlint

I like to exercise, run and play basketball.”

Jon Eichten • St. Cloud Technical & Community College

SUN UP TO SUN DOWN.

C Jo P S A D

Nothing beats hands-on experience when you’re managing a business. Well, we’ve been around for over 70 years and have more than $8 billion in assets. So if you’re looking for expert advice and financial support tailored to your business, talk to a seasoned Bremer business banker today.

WORK HARD. BANK EASY.

Bremer.com Downtown St. Cloud 251-3300 • West St. Cloud 656-3300 Sauk Rapids 252-1938 • Sartell 255-7121 • Rice 393-2600 800-908-BANK (2265) Member FDIC. ©2014 Bremer Financial Corporation. All rights reserved.

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UpFront

NEWS REEL OVERMAN RECEIVES NATIONAL AWARD Jacob Overman, CFP®, ChFC®, CLU®, financial advisor of Northwestern Mutual in St. Cloud, qualified for the NAIFA Quality Award from the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors (NAIFA). The award recognizes financial representatives for their competence and dedication to the insurance industry and their clients. This is the fourth time he has received this honor.

LOUGHEED JOINS IIW MINNESOTA Whitney Lougheed joined IIW Minnesota as an architect. She brings historic preservation, green building, and specialized commercial design expertise to the growing company. Lougheed holds both a Masters of Architecture and a Bachelors of Science degree in environmental design from North Dakota State University.

BERG RECEIVES AWARD Gary Berg, G.L. Berg Entertainment Performing Artists & Speakers, received the Alumni Distinguished Achievement Award from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (UWEC.) UWEC also selected him to present the commencement addresses at two graduation ceremonies in December.

GATR NOMINATED FOR DEALER OF THE YEAR American Truck Dealers nominated GATR Truck Center President Bob Neitzke for the 2015 Truck Dealer of the Year Award. Nominees were selected by state, metro and national association leaders.

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CAN’ T M IS S O PPO RT U NIT IES TO INF LU E NC E , PRO M OT E , A ND L E AR N . Visit events.StCloudAreaChamber.com for a detailed calendar. SPOTLIGHT

APRIL 12-15

St. Cloud goes to Washington D.C. Join us as St. Cloud goes to Washington D.C. Meet with Minnesota senators and representatives, receive business briefings from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and sight see in historic Washington D.C. Registration is required to Teresa, tbohnen@ StCloudAreaChamber.com.

MARCH 3

Meets the first Wednesday of the month, noon-1 p.m.

Business Day at the Capitol

MARCH 19, APRIL 14 & APRIL 23

at the Chamber office, 110 6th Ave. S. Registration is required: $15 for Chamber members, $22 for the general public.

Business After Hours

Lobby with Minnesota leaders from 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. at the Crowne Plaza St. Paul – Riverfront, Great River Ballroom, 11 East Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul. Registration is required to Leah Tomasetti, Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, ltomasetti@mnchamber.com. Cost is $95 per person.

MARCH 4 & APRIL 1

Lunchtime Learning Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge.

March 4: Sponsored by Accountemps and OfficeTeam with Luke Greiner, Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, presenting “$12 is the New $10: The Realities of Today’s Wage Economy.” April 1: “Managing Change in the Workplace” presented by Sarah Prom, Workplace Behavioral Solutions, sponsored by Mark J. Traut Wells.

A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. March 19: Hosted by Gaslight Creative, 713 W St. Germain St., St. Cloud. April 14: Business After Hours EXTRA! hosted by St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and cosponsored by over 60 businesses, at the Best Western-Kelly Inn, 100 4th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Corporate


sponsors are Alive Signage and Indigo Signworks.

Waite Park issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance.

April 23: Waite Park Chamber After Hours hosted at La Casita, 314 Division St., Waite Park

11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

MARCH 13 & APRIL 10

Government Affairs A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, 7:30 - 9 a.m. at the Chamber office*, 110 6th Ave. S. March 13: “Workplace Security” April 10: Federal Issues Review and Update

MARCH 18 & APRIL 15

Waite Park Chamber For businesses interested in

March 18: Hosted by Famous Dave’s at Waite Park City Hall, 19 13th Ave. N. Includes a presentation on “Diversity Programs in St. Cloud School District 742,” by Henry Galloway. April 15: Hosted by CentraCare Health at the Moose Family Center, 1300 3rd St. N, Waite Park. Includes a presentation on “Maintaining our Roads and Bridges.”

MARCH 26 & APRIL 23

Sauk Rapids Chamber For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two

days in advance. 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. March 26: Hosted by Tri-County Organics at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. Guest speaker Larry Strake will discuss “Community Wellness.”

IN THE NEWS

SPIRIT AWARD

April 23: Hosted by Urban Moose Brewing, location to be determined. A panel of business representatives will talk about how volunteering has helped them personally and professionally.

Nikki Fisher, St. Cloud Convention & Visitors Bureau, received the 2014 Spirit Award from the Northern Lights Chapter of the Society of Government Meeting Planners.

For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940. * This spring the Chamber office is relocating to 1411 West Saint Germain, suite 101, St. Cloud. In March and April please confirm the location of all events held at the Chamber office prior to your participation.

Proviant Group A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

Approach retirement confidently. When you plan ahead for your financial future, you’re better prepared to live the life you want. That’s why we’re here.

The Proviant Group. We’ll help you define your financial journey. 320.654.6715 | ProviantGroup.com | 1765 Roosevelt Rd., St. Cloud, MN Ameriprise Financial cannot guarantee future financial results. The Compass is a trademark of Ameriprise Financial, Inc. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2015 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved.

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UpFront NEW AT THE TOP

NEWS REEL CARLSON ADVISORS MERGES, PROMOTES, HIRES Carlson Advisors, LLP, certified accounting firm in St. Cloud, merged with Spaniol & Good, LTD in Sartell. Jacque Klein, CPA, was promoted to supervisor at Carlson Advisors. She practices in the area of closely held businesses (S-corps and partnerships) and fiduciary accounting. Amanda Ertl joined Carlson Advisors as an accountant. Ertl, formerly an intern with the firm, holds a B.S. in Accounting from St. Cloud State University.

Jed Meyer, 38 President and CEO, St. Cloud Federal Credit Union Previous employer: Affinity Plus Federal Credit Union

When did you start in your current position? May 27, 2014

What will you miss most about your previous position? The people. I worked with some great individuals at Affinity Plus. The good news is that I walked into an organization filled with passionate and talented employees who want to make a difference in the St. Cloud and surrounding communities. I feel I have

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already found at St. Cloud Federal Credit Union what I left behind at Affinity Plus - the ability to go to work every day surrounded by great people who want to make a difference. What are you looking forward to the most in your new position? Being a CEO of a cooperative is truly a dream come true. I am blessed to have the opportunity to lead an organization that is built

Call Jaime Engel for a free quote today!

(320) 257-7100 or email info@jdbit.com Please visit our new responsive web site: www.jdbit.com

JDB IT | 720 W St. Germain, Suite 150, St. Cloud, MN 56301 | www.jdbit.com | (320) 257-7100 20

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to do what is right for our members by always putting people ahead of profit. Our members (customers) are our owners and that is truly a fun organization to lead. Last but not least, St Cloud Federal Credit Union has been giving back and making a difference in the surrounding communities for 85 years now. I not only look to continue that

tradition, but to enhance it! We are local, we employ locally, we make decisions locally, and we give back locally. Before my time here is done, when people in our community think or talk about St. Cloud Federal Credit Union, I want the first thing they say to be: “That is a business that makes a difference in our community!�

Where did you grow up? Just north of the Twin Cities in Ham Lake, MN What are your hobbies? Well, with three kids, everything they do are my hobbies! I love it - whether it be their sport events, school events, camping, hunting, fishing, or our yearly family vacation, my best time spent outside of work is with them.

FUN FACT: Since I was very young I have always loved riding motorcycles and have owned almost every type over the years. Since starting a family, this hobby has been put on hold, but later in life I look forward to getting back into it.

M A N U FAC T U R E R OF P R E M I U M C ONC R E T E PAV I NG S TON E S , SL A B S & WA L L S

Create your own personal touch with the wide variety of high quality Borgert pavers and walls. Your patio creates the perfect mood to relax, entertain and just enjoy life itself.

IN THE NEWS

GSDC EARNS AWARD The Economic Development Association of Minnesota awarded the Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation (GSDC) with the Economic Development Marketing Award for the Greater St. Cloud JobSpot. JobSpot, an online regional talent portal, serves employers, job seekers, educational institutions, and workforce partners throughout Central Minnesota.

Visit our showroom at: 8646 Ridgewood Rd., St. Joseph, MN 56374 For more information or for a free catalog call 320.363.4671 W W W. B O R G E R T P R O D U C T S . C O M

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UpFront TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS

NEWS REEL FREIGHTLINER ANNOUNCES SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

Compiled by Whitney Bina. For consideration in News Reel send your news release to givers@ BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Toepfer at Law, 14 7th Ave. N, Suite 115, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Anthony Toepfer and Jill Magelssen.

United Cerebral Palsy of Central Minn., 510 25th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Carl Newbanks, Marilyn Possin, Jenna Berger and Sheri Moran.

Reliant Transportation, taxi, medical transportation, stretcher, wheelchair, accessible transportation, 600 25th Ave. S, Suite 106, St. Cloud. Pictured: Ben Warne, Dool Salat and Sheri Moran.

SPOT Rehabilitation and Home Health Care, 2835 W St. Germain St., Suite 300, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Kathy Pauly Trueman, Robbie Holen, Kirsten Becker, Beth Stienessen and Beth Putz.

NEW MEMBERS - NOT PICTURED

Veritae Group, LLC, providing interim accounting and finance leadership to companies in the St. Cloud area, including interim CFOs, controllers and project executives to organizations in transition or in need of executive resources, 3315 Roosevelt Road, Suite 100A, St. Cloud. Pictured: Julie Forsberg, Sally Mainquist, Kris Larson and Peg Imholte.

Dunkin’ Donuts, 130 Royal St., Canton, MA. Arctic Cold Storage, warehouse management system, storage, cold storage, 4139 Roosevelt Road, St. Cloud.

DON’T JUST FLIP A COIN

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when it comes to your accounting.

So we made that our focus.

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Working with people, not just numb3rs. An Independently Owned Member, McGladrey Alliance

www.swcocpas.com Federally Insured by NCUA

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MIN NE S

Working with us makes c3nts.

Business Loans Centered on you.

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Top 25 Minnesota CPA Firm

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Contact Business Lender Chad Hess today—888.330.8482! myCMCU.org | facebook.com/myCMCU

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Whether you need to finance a new venture or expand your existing business, our trusted advisors will focus on finding a solution to fit your needs.

MIN NE

If it’s important to you, we’ll make it happen.

TA SO NE

Freightliner of St. Cloud awarded $2,500 scholarships to the following individuals: Ryan Schusted, Adam Veurink, and Cody Zoellner. Recipients of the annual Freightliner scholarships must be students in the diesel engine program at St. Cloud Technical and Community College and an apprentice technician at Freightliner of St. Cloud. Scholarship selections are based on academic excellence, class attendance, work ethic, and job performance.

Little Falls 320.632.6311

Albany 320.845.2940

Maple Lake 320.963.5414

Monticello 763.295.5070

St. Cloud 320.251.0286


TOP HATS : NEW LOCATIONS, OWNERSHIP & EXPANSIONS

ABC Seamless Siding, Windows & Gutters, 301 4th Ave. S, Sartell. Pictured: Greg E. Theis, Fritz Primus, Adriana Friendshuh, John Struk and Beth Putz.

Geyer Wedding & Event Rentals, 1816 Saint Germain St., St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Lana Hansen, Brittnee Linn, Abby Hall and Julie Forsberg.

HMA Architects, Ltd., 700 W St. Germain St., Suite 200, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Murray Mack and Diane Diego Ohmann.

Bounce Adventure, 79 3rd St. NE, Waite Park. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Devin Cesnik and Brian Jarl.

Spartan Survival Training, 79 3rd St. NE, Waite Park. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Devin Cesnik and Brian Jarl.

TOP HATS : NEW BUSINESSES

Klimek & Kasella, Ltd., a CPA firm offering QuickBooks consulting, payroll, accounting and tax services for individuals, businesses, farms, and estates, 1139 Franklin Ave., Suite 3, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Kris Hellickson, Toni Kasella, Leann Klimek and Shawn Brannan.

UNCORK and

UNWIND after work at Ciatti’s

Burlington Coat Factory, 250 33rd Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Sheri Moran, Jarod Gustafson, Amy Higgens and Peg Imholte.

Andy’s Towing, LLC, 675 Crescent St NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sheri Moran, Candy Kampa, Joe Kampa, and Diane Diego Ohmann.

DaVita, providing in-center and home dialysis treatments for patients that live, work, or visit the area, 30 25th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Shawn Brannan, Julie Ludwig, Amanda Midas, Angela Pohl, Cari Dock, Dr. Jeff Skogen and Sheri Moran.

Customized Training Affordable. Professional. Personalized. Corporate Education & Outreach provides customized training tailored to fit your needs. We also offer: Seminars Workshops Conference Planning Services Career Training (online & classroom)

Unwind in the lounge with happy hour drink and app specials – like flatbreads for only $5.99 and pizzas for $4.99 with a beverage purchase. Check out our happy hour specials and times at ciattisristorante.com.

RISTORANTE

2635 West Division Street • Saint Cloud 320-257-7900 • CiattisRistorante.com

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UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

Insurance Solutions

Businesses need insurance, but what does your company need and how do you go about buying the right insurance? By Jocelyn Kortan and Joe Westerlind

I

t’s imperative to select a broker/agent who understands your business inside and out. Not all agents, risk managers, or consultants are the same. Choose a broker you feel comfortable working with. Ask yourself, do I simply want an insurance policy and nothing else? Is price my only concern? Do I want my broker to assist me in making risk management decisions? There is a broker out there for every business, but not every broker is meant for you. Be prepared to interview different brokers to determine how willing they are to meet your needs. What coverage is needed? As a business owner, you have

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a sense for some of the risks your business faces. Almost all risks have an insurance solution, but not all risks need a solution. It’s important for you and your broker to decide which coverages are most important. Workers’ compensation, property insurance, general liability, and commercial auto are standard coverages a small business would need, though depending on your risk, you may need additional lines of insurance. Workers’ Compensation— Employers are required by law to provide workers’ compensation to all hired W2 employees. Workers’ compensation covers medical

expenses, rehabilitation costs and lost wages for injuries sustained by employees while working. The best work comp programs focus on preventing injuries before they begin, but also have a process in place for returning injured workers to the job after recovery. Property—Property insurance provides protection to your business when your property is affected by perils such as weather, fire and theft. It’s important to have your property properly valued and understand how your insurance policy is going to pay in the event of a loss. Some policies pay replacement cost which means the property will be replaced within policy limits

regardless of depreciation. Other policies pay actual cash value which means the property is valued at replacement cost, minus depreciation. Selecting the right values and coverages upfront will alleviate the chances of being underinsured at the time of a loss. General Liability—General liability insurance policies are intended to pay sums (both damages and defense expenses) you are obligated to pay when someone is injured or when property damage is caused by your operations, premise, products, or completed operations. The policy can also protect you against liability as a tenant if you cause damage to that


property. Not all carriers provide the same coverage so it’s important that you and your broker review the policy carefully for any exclusions. Most policies provide $1 million in coverage per claim and $2 million in the aggregate, but you may need more, depending on your operations. An underwriter may offer higher limits as an option, otherwise purchasing an umbrella policy can provide you with the additional, necessary protection. Commercial Auto— Minnesota requires all owners of vehicles to carry no-fault insurance, liability insurance, and uninsured motorist

insurance. The auto policy can be designed to cover vehicles your business either owns, leases, rents, or borrows and typically provides $1 million in liability coverage. As a small business owner you may not manage a fleet of vehicles, but an auto policy is still necessary if employees use their personal vehicles for work-related purposes. For example, one of your employees is on the road completing a work-related errand when an accident occurs. The employee’s personal auto policy will pay damages first, but your commercial auto policy (non-

owned auto liability) will be liable for excess damages. Cyber and Privacy Liability— Although not all business owners will make buying this policy a priority, data breaches are an emerging risk business owners need to be aware of. The cyber and data privacy policy is intended to cover your business’ liability when customers’ or clients’ personal information is exposed, such as Social Security numbers, credit card information, or health records. The policy pays for a variety of expenses you become obligated to pay including notification costs, fines and penalties, and credit

monitoring. If your company engages in electronic activities, such as selling products via the Internet, you are at a greater risk and should discuss this coverage with your broker. Buying insurance and developing a risk management program does not happen over night. Do your homework. A broker who understands your operations will be more effective at marketing your business to insurance carriers and securing best-in-class pricing. Jocelyn Kortan is a producer and Joe Westerlind is a partner at Mahowald Insurance. They can be reached at www.mahowald.net.

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UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

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E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

NETWORK

Students from Beijing were guests at the Chamber in February.

Chamber President Teresa Bohnen explains the role of the Chamber of Commerce in business.

GROW

Elected officials met with the Chamber’s Leadership class in December.

Rep. Jim Knoblach

Rep. Tama Theis

Rep. Tim O’Driscoll

Heritage and History Day with the Leadership class Annette Atkins, Professor Emerita of History, Saint John’s University/ College of Saint Benedict challenges the Chamber’s leadership class to rethink the meaning of history.

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We were all immigrants once. That’s the message the leadership class received from a panel discussion on The New Immigrant Experience.


NETWORK

Sentry Bank was host to the Waite Park Chamber in December.

Jane Lichty, Sentry Bank

Bob Ringstrom, Strata Performance Solutions (L); Peter Mergen, Gabriel Media; and Steve Nusbaum, Farmers Insurance

Leeann Klimek (L) and Toni Kasella, Klimek & Kasella

Dan Buchholz and Kelly Troska, St. Cloud Technical and Community College

GROW

Lunchtime Learning

Cliff Robbins, Cohlab, talks to a full house about trends in technology at Lunchtime Learning.

Pat Thielman, St. Cloud State University, helps participants understand how different personalities can work together.

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BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

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30 Tech Strategies 31 & 33 Tech News 32 & 34 Management Toolkit 36 Economy Central by Falcon Bank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

ENTREPRENEURISM

ROBBED!

It isn’t just your real property that can be stolen these days. Intellectual property is up for grabs unless you take steps to keep it safe.

A

nyone can steal from you, including domestic and foreign rivals. By far the most common threat to small business owners is disgruntled employees. Look for warning signs that an employee may be gathering and passing information outside your company. Protection Strategies Assess your company’s information security vulnerabilities and fix or mitigate the risks associated with those vulnerabilities.

––––––––– Do not store private information vital to your company on any device that connects to the Internet. ––––––––– Use up-to-date software security tools. Many firewalls stop incoming threats, but do not restrict outbound data. ––––––––– Educate employees on spear phishing email tactics. Establish protocols for quarantining suspicious email. ––––––––– Ensure your employees are aware of, and are trained to avoid unintended disclosures. ––––––––– Remind employees of security policies on a regular basis through active training and seminars. Use signs and computer banners to reinforce security policies. ––––––––– Document employee education and all other measures you take to

protect your intellectual property. ––––––––– Ensure human resource policies are in place that specifically enhance security and company policies. Create clear incentives for adhering to company security policies. Contact Law Enforcement You are ultimately responsible for protecting your own intellectual property. Congress has continually expanded and strengthened criminal laws for violations of intellectual property rights to protect innovation, however, you need to take reasonable steps to protect your intellectual property and products, and document those measures. If you believe your company is a victim of these crimes, contact the FBI or the National Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center. Source: Federal Bureau of Investigation

FYI Contact the FBI for a vulnerability self-assessment tool or security awareness training.

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Common Tactics for Stealing Intellectual Property Computer hacking! (Electronic-device hacking) –––––––––

A visitor connects an electronic device to your system, such as a thumb drive, that adds malware or downloads your information –––––––––

Someone hacks into your network via a spear phishing attack –––––––––

An unattended laptop is accessed or stolen –––––––––

Review of publicly available sources. Are you sharing too much information? –––––––––

Obtaining your surplus equipment. Thousands of pages of stored information may still reside in the memory of a copier, printer, fax machine, etc –––––––––

Employment solicitation (try to hire your key employees) –––––––––

Theft or unauthorized photography of products at trade shows


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Top: Metro Bus has partnered with Townsquare Media to host the drive at local grocery stores since 2011. Above: St. Cloud Metro Bus Executive Director Ryan Daniel (left) and Marketing & Communications Manager Berta Hartig (right) delivered food and cash to the St. Cloud Salvation Army and the Catholic Charities Emergency Services food shelves in December.

S

t. Cloud Metro Bus teamed up with Townsquare Media and Royal Tire to collect more than 2,500 pounds and over $1,500 for local food shelves during its fourth annual “Fill the Flyer” food drive in December. The cash portion was matched by a local grant from the Skalicky Foundation. The stuff-the-bus style food drive is mobile, each day moving to a different grocery store for three hours. The drive is named for New Flyer, which manufactured the current Metro Bus fleet. Because of the New Flyer plant in St. Cloud, the name is known in the community. Metro Bus also hosts a one-day “Fill the Flyer” food drive in the summer at Summertime by George. Since 2011, Metro Bus has collected nearly 20,000 pounds and over $7,400 during the summer and winter food drives.

90 years of history, one brand new home

We’re proud to announce the opening of our new location in the heart of our hometown, where we look forward to serving your legal needs for the next 90 years.

320-251-1414 1740 West St. Germain Street, St Cloud, MN 56301 quinlivan.com M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5 //

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BusinessTools TECH STRATEGIES

Share-Ability

It’s been more than a decade since MySpace, LinkedIn and Facebook courted their first followers, yet each year brings significant shifts in the industry. Are you ready for 2015? By Dawn Zimmerman histories. It’s been used mostly by law enforcement, journalists and politicians.

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ho’s got an eye on social media for your organization? Social media is becoming as important to business as a website with it marketing and now direct selling opportunities. Here’s a look at some of the social media trends to watch in 2015: More from the Pinterest playbook. Social media activity is becoming less about what people want to know and more about what they want to share. That’s the main premise for Pinterest – to keep sharing the good ideas already out there. The “share-ability” of content is what will make it more valuable and go viral. It will

become more important for organizations to ask themselves how likely the specific content they’re posting will be repinned, retweeted and shared again and again, across multiple platforms.

sCommerce applications and social media integrations will continue to take hold and have significant implications for businesses. Size it up and start planning. There’s money on the table.

A new take on shopping socially. Move over mobile ecommerce. Shopping is social. sCommerce, as it has been coined, started in 2014 with Twitter and Facebook integrating “Buy” buttons on their sites. With a click or two, users could purchase an item without ever leaving the social network. Twitter also rolled out new Product Cards in 2014 to help businesses further elevate their products and generate a sale through Twitter. The

Reclaiming some privacy. Social media platforms began to answer a cry for privacy and even anonymity among users. In October, Facebook launched a new chat app that allows users to form chat rooms around shared interests and keep their names and locations anonymous. Shortly after, Facebook began providing support for Tor, an open-source privacy service that allows users to conceal their identities, locations and browsing

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in social media.

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Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5

Vying for more video. The major social media platforms have an eye on video and those who are not upping their video game will lose market share in 2015. Microvideos are gaining popularity and giving way to a new wave of microvloggers (really short video blogs). Instagram in 2014 unveiled video ads and give marketers the ability to pay to target 15-second videos based on age, gender and geography. Instagram positioned itself well as the preferred social media platform for social media marketing and micro-video. Get comfortable with video and start shaping your video plans. If you’re not posting videos, you’re not staying relevant. Ad-freedom. Instagram, Facebook and Twitter all enhanced the advertising capabilities available to marketers in 2014 with more changes expected with the growth of sCommerce. The question will be how will the “Ello-factor” come into play? Ello is a new social media platform that promises a “forever-ad free experience” and never to sell users’ information to third parties. The platform is still in beta and available by invitation only. The results of this experiment are worth watching. Get serious about social media. It stands to change your business.


TECH NEWS

Mycestro

M

ycestro is the next generation of 3D Mouse. It is slim, easy to use, fits on your finger, and allows you to control your computer with simple hand gestures. The Mycestro 3D mouse is activated by your thumb, and

it is compatible with Bluetooth. Its battery life is estimated to be about 7 – 8 hours based on usage, and it can be charged via USB. See the Mycestro in action at www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com Source: Use of Technology

Carlson & Stewart Refrigeration expands Carlson & Stewart Refrigeration, Inc. expanded their Sauk Rapids operations and moved to a larger building along Highway 10. The expansion aims to improve client services, expand warehouse space, and provide a larger fabrication area with room for growth. The company serves Minnesota, the Dakotas, Iowa and Wisconsin and has office locations in Marshall and Sauk Rapids, MN and Sioux Falls, SD.

SCIENCE

Wearable Tech Some jobs come with a uniform. For an increasing number of employees, that uniform will soon include a badge that tracks everything they do. Many companies already encourage employees to wear activity trackers like the Fitbit, often in exchange for discounts on health insurance. But elsewhere, such wearables are being used to monitor exactly how employees work. Does monitoring your employees with wearable tech actually boost their productivity? So far there’s little research to support the idea. Source: NewScientist.com

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BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

The Line Forms Here If you’re thinking about retirement you’d better be cultivating your next generation of business leaders. By Tracy Knofla

assertive communication, problem solving, decision making, collaboration, and listening. A system should be in place to recognize and track these employees for eventual inclusion in supplementary training opportunities.

B

efore your employees start riding off into the retirement sunset, you will want to insure that there is a cadre of talented and empowered employees ready to take the reins. And not just as the future CEO – it takes more than the company president to ensure the future success of your business. By following a few simple steps you can position your business to be effective for years to come, with relatively little effort and a fantastic return on your investment. Be Intentional Sometimes a superstar employee will emerge from the rest. But more often, these folks are overlooked because the company has not created an environment for them to thrive.

Your company should have a clearly stated operational goal of searching for talented employees to groom for future leadership. If it doesn’t appear in writing as an organizational imperative it won’t happen. Create a statement that reflects your desire to mentor or coach employees into enhanced roles within the business. Search for the Talent Within Most superheroes have day jobs. They wear street clothes and only don their costumes when trouble is in the air. Identifying employees with great potential will be more difficult than you think. It should be a company-wide priority to identify employees within the ranks who exhibit desirable skills. These skills may include: initiative,

Offer Opportunities for Employees to “Step Up” Employee committees offer an excellent opportunity to showcase additional skills in the workplace. Professional development, safety, continuous improvement, and employee engagement are just a few committees that could be formed to allow individuals a chance to shine. Listen to the Questioners Employees who take the time and the professional risk to ask good questions of management may be the ones to pay special attention to. Even if the questions seem adversarial, a person who respectfully asks them is a person worth a second look. Think Globally, Engage Locally One of the most important skills that your current executives have cultivated over the length of their careers is the ability to think globally

contributor Tracy Knofla is the co-owner and featured consultant of High Impact Training. She has been presenting to audiences across the country for more than 25 years.

32

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5

about your business operations and understand the impact of industry trends and challenges. This big picture thinking can be taught to employees at every level. Staff meetings can include an agenda item about industry trends. Employees can be encouraged to conduct independent research and offered opportunities to present their findings. A second, but equally important expertise that current leaders have developed is a deep connection to the local community through interactions with other business leaders and by serving on community boards and committees. These local connections provide immeasurable value to your business. To create these connections at all levels of the company, start with your local chamber of commerce. For instance, the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce offers opportunities for employees to network at virtually every level within your company. Encourage your employees to serve on some local committees as representatives of your business. It doesn’t take a large lineitem in your budget to create your next wave of business leaders. It does take a bit of forethought and a coordinated effort. The more quickly you check this off your to-do list, the sooner you will be enjoying the tropical breezes on the 19th hole!


TECH NEWS

Key to the Streets T

his cloud-based service allows anyone with a mobile device to participate in the design of public spaces. The main focus is encouraging more people to walk—the cheapest and easiest way to improve one’s wellbeing. People are encouraged to use Key to the Streets when they’re physically standing at the exact location they hope to help improve. Capture a photo and the location info in the Key to the Streets app, then either sketch and/or drag/drop elements on the photo to provide design ideas. There’s also an option to send audio or text messages about your ideas. Source: Good Magazine

SCIENCE

RADICAL NEW AI Engineers who helped to build Apple’s Siri are now trying to build a more advanced virtual assistant at their startup, Viv Labs. While Siri can only perform tasks that Apple engineers explicitly implement, this new program, the team says, will be able to teach itself, giving it almost limitless capabilities. In time, they believe their creation will be able to use your personal preferences and a near-infinite web of connections to answer almost any query and perform almost any function. But can it vacuum the den? Source: Wired.com

DON’T MISS

Lunchtime Learning “$12 is the New $10: The Realities of Today’s Wage Economy.” March 4: noon-1 p.m. at the Chamber office, 110 6th Ave. S. Registration is required: $15 for Chamber members, $22 for the general public.

Business Security

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BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Hire Right Consistency will help employers avoid liability during the hiring process. By Betsey Lund

T

he hiring process can be one of the most critical stages of the employeremployee relationship. Finding the perfect employee exposes an employer to liability if laws and regulations are violated. Here are some tips to follow when hiring a new employee: Illegal Interview Questions: It is illegal to refuse to hire an applicant because of their race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, marital status, disability, public assistance, age, sexual orientation, or familial status.

www.bdiphoto.com • 1-320-253-9493

Still and moving images for business communication.

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Although discrimination may not be intentional, the applicant’s perception of discrimination is paramount. Narrow your questioning to what really matters by focusing on the applicant’s training and skills for the job. Criminal Backgrounds: New legislation prohibits private employers from asking applicants about their criminal backgrounds until they have been offered an interview, or a conditional offer for employment has been extended. Only employers who are required by state or federal

law to conduct background checks are exempt under the new legislation. Using Social Media: Viewing an applicant’s social media profile may provide you with information about the applicant’s age, race, sexual orientation, familial status, disability, etc. With vast developments in electronic discovery, your search history could quickly become a liability. A disgruntled applicant, upset for not being hired, may perceive that discrimination occurred during the hiring process.


Physical Limitations and Examinations: With its widereaching arms, the Americans with Disabilities Act prevents employers from asking applicants whether or not they are disabled, or about the severity of their disabilities. Focus your inquiry on the applicant’s ability to perform job-related and necessary functions. Drug Testing: An employer may require an applicant to take a drug test so long as a job offer has been extended. All applicants with conditional offers for employment for the same position are required to undergo the same test,

conducted by an approved laboratory, and following the organization’s written drug and alcohol policy. The policy must contain, at a minimum, the requirements set forth in Minnesota Statute Section 181.952. Written Job Description: Create a well thought-out job description before the hiring process begins. This will help your hiring team focus on the applicant’s skills and training for the

job and not on non-essential factors. Ready to Offer the Job? Be certain all requirements and conditions for employment have been met before any offers of employment are made or any statements are made that would lead an applicant to believe their employment has been guaranteed. Be Consistent: Consistency is the name of the game.

All applicants should be treated similarly and the same requirements should be made of all applicants applying for the position. Anything else could be perceived as discriminatory. Don’t drop the ball. Consulting with an attorney to learn about the legal regulations that affect your business and industry is imperative. A good attorney can decrease your exposure to liability and employment law violations.

contributor Betsey Lund is a partner in the law firm of Lund Sauter, P. A. She practices in the areas of employment law, business law, family law, and estate planning.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5 //

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BusinessTools Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Correlation

How the answer to a simple question can predict recessions. By King Banaian

A

major complaint of area employers is how hard it is to find qualified workers. It may surprise readers to know that the St. Cloud Area Quarterly Business Report has asked the question on how hard it is to find qualified workers since December 1998. We ask both how hard it was in the last three months, and how hard they expect it will be over the next six months. When we first asked it, more than 2/3rds of area businesses reported it was more difficult to find workers in the last three months than it had been previously. We have asked that same question 63 times since then. This data may tell us something about future movements in area employment. Having experienced two full cycles of expansion and contraction in the data allows us now to examine the predictive power of the survey. On the graph at right, the blue line represents employment in the private sector in the St. Cloud area. The red line represents the diffusion index for our question on expected future difficulty in attracting qualified workers. A diffusion index is

DEED offers technical assistance vouchers

greater than zero when more respondents say attracting qualified workers will be harder in the next six months than say it will be easier. A negative number means more said it would be easier than harder. One can see that in late 1999 the difficulty finding workers began to recede. About a year later the (relatively) mild recession of 2000-01 began. Locally the closing of Fingerhut in 2003 prolonged the period of easy hiring but by 2004 we started to experience labor market tightness and rising employment. In late 2006 the diffusion index began to fall, and a year later the Great Recession began. The bottom of the diffusion index series came in February 2009, and by the end of that year the Great Recession was over as far as St. Cloud was concerned.

Correlation certainly doesn’t mean causation, as we teach our students, so one should be cautious in making predictions from these data. But it does give us some comfort to report that the latest measures of the difficulty finding qualified workers is as high as it has been since 1999. That strikes me as meaning the next recession is at least a few quarters away. King Banaian is a professor of economics and interim dean of the School of Public Affairs at St. Cloud State University.

BY THE NUMBERS

Minnesota manufacturers are optimistic 52%

expect orders to grow in 2015

42%

expect to hire more workers

95%

expect productivity to increase

85%

expect profits to increase or stay the same

Source: A random survey of Minnesota manufacturers conducted in November 2014 by the Minn. DEED.

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Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5

TECHNOLOGY

The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) has developed a pilot program that provides up to $25,000 to help small businesses pay for technical assistance and services from public higher education institutions and nonprofit entities. Qualifying companies will receive vouchers, which can be redeemed for technical assistance and services that include research, technical development, product development, commercialization, market development, technology exploration and improved business practices. Companies with 40 or fewer employees, with at least half of the employees based in Minnesota, may apply. Recipients must provide a cash match equal to 50 percent of the voucher award. DEED will provide funding for the face value of each voucher once a business receives technical assistance and services and documents a deliverable outcome. Application materials and other details about the program are available on the DEED website or at www.BusinessCentral Magazine.com


September

$80M

$120M

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

Economy Central presented by

December July

TOTAL: $62,358,547

COLOR KEY:

2015

November June

Home Sales C

October May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2014

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

August

Compiled by Sharon Henry, data current as of 2/8/15.

Residential Building Permits

Home Sales C

PARK,

October

$62,358,547

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2015

$54,435,063

$70M

PARK,

100M

7,060,554.11

9,916,621.69

Residential Building Permits

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2014 ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE September April

116 $879,943 $1,803,560

St. Augusta

99 February

St. Joseph

128 January

Total as of 2/8/15.

December November October

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

St. Cloud

$87,075,891 $57,715,070 December July

425

397

Sauk Rapids

November $12,027,944 $7,465,381 June

48

409

Sartell 174 30 October $3,531,780 $3,600,047 May Waite Park

September $4,377,148 $7,151,019 Apr

St. Augusta

August $6,945,494 $202,027 Mar

84

11

7

78

82

TOTAL: 1429

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69 $80M $100M $120M

TOTAL: 1411

St. Joseph

90

July Feb $3,102,294 $3,783,078

Total as of 2/8/15.

June Jan

1500

$1.5M

Unemployment Rates 2013-2014

8%

$0M

$20M

2015

$100M

2013 2015

$0

$300k

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

Feb 2013-2014 % CHANGE

$120M

2.5%

$0

Jan

$300k

2.0%

October

J

A

December

September

J

November

August

July

June

May

April

0.5%

March

February

1.0%

January

1.5%

December

November

October

September

August

6%

$80M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOS

2013

Non Farm Jobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

Food and Be

2014

Mar

$60M

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

7%

$40M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOS

Apr

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11 2013

Food and Be

2014

May St. Joseph. Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and

2014

300

Commercial 2013 2014 2015 August #/$ #/$ #/$

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

$60M

176 0 $1,702,322 $1,353,832

1200

$40M

2013

100 $3,327,830 $4,437,367

900

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

$20M

December

80 March

600

$900k

$0M

300

2014

Waite Park

300

$600k

2013 2015

November

$80M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2014

0

382 447 $18,539,531 $19,206,069

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$70M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

Commercial Building Permits

October

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$60M

Commercial Building Permits

2015

September

Sauk Rapids

2015

$50M

1209

2014

$40M

August

1227

0

$30M

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

$300k

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

July

June January $18,425,316 $26,145,498

2013

2015

2014

2013

$0

$10M

June

St. Cloud

Sartell 438 291 April $11,560,121 $8,129,708

TOTAL: $54,435,063

$0M

May

April

2013 Residential 2013 2014 2015 July 2015 February #/$ #/$ #/$

2014

2013

March

August BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY March

TOTAL: $60M $62,358,547 $70M $80M

$50M

February

January

$40M

December

$30M

November

$20M

October

$10M

September

$0M

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

2013 2015

TOTAL: $54,435,063

S

O

0.0% -0.5%

5%

-1.0% -1.5%

4%

-2.0% -2.5% -3.0%

3% N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

N

Benton & Stearns Counties Minnesota United States

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5 //

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37


58,547

$80M

BusinessTools

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

September

April

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

OUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, H

September

August

July

June

May

Mar

Feb

Jan

Apr

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

uilding Permits

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

October

August

September July

2015

August

TOTAL: 1429

May

2014

April

2014

February

2013

1500

Feb

$0

Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Jan $60MSources: $80M $100M $120M Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

MINNESOTA AND OTHER UPPER MIDWEST CITIES OF COMPARABLE SIZE TO ST. CLOUD November

250

$0

168

70

$600k

$900k

350

111.8

105.2

83.1

95.3

109.6

105.0

3rd Quarter

95.6

110.3

74.7

89.4

95.9

108.7

105.8

June

St. Paul, MN

107.8

Mankato, MN

95.3

April

March Cedar Rapids, IA 93.1

104.1

114.6

91.1

105.1

101.8

110.6

104.2

81.7

88.6

101.2

103.3

102.3

91.7

85.4

103.3

95.6

102.6

95.0

98.9

79.2

89.8

101.1

110.1

99.0

Eau Claire, WI February93.3

$1.2M

$1.5M

Milwaukee WI 102.1 101.8 104.0 112.7 98.8 116.0 96.4 January The Cost of Living index measures regional differences in the cost of consumer goods and services, excluding taxes and non-consumer expenditures, for professional and managerial households in the top income quintile. It is based on more than 90,000 prices covering almost 60 different items for which prices are collected quarterly by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Small differences should not be interpreted as showing any measurable difference, according to ACCRA.

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5

March

New York (Manhattan) NY Honolulu HI New York (Brooklyn) NY $0 $300k $600k $900k $1.2M $1.5M CA San Francisco Hilo, HI Housing/Real Estate sources: St. Cloud Area Association of Realtors, http:// Orange County CA stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics; Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stamford CT Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office; http://thething.mplsrealtor.com/ Nevada County CA Washington, D.C. Oakland CA

February

TOTAL: $1,336,559

Accra Index January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

TOTAL: $1,356,663

2014

38

99.9

75.4

Minneapolis,May MN 107.9 104.1 115.4 92.6 103.7 100.8 110.4

Lodging Tax Dollars

2013

83.1

109.8

’14 Annual Report 95.0 109.2 76.5 85.1 97.0 109.8 105.3

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

53

$300k

78.2

94.8

1500

$1.5M

Total as of 2/8/15.

246

105.5

2nd Quarter

July

Residential 2013 2014 2015 TOTAL: $1,326,730.36 Stearns Co. 2013 Benton Co.

Grocery Housing Utilities Transpo- Health Misc. Goods Items rtation Care & Services

St. Cloud, MN August 95.7 1st Quarter

TOTAL: 316

300

$1.5M

TOTAL: 1429

200

All Items September

TOTAL: 1411

150

October

CITY

1200

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

100

COST OF LIVING INDEX

900

$900k

50

December

600

$600k 0

2014 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

$1.2M

2014 Annual Report

TOTAL: 221PARK, 6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2015 2013

$900k

COST OF LIVING

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

2014

$600k

300

$300k 2015

$300k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Incorporations - MN Secretary of State, Graph courtesy of SCSU

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

January

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

1200

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

900

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

600

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

300

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

0

Mar

0

2015

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

2014

Apr

2013

March

2015

2014

2013

2013

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

June

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

MayTOTAL: 1411

2015

June

2015

July

$0

0M

35,063

M

21.69

54.11

$120M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Among the 281 urban areas participating in the three quarters of 2014, the after-tax cost for a professional/managerial standard of living ranged from more than twice the national average in New York (Manhattan) NY to almost 20 percent below the national average in Harlingen, TX. New York (Manhattan) NY

222.6

Honolulu HI

174.9

New York (Brooklyn) NY

169.8

San Francisco CA

167.5

Hilo, HI

153.0

Orange County CA

147.5

Stamford CT

145.2

Nevada County CA

144.9

Washington, D.C.

141.6

Oakland CA $0

$50

140.0 $100

$150

$200

Economy Central presented by

$250


x

Caryn Stadther

Marketing Director and Vice President

x

John Herges President and CEO

x

Jessica Bitz

Vice President and Senior Lender

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BUSINESS AS USUAL

CHRISTY AND GRANT GILLELAND PLAN TO GROW THE FAMILY BUSINESS BY FOCUSING ON THE MISSION AND VISION THAT GUIDED THE COMPANY TO ITS CURRENT SUCCESS. BY JOHN PEPPER / PHOTOS BY JOEL BUTKOWSKI

40

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5


O

ne of the beautiful things about American capitalism is the freedom it gives entrepreneurs

to design and create their own roads to success. There’s no master plan. At St. Cloud’s Gilleland Chevrolet and Cadillac, ownership is passing from one generation to the next, and the goals of the new owners are based largely on events of the past. SUCCESS The Gilleland story begins with an entrepreneur and mentor named Leonard Rydell. Rydell got into the car business after WWII, opening a dealership in Montgomery, Minnesota. In 1954, at Chevrolet’s request, he moved to North Dakota to operate the Chevrolet dealership in Grand Forks. Duane Gilleland was hired by Rydell as an automotive technician out of Thief River Falls Community College to work at the Grand Forks dealership. Ambitious and capable, Duane worked his way up to service manager and then to general manager. After he told Rydell that he hoped one day to own his own dealership, the employer did something unusual. He decided to help Duane achieve his dream.  Baston Chevrolet was a dealership that opened its doors in St. Cloud in 1942. It was a successful dealership, but by 1986 Fred Baston was ready to call it quits and had put the business on the market. Rydell heard that the business was available and he offered to help Duane secure funding to purchase it. The deal was completed, and on August 1,1986, Baston sold his business to Duane and Karen Gilleland, which led to their move to St. Cloud.

Rydell, who died in 2000, didn’t only help Duane Gilleland. He helped other employees in the same way. Today, Leonard Rydell’s son Wes, Duane Gilleland, and two other former employees-turned-owners collectively oversee the Rydell group which has dealerships in more than 60 locations across the United States. It is the largest dealer group in the country. Every Rydell dealership is independently owned while operating under the same business philosophy, originated by the business and personal philosophies of Leonard Rydell. They all share the same mission: “To exceed our customers’ and employees’ expectations and maintain their loyalty for a lifetime.” They share the same vision: “To be so effective that we are able to be helpful to others.” And they have the same set of values:  • The Value of Individual Responsibility and Accountability • The Value of Unconditional Dedication to Excellence • The Value of Honesty and Integrity • The Value of the Worth of our People • The Value of Ongoing Improvements • The Value of Being Good Community Citizens • The Value of Cooperation, Working Together, and Communication

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Ownership of a Rydell group business is somewhat like owning a franchise. However, an owner who has purchased all the stock in the store is free to do as he or she pleases with no fees due to the Rydell Company. Similarly, the philosophy and model laid down by the Rydell Company needs to be followed 100 percent until all shares in the business are purchased, but after that the owners are free to do as they wish. Rydell owners are empowered and encouraged to look for managers who have the capability and ambition to own their own dealerships and put them through a development program that exposes them to sales, parts, inventory and other aspects of the business. In that way, talented individuals are grown within the dealership, and if they are successful they can be nominated for Rydell dealer candidate training. The group purchases three or four dealerships per year as they become available, and puts into them graduates of the training program who have been groomed as managers. They also provide a financial plan so the managers can buy out the Rydell group and take over complete ownership of the business.

Every community the Rydell group goes into we know we’re going to grow the people and grow the store to be good community citizens. It’s not about growing profits, but the approach is financially successful.” – CHRISTY GILLELAND

All of the Rydell group’s dealerships are owned by individuals who have been mentored in this way by other owners, or they are owned by people like Christy and Grant Gilleland, the children of Duane and Karen Gilleland.

SUCCESSION Today, Gilleland Chevrolet and Cadillac is a busy and familiar business on the north side of Division Street, straddling the now closed and paved over intersection with 30th Ave. N. It employs approximately 114 people in its sales, parts, service, Quick Lube, and body shop departments. (The body shop, St. Cloud Collision Center, is at a separate location.) Christy and Grant grew up with the business, or as they call it, “the

store,” and are in the process of buying it from their parents. They don’t plan to acquire new operations and expand in new directions. In fact, they don’t plan to change much at all. They plan to grow the business by working within the unique structure, mission and vision that guided the Gilleland business to success. The purpose of the organization is building people and building families, Christy said. “Every community the Rydell group goes into we know we’re going to grow the people and grow the store to be good community citizens. It’s not about growing profits, but the approach is financially successful.” Christy, 37, and Grant, 33, are a study in contrasts. Christy is dark eyed, dark haired,

TIMELINE •• 1942 Baston Chevrolet moves from Minneapolis to downtown St. Cloud on the corner of St. Germain and 9th Ave. •• Mid-1960s Baston Chevrolet builds a new facility and relocates to the current Chevrolet location at 3019 W Division St. •• August 1, 1986 Fred Baston sells the dealership to Duane and Karen Gilleland •• 1989 Duane Gilleland and partners begin a holding company, the Rydell Group, to acquire additional dealerships which are sold to the operators placed in the stores

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by the holding company. Today the Rydell Group has 55 stores. •• 1994 Duane Gilleland purchases Krebsbach Chevrolet in St. Joseph from Thomas Krebsbach, merging the two dealerships and closing the St. Joseph location

•• 1999 Duane Gilleland purchases Klein OldsmobileCadillac from Bill and Gary Klein, merging the two dealerships and closing the downtown Klein location

•• 1994 Christy Gilleland starts working in the office at Gilleland Chevrolet, filing papers and answering phones •• 1998 Grant Gilleland starts working for Gilleland’s Quick Lube, changing oil and detailing cars Gilleland Cheverolet 1988

•• January 1, 2014 Christy and Grant Gilleland enter into a buyout agreement to purchase Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac from their parents


Ruth Mielke sorts parts inventory. Gilleland employs about 114 people throughout the company.

BUSINESS PROFILE

Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac, Inc. .....................

3019 W Division Street, St. Cloud, MN 56301 320-251-4943 320-255-7007 support@gillelandchevrolet.com www.gillelandchevrolet.com Leadership team: Duane Gilleland, president and CEO: Christy Gilleland, executive manager; Grant Gilleland, Gilleland & St. Cloud Quick Lube general manager

expressive, full of motion and energy. And where Christy is dark, Grant is light. He’s still and quiet, the observer in the room. Duane didn’t pressure them to go into the family business, they say, but both worked for their father from their early teens. Duane made sure that they got a good grounding. They worked in all areas of the business, and they started at the bottom. “That was one thing our dad stressed when we both started here in high school,” Christy said. “He said you’re going to make minimum wage, you’re going to do the dirty jobs, and you’re going to work in every department.”  “We hated it at the time,” Grant said, “but looking back, it was probably the best thing that could have happened.” This is the initial year of the buyout agreement. Now 64, Duane is still a relatively young man. He maintains a home in Sartell, but his main residence is now in Arizona where he has a passive interest in a couple of dealerships. The siblings expect the buyout process to take 5 to 7 years.  Succession in family-owned businesses isn’t always successful. According to the Gillelands, only about 50 percent survive

the second generation, and only 10 percent survive third generation ownership. Second generation owners who take over the business without the right training and attitude often fail to fight for the economies and efficiencies that can make the difference between success and failure. “We were brought up to be, for want of a better word, stingy,” Christy said. To ensure that his children saw more of the automotive business than what was in their own back yard, Duane told his children they had to either go work someplace else or quit. Christy attended St. Cloud State University and earned a degree in Business Management. After graduation, she took a position at a different Rydell dealership where only the owner knew of her family connections to the group. Grant completed the first year of the Sales & Marketing program at the St. Cloud Technical College and soon after began his own auto wholesale business.

A CHANGING INDUSTRY

Ownership: Duane and Karen Gilleland own100 percent of the business; they are currently in a succession plan to sell the business to their children, Christy and Grant. Business Description: Automotive sales, service, parts, and collision Number of employees: 89 at the dealership, 25 at St. Cloud Quick Lube Previous Year sales: $64.7 million Current year projected sales: $75 million

FUN FACT

••••••••••••••••••••

When Christy Gilleland was 9 years old her Aunt had her write on a piece of paper what she wanted to do when she grew up. It said: “Own a store.” She still has the paper.

One of the biggest changes in the business took place in 1992, when Gilleland introduced non-negotiable pricing.

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PERSONAL PROFILES

Christy Gilleland, 37 Executive Manager, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac

Hometown: Grand Forks, ND until 10, Sauk Rapids until 21, Sartell now Education: B.S. Business Management, St. Cloud State University Work History: Six months for a Ford dealership in South Dakota in 2000; 20 years at Gilleland Family:  Boyfriend, Nick Fath and his two children, Sierra (9) and Dylan (7) Hobbies: 4-wheeling, snowmobiling, boating, golf, lying by the pool, traveling Advice to a would-be entrepreneur:  NEVER be afraid to admit when you are wrong, and LEARN from it! Best advice you’ve received: “Don’t stress or worry about what could happen, it won’t change the outcome,” from my grandma, June Gilleland

Grant Gilleland, 32

General Manager Gilleland & St. Cloud Quick Lube Hometown: Grand Forks, Sauk Rapids and now Rice Education: Sauk RapidsRice High School Work History: 16 years at St. Cloud Quick Lube and Gilleland                                          Family: Wife, Destiny and 3 children, Catera (9), Rylan (3) and Ridley (1) Hobbies: Snowmobiling, boating, golf, tinkering on motors Advice to a would-be entrepreneur:  Work hard, put in your time, and don’t sweat the small stuff…keep it simple! Best advice you’ve received: “Never take advantage of a customer, even if you can,”  from Leonard Rydell

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Wes Rydell had pioneered nonnegotiable pricing in Grand Forks, but Gilleland was the first auto dealer in the St. Cloud area to introduce the one sticker price concept. The Rydell group knew that most customers hated the process of bartering, and that it made automobile purchasing stressful and unpleasant for many people. Six of their dealers decided to trial the one-price philosophy. “It got a lot of attention,” Christy said. “Competitors thought it was the worst idea ever. But right around that time Saturn came onto the market with the window sticker price being the price you paid, so people started to think that was the way to go. When Dad pioneered that idea, nobody else did it. Now everybody is doing it. It’s not so weird anymore.” Gilleland sales staff are not paid on commission, but on volume. Their bonus

for selling five economy cars is the same as if they sell five Cadillacs. This eliminates the incentive for a salesperson to up-sell customers into larger, more expensive models. Instead, the system encourages sales staff to pay attention to customer needs and find them the right car. “Our sales staff don’t care what you buy. They want to sell a car that works for you, and that fits your budget, so you’ll come back and buy more cars from us,” Christy said. Fortunately for the siblings, Gilleland’s change in leadership is happening as the automotive industry is recovering from one of its darkest periods. During the recession, people were no longer buying new motor cars in the same way they used to. They were repairing their cars and keeping them extra years instead of trading in. Either from fear or necessity,


Dealers used to have a bad reputation for service, and people would go to their neighborhood garage instead. Now, we’re working on building loyal customers. We want to go beyond brand loyalty to dealer loyalty.” – CHRISTY GILLELAND

Doug Schmidt services a vehicle. Service, parts and collision repair provide 60% of Gilleland’s revenue.

people learned how to budget more than they had previously. Post recession, business is good. “The mood of the market is pretty fantastic right now. Sales are up -- not just here but statewide and nationwide. The sun is shining,” Christy said. They still face challenges, because the automobile industry has been affected by technological change, both generally and specific to their industry.  Christy and Grant describe the Internet as a game changer. Today’s customers can easily find out the pricing structure at other dealers around the state and even across the nation. Customers are also much more knowledgeable about the options available to them. “The knowledge that customers gained has made every dealer change their game,” Christy said. “We used to have to educate customers. Now they

come in and say I want this truck in this color and this is what I’m willing to pay.” It isn’t just the sales operation that has been affected. Service has changed, too. Mechanically, automobiles are much more reliable than in the past. Cars don’t break down like they used to. Warranties are longer. Less maintenance is needed. “You don’t need to bring the car in every summer to replace the Freon for your air conditioning, for example. There’s a lot of things we used to be able to sell to customers  that we can’t sell now. We’ve had to change our game. Our goal now is not to sell you things when you come in. Our goal now is to check your car every time you come in and give you a report on its condition, so when you do need brake pads you’ll get them from us because you know that we’ve been checking them,” Christy explained. “Dealers used to have a bad reputation for service, and people would go to their neighborhood garage instead. Now, we’re working on building loyal customers. We want to go beyond brand loyalty to dealer loyalty.” Brand loyalty, the Gillelands will tell you, is something else that is all but extinct. Today’s customers may be looking for a Chevrolet or other General Motors brand, but they are also making comparisons with other domestic brands as well as Kia, Hyundai and other imports.

PAY IT FORWARD Christy and Grant have confidence in each other and share responsibility easily. They are actively involved in all areas of their business. “Grant ran the Quick Lube business for a while,” Christy said, so his experience with that operation trumps

any knowledge Christy may have gained. “It was profitable, the customers were happy and the employees were happy, so it wouldn’t make any sense for me to get involved,” she said. They expect that ten years from now they will probably be running the business the same way they are now, but with more volume and a larger customer base. Their priorities are to keep the customers happy and to honor the traditions of the business. Their children will be given the opportunity to join the business, but on the same terms they were given - beginning at the bottom and working their way up. “The main thing is that we owe everything not only to our Dad, but our loyal customers,” Christy said. “If it weren’t for either of those two we wouldn’t be sitting here and we know that. Our number one priority, as we transition and buy this out from our Dad, is that we don’t want to change our philosophy or the way we do business because it’s obviously worked. And we don’t want our vision clouded by anything else. We just want to stick with what works and keep doing what we do best.” In fact, they would like to be able to pay forward the generosity showed to their father by Leonard Rydell. One of their biggest wishes is that within the next 10 years they can identify and groom at least two people under their leadership who could go through the Rydell development program and get their own stores, Christy said. “Personally and professionally it would mean a lot to us. That would be a huge win. It’s one of our shared goals.” John Pepper is a freelance writer in St. Cloud, Minn.

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Feature

From urban planning to consumerism, sustainable business practices touch every part of our lives…and impact your bottom line. By mary macdonell belisle

College of St. Benedict student housing construction was awarded LEED® for Homes Platinum, the first college student housing in Minnesota to do so.

S

ustainability objectives have become part of many organizational strategic goals. Global companies are making news as they work to reduce their energy footprints. But they aren’t alone. There are many companies and organizations in the St. Cloud area that are taking “going green” to heart. Electrolux Green Spirit Multi-national appliance manufacturer Electrolux, of Stockholm, Sweden, operates an appliance manufacturing plant in St. Cloud, employing over 1,259 people. Sustainability is a priority. In fact in 2007, Electrolux Group received the Sustainable Energy Award from the European Commission in

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the “Corporate commitment” category for its actions to reduce energy consumption in factories, products, and services. In 2011 the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Energy named the company “EnergyStar® Partner of the Year for Product Manufacture.” The Dow Jones Sustainability World Index recognized Electrolux as a leader in its industry for the seventh consecutive year in 2013. Electrolux’s Green Spirit program is part of the Electrolux Manufacturing System. Sustainability objectives are set to reduce resource consumption (energy/water), waste, and emissions during the manufacturing process and in consumer use of the

company’s Green Spirit products. To accomplish this, the company 1) uses an energy management system to create action plans and track results; 2) integrates Green Spirit into the existing manufacturing program; 3) invests in energylean technologies by involving suppliers; 4) helps establish global energy standards for equipment; and 5) engages employees through sharing, safety days, and team sustainability awards. Green Spirit’s 2020 goal is to reduce energy use in production by 50 percent and CO2 impact by 50 percent, compared to 2005 levels. The Electrolux Professional Green Spirit products are up to 95 percent recyclable and global ISO certified, and environmentally friendly from design to manufacturing and from product usage to disposal. Central Minnesota Sustainability Project Rick and Carol Gibson-Miller, St. Cloud, created the Central Minnesota Sustainability Project (CMSP) in 2009. “Our role is to get people engaged in sustainable and healthy food production,” said Miller, a lifelong gardener who has devoted much time to the organic and sustainable farming industry. CMSP has facilitated the operation of three community gardens where participants find affordable, chemical-free food access on a plot they purchase or cultivate through a needbased scholarship. Individuals

and families garden with the group in the African-American Promise Neighborhood Community Garden, near Talahi school. The Maine Prairie Community Garden, located at Diocese Park, serves 76 recent immigrant families. The James Kelly Community Garden at the CentraCare Health Plaza serves community members and medical staff on 46 plots. Plots are approximately 10’x20’ and produce roughly

BY THE NUMBERS

The Business of Sustainability

63%

Companies that are reducing energy use in their operations –––––––––––––

61%

Companies that are reducing operational waste –––––––––––––

67%

Companies that have integrated sustainability into their missions and values –––––––––––––

43%

Companies that are reducing emissions from operations –––––––––––––

31%

Companies that are committing R&D resources to sustainable products

Source: 2011 McKinsey Global Online Survey; responses were received from 3,203 executives representing the full range of regions, industries, tenures, company sizes, and functional specialties

A Sustainable Future


$400 worth of fresh produce annually. In addition to the subscription fees, various organizations have awarded the project grant money. CMSP also operates a Market Garden Program where gardeners cultivate crops for sale at farmers markets and restaurants. Common Ground Garden – Monastery of St. Benedict Phyllis Plantenberg, OSB, spearheaded efforts in 1993 to create a community-supported agriculture (CSA) site at the Monastery of St. Benedict in St. Joseph. One of the first in the state of Minnesota, Common Ground Garden served a dozen

As technology continues to become more advanced, more new products and building materials will be developed that will keep reducing the amount of energy used to create materials, and to construct and operate facilities.” – David Leapaldt, principal, IIW

families that first year with the help of a grant. Since then, the enterprise has been self-sustaining. “We are very happy with 100 subscriptions,” said Production Manager Kate Ritger. “The community relationships we build are also important to us and speak to our mission.” Subscribers cultivate the threeacre garden for their use and/ or for sale at various farmers’ markets and restaurants, or donation to local food shelves.

Crops are typically planted in May and harvested in October. Each subscriber may harvest a crop weekly. Produce is grown organically using cover crops, crop rotation, and compost in cultivation rather than harmful chemical herbicides, pesticides, and fertilizers. College of Saint Benedict (CSB) Sustainability Initiatives “Sustainability is central to our institutional values and

mission,” said Judy Purman, director of sustainability at CSB, which has implemented many sustainability projects. “Stash it. Don’t trash it” diverts useable items from the landfill. In the spring when students cast off furniture, appliances, TVs, etc., salvageable items are collected by volunteers and moved to a 40’ trailer, donated by Rice Building Systems. Items are stored over the summer and sold in an August garage sale to

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Feature

Sustainability projects on the College of St. Benedict campus include The Full Circle Winter Greenhouse (left) which grows and sells produce on campus, and the “Stash it. Don’t trash it” event that keeps usable goods out of landfills.

returning students. CSB was also the first college in Minnesota and one of nine in the U.S. to eliminate the distribution of water bottled in plastic, reducing the environmental, economic, and social costs of production,

transport, and sale of bottled water. Today there are 40 hydration stations on campus. The Full Circle Winter Greenhouse is a student-initiated and operated project that grows and sells its produce to McGlynn’s Sports Café in the

campus center. The 16’x22’ greenhouse faces north/south to maximize the winter sun in this passive solar design. Its three-layered acrylic panels face south and are opaque, diffusing the sunlight for even heating. Greenhouse temperatures often

reach 90 degrees. On cloudy days, when temperatures reach 40 degrees, the electric backup heater engages. Sustainability is not just about food and landfills at CSB. The recent 125-person Centennial Commons student housing construction on campus was awarded LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) for Homes Platinum by the U.S. Green Building Council, the first college student housing in Minnesota to do so. IIW sustainability mindset David Leapaldt, architect and principal at IIW, St. Cloud, is an original member of the St. Cloud Area Sustainability

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Committee, intent on increasing sustainability in the city. Helping clients build responsibly, with attention to sustainability practices, is what he and his colleagues do. “Most clients say they want an energy-efficient building,” said Leapaldt. “So we’re seeing a little more awareness of sustainability now.” Many clients are aware of cost and energy savings gained through the use of environmentally friendly systems for heating and cooling. Fewer are aware of the affect lighting has on their overall energy bill, where savings from improved lighting technology combined with sensor technology can

make a big impact. “Not many look at the embedded energy cost of the materials used either,” said Leapaldt. Operationally, IIW has reduced the printing of architectural plans during the bidding process by 70-80 percent by posting documents on digital sites where bidders can download the data. Job sites are slower to adapt to this trend, but Leapaldt believes “we will soon see fewer printed documents on the sites.” However, job sites are improving. In the not so distant past, one dumpster at the job site would take all trash and debris to the landfill. Today multiple

dumpsters are used to separate waste for recycling.

CO2 into the atmosphere. East Side Glass’ sustainability effort is comparable to planting 5,000 trees, according to solar contractor Innovative Power Systems of St. Paul. “The Made in MN solar bonus program, Xcel Energy Solar Rewards, and their no upfront cost financing package made this a very good investment for us,” said Dave Ferkinhoff, president.

East Side Glass toasts solar Luke Ferkinhoff, vice-president of East Side Glass, believes the development and use of passive solar windows is on the horizon, along with self-tinting windows where oxygen triggers a chemical reaction to adjust the amount of sunlight allowed in a building. The full-service glass company in St. Cloud put a solar electric system into its own building. Solar panels should produce 50,000 kilowatts of energy on average per year. The same amount of energy produced by coal would release 100,000 pounds of

Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance copy and content writer with wordingforyou.com, St. Cloud, MN.

For a complete list of sources used in this story, visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

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Special Focus

MAKING A MOVE

EXPERT ADVICE

If you’re relocating your business remember the three Ps: Planning, Partners and Positivity. By Whitney Bina always prepared,” Grewing said. “Weekly meetings were scheduled between our general and CEO to go over building updates and plans.”

Y

our company outgrew its current space and relocation appears imminent. Stress levels rise, employees appear disgruntled and decisions overwhelm you. Relocating poses a challenge for any business, but it doesn’t have to be as difficult as it first appears. Before you jump right into an office move, create a plan and explore your options.

1. Timing is everything Why do you want or need to relocate your office space and is it the right time? If your company’s long-term lease is coming to an end, an office move might be ideal. If your organization aims to hire additional employees, but doesn’t have the capacity to house them, relocation might be necessary. Just remember to plan ahead. For Red Grewing, office administrator, Quinlivan and Hughes, relocation was a multiyear process. “Four years ago, we knew our lease was going to be up soon,” he said. “We had decisions to make. Do we stay in our current office space or

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do we find a new location? Why do we want to move? What do we need in terms of size? Do we want to own or lease?” Ask yourself the same questions to determine the best options for your organization. 2.Make it a team effort Now that you’ve decided to relocate, before you do anything else, line yourself up with people who have experience with relocations, Grewing said. They can provide you with the right connections. Find experts you trust and don’t attempt the relocation process alone. Hire a commercial realtor and a general contractor as soon as possible. Market knowledge proves important. “Our commercial realtor knew both lease rates and build-out rates,” Grewing said. “They searched for properties and helped us find the right space.” General contractors also assist in finding and designing suitable office space. “Our general contractor was

3.Logistics, logistics, logistics It’s never too early to start preparing to move. “Set up a communications plan,” Jeff Brunn, Red’s Transfer, said. “Notify all customers, vendors, and other important contacts of your upcoming move.” Companies and organizations should also set up an in-house moving committee. Assign tasks and have regular relocation meetings, Brunn said. “For our move, we created different committees and split up tasks into bite-size increments,” Grewing said. “It helped us simplify the overall process.” Seek help from other vendors such as interior designers and decorators. These professionals work with you to create functional floor plans and provide insight into making your space more flexible, Grewing said.

Tips for a successful relocation.

Tracy Hamilton Curran, Hughes Mathews Greer 1.Color-code office spaces for the actual move – every space should have its own color. Employees should use their assigned color for their moving bins, boxes, equipment and furniture. 2.Keep a master moving calendar and provide weekly or daily up-to-date details to your employees. 3.Connect with any tenants in your new building and exchange contact information. 4.The day before the move, make absolutely sure you have a full backup of your system. Also, print a list of calendar events for the next five business days. It’s better to be prepared in case anything goes wrong in the transfer process.

What are the top five things to accomplish before the moving crew helps you relocate? Jeff Brunn – Red’s Transfer 1.Set up a communications plan. 2.Set up a moving committee. 3.Determine what furnishings you will need and

won’t need at your new location. 4.Make staff aware of important items they need and use. Don’t move anything that

currently isn’t being used. 5.Discuss proper packing requirements.


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Special Focus: Commercial Construction

4.Attitude is everything Relocation is an entire staff initiative and it begins with attitude. Company decision makers can earn employee buy-in by keeping their staff up-to-date on relocation decisions and maintaining positive attitudes and excitement themselves. “Our team effort was the one thing that made the move successful,” Grewing said. “There was no Most Valuable Player in the process - everyone owned their part.” Although daunting, relocations can be successful. Plan ahead, find appropriate partners, divvy out tasks and most importantly, stay positive. Whitney Bina is the communications and workforce development coordinator at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

Rice Building Systems, Inc. GNP Dock & Cooler Addition LOCATION GNP Company Cold Spring, Minnesota GENERAL CONTRACTOR Rice Building Systems, Inc

Special Focus:

Commercial Construction Continue reading to learn more about the variety of Commercial Construction Services available in Central Minnesota.

ARCHITECT Evans Freimuth Architects, LLC WEBSITE ricebuildingsystems.com DESCRIPTION Completed in two phases which include a 7,395 SF 34 degree shipping dock and cooler, a 3,800 SF new 2 story dock office and an 10,125 SF 28 degree storage cooler. Both buildings feature insulated cooler wall panels and conventional Butler structural steel construction.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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Winkelman Building Corp Autumn Glen Senior Living LOCATION Coon Rapids, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Winkelman Building Corp. ARCHITECT Frisbie Architects PROJECT COMPLETION December 2014 PROJECT COST $10.2 million WEBSITE www.winkbuild.com DESCRIPTION This 135,000 sf senior campus includes independent, assisted living and memory care living units plus undergeround parking.

W Gohman Construction Minnwest Bank

LOCATION Minnwest Bank - St. Cloud, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR W Gohman Construction ARCHITECT Mahler and Associates

COMPLETION DATE December 2014

WEBSITE www.wgohman.com

COST $544,000

DESCRIPTION The 2155 Sf. addition and remodel of the bank. New addition includes 5 offices, a conference room and 3 work stations. Existing offices remodeled to include a new server room and access to new addition.

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Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5


uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

Special Focus: Commercial Construction

Miller Architects & Builders Stearns Leasing Addition

LOCATION Stearns Equipment Finance & Leasing Albany, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Miller Architects & Builders ARCHITECT Keenan Architectural Group PROJECT COMPLETION January 2015

WEBSITE www.millerab.com

FOCUSED ONTHE FUTURE

Strack Companies Trinity Logistics LOCATION Sartell, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Strack Companies

SILVERCREST OFFICE COMPLEX | SARTELL, MN

DESCRIPTION 10,864 sf. office and call center addition with 75 cubicles, private offices, file room, coffee room, recessed training room with video conference, expanded break room/kitchen, and additional parking.

ARCHITECT Negen & Associates

PROJECT COMPLETION June 2015 WEBSITE www.strackcompanies.com DESCRIPTION The new home for Granite Logistics Services, LLC, an agent for Trinity Logistics, is as stunning as it’s setting on the water’s edge at Sartell’s Pine Lakes Development. This high-tech 13,000 square foot facitlity is loaded with amenities and offers a pleasant and modern environment with numerous architectural features for its growing employee base.

RIVER’S EDGE CONVENTION CENTER | ST. CLOUD, MN

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT REAL ESTATE SERVICES 320.251.5933 | 888.678.7225 | StrackCompanies.com

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

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Business Spotlight INSIGHT INSURANCE SERVICES

SECONDS COUNT

The insurance industry is changing quickly…if you don’t change with it, you’re going to be left behind. By Whitney Bina

TIMELINE September 2000 Dave Toeben starts Insight Insurance Services at the 2700 building by Panera in St. Cloud 2002 Toeben moves his office to Waite Park by the Parkwood movie theaters 2006 Toeben moves his office to 3rd Street in St. Cloud May 2014 Insight Insurance Services is now located in Market Place Plaza in Waite Park

______________ AT A GLANCE Insight Insurance Services

Business Central recently sat down with Dave Toeben, Insight Insurance Services, to learn more about his company. When we arrived at his office, he was on hold waiting to speak to an insurance representative. We continued on with our interview, regularly reminded by the cell phone that his call would be answered in the order received. Business Central: How did you get into the insurance business? ______________

second of every day. If you don’t change with it, you’re going to be left behind.

Toeben: A gentleman I knew from a college sales training class was looking for someone to work for his insurance company. As I learned about the business, the potential earnings were very appealing. It was only after I signed on that I learned my earnings were on commission. The first few years were tough, but I worked hard and made new connections. A few years later, he sold his agency and I opened Insight Insurance Services.

BC: What has been your biggest business challenge? ______________

BC: How have things changed since you began Insight Insurance Services? ______________ Toeben: Technology has helped the industry overall – data is in one central location now, which makes business more efficient. The industry is changing every 54

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 5

Toeben: Obamacare – it’s been a huge change for both us and our clients. Healthcare rates have increased so much in the last few years and healthcare reform is constantly changing. The larger the employer, the more complicated it gets. BC: What do you like best about business ownership? ______________ Toeben: I enjoy being my own boss. There are pros and cons of business ownership and the last few years have been challenging, but I’m learning how to adjust my business to succeed and meet new regulations. My philosophy has always been “work hard, play hard.”

BC: What does the future look like for you? ______________ Toeben: I’m expanding my services into business succession planning. We will always do health insurance on a referral basis, but it’s time to change our offerings to reflect the changing needs of our clients. In the next few years more and more business owners will be transitioning out of the workforce. As most business owners don’t have a plan in place, I want to help them plan for retirement and protect them when unexpected things happen.

Right before we wrapped up the interview, the insurance representative came online. Dave was on hold for 57 minutes for an answer to one question that took three minutes. Fifty seven minutes of waiting for a three minute answer – just a normal day in the life of an insurance agent.

Dave Toeben, CEO 110 2nd St. S, Ste 220, Waite Park, MN 56387 Phone: (320) 258-3122 Fax: (320) 207-2163 info@look2insight.com www.look2insight.com Business Description: Insight Insurance Services is an independent agency that specializes in providing solutions for business owners to help them attract and retain employees, as well as protect and transfer their businesses. Opened: September 2000 Number of Employees: 2 Chamber member since November 2000

______________

PERSONAL PROFILE Dave Toeben Hometown: Freeport, MN; moved to St. Cloud, MN for college. Education: St. Cloud State University; Department of Commerce License in Insurance; Self-education to keep up with the industry. Family: Wife - Angela Hobbies: Spending time with friends and family, golfing, fishing, hunting and traveling.


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March/April 2015  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce business magazine, Business Central

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