Page 1

Mike Schlough

Joan Schatz


After a tumor was discovered in his colon at age 60, Bill states, “My message for

everybody — get your colonoscopy.”

IT IS TIME TO GET SCREENED. Colon cancer screening is the best way to prevent colon cancer. Begin regular screening at age 50. If there is family history or other risk factors, screening should begin earlier. To learn more about screening tests, talk to your provider or visit centracare.com.

Bill Cahoy Cold Spring, Minn.

| OUR BEST FOR YOU


Business solutions centered on you.

CMCU business lenders visit your business to discuss the best financial solutions to help raise your bottom line. CMCU offers SBA loans and is a designated SBA Preferred Lender with the Small Business Administration (SBA). The SBA program offers flexible repayment terms and you will receive local, expedited processing of your loan application.

Talk to a lender today or apply online! 888.330.8482 | mycmcu.org |

Centered on you.

Federally Insured by NCUA. Equal Opportunity Lender.


MARCH/APRIL 2017

6 18

CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

GROW

36 Cover Story

President’s Letter Business Calendar

8 22

Editor’s Note

Network Central

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 7 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

36

THE PARK WAY Built into the essence of stone-equipment manufacturer Park Industries is the firm belief that if you treat employees with integrity and respect, customers will follow. PROFIT

42 Feature INNOVATION NATION Not taking risks is risky business.

46 Special Focus HELP WANTED Construction is among many industries that are finding it increasingly difficult to fill open positions.

52 Special Section COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION

10 UPFRONT Valuable information designed to guide and educate

24 BUSINESS TOOLS Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business

54 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Northway Dental

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2017 Business Central, LLC

• Learn New Stuff Fast

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• DIY Press Coverage

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101,

• 2017 Social Media Trends • Keys to Superior Hiring

Business Central is published six times a year

P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


Same-day appointments available

Preventive check-ups today make for a healthier tomorrow. Visit hpcmc.com or call 320-253-5220 to make an appointment.

We welcome most insurance plans.


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

President’s Letter

Big Business

A

s chair of our Chamber’s Board of Directors, Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, has identified three goals he would like our organization to focus on: • Expand the Chamber’s diversity efforts • Expand the Board’s understanding of committee work • Educate and recruit larger businesses to the Chamber Eighty percent of our Chamber members are businesses with fewer than 25 employees. However, our programs and events are developed to give all members tools they can use to succeed, whether they are an independent contractor or an international corporation. Even so, we often hear these excuses from large businesses for not joining the Chamber: WE DON’T DO BUSINESS LOCALLY. Your customers may not be local, but I’ll bet you’re hiring local people, using local vendors and depending on local infrastructure to support your operations. Membership from our largest companies, no matter who their customers are, ensures health for all of our members and our community. Strong communities have good libraries and active, healthy chambers of commerce! WE DON’T HAVE TIME TO PARTICIPATE IN YOUR EVENTS. Your membership in our chamber enables anyone in your company to participate in our unmatched networking events, extensive training seminars, and influential government affairs activities. In fact, we have a certified Supervisor Development Program that several larger companies

6

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826

include as part of their own supervisor training programs. OUR CORPORATE OFFICE WON’T LET US JOIN CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE. Of all of the excuses, this one is probably the weakest. I have never been able to verify this objection with one corporate office. As a local manager, I know you find room in tight budgets for priority expenditures. If you take advantage of the value our chamber offers, you will make room for us. If you don’t, you are missing an unmatched opportunity to drive additional customers and sales.

Program Hotline: 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com www.StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator: Whitney Bina, ext.130 Special Events Coordinator: Sheri Wegner, ext. 131 Membership Sales Specialist: Rhonda Dahlgren, ext. 134 Administrative Assistant: Kellie Libert, ext. 124 Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100

WE PUT OUR “CHARITABLE DOLLARS” ELSEWHERE. That is good, because our chamber is NOT a charitable organization. We are a membership organization, providing exponential value for every dollar our members invest with us. We provide referrals, a free job bank, a free business calendar, networking, advertising opportunities, education and training, special events, promotion, membership in the Sauk Rapids and Waite Park Chambers, advocacy with all levels of government, and convention and visitors services. The smartest boss I ever had told me never to ask a potential customer a question to which I didn’t know the answer. So now I ask you: Is there any other organization that does all that for you? Come join us, potential Big Business Members. Choose to support those who support you, and we will all benefit.

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Main Phone: 320-251-4170 Executive Director: Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Director of Convention Sales: Lori Cates, ext. 113 Director of Sports & Special Events: Dana Randt, ext. 110 Sales Manager: Nikki Fisher, ext. 112 Social Media & Marketing Specialist: Emily Bertram, ext. 129 Sales & Marketing Coordinator: Rachel Thompson, ext. 128 Administrative Assistant: Carrie Zwack, ext. 100 2016-17 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Past Board Chair Dan Bittman, Sauk Rapids-Rice School District David Borgert, CentraCare Health Neil Franz, Franz Hultgren Evenson, Professional Association Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Jim Gruenke, Traut Companies Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Board Chair Melinda Vonderahe, Chamber Board Vice Chair Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud


For the community that believes in itself, there’s a bank that does, too.

At U.S. Bank, we’re dedicated to helping improve the lives of those in our community, because when people come together with a common goal, the impossible suddenly becomes possible. Our support means funding and volunteering in the programs and organizations that make our community a better place to live. U.S. Bank is proud to support the St. Cloud Community.

St. Cloud Downtown 1015 West St. Germain Street | St. Cloud, MN 56301 320.251.7110

visit a branch 800.USBANKS (872.2657) usbank.com

Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC. ©2016 U.S. Bank. “World’s Most Ethical Companies” and “Ethisphere” names and marks are registered trademarks of Ethisphere LLC.


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Editor’s Note

Granite Magic 4

3 1.

2.

1.Adding the tape to a big slab of granite helped me

visualize it as a countertop, rather than a big slab of granite. 2 and 3. Granite Magic! From template to cut out, the virtual world of granite countertops allows you to see exactly how your countertops will look. 4.Installed, ready for use, and beautiful.

T

here is a major remodeling/construction project underway at my house. A large portion of it involves creating a new kitchen. Based on advice from a friend I went to the granite store to pick out THE piece of granite that would become my new countertops. I don’t know about you, but trying to imagine what a huge piece of rock is going to look like when it is cut down and reshaped into countertops is not my strong suit. In an attempt to help me visualize the final product, the saleswoman took a piece of tape and roughly marked out a section of granite. That was surprisingly helpful and, because I couldn’t stand there all day vacillating, I picked a piece. Two, actually. Then this really cool thing happened. I went to the fabrication store where they took a picture of my pieces of granite and popped them up on a big screen as if they were cut and ready to be installed. You could see where the sinks and the cook top would go, you could see where the seams fell, you could see the curves… it was granite magic! In my case you could also see the

8

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

spot on the granite that I didn’t like. With a little more magic the layout was adjusted so that spot became a hole for the sink. It turns out that one of the companies that does granite magic is Park Industries. (See the cover story on page 36). Park manufactures equipment for the stone industry. While we were visiting the company I saw they were set up to take a photo of a slab of granite. It turns out that software is one of Park’s products. Working with partners they are able to provide various software solutions to their customers that can help them manage their businesses more effectively. This includes software that captures precise images of granite slabs in high resolution. The images can then be used for slab layout so customers like me can see their countertop, in 3-D, before any stone processing has begun. Granite Magic! As you can see from the photos, my counters are installed and ready to go to work. My photography aside, they look — you guessed it — magic! Until next issue,


Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Whitney Bina, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Oriane Casale, Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) Heidi Everett, Watab Communications Brian Hart, Sandler Training Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Tracy Knofla, High Impact Training Kellie Libert, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Mary MacDonell Belisle, wordingforyou.com

Jeanine Nistler, freelance writer Chad Staul, Rinke Noonan Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

OPERATIONS 101: WHY PAY TO RUN EQUIPMENT WHEN YOU DON’T NEED TO?

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320)656-3808 Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

That’s basically how Energy Management Systems (EMS) work. They can be set to automatically turn systems on and off at preset times. Might seem like a small thing, but those savings rack up in a hurry. And right now, we’ll help offset the cost of installing an EMS or adding control points to your current system. Savings. Just another thing Xcel Energy is always delivering. For details, visit xcelenergy.com/Business or call 855.839.8862.

© 2017 Xcel Energy Inc.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

9


INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

New at the Top • Your Voice in Government • People to Know

Do it Now! • Business Calendar • Top Hat Photos • The Trouble with Business uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Get a Grip

NEWS REEL

If your business is controlling you, it’s time to read Traction and take back control. Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill

Traction: Get A Grip On Your Business by Gino Wickman, BenBella Books, Dallas, Texas, 2007, ISBN 978-1936661-84-8

G

ino Wickman’s passion is helping people get what they want from their businesses. Wickman created the Entrepreneurial Operating System (EOS), a holistic system that, when implemented in an organization, helps leaders run better businesses, get better control, have better life balance, and gain more traction. When the entire organization advances together, you have a healthy, functional, and cohesive team. He spends most of his time as an EOS implementer, working hands-on with the leadership teams of entrepreneurial companies to help them fully

10

implement EOS in their organizations. This book consists of 10 chapters – they are: (1) The Entrepreneurial Operating System and Strengthening the Six Key Components. (2) Letting Go of the Vine. (3) The Vision Component – Do They See What You Are Saying? (4) The People Component – Surround Yourself with Good People. (5) The Data Component – Safety in Numbers. (6) The Issues Component – Decide. (7) The Process Component – Finding Your Way. (8) The Traction Component – Luftmensch to Action! (9) Putting It All Together – The Grand Journey. (10) Getting Started. Wickman identifies five common frustrations of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial actions. They are: 1 Lack of control – you don’t have enough control over your time, the market, or your company. Instead of controlling the business, the business is controlling you. 2 People – you’re frustrated with your employees, customers,

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

vendors, or partners. They don’t seem to listen, understand you, or follow through with their actions. 3 Profit – simply put, there’s not enough of it. 4 The ceiling – your growth has stopped. No matter what you do, you can’t seem to break through and get to the next level. 5 Nothing’s working – you’ve tried various strategies and quick-fix remedies. None have worked for long, and as a result, your staff has become numb to new initiatives. Wickman explains that the client is not the business. The business is an entity in and of itself. The client created it and must turn it into a self-sustaining organism in order to find success. He teaches clients strong guiding principles that will work for their companies. Traction will help you get your grip! Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor from St. Cloud State University.

ST. CLOUD HOSPITAL RECOGNIZED U.S. News & World Report ranked St. Cloud Hospital’s orthopedics services as number 32 in the nation. Less than three percent of nationwide hospitals earned a national top 50 ranking in at least one of 16 specialties. Overall, the hospital ranks third among Minnesota’s approximately 150 hospitals. The report also ranked St. Cloud Hospital as “high performing” in seven other areas.

BLOEMENDAALGRUETT JOINS SBETC Joan BloemendaalGruett joined Stearns-Benton Employment & Training Council (SBETC) as development director. She brings several years of grant writing, workforce development, program development, and training experience to the organization.

TRIMM, NELSON NAMED ‘ROCK STARS’ Credit Union Magazine designated Great River Federal Credit Union (GRFCU) staff Randy Trimm, CEO, and Becky Nelson, human resources manager, as 2016 Credit Union Rock Stars. Only four of the 49 winners named are from Minnesota. Trimm was recognized for his industry experience and passion while Nelson was awarded for her work on the well-being and volunteer committees at GRFCU.


POINT OF VIEW

Business Central asks readers:

“What is one of the best qualities a good leader should possess?”

IN THE NEWS

Fresh Thyme opens

Be a visionary. It’s easy to charge forward toward a goal if someone sets it up for an organization.”

Matt Binsfeld • Park Industries

Lead by example, and mentor in all you do.”

Bobbie Mattison • Catholic Charities

Confidence to make decisions to move the company forward.”

Sara Lommel • Marco

As my St. Cloud State University college professor, Bassey Eyo, taught me ‘service with humility.’”

Adam Vee • American Heritage National Bank

Fresh Thyme Farmers Market opened its 51st store in Waite Park in January. Fresh Thyme

Honesty and transparency. A good leader is honest with you and transparent with the company’s vision.”

focuses on healthy and organic

Anita Chisholm • Times Media

70 stores throughout the

products and groceries and offers organic and local fruits and vegetables, a natural meat department, healthy deli foods, supplement products and more. The company plans to open Midwest by the end of 2017.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

11


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL SOGGE JOINS QUINLIVAN & HUGHES

Grassroots Advocacy

The most effective lobbyists are people who can relate issues to their own experiences. By Teresa Bohnen

Jessie L. Sogge joined Quinlivan & Hughes law firm as a trial attorney for the litigation practice group. Sogge brings over ten years of experience in both plaintiff and defense cases and criminal prosecution and defense work in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

GET YOUR MESSAGE HEARD Here are some tips to communicate your grassroots message to our state and federal lawmakers. (Whether you write your legislator or have a personal appointment, the

MCANALLY JOINS CENTRACARE Kelsey McAnally, D.O., joined CentraCare Wound Center. Her special interests include chronic wound care, quality improvement and health literacy.

ERICKSON RECOGNIZED ERP named Daniel Erickson, manager, product strategy, ProcessPro, a finalist in the Best Writer category for the ERP Software Writers’ Awards 2016. The annual awards recognize excellence in ERP community writing including articles, blog posts and reviews.

ANDERSON JOINS BOARD Brett Anderson, branch manager, Sentry Bank, joined the Initiative Foundation Board of Trustees as its inaugural apprentice trustee. Anderson, an Initiative Foundation Emerging Leaders program graduate, will serve a one-year, non-voting term to provide insight into board operations. The new apprentice position is intended to provide a next-generation leader with knowledge about how a board guides the successful operation of a regional nonprofit.

BRENNY TRANSPORTATION PROMOTES Brenny Transportation, Inc. promoted Ben Minke to logistics manager.

12

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

same criteria apply.)

M

ost people have no desire to be a “lobbyist.” Many consider it a sleazy, backroom kind of job, where deals are cut, and under-the-table, shady activities prevail. From my experience, reality is far from this perception. Lobbyists are experts in their fields. Elected officials rely on lobbyists to provide information that makes good governing quicker and easier. Lobbyists generally represent one side of an issue and most legislators seek to hear both sides before making policy decisions. The most effective lobbyists are people who can relate issues to their own experiences or professional expertise. That’s what’s called Grassroots Advocacy, and it’s my favorite kind! When people have a personal stake in lawmaking, they can make impassioned statements about impacts and ripple effects. Recently, I attended a session in which small business owners reported paying $3,600 health insurance premiums every month, just

for the privilege of paying their first $10,000 of out of pocket medical costs. These “insureds” are expected to pay $53,200 annually before their insurance kicks in. These “insureds” are Central Minnesota farmers who must have health insurance because of the risks of their chosen profession: growing food for people. Every elected official in the room sat up and listened carefully to the pleas for immediate help; the compassion in their eyes making it evident that the message had been effectively communicated. Those Minnesota farmers are the most effective lobbyists I’ve ever witnessed. And you can be, too. Do not be intimidated to speak with our elected officials. They want to hear from you. Email is generally the best way to communicate with them. Teresa Bohnen is president of

n Limit your communication to one, clearly defined topic. If it applies to a bill number, make sure you include it. n State in your own words why you are concerned about the issue or legislation. Your personal experience is always the best support for your view. n Communicate as early as possible with your legislators, preferably before they have taken a position on the issue. n Clearly state your own position and what you wish for them to do. Be constructive and reasonable. n If you are a spokesman for a group, be sure to mention it. n Ask your legislators to explain their views to you. As a constituent, you are entitled to know their positions.

the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

You can find a list of our Central Minnesota legislators’ emails at StCloudAreaChamber.com.


NEW AT THE TOP

IN THE NEWS

Meet Brian Gibson, 47

Arvig recognized

Executive Director, Saint Cloud Area Planning Organization Previous employer: Oahu Metropolitan Planning Organization, Honolulu, Hawaii What will you miss most about your previous position? The ability to snorkel on Thanksgiving Day

Fun fact about yourself: I had a co-starring role in one episode of Hawaii 5-0

When did you start in your current position? July 7, 2016

Twin Cities Business (TCB) recognized David Arvig, vice president and COO, Arvig, as one of the 100 People to Know in 2017. Every year TCB recognizes individuals expected to make an impact on local business, the regional economy and/or the quality of life.

What are you looking forward to the most in your new position? Being nearer friends and family, and helping the St. Cloud region develop and prosper Where did you grow up? Wahpeton, North Dakota What are your hobbies? The arts – photography, film, theatre, acting, directing

3 spine specialists for 3 times the back support. From non-operative care to surgery. Spine care is no small feat. So when it’s time to evaluate a patient’s back condition, we have a team of three highly trained specialists at their service. Each one specializes in the most proven methods of non-surgical therapy and minimally-invasive operating techniques in order to get backs on track as quickly as possible, in the best way possible. Our team is dedicated to providing Central Minnesota with the strongest spine care, delivered with precision. Faster treatments, better outcomes. Right here at home.

StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100 1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell

Knee & Shoulder • Joint Replacement • Sports Medicine • Hand Center • Trauma • Spine Center • Foot & Ankle • Physical & Occupational Therapy

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

13


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL BAKKE EARNS MEMBER OF THE YEAR Christine Bakke, administrator, St. Benedict’s Senior Community, received the “Member of the Year” award from Care Providers of Minnesota. The award honors individuals who contribute time, energy and expertise to Care Providers of Minnesota and the long-term care profession.

SCHLENNER WENNER PROMOTES Schlenner Wenner & Co. promoted Ryan Finberg and Jonathan S. Archer to partner. Finberg, CPA, MBT, specializes in small business accounting and taxation. Archer, CPA, provides auditing and accounting services for notfor-profit organizations and governmental entities.

HOSCH JOINS GSDC Larry Hosch joined the Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation (GSDC) as business development director. Hosch brings over 20 years of experience in the government and non-profit industries, and most recently served in a role at the Minnesota Department of Human Services.

HOWEISON RECOGNIZED John Howeison, Brenny Transportation, was nominated for the National Association of Small Trucking Companies (NASTC) driver of the year award. The NASTC represents over 7,000 trucking companies in the U.S. and Canada that employ over 91,000 drivers. Howeison has worked for Brenny for more than seven years and has over 3.5 million accident free miles in 17 years of professional truck driving experience.

14

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

The Real Fear is Loss We all know that people fear change…or do they?

I

t is said so often that the adage has been generally accepted as true: people are afraid of change. But I have my own hypothesis about all of this that is admittedly drawn from life experience, rather than from deep research. Most people don’t fear change. They fear loss. Consider the person who suddenly discovers his position has been eliminated versus the individual who, of her own volition and because she sought a new challenge, has accepted a promising assignment. Both face life change, but one alternative holds the significant prospect of hurt while the other offers reward. Folks facing an upheaval in housing brought about by financial hardship look at a change of residence much differently than those who seek to move because they think a new house will somehow be better. The former circumstance is rife with the potential for problems, while the latter holds out real hope for happiness. It isn’t change alone that generates the fear, but the consequence of that change. For me, the lesson in this simple analysis has

always been to try to shape and frame the inevitability of change around personal, professional, and even institutional gain. As I’ve helped transform schools I’ve served, and assisted organizations in the midst of significant

By Greg Vandal

zations facing their own unique transitions. Surely, not all change can (or should) be explained away as gain. Sometimes it is purely a loss, and honor must prevent a moral person from pretending the change

Sometimes it is purely a loss, ... I’ve watched those who have mourned the passing of a loved one find a renewed spirit through the difficult journey. transition, my efforts have been to maximize the possibility for real and shared gain while minimizing the loss that might result. Those in the medical profession who subscribe to the time-honored code to “first, do no harm” must still regularly engage in invasive procedures and even take extreme measures pursuing a health improvement. They convince patients to go through these procedures in order that the quality of life will be enhanced as a result. Patients suffer short-term loss for the possibility, at least, of long-term gain. Sometimes a similar trade is required of individuals and organi-

is positive when it is not. Still, I’ve watched those who have mourned the passing of a loved one find a renewed spirit through the difficult journey. I’ve been part of organizations that have, for financial reasons, undergone forced staff reductions, but still emerged intact, and most of those good people did land on their feet. Still, if a change-agent can focus authentically and intently on what will be gained from life’s constant and seemingly inevitable transformations, rather than on what will be lost as a result, it is easier to drive fear out of the equation. Then, change might be embraced instead.

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@voxliberi.com.


PEOPLE TO KNOW

Roger Schleper

Roy Dodds

Premier Real Estate Services (320) 980-7625 Roger@PremierHome Search.com Chair, Top Hatters Club ––––––––––– The Top Hat ambassadors welcome new members, congratulate members who have expanded or relocated, and serve as greeters and hosts at Chamber events.

Urban Lodge Brewery & Restaurant (320) 281-5454 roy@urbanlodge brewery.com Chair, Chamber Connection ––––––––––– Chamber Connection is the premier networking event for businesses in Central Minnesota. Hosted by a different Chamber member every Friday morning, Chamber Connection attracts 120 -150 people each week to network and share information about their businesses, all for the price of $1 at the door.

Tom Monson Minnwest Bank (320) 529-4818 tomm@minnwest bankgroup.com Chair, Chamber Open ––––––––––– The Chamber Open is an annual networking and fundraising event for the Chamber. Volunteers organize the day’s activities, sell sponsorships, and help the day of the Open. This year the Chamber Open is double the fun on Monday, August 14. You can choose from 18 holes at the St. Cloud Country Club or nine holes at Boulder Ridge Golf Course, and still enjoy the great dinner, silent auction and door prizes you’ve come to expect.

Business banking with a personal touch. From customizable loans to remote deposit capture, we bring personal and timely service to all aspects of business banking.

Jerry Westhoff Edina Realty (320) 267-4873 jerrywesthoff@ edinarealty.com Chair, CVB Advisory Board ––––––––––– The Chamber’s Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB) is dedicated to promoting the St. Cloud area as a premier tourist destination. Members of the Advisory Board approve budgets, marketing campaigns, and recommend policy positions.

Personal Banking Business & Agriculture Online Services

Because friendly still counts. Sonia Nordmann El-Jay Plumbing & Heating, Inc. (320) 248-0165 sonia@eljayplumbing.com Chair, VIP Committee

The VIP (Value Information Promotion) Retention Committee calls on Chamber members to share information about coming events, inquire about membership satisfaction, and encourage businesses to take full advantage of their Chamber membership.

Sauk Rapids 320.252.5121

1301 2nd St N

NMLS #528169

Pierz 320.468.6422 80 Main St

Eden Valley 320.453.2000

359 State St N

FMpierz.com M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

15


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront DO IT NOW!

NEWS REEL BERGANKDV ACQUIRES BerganKDV expanded into Iowa with the acquisitions of accounting firms Carlson Hartsock & Guither PLC in Iowa City, and Agribusiness Resources CPA, LLC in Gilbert, Iowa.

Keep your Career Skills Competitive. blogs, online newsletters and social media sites to stay informed. Connect with other colleagues around the county and the world.

SANDBAKKEN PROMOTED Alexa Sandbakken, Heartland Security, has been promoted to marketing manager. Heartland Security specializes in residential and commercial alarm systems, as well as home medical monitoring systems.

VARILEK JOINS INITIATIVE FOUNDATION Matt Varilek joined the Initiative Foundation as president and chief executive officer. Varilek formerly served as chief operating officer for the U.S. Small Business Administration in Washington, D.C.

CENTRACARE HEALTH RECEIVES AWARD CentraCare Health received a silver Best Networking e-Healthcare Leadership Award at the 20th Annual Healthcare Internet Conference. The national award recognizes health care systems for excellence in blogs, chats, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and other social networking channels.

AIS PLANNING HIRES Pam Trobec and Jordan Kretsch joined AIS Planning. Trobec, client services and operations specialist, has over 30 years of experience in the financial services industry. Kretsch, client services coordinator, is a recent graduate of St. Cloud State University.

16

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

4 Scan job listings. Even

I

n the daily rush to accomplish our work tasks, one important and major duty often gets overlooked: personal skill development. Our day-to-day jobs keep us busy and therefore we often overlook the skills needed to keep up with industry changes and desired career advancements. “A September 2014 survey from training firm Udemy found that 61 percent of Americans believe that today’s workforce is plagued by a skills gap, but they don’t think they’re part of the problem,” according to Gwen Moran, Fast Company. Moran, with the help of Jason Hanold, founder

of Hanold Associates, compiled a check list you can use to keep your professional skills on track: 1 Keep an eye on your industry. Are there new technologies available? Is your profession changing? Ask yourself “What’s next?”

if you’re not in the market for a new job, review listings. Keep an eye on the demand for skills that you may or may not have and start building on areas that need improvement. 5 Pay attention to who is being hired. When your company hires one person over another, try to find out why and learn from the new hire. 6 Set personal goals and

2 See what vendors are selling to your industry. Attend vendor tradeshows to see new technology and learn about your industry’s best practices. Keep an eye on trade magazines to learn more about major industry vendors and services.

don’t forget soft skills. Set annual professional development goals for yourself. Don’t overlook general skills like humility or teamwork – those are often very important in order to advance your career. Source: “6 Ways to Check That Your Career Skills Are Still Competitive,” by

3 Interview influencers.

Gwen Moran, Fast Company

Subscribe to publications,

IN THE NEWS

Heartland Security acquires Tri Comm Heartland Security Systems acquired Tri Comm Security Services, a company that has served the St. Cloud area for over 20 years. Melrose-based Heartland Security is owned by 14 electric cooperatives throughout the Midwest, including Stearns Electric.


IN THE NEWS MARK YOUR CALENDAR

4 GREAT EVENTS WORTH CHECKING OUT. ST. CLOUD "STATE OF THE CITY" ADDRESS APRIL 11 Annual St. Cloud "State of the City" Address presented by Mayor Dave Kleis on April 11 from 12:30-1:30 p.m. at the new St. Cloud Community Aquatic Center. Free and open to the public. Registration is not required.

BUSINESS DAY AT THE CAPITOL MARCH 8 Annual event presented by the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce. Lobby with Minnesota leaders on March 8 from 10:45 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. at the InterContinental St. Paul Riverfront, 411 E Kellogg Blvd, St. Paul. Registration is required to Alyssa Roach, Minnesota Chamber, aroach@ mnchamber.com. Cost is $100 per person.

ST. CLOUD GOES TO WASHINGTON, D.C. APRIL 3-6 Join us April 3-6 as St. Cloud goes to Washington, D.C. Meet with Minnesota senators and representatives, receive business briefings from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and site-see in our nation’s capital. Registration is required to Teresa, tbohnen@ StCloudAreaChamber.com.

SEE THE CITY – HOW IT’S MADE APRIL 21 The all new See the City Bus Tour kicks off April 21 with “How it’s Made.” Tour businesses in the St. Cloud area and see what local companies in our region have to offer. Time and cost are TBD. Visit SeetheCity-Chamber. com for more information.

Freightliner opens Brainerd location Freightliner of St. Cloud acquired a truck, trailer parts and service center in Brainerd. Formerly Advanced Diesel Services, the acquisition allows Freightliner to open Northland Freightliner on Highway 210 East in Brainerd. All Advanced Diesel Services employees joined the Freightliner team.

Keeping you on the job. Midwest Occupational Medicine (MOM) is a department of St. Cloud Medical Group located in our St. Cloud south campus. As your employment health partner, you’ll get full access to our clinic services, including imaging, lab, and specialty providers. From DOT physicals, rapid drug testing, and hearing conservation programs to full workers’ compensation treatment, MOM knows how to keep both employees and their employers well cared for.

MidwestOccupationalMedicine.com 320-251-WORK (9675) 1301 33rd Street South, St. Cloud, MN A department of St. Cloud Medical Group

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

17


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NEWS REEL LUNDEEN JOINS RAJKOWSKI HANSMEIER Stacy Lundeen joined Rajkowski Hansmeier as attorney. She practices in the areas of municipal law, estate planning, civil litigation and family law.

BOHNEN PRESENTS AT MN LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce President Teresa Bohnen presented to the Minnesota Legislature at “One Minnesota,” an annual educational retreat. She addressed opportunities and challenges facing businesses in Central Minnesota, including workforce changes, immigrant populations, and health insurance premiums.

AILIE JOINS SKINFITNESSMD Michele Ailie joined SkinFitNessMD as a registered nurse. Ailie has over 17 years of nursing experience and previously served as an active and inactive duty US Army Captain registered nurse. Most recently, she worked in all specialty surgery areas at the Same Day Surgery Center in Hutchinson.

INITIATIVE FOUNDATION AWARDS GRANTS The Initiative Foundation and its Partner Funds awarded 157 grants totaling $475,229 during the fourth quarter of 2016. Among those receiving grants were the St. Cloud Area School District, Sauk Rapids-Rice Education Foundation, and Granite Equity Partners.

BCCalendar GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

MARCH/APRIL 2017

CAN’ T M IS S O PPO RT U NIT IES TO INF LU E NC E , PRO M OT E , A ND L E AR N . Visit StCloudAreaChamber.com for the most current and detailed calendar. SPOTLIGHT

APRIL 11

ST. CLOUD AREA BUSINESS SHOWCASE Formerly Business After Hours EXTRA!, this annual tradeshow-style event features 90 business sponsors and food vendors. There is no cost to attend. 4-7 p.m. St. Cloud River’s Edge Convention Center, 10 4th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Sponsorships available. Visit StcBusinessShowcase.com for more information.

MARCH 1 & APRIL 5

Lunchtime Learning Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge. Meets the first Wednesday of the month, noon-1 p.m., at the Chamber office*. Registration is required: $15 for Chamber members, $22 for the general public. March 1: Sponsored by Rasmussen College with Kelly Zaske, Gaslight Creative, presenting “Building a Brand Blueprint.” April 5: “The Changing Face of St. Cloud” presented by Nancy Myers, GNP Company, sponsored

18

u

by The Bridge World Language Center.

MARCH 10 & APRIL 14

Government Affairs A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, 7:30 - 9 a.m. at the Chamber office* March 10: State Update April 14: Federal Update

MARCH 14 & APRIL 11

NEXT – Chamber’s Emerging Leaders Offers professional development, leadership and networking opportunities for emerging leaders in Central Minnesota. Meets the

second Tuesday of every month, noon1 p.m. Cost is $195 for an annual membership. Register to Whitney, wbina@ StCloudAreaChamber.com. March 14: “Our Newest Neighbors: Somali Refugee Process” at the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce office*. April 11: Small group activity and networking event. Location TBD.

MARCH 15 & APRIL 19

Waite Park Chamber For businesses interested in Waite Park community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.


March 15: Hosted by Audio Video Extremes on-site at 1131 2nd St. S, Waite Park. Includes a presentation on the St. Cloud School District #742 language immersion programs. April 19: Hosted by the Waite Park American Legion – Silver Star Post 428 on-site at 17 2nd Ave. S, Waite Park. Includes a presentation called “Engaging the Business Community in Diversity” presented by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Diversity Council.

business

financial

technology We solve complex business, financial and technology challenges, all under one roof.

MARCH 16 & APRIL 20

WE ARE BERGANKDV

Business After Hours A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

bergankdv.com

March 16: Hosted by Rolling Ridge Wedding & Event Center, 31101 County Road 133, St. Joseph

www.scr-mn.com

April 20: Waite Park Chamber After Hours hosted by La Casita, 314 Division St., Waite Park

MARCH 23 & APRIL 24

Sauk Rapids Chamber For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. Meetings are held at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids, from 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. March 23: “Sauk Rapids State of the City Address” hosted by Cartridge World of St. Cloud. April 24: Hosted by The Good Shepherd Community. *The St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce is located at 1411 W St. Germain Street, suite 101. For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940.

Formerly St. Cloud Refrigeration

Central | Metro

St. Cloud • Twin Cities Wilmar • Alexandria 1-800-827-1642

REFRIGERATION

Nothern

Brainerd • Baxter 1-800-273-9071

HVAC

Duluth | Superior

SERVICE

1-800-827-1642

BUILDING AUTOMATION FOOD SERVICE

Southern

Rochester 1-877-399-4546 Mankato 1-800-447-3259

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

19


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

NEWS REEL HESSER NAMED CEO Atomic Holdings, parent company of Atomic Learning, Inc., named Paul Hesser Chief Executive Officer. Hesser leads the organization’s focus on helping educators increase student success.

Accepting Critical Feedback

All employees are subject to critique in the workplace. Those who keep an open mind may find they learn something useful. By Tracy Knofla You Are Not Your Job Many people invest so much of themselves in their work that they take any judgment of their work effort as a personal attack. Work is work. You may have many skills and talents that make you a great person and employee, however your work habits may need to change. Your attention to detail may need to be refined. None of those things change the kind of person you are. You just need to change something you do on the job.

ERNE PROMOTED Marco promoted Todd Erne to vice president of IT solutions. Erne joined Marco’s St. Louis Park office as director of sales in January 2016.

ROLLING RIDGE RECOGNIZED Rolling Ridge Wedding & Event Center was selected as a 2017 winner of The Knot Best of Weddings. The award represents the highest-rated wedding professionals as reviewed by real couples, their families and wedding guests on The Knot. In 2017, only 2 percent of the 250,000 local wedding professionals listed on TheKnot.com received this honor.

ASHLEY ARVIG PROMOTED Ashley Arvig is the new director of Time Communications, an Arvig company. She has been in the call center environment for more than 20 years, most recently as a senior sales manager for Time Communications. Arvig graduated from Rasmussen College, Fargo, where she studied business and accounting. She currently serves on the Arvig board of directors. Newsreel is compiled by Whitney Bina. For consideration in News Reel send your news release to givers@StCloudAreaChamber.com

20

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

H

uman beings make hundreds of judgments every day. What to wear, what route to take to the office, whether to bring an umbrella, or where to go for lunch. We also judge other people. For instance, we wonder if Abbey in the next cubicle is texting too much or if Bob is wearing too much cologne. We judge our children by the amount of time they spend on their homework and many of us are armchair quarterbacks, judging the plays called on the field. With all of this judging going on, it should come as no surprise that we will also be judged for

our performance in the workplace. Many employees seem surprised when it is time for the annual evaluation and even more surprised when they hear a bit of critical feedback from their supervisor or a co-worker. It’s as if they believe that they are above judgment in the workplace and they should simply be left alone to do their work. All employees are subject to critique in the workplace. Here are some things to consider as you prepare for your annual review or that inevitable criticism from your supervisor:

You Are Not Perfect Everyone makes mistakes. Everyone has areas to improve. You have to stop being angry when someone points out a mistake or an area in which you are deficient. Try to learn from your mistakes. Be willing and able to discuss your mistakes and how you have improved your performance because of them. Be Honest With Yourself You know the amount of effort you expend at work. When you work hard you expect to be recognized for it. When you ease up

contributor Tracy Knofla is the co-owner and featured consultant of High Impact Training. She has been presenting to audiences across the country for more than 25 years.


or slack off, don’t blame others or turn against your supervisor for pointing it out. Own your performance and be honest, at the very least, with yourself. Everyone Needs Coaching Olympic athletes all have a coach. Michael Phelps hops out of the pool and looks to his coach for enthusiastic praise or critical feedback. He knows that both are important

to his success in the water. The same is true for engaged employees. You cannot just hear positive feedback. You must hear comments that challenge you and push you to be a better worker. You should do all you can to encourage your supervisor to provide you a balanced perspective of your talents. Even when you prepare yourself with the points already

mentioned, it still takes some advanced interpersonal skills to successfully receive an evaluation of your work. Try these few things to make the process more productive.

Ask for a follow-up appointment so you have time to reflect. _________ Calmly explain your perspective and your proposed plan to correct the situation. _________ Keep track of your successes and refer to them often.

Listen without becoming defensive. _________

The world thrives on judgment of others. Work to keep yours as professional as possible.

Take good notes. _________

TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

Strom Engineering provides temporary workforce and labor support, including industrial strike staffing, 10505 Wayzata Blvd, suite 300, Minnetonka. Pictured: Liz Kellner, Drew Tvrdik, Beth Putz.

St. Cloud Mortgage, 606 25th Ave. S, suite 102. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Maranda Lager, Shelvin Dean, Justin Schaefer, Corey Eckstrand, Jennifer Brown, Matt Knutson.

Rollga, an effective and comfortable foam roller, 1705 W St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Tim Schmidt, Liz Kellner.

CPS, Ltd., civil engineering, planning, and surveying, 400 1st Street S, Suite 600, St. Cloud. Pictured: Liz Kellner, Rich Romness, Roger Schleper.

Office Max, office supplies, technology, Intel toner, furniture, and copy center, 2530 W Division Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Ben Williams, Liz Kellner.

Processus, Inc., an outpatient counseling and consulting center providing psychotherapy and mental health services to a diverse population, 110 2nd Street S, suite 301, Waite Park. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Gayle Neuerburg, James Bryer, Liz Kellner.

Wigs for Women, enhancing the dignity, self-esteem and well-being of those who are experiencing hair loss due to cancer, 422 Riverside Drive SE, St. Cloud. Pictured Sheri Moran, Robin Ott, Diane Diego Ohmann.

Imagine Chiropractic focuses on restoring the body to health naturally by creating balance in the spine and nervous system, 750 1st Street S, Suite 103, Waite Park. Pictured: Erik Hanson, Dr. Carolyn Urbanski, Dr. Jill Braaten Helmin, Darcie Williamson, Peg Imholte.

TOP HATS: NEW LOCATIONS, OWNERSHIP & EXPANSIONS New owners: AIS Planning offers financial, retirement, and life/wealth planning, 3701 12th Street N, Suite 103, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenchenk, Cathy Juilfs, Jason Hallonquist, Caryn Stadther.

New owners: Batteries Plus Bulbs offers retail and wholesale supply of all batteries, light bulbs and smart phone and tablet repair, 2710 2nd Street S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Lance Barthel, Bernie Perryman, Matt Knutson.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

21


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

NETWORK

Business After Hours provides plenty of time for meeting new friends…and old.

Carrie Tripp, Initiative Foundation (L); Mike Wahlin, Miller Auto; Sheri Wahlin, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Minn. (BBBS); Shawn Brannan, All Elements, Inc.

Jason Bernick and Leslie Netter Bernick, Bernick’s Inc.

Jason Bernick, Bernick's (L) appears on the Chamber’s radio program with Dick Nelson, Townsquare Media to promote Business After Hours at Bernick's.

Halli Rodriguez (L) and Tracy Jacobs, BerganKDV

22

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

Debbie Clausen, Thrivent (L); Tammy Hanson and Leah Vagle, Doherty Staffing

Andrew Madden, St. Cloud State University (L); Karen Pundsack, Great River Regional Library; Joseph Mueller, St. Cloud Area Planning Organization

Jessica Houle, United Way of Central Minn. (L); Ashley Nieland and Jackie Johnson, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Minn.; Tarryl Clark, St. Cloud Technical and Community College


Aaron Newman (L) and Nate Peterson, Brenny Transportation

Lisa Schulte, Quarks, and Joe Erickson, St. Cloud Rox

Mike Phillips, BankVista (L), and John Ruis, United Way of Central Minn.

Sue Carlson, Rengel Printing; Amie and Jon Theis, Harbor Drive Hookup

Roy Dodds, Urban Lodge Restaurant and Brewery (L); Tanya and Doug Boser, Boser Construction

Callen Weispfenning, Adult & Pediatric Urology (L); Gary Cordie, Prudential Financial; Philip Luitjens, Adult & Pediatric Urology

Georgette and Paul Berndt, Net V Pro, and Brian Jarl, Advantage 1 Insurance

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

23


InSIDE THIS ISSUE: Management Toolkit Entreprenuerism • Tech Strategies

BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

Doing Good • Economy Central by Falcon Bank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Administering Final Pay

Handing out that final paycheck may seem straightforward, buy if you don’t follow Minnesota’s rules, you could make some costly mistakes. By Chad Staul

G

iving an employee his or her final paycheck seems like a simple act. But employers continue to make costly mistakes in terms of when final pay is due and the amount to be paid. In Minnesota, how the employment relationship ends determines when to provide an employee’s final pay. Likewise, there must be a strong understanding of what

constitutes all earned but unpaid wages or commissions. When is Final Pay Due? In Minnesota, when final pay is due depends on whether the employee is terminated or voluntarily resigns. Each has its own set of rules. Generally, the party making the decision to end the employment relationship

bears the higher burden. When an employee is terminated, the wages or commissions actually earned and unpaid at the time of the discharge are immediately due and payable upon the employee’s written or oral demand. Once demanded, the employer has 24 hours to pay or risk being in default. Employers are sometimes caught off guard in situations where demand is made at the time the employer informs the employee of his or her employment termination. Because employers likely know of their decisions in advance, however, they should anticipate the request and have the employee’s final pay already calculated and available. When an employee voluntarily resigns, all wages or commissions earned and unpaid must be paid no later than the first regularly scheduled payday following the employee’s last day of employment. If the first regularly scheduled payday is less than five calendar days after the final day, the employer can

contributor Chad Staul is an attorney with Rinke Noonan. He concentrates his practice in the areas of employment and business law.

24

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

When an employee is terminated, the wages or commissions actually earned and unpaid at the time of the discharge are immediately due and payable upon the employee’s written or oral demand.

wait until the second regularly scheduled payday, but in no case can it take longer than 20 calendar days to effectuate payment. In this scenario, allowing the employer additional time makes sense because the employer likely has little or no advance notice of the employee’s resignation. If the employee is not timely paid, he or she can again make a written or oral demand which the employer must honor within 24 hours. What Constitutes Earned but Unpaid Wages and Commissions? Another common error is failing to understand what encompasses an employee’s earned, but unpaid wages. In addition to an employee’s hourly wage or salary for the appropriate time worked,


employers should consider things such as: Payment for earned, but unused vacation/PTO under an employer’s policy ––––––––––– Promised severance payments pursuant to an employment contract ––––––––––– Earned, but unpaid bonuses ––––––––––– Sales commissions calculated through the employee’s separation date, consistent with an existing commission plan or pay structure

Coordination among various departments is key for an employer to account for all earned but unpaid wages during the administrative process. What are the Consequences for Untimely Payment and/or Paying an Improper Amount? Defaulting employers face a variety of penalties, the most notable of which is a statutory penalty in the amount of the employee’s average daily earnings for each day the employer fails to pay, up to a maximum of 15 days. Other exposure includes payment of an employee’s attorneys’ fees should litigation be necessary, as well as paying double the amount of disputed wages for certain intentionally fraudulent acts. Administering final pay in Minnesota means more than providing an employee with a final paycheck. It means implementing policies and procedures that ensure timely payment based on the method of separation; taking into account all potential sources of compensation owed upon separation; ensuring proper calculation of all earned but unpaid wages and commissions; and informing management personnel of available options in case of a wage dispute.

FAST BUSINESS LOAN EXPERTS!

FASTTrack Approvals in hours on SBA loans $350,000 or less and in days on loans up to $5 million! We get the job done!

For A Quick Answer Call

1.888.320.2899 follow us

stearnsbank.com

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

25


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Restrain the Use of the Ax Painful personnel changes shouldn’t be considered lightly.

“Off with their heads!” That’s how the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland solves problems. In the real world, however, businesses that refrain from axing personnel during an impulsive purging have a better chance of ascertaining the actual reasons for their woes ... and addressing them. “A company in trouble often focuses on structure because it’s the easiest to work on,” said Dave Logan, owner of CultureSync and author of The Three Laws of Performance. This is not always the best idea. Logan suggests companies evaluate strategy, structure, processes and systems, and culture. “When a company is in a death spiral, all four will be going crazy.”

26

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

“When my consultancy goes into a client’s workplace . . . we go on a SHRIMP hunt,” said Mike Michalowicz, Provendus Group CEO and author of The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur. They look at “Simple Habits that are generating Recurring Income or Maximized Productivity.” “The goal is to look for what’s working, even in the midst of overwhelming failure, then grow that habit.” Don’t immediately clean house, says Jeff Haden, contributing editor, Inc. Magazine. Fixing a broken company is most satisfying when it respects its people resource. “It’s extremely important to maintain the talent that originally created the concept or brand; they are the company,” said Haden,

By Mary MacDonell Belisle

noting a failing company can recover if the brand once had value and if its backend delivers to meet an opportunity. However, it will take people to make it happen. Cash flow and underperformance often necessitate scrutiny of personnel issues. For longterm cash-flow challenges, companies may be forced into layoffs, said business consultant Marty Moran, ClearPath CEO, St. Cloud. If cash flow is a short-term problem due to market conditions that will improve, businesses may opt to keep their personnel. Instead, they could seek or extend a line of credit, or initiate pay cuts across the board. An underperforming company may need to focus on changing

personnel to secure the right leader or team. “One thing to be careful about is focusing so much of a company’s energy on the decision to let one person who is underperforming go -- or not -- that you lose sight of the rest of the team who may be performing well,” Moran said. “Employees are smart and know when someone is underperforming and consistently not meeting expectations. They are looking for leadership to make a change for the greater good.” Intelligent leadership realizes something needs to be done before reaching a crisis, said Bob Ringstrom, Strata Performance, St. Joseph. As “their most important asset,” leaders should invest more toward understanding their employees and the roles they’re best suited for. “Sound initial placement, or thoughtful re-assignment, has a significant influence on the bottom line and efficiency of the organization.” When a company needs heavy-duty fixing, “severing heads” should be the last resort. Instead, a systematic approach to repairing problems is the enlightened way to secure peace and prosperity in the domain. Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance copy and content writer with www.wordingforyou. com, St. Cloud, Minn.

For the sources used in this story, visit Business CentralMagazine.com


DOING GOOD

The Jolly Trolley

N

early $2,500 and over 2,400 pounds of food were collected during the Jolly Trolley food drive hosted by Metro Bus in December. Metro Bus partnered with Royal Tire and Townsquare Media to collect donations for local food shelves. Since the winter drive began in 2011, more than 18,000 pounds of food and

$9,600 have been collected. This year’s cash donations were up 12 percent over last year. The food drive benefitted Catholic Charities Emergency Services, the Salvation Army, and the Promise Neighborhood.

Volunteers from Metro Bus, Royal Tire and Townsquare Media collected 1.2 tons of non-perishable food and nearly $2,500 during the annual mobile food drive hosted by Metro Bus. The cash donations have the opportunity to be matched through the local Charity Challenge grant.

Courtesy of Metro Bus

Holiday food drive supports local charities.

IN THE NEWS

Good Germs A startup called Indigo is working on a way to boost crop yields by reintroducing microbes that have been killed by pesticides and other chemicals. The company, which says it has brought in $56 million in funding, says this approach led to 10% higher yields in one of its tests. Source: The Verge

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

27


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools TECH STRATEGIES

Video Rules

Rising video consumption provides new opportunities for businesses.

By Dawn Zimmerman

to have concerns about their ability to execute a meaningful product. But the expectations of viewers are not a polished marketing video. Videos that go viral are real, raw and even a bit unplugged.

A

critical component of any content strategy for social media today is video. (That’s coming from someone who loves the written word). Video consumption has skyrocketed across platforms from Facebook and Instagram to Twitter and YouTube. It’s given way to a whole new generation of real-time social media use with the introduction of live streaming. No matter your mission as an organization, video should play a role in sharing it.

YouTube may have set this video trend in motion and remains a go-to like Google. It has become the library of videos. You can find anything there – literally – but it is Facebook that’s catapulting this trend with 4 billion video streams a day. And growing. Facebook is quickly becoming TV’s competition, especially with the launch of Facebook Live. So how do you get started? Let go of old expectations. It’s common for organizations

Be real. International House of Pancakes gained viral attention when the restaurant announced its summer flavors with a live video stream on Facebook of plates of pancakes on a table with the sights and sounds of the ocean as their background. This immersive experience captured people’s attention – and kept it. Within a short time, the video generated 385,000 views with the average viewer watching for 3 minutes. That’s a long time in the world of social media. It also led to many comments from viewers sharing their desire and plans to visit IHOP. Some of the comments actually questioned if it was even real, suggesting it looked more like a green screen production. It was too perfect. Start small. Or should I say short. Create a microvideo. These 10-20 seconds of video are the most consumed and preferred content today. Consider what you may traditionally capture as a photo for marketing and try

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in social media.

28

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

video. Take it a step farther by identifying opportunities where you can show what you do or why you do it – in action. That could be as simple as capturing your CEO giving a presentation or sharing a personal message. The possibilities are endless. Pick one and execute. Set repeat. The best way to get better at video is keep doing it. Make video a habit in your marketing and events. Make it a practice to brainstorm videos that show your culture, share your mission and engage your followers. On Facebook, personal, smart and sharable videos perform best. Videos that draw out emotion almost always win - anywhere. How can you make people laugh or move their hearts? Measure engagement. You don’t have to wonder if people viewed your video – or even for how long. Social media platforms like Facebook provide you with all the analytics. On Facebook, you can drill down to determine what percentage of viewers watched the first 30 seconds and how many viewed at least 95 percent of it. Take the time to look at the data and learn from it. Posts with video often outperform any other type of post. Take a chance. It’s worth it. You have an opportunity to tell your story in a way that can be more engaging and memorable than words on paper or a photo.


TECH NEWS

The IRS Goes Social Even the IRS wants to be social. Now you can check on your tax refund, learn the latest tax news, or get helpful tax tips on how to do your taxes – all on the IRS’ social media platforms. Check them out at @IRSnews, IRS Tumbler, Facebook, podcasts, and YouTube. Move over cute cat videos, here comes the IRS. Source: IRS.gov

SCIENCE

FARMING’S FUTURE? In a thought-experiment about the future of farming, one Danish graduate student designed three hypothetical products: Gene Gun Hack, Aurel Insecticide, and Precision Weather Modification Device.

The gene gun hack injects invasive weed species into desirable crops, systematically destroying a field. Happily, the other two creations are not this disturbing. The Aurel Insecticide is an omni-directional speaker that pipes out vibrations in order to stimulate plant defenses.

And the weather modification device is intended to target specific locations that need rain. While the products are all non-working proto-types, and were never intended for production, they are all rooted in scientific reality.

Prototype for the Gene Gun Hack

Source: Wired.com

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

29


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools ENTREPRENUERISM

Sales Forecasting Will it be sunny next quarter? Monitoring and tracking leading indicators will help you keep the sun out all year long. By Brian Hart

T

hey’re not meteorologists, but sales managers and sales professionals are routinely asked to make forecasts. They are asked to predict the upcoming business “weather.” Is it going to be sunny, cloudy, or stormy next quarter? Next year? Sales forecasts are important. They’re a key input to serious business decisions about plant and equipment investments, raw material purchases, staffing levels and more. Good forecasts demonstrate

a solid understanding of the business. What tools do sales forecasters have at their disposal? What serves as their Doppler radar or their satellite imagery? What “sales weather” data is available? How do you create useful — that is, reliable and reasonably accurate — predictions of future sales? One common approach is to look at past sales data and project similar sales results in the forecast period. For example, if one of our sales team sold $20,000 per month

for the first eight months of the year ($160,000 year-todate), we might extend those same results for the remaining four months and predict total annual sales of $240,000. There are obvious pitfalls in such a simplistic approach. Consequently, other variables are introduced into forecast equations to address seasonality, outside economic conditions such as interest rates and currency valuations, and a host of other factors pertinent to the business. A second method is to look at the probability of closing deals that are in the sales pipeline. There’s a ubiquitous problem associated with this method. Lots of deals go into pipeline reports, but few come out. Pipeline data typically includes very old opportunities that are highly unlikely to close. These two forecasting methods share a fundamental weakness. They rely on lagging indicators. They reflect historical results. The accuracy and reliability of sales forecasts can be vastly improved by tracking and measuring leading indicators, ones that predict future results. Leading indicators for sales are tied to prospecting and selling activities. For instance, contacts made, unique first conversations,

sales appointments set, sales appointments kept, proposals/ estimates/quotes provided, and number of sales closed. Monitoring and tracking leading indicators not only injects far more reliability into our forecasts, it unleashes a super power that, for meteorologists, is the stuff of science fiction: the ability to not only predict, but to actually control the weather. If our earlier forecast of $240,000 was against a sales quota of $300,000, it’s a prediction for cloudy weather at the very least, if not a catastrophic storm. However, with proven knowledge of the leading indicators, our salesperson can adjust activity to ensure reaching the goal. Increasing the number of contacts made will lead to more initial conversations. That will increase the number of first meetings. That will, in turn, lead to more proposals and, ultimately, more closed deals. Sales pros and their managers can jointly develop a recipe composed of ingredients (the activities) and amounts (the frequency of the activities) to create the desired sunny outcome: achievement or over-achievement of the salesperson’s revenue goal. The forecast when based on leading indicators? Clear skies.

contributor Brian Hart is the owner and president of Sandler Training in St. Cloud, specializing in sales, management, and leadership training and development. He can be reached at brain.hart@sandler.com

30

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7


Green at Work

Making the same choices at work as you do at home can help cut costs.

GOING GREEN

T

he places where we work, play, and learn account for nearly half the nation’s energy use. Making many of the same green choices at work as you make at home can save energy and reduce costs.

Give it a Rest Use the power management settings on your computer and monitor so they go into power save mode when not in use. Also use a power strip as a central “turn off” point when you’re using equipment to completely disconnect the power supply.

Unplug It Unplug electronics such as cell phones and laptops once they’re charged. Adapters plugged into

Delizioso!

outlets use energy even if they’re not charging.

Light Up Your Work Life Replace the light bulb in your desk lamp with an ENERGY STAR qualified bulb. It’ll last up to 10 times longer and use about 75 percent less energy. Turn off the lights when you leave, especially at the end of the day.

Let It Flow Keep air vents clear of paper, files, and office supplies. It takes as much as 25 percent more energy to pump air into the workspace if the vents are blocked. Plus you might be able to get rid of your space heater! Source: Energy Star

EXPERIENCE MATTERS

MICHAEL WENNER, Partner, CPA

WILLIAM BUCKENTINE, Partner, CPA

Ciatti’s has been serving up award-winning Italian lunches and dinners for over 25 years. Experience the “Delizioso” difference at Ciatti’s!

Over 19 years of public accounting experience. Specializing in Business and Personal Tax, Business Consulting, Financial Statement Preparation and Accounting.

Over 31 years public accounting experience. Specializing in Tax Accounting and Management Consulting Services, Personal Management Consulting, Business Start-ups and Acquisitions.

Voted BEST ACCOUNTING FIRM in Central MN by St. Cloud Times Readers

RISTORANTE

2635 West Division Street • Saint Cloud • 320-257-7900 CiattisRistorante.com

Working with people, not just numb3rs.

Albany 320.845.2940

Little Falls 320.632.6311

Monticello 763.295.5070

St. Cloud 320.251.0286

An Independently Owned Member, RSM US Alliance

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

Maple Lake 320.963.5414

www.swcocpas.com

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

31


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Optimistic Outlook

Local business leaders share their industry forecasts for 2017 INDUSTRY LEADERS Alexa Sandbakken, marketing manager, Heartland Security Steve Palmer, owner, Palmer Printing Laurie Humphrey, owner, financial advisor, Granite Financial Kevin Johnson, owner, K. Johnson Construction

Today, home security systems serve as the hub for home communications, connecting together all of your controlled devices, such as thermostats and lights, while still protecting lives and property. Moving into 2017, new technologies allow Heartland Security to provide home security systems with video cameras that can be viewed from anywhere via a smart phone, tablet, or computer. “To have the availability to view your home at anytime from anywhere is very comforting to our customers,” she said. “Overall, we anticipate continued growth in the alarm system industry as new technology continues to emerge.”

HEALTHCARE Dan Weaver and Mike Hiscock, physical therapists, Northern Star Therapy

A

s 2017 kicks off, we at Business Central are wondering what the year looks like in Central Minnesota. We met with local industry leaders to gather their business forecasts for the coming year. Here is what we learned.

TECHNOLOGY Alexa Sandbakken, marketing manager, Heartland Security New technologies continue to drive change for the security industry. “There have been more changes to the security systems industry in the last few years than there have been in the previous 20 years,” Alexa Sandbakken said.

32

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

Dan Weaver and Mike Hiscock, physical therapists, Northern Star Therapy Northern Star Therapy specializes in physical and occupational therapy. Although healthcare faces many changes year after year, the most recent significant industry change has been preparing the profession for the transition away from fee for service payments for patients. “Future payment models will be based on complexity and severity of dysfunction rather than services rendered,” Dan Weaver said. “Patients will be able to receive multiple services without concerns for additional costs and therapists can base a plan of care solely on the patient’s needs, rather than what their insurance will cover.”

Compiled by Whitney Bina, communications and workforce development coordinator, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

Medical trends are focusing on wellness. “Overall, more emphasis is being made on the value of exercising and proactive healthcare,” Mike Hiscock said. “Over the next year, we hope to advance a wellness agenda within our clinics and the community.”

MANUFACTURING Steve Palmer, owner, Palmer Printing The last five years encompassed a recovery period and resurgence of the printing industry, according to Steve Palmer. Printing continues to be popular, but industry consolidation will grow as it’s becoming harder and harder for smaller companies to maintain steady growth. Printers poised to succeed in 2017 are those that concentrate in new markets and that have added new services and capabilities, he said. “The past year has been the best year Palmer has ever had in our 50 years,” he said. “We are really excited about the next few years. We feel we will have good growth in all three of our market segments and we predict very high growth in large format printing.”

FINANCIAL Laurie Humphrey, owner, financial advisor, Granite Financial “The new year will roll out the beginning stages of the new Department of Labor Fiduciary Rule, arguably the largest, single piece of regulation related to the financial services industry in more than a decade,” Laurie Humphrey said.

This rule issues new regulations for retirement accounts, which include 401(k) and pension plans, as well as Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs). “The changes are intended to ensure that financial advisors act in the best interests of the client, something we have always prided ourselves on at Granite Financial,” she said. Looking forward to 2017 and beyond, thousands of baby boomers will retire, leading to the largest generational wealth transfer in the history of the United States. “Ultimately, we believe that these changes will continue to drive consumers to quality, relationship-driven advisors,” she said.

CONSTRUCTION Kevin Johnson, owner, K. Johnson Construction Last year was a busy year for construction and industry growth continues into 2017. Both residential and commercial construction projects will continue to keep the industry busy, Kevin Johnson said. If interest rates go up in 2017, the industry might face a minor slowdown. However, if they stay where they are at, we will continue to see growth for both residential and commercial projects. Alternative energy projects continue to increase throughout the industry. “By 2025, the state government has regulated that 25 percent of energy must come from new energy sources,” Johnson said. “This is a huge opportunity for the industry over the next few years.”


8,072.27

2014

2015

December

March

Residential

November

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

Home Sales C

2015 October

September

August

July

$100M

June

$80M

October April

May

$60M

April

$40M

March

TOTAL:$84,908,072.27

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

TOTAL: $62,358,547

TOTAL:$64,832,866

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

2016

2014 August #/$ #/$ #/$ February St. Cloud 1209 1,151 986* July $26,145,498 $21,854,833 $32,774,443 * 2016 January 0 Sauk Rapids 447 321 345* June $19,206,069 $15,843,450 $22,647,287.40*

500

$100M

December 0 Total as of 2/12/17. January *St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids totals are not final for 2016 at time of print.

$600k

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

Commercial

ST. CLOUD

2016

1000

#/$ #/$ #/$ August

$900k

1500

2014

82 151 71 August Feb $3,783,078 $8,057,329 $32,698,175.09

2016

July $0 Total as of 2/12/17. Jan *St. Cloud & Sauk Rapids totals are not final for 2016 at time of print. June

2000

$200M

St. Joseph

TOTAL: 1655

TOTAL: $239,669,534.12

TOTAL: 1752

St. Augusta 7 5 66 September $202,027 $871,000 $0 Mar

TOTAL: 1429

TOTAL: $1,481,088.14

$1.5M

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

84 140 106 ST. CLOUD October $7,151,019 $18,735,131 $3,9550,295.02 Apr

Waite Park

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

$150M

Food and Bev

Sartell 30 35 33 November $3,600,047 $11,485,611 $13,013,812.00 May 2015

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$100M

2015

Food and Be

Sauk Rapids 409 567 555* December $7,465,381 $16,890,519 $15,684,403.00* June

Commercial Building Permits

$50M

2014

500

St. Cloud 397 444 464* 2016 $57,715,070 $94,320,804 $138,751,046* July

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19

$0M

November October

TOTAL: $239,669,534.12

2014

2014

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$80M

Commercial Building Permits

2015

March

St. Joseph 176 142 186 February $1,353,832 $2,293,565 $4,796,650.51

$60M

2016

100 79 102 $4,437,367 $4,720,246 $9,180,779.85

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$40M

2016

$20M

St. Augusta

500

$300k

$0M

2015

Waite Park 116 113 78 April $1,803,560 $1,552,641 $2,197,512.66

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

2014

2015

2016

2015

2014

$0

TOTAL: $62,358,547

2014

Sartell 291 329 252 May $8,129,708 $18,168,133 $13,311,388.85

2015

2016

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

2016

July December June

November May

Residential Building Permits

$0M

832,866

COLOR KEY:

Compiled by Kellie Libert, data current as of 2/12/17

2014 2016

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

TOTAL:$64,832,866 2015

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL:$84,908,072.27

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS 2016

October

$100M

$250M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

358,547

,534.12

,393.19

,621.69

Residential Building Permits

$250M

$300k

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19 Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

2015

May

2015

Unemployment Rates 2016

2014

Apr

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

$0

December

November

1.0%

5%

October

Jan

September

August

July

June

May

$250M

Feb

April

$200M

March

December

$150M

November

October

$100M

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

$50M

1.5%

February

2.0%

January

6%

$0M

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com 2014

2016% CHANGE

$300k

N

D

0.5% 0.0% -0.5%

4%

-1.0% -1.5% -2.0%

3% J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

-2.5% J

F

M

A

M

J

J

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

A

S

O

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

33


072.27

BusinessTools

32,866

58,547

$100M

34.12

93.19

21.69

$250M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

October

August

September

August

July

June

May

TOTAL: 1752

April

September

ST. CLOUD

October

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

D, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

September

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

lding Permits

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

September

2016

TOTAL: $1,481,088.14

July

TOTAL: $239,669,534.12

August July

TOTAL: 1655

June

2016

May

2015

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

June

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19

April May

500

$600k

December

November

1000

$900k

TOTAL: $1,481,088.14 TOTAL: 221

2015

250

2016 $1,326,730.36 TOTAL:

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office $0 $300k $600k $900k $1.2M Total as of 2/12/17.

Lodging Tax Dollars

TOTAL: $1,508,301.02

BY THE NUMBERS

2015 TOTAL: $1,454,373.86 2014

$0

$500k

$1M

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Total as of 2/12/17.

34

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

$1.5M

$2M

$1.5M

4.8%

The share of minorityheld jobs in construction in 2015, compared to 11.7 percent across all industries.

17,300

The number of women who currently work in Minnesota’s construction industry

Economy Central presented by

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2016

TOTAL: $1,662,375.59

$1.5M

January

ST. CLOUD

2000

$1.5M

Stearns Co. 168 181 158 2014 Benton Co. 53 54 39

TOTAL: 1752

2014

200

TOTAL: 1655

2015 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS Residential

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

150

TOTAL: 1429

100

$1.2M

To helpOctober Northern Star Therapy advance its mission, “Excellence in delivery of physical and occupational September therapy services to improve function for life,” they joined August the M.O. G. group. M.O.G. (Medically Oriented Gym) is a cooperative July group of physical therapy clinics located throughout June the United States. The group has developed protocols May for treatment of various impairments (diabetes, obesity, Parkinson’s disease/balance disorders) and April collected data to prove the outcomes and the value March of exercise, according to Dan Weaver, a physical February therapist at Northern Star Therapy. Initial pilot studies have had amazing results, demonstrating up to $4,000 January per year in savings on medical expenses for the diabetic population, he said. “We are very excited to grow this program,” Weaver said. “We hope to not only promote the program within our clinics, but also to expand into the corporate world in the form of corporate employee health programs.” 1500

50

TOTAL: $1,481,088.14

$1.2M

0

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

2016 2014

$900k

M.O.G. Medically Oriented Gym groups

Food and Beverage Tax Collection TOTAL: 235 ST. CLOUD

$600k

Total as of 2/12/17.

TOTAL: 197

2015

$300k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions

2016

January

$0

Housing/Real Estate St. Cloud Area AssociationJan of Realtors, $150M $200Msources:$250M http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics. Total as of 2/12/17.

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

2014

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

2000

Feb

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

1500

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

0

$300k

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

1000

2016

February

ST. CLOUD

500

2015

2014

2016

March

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

0

2015

Apr Mar

$0

$100M

2015

2014

2014

TOTAL: 1429


Paula Capes

Debra Grant

Jessica Bitz

Kendra Berger

Caryn Stadther

FALCON NATIONAL BANK WOMEN MAKING A REAL DIFFERENCE That’s Us. Truly making a difference inside our organization and out in our communities, the women of Falcon National Bank lead with strength and trust. Bringing dedicated leadership, our team of women is here for the bank – and here for you.

Member FDIC

www.FalconNational.com


THE

PARK WAY BY JEANINE NISTLER | PHOTOS BY BDI PHOTO

I

t would be natural to hear words like “profit and loss” or “marketing strategy” in a conversation about a company that designs and produces machinery for the stone-working industry. Words like “values” and “people” may come as a surprise.

But ask Park Industries’ Co-Presidents Joan Schatz and Mike Schlough about their company and they’ll tell you that values and people are exactly what make this St. Cloud business successful. “You can run an organization based on rules or you can run it based on values,” Joan said. The values approach is “the most effective on every front.”

36

Built into the essence of stone-equipment manufacturer Park Industries, is the firm belief that if you treat employees with integrity and respect, customers will follow.

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

That includes trusting and empowering employees – and knowing their names. When Mike’s dad, Tom Schlough, took over the family business from his father, Leon, in 1976, one of his goals was to always call each of the approximately 15 employees by name. “It’s amazing what happens when a leader does that,” said Tom, who retired as CEO in 2014.

Mike and Joan have continued that practice with their workforce, which now numbers 300. In fact, employees sometimes are incredulous at their leaders’ attention to personal details. Joan tells of a night when she was at Park to serve a meal to second-shift employees. She noticed two men nudging each other and whispering. When she called them by their names,


Tom Schlough

Mike Schlough

Joan Schatz

MMAARRCCHH/A /APPRRIILL 22 0 1 67 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

37


the employee named Jordan said to his companion, “Brandon, see, I told you.”

Values and People

V

alues and people are part of “The Park Way,” a belief system that drives every aspect of Park Industries. Mike and Joan remember an executive coach challenged them to come up with a 30-second version of The Park Way because, as Mike said, “the half-hour version isn’t an easy tool to convey.” The coach instructed Mike and Joan to each write down what The Park Way meant to them. “We put our pieces of paper on the table and they were the same three words,” he said. Each had written: Trust, Integrity, Respect. “The Park Way, I absolutely believe, is one of the things that carried us through the recession,” Joan said. While Tom never had any doubt that Park Industries would make it through those dark days, Mike and Joan clearly remember the doubts they felt. It was 2007. The housing market crashed. Materials costs skyrocketed. Customers couldn’t get financing for the machines Park was selling. The company experienced an almost catastrophic drop in demand. While the nation’s recession officially lasted 18 months, Mike said, for Park it was 4.5 years of wondering, “Can we

do anything, right?” Added Joan, “It was truly a marathon.” Tom credits the company’s survival to its customer focus. “We worked hard to maintain a high level of customer support. That wasn’t common in the industry. That enhanced the image of the company.” And, Joan said, “We continued to invest in the product,” making changes to stay, not just abreast of, but ahead of industry changes. Park Industries has continued to change, even since Tom’s retirement. “It’s a different business today,” Joan said. It’s substantially larger and the products have changed. Their customers are more diverse. “Our industry has seen a transformation from being an artisan or craftsman industry to being more production oriented,” she said. Mike noted that Park Industries is self-reliant. The Park team does it all, from primary market research to design to fabrication, sales and installation. “There’s no third party. That’s just the way we do it,” he said. Co-presidency is another “just the way we do it” approach at Park Industries. Mike and Joan say their skills and styles are complementary – and their responsibilities are clearly delineated. “We’re very different and well matched,” Joan said. Mike and his team focus on strategy and marketing for the current year and the coming year. Joan and her

SCORE Counselors to America’s Small Business

O

ne of Tom Schlough’s retirement passions is helping other entrepreneurs succeed. His commitment includes serving on the board of the Central Minnesota Chapter of SCORE, part of a national nonprofit association dedicated to entrepreneur education and the formation, growth and success of the nation’s small businesses. This chapter provides free business mentoring services, educational workshops, and templates and tools to entrepreneurs and business owners located in the St. Cloud area. Business mentoring provides one-on-one consulting for any business looking to improve their chances of success. These services are provided at no charge by a staff of seasoned and experienced business executives, such as Schlough. By working with a SCORE mentor, a business owner has access to years of real world business experience and local resources. Learn more at Centralminnesota.score.org 38

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

BUSINESS BUSINESS PROFILE PROFILE Park Industries 6301 Saukview Drive Phone: 320-251-5077 Fax: 320-251-8126 Email: park@parkindustries.com Website: Parkindustries.com Co-Presidents: Joan Schatz and Mike Schlough Chairman of the Board: Tom Schlough Ownership: The Schlough Family Business Description: Manufacturer of stone and metal fabrication equipment Employees: 300

team concentrate on production, meeting deadlines, and shipping. In other words, they must deliver on what Mike’s team envisions. Did they do a good job of co-leading from the get-go? “I don’t think it was ever terribly rocky,” Joan said, “but it gets better as time goes by.” Mike and Joan each meet with their individual leadership teams weekly, and they also conduct a combined leadership meeting. They have a scheduled 90-minute, one-on-one meeting with each other, and there are occasional ad hoc meetings and hallway conversations. The rest of the time, each co-president is focusing on his or her areas of responsibility. Whether Mike and Joan are dealing with each other, their leadership teams or front-line employees, they find that open communication, including quarterly financial updates to all who work there, is essential to trust. “If there’s something we can’t talk about, we just say it is premature and will be transparent when it’s appropriate,” Joan said.

Reporting to a board

I

n the fall of 2012, Tom was CEO. Joan and Mike were co-presidents. When Tom vacated the CEO position two years later, that role was eliminated. Today Joan and Mike report


THE PARK WAY Trust. Integrity. Respect The Park Way is a company philosophy built on a vision of how a worldclass company treats its customers. Imbedded in the philosophy is a commitment by company leadership and employees to build on their accomplishments and to expect more of themselves than their customers do. The Park Way can trace its roots to what has become known as the Crankshaft Philosophy.

The Crankshaft Philosophy

directly to a board of directors, which they say works well. “It’s not about a power struggle,” Mike said. “It’s about realizing that the five people on the other side of the table have 200 years of experience.” Another important part of Tom’s retirement was his commitment to not showing up at Park Industries. “If outgoing leadership comes back from time to time, their mere presence impacts business,” Mike said. “In leadership transitions, organizations need to grieve. … If you don’t give the organization time to grieve, they hang on.”

“Tom very graciously agreed that he would stay away,” Joan said. “He deserves a lot of credit for that.” “Joan and Mike are exceptionally good people, good business people. They want to run the business their own way,” said Tom, who recognized that “if I don’t get the hell out of here, they’re going to leave.” A change in leaders should involve change in the way a business is run, said Joan. “We have different skills, different perspectives than Tom had. To expect us to run it the way Tom did wouldn’t make any sense.”

Many years ago, Tom Schlough, former Park President, saw how not to treat a customer. The story goes that the crankshaft, of all things, broke on his neighbor’s car. The local dealership, where the friend bought the car, offered to fix it—but at full rate, since it was out of warranty. Tom’s friend pointed out that this was clearly a manufacturing defect. After all, who breaks a crankshaft? “Nope,” the person behind the counter said, “Full rate.” A car isn’t worth a lot without a crankshaft, so Tom’s friend angrily agreed to the repair. Then he vowed never to buy from that dealer or that car manufacturer again. (He hasn’t.) To remind everyone at Park Industries that customer service is everyone’s responsibility, Tom put miniature crankshafts on associates’ desks—a symbol of the Park Way and how to properly take care of customers.

COMPANY TIMELINE 1953 Leon Schlough founds Gran-A-Stone. The company makes colored concrete blocks, splitting them to show a rock face. Leon invents a machine that splits concrete and stone. The technology used to split the blocks is the genesis of Park Tool Company. 1969 Tom Schlough joins his father, Leon, in business. 1972 Leon separately incorporates Park Tool and Gran-A-Stone, as part of a company succession plan.

1976 Tom and Joyce Schlough purchase Park Tool Company from Leon. Leon continues to own and work at Gran-A-Stone. 1978 Leon sells Gran-A-Stone to Linus Koopmeiners; Leon retires. 1984 Park Tool is renamed Park Industries. The company moves from Waite Park to a new facility at 6600 Saukview Drive in St. Cloud.

1993 Tom Schlough forms a Board of Advisors to help him guide the company. 1996 Park Industries is selected as the 1996 St. Cloud Area Small Business of the Year. 1997 Tom Schlough is selected as the 1997 Minnesota Entrepreneur of the Year.

2005 Tom Schlough disbands the Board of Advisors and forms a Board of Directors; Mike Schlough joins the company. 2006 Joan Schatz joins the company. 2012 Joan and Mike become co-presidents; Tom remains CEO

1999 Park Industries expands, building a second facility at 6301 Saukview Drive.

2014 Tom retires as CEO and remains with the company as chair of the Board of Directors; Joan and Mike continue as co-presidents. The position of CEO is eliminated.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

39


PERSONAL PROFILES Mike sees a big difference between being an owner and being a co-president. “My owner hat is at my house or across town when we (owners) meet. But it’s not here in the office.”

The Schlough Family Way

T

om and Joyce Schlough insisted that their children – Christine, Mark and Mike – get jobs when they were old enough. But those jobs could not be at Park Industries. “How would you like to supervise the boss’ kid?” Tom asked rhetorically. The Schlough kids couldn’t apply for jobs in the family business until they had graduated from college and worked at least five years somewhere else. Mike joined the company in 2005 after taking a different career path. “I had no aspirations of working here,” said Mike, whose degree is in engineering. “I wanted to earn my stripes on my own two feet.” He worked in manufacturing, engineering and sales/marketing for Ingersoll Rand for six years. Then Mike realized he wanted to learn more about the family business, of which he was part owner. Park Industries was growing and there were new roles at the company that contained elements of what Mike had been doing, so he applied for a position and was hired. Joan, whose degrees are in math and accounting, had no interest in

NEW CHALLENGES Tom Schlough may be retired, but he’s still putting his leadership skills to good use.

40

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

T

Joan Schatz

Mike Schlough

Co-President

Co-President

Hometown: Rochester, MN Education: Bachelor of Arts – Accounting and Bachelor of Arts – Math, both from Luther College Work History: KPMG, Deluxe Corporation, Ecolab, Gelco Information Network, Park Industries

Hometown: St. Cloud Education: Studied at Saint John’s University; Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Minnesota Work History: Ingersoll Rand 1999-2005, Park Industries 2005-present

Family: Husband Kevin; son Eric (18); daughter Rachel (15)

Family: Wife Becky and two daughters

Hobbies: Backpacking, skiing, travel, bike riding

Hobbies: Home improvement projects, travel, gardening, cooking, fishing, hunting

Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: Get the right people. Hire the right people and surround yourself with helpful, supportive people that want to see you succeed. Best advice you’ve received and who gave it to you: Develop a written personal mission statement and use it to guide professional and personal decisions. —Executive coach Russ Lilienthal

om Schlough didn’t retire his leadership skills when he retired as Park Industries CEO. He is putting them to use as board chair for Partner for Student Success, an organization that is uniting the community in the collective pursuit of student success. When he was asked to join PFSS, Tom was intrigued to learn about societal factors

Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: Figure out where you want to end up, and other people can help you get there. It doesn’t work the other way around, and you won’t have all of the answers along the way. Best advice you’ve received and who gave it to you: One’s biggest career limiter is an unwillingness to be coached, be vulnerable, and press on without knowing what comes next. —Manager from previous company

that impact high school graduation rates. And he was drawn to the group’s commitment to provide work experiences for junior high and high school students. “I enjoy these kinds of challenges,” Tom said. “I believe this is a huge deal, the issue of youth development.” Partner for Student Success is not a governing body for school districts or

other organizations. It doesn’t develop or execute programs. Rather, it works with partners who do. THE ORGANIZATION HOLDS THE FOLLOWING VALUES: • When students succeed, the entire community succeeds. • Every student must be supported in and out of school. • Learning encompasses


FUN FACT: Park Industries is the largest manufacturer of stone fabrication equipment in North America, producing over 13,000 machines since 1953

Thomas L (Tom) Schlough Chairman of the Board of Directors Age: 75 Hometown: Sartell, Minn., (by way of Menominee, Wis., Waite Park and St. Cloud) Education: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (BSME) from the University of Minnesota Work History: U.S. Army, Park Industries Family: Wife Joyce; children: Christine (Chris), Mark, Michael (Mike) Hobbies: Lake stuff (boating, fishing), grandkids, travel, old cars Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: Get a mentor (see side bar about SCORE) Best advice you’ve received and who gave it to you: Go to college, take ROTC, tell the truth, pray. —My Dad

more than just the traditional classroom. • Data-driven decisions lead to better outcomes. • Success for all students can only be achieved with a shared, voluntary and clear commitment across the network of partners. That network includes an array of businesses, educational institutions and civic organizations. Until just

working for a family-owned business. She interviewed at Park Industries simply to sharpen her interview skills. After the interview, “I called my husband from the car and said, ‘I think we need to talk.’ I was so impressed with the culture and how the organization was run.” Joan described the Park Industries culture as “a breath of fresh air.”

under a year ago, PFSS had no paid staff. The organization hired an executive director in May 2016. “It’s a big project, but we are making progress,” said Tom, who believes that PFSS’s work “will bear fruit over time. … I think we can make a difference.” ON THE PFSS HORIZON: • Expand current efforts to identify caring adults to

Ten years later, Joan notes that “it’s the longest I’ve ever worked anywhere.” What has kept her at Park Industries? “It’s all about the people.” Park Industries, she said, is committed to helping not only customers, but associates, their families and the community be successful. Jeanine Nistler is St. Cloud-based freelance writer.

support and mentor seventhand eighth-grade students. • Create an intervention program to work with eighthgrade students who are at risk of falling behind. • Complete the analysis of the Readiness and Career Training asset inventory list and identify gaps in services. • Educate families and the community on the importance of experiential learning.

• Create a pilot program to disseminate regional education and employment opportunities/ paths to success. Tom is quick to focus the spotlight on the other 18 board members and the community partners. “Personally, I can’t take a lot of credit,” he said. “We have a good board and people that care deeply.”

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

41


uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Feature

NOT TAKING RISKS IS RISKY BUSINESS By Heidi L. Everett, PhD

Innovation: An idea, embodied in a technology, product, or process, which is new and creates value. —The 2015 Strategy for American Innovation by the National Economic Council

Innovation. The word often conjures up images of fun gadgets, medical technologies and other scientific breakthroughs. But this article isn’t about that. Instead, this article is about big ideas and the innovative processes that move us towards them. Sometimes without the backing of a big budget. Sometimes with limited knowledge of what could be. But always with the hope for a brighter, bolder future. BIG IDEA: Healthy Kids When Diane Mendel and Melody Peterson set out to serve healthy, fresh food and limit processed, store-bought food for the children at Playhouse Child Care Centers, their vision was small. So they

42

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

“dabbled” in 2012-2013 by contacting local farmers for pricing on vegetables and strawberries. Then, Peterson wrote a grant to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, and everything changed. “After we received the first grant, we realized how small our thinking scale was,” Peterson said. The grant provided opportunities to network and collaborate with other grant recipients and likeminded agencies. Since then, they’ve been able to amp up the freshness at all five Playhouse Child Care Centers in St. Cloud, Sartell and Sauk Rapids, but, Mendel noted, “It’s a lot of work.” Their entire food services operation was impacted.

and Office of Science and Technology Policy They needed to adapt to the shorter shelf life of fresh ingredients, more frequent food shipments, planning menus based on the growing season and having a back-up plan based on harvest yields. Making a menu and baby food from scratch also takes time, effort and planning, Mendel explained. Take making French fries, for instance. Rather than simply opening packages of storebought fries, fresh potatoes have to be peeled, sliced and baked. Curriculum was adapted too. Playhouse staff had to learn which foods are most appropriate at certain ages and how to best introduce new foods to kids. “If we can get the kids excited about what they are going to be eating, they are

more apt to try it,” Peterson said. “Our center administrators and staff devote the time because we want what is best for the children,” Mendel said. To that end, kids are getting involved in the process, shucking corn and snapping green beans. They’ve even gone on strawberry picking field trips. Not every idea finds success, though. They explored the option to provide ready-made meals for families to purchase and take with them at the end of the day for dinner. Rules, regulations, licensing and other requirements became too cumbersome. But that doesn’t deter them. “You can’t get complacent,” Mendel said.


Their fresh food initiative has already paid off, but not necessarily in cost or time savings. Many of the changes they’ve made are part of the new 2017 Federal nutritional guidelines. “The new changes don’t impact us because we opted to make them a while ago,” Peterson said. “We’ve found it’s much easier to be proactive than reactive.” BIG IDEA: Fearless Partnerships Central Minnesota has an employment gap and employers big and small are feeling it. An aging workforce and breakneck technology advances only exacerbate the problem. Nationwide, the

“After we received the first grant, we realized how small our thinking scale was,” —Melody Peterson on setting out to serve heatlhier food.

manufacturing sector alone predicts 2 million jobs will go unfilled in the next decade. So what do you do when employers are knocking on doors looking for skilled workers? “We look outside to see what we need inside,” said Joyce Helens, president of St. Cloud Technical and Community College (SCTCC). Since 1948, SCTCC has relied on innovative partnerships to ensure the college is preparing a highly

skilled workforce in step or ahead of the region’s needs. Park Industries, CentraCare, Xcel Energy and others have helped create academic programs from scratch, as well as adjust existing programs. New programs include nuclear energy technology to train the next generation of energy technicians and biomedical equipment repair to service the many hospitals, clinics and specialty medical services in our area. Ongoing customized training helps

current employees ward off skill deficits in science, technology, engineering and math allowing employers to serve customers, meet demand, innovate, and expand. “The hallmarks of strong partnerships are fearlessness, a willingness to hear perceptions about your organization or the way things are done, taking risks, and following through,” Helens said. “It takes a lot of energy and time to collect the evidence, but it’s the only way it works.”

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

43


uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Feature “That’s the joy of career and technical education. It allows individuals to improve and aligns with employment needs to make sure democracy works.” —Darrin Strosahl, SCTCC dean of skilled trades and industry Most recently, SCTCC partnered with CentraCare to give nursing students access to the electronic medical record system known as EPIC. The access is granted through CentraCare’s license; otherwise it would be cost-prohibitive for the college. “Students in health care education across the country practice on simulated software for health charts that can’t mimic the real thing,” said Carolyn Olson, SCTCC vice president of academic affairs.

“Our students now have access to the EPIC playground. They graduate and go to CentraCare. CentraCare saves time and money on training, has better patient outcomes, and they get a nurse who is totally prepared.” The college also partnered with the St. Cloud Times, local employers and surrounding school districts on the SPARK Initiative. The goal was to promote career and technical education as a means to highly skilled, good paying jobs.

The effort included open houses at SCTCC and businesses, allowing students, families, educators and guidance counselors to tour programs and receive hands-on time with equipment. Frontpage stories in the St. Cloud Times profiled career fields, employers and employees. Ongoing meetings with local school districts provided a platform to discuss career paths and earnings potential. Darrin Strosahl, SCTCC dean of skilled trades and

industry, understands why these partnerships contribute to the big idea. “That’s the joy of career and technical education. It allows individuals to improve and aligns with employment needs to make sure democracy works.” BIG IDEA: Dirty Water Made Drinkable It started with a question: “Can we clean our water to a drinkable standard and reuse it?” The water in question is used for cleaning poultry, sanitizing production facilities, lawn sprinkling and truck washing at GNP Company, makers of the premium natural chicken brands Gold'n Plump and

MOBILE | SEO | CMS CHECK OUT THE NEW ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SITE. BUILT AND SUPPORED BY JDB IT. SITE DESIGN BY THELEN ADVERTISING. – WWW.STCLOUDAREACHAMBER.COM

JDB IT IS YOUR ONE STOP SOURCE FOR ALL OF YOUR WEB DEVELOPMENT NEEDS.

44

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7


Just BARE Chicken. About 95 percent of the water that comes into the GNP plant goes down the drain. GNP Company demonstrated its innovative spirit in summer 2016 by showcasing ground-breaking water purification technology at its Cold Spring, Minn. processing plant. With equipment provided by two Minnesota companies, GE Osmonics and Nanostone Water, the goal was to demonstrate to the Minnesota Department of Health that water purification technology can effectively scrub used water to a standard which exceeds that of drinking water.

“Minnesota has a lot of processing facilities with high water demands,” said Paul Helgeson, corporate social responsibility manager. “We all are struggling with the potential for water scarcity and water quality issues. “It made sense to pursue the water purification pilot as a way to understand what options we might have,” he said. Helgeson explained that current food safety regulations don’t allow for reusing water even if it is purified to a drinkable standard, and that needs to change. “These regulations are from 50 years ago with pretty simple definitions about ground water or surface water,” he said.

The plan is to collaborate with government agencies to encourage creation of new guidelines regarding safe mechanical water sources that can be reused. IF IT WAS EASY … GNP Company is busy sharing the success of the pilot purification project with regulators. At this time, there’s no clear path to implementation. “This is more about understanding and preparing for the opportunity to do this rather than getting it up and running by a distinct timeline,” Helgeson said. At Playhouse Child Care Centers, Peterson and Mendel

want to build relationships with other local facilities in hopes of building a transportation and distribution infrastructure. The goal is to make it less costprohibitive to provide fresh food for all. “We’re buying for five sites,” Peterson said. “We want to see what we can do as a childcare industry to be proactive and get better pricing and better food for our kids.” Heidi L. Everett, PhD, is owner of Watab Communications. She teaches business communications at St. Cloud State University and project management at Minnesota State University Mankato. She can be reached at watabcomm@ gmail.com

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

45


uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Special Focus

contributor Oriane Casale is assistant director of the Labor Market Information Office of the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED). This is an excerpt from an article (The Case for Diversifying Construction) that appeared in the December 2016 issue of TRENDS, a publication of DEED.

HELP WANTED Construction is among many industries that are finding it increasingly difficult to fill open positions. By Oriane Casale

To read the full article, visit Business CentralMagazine.com

Building lasting

relationships for more than

60 years Over the past four years, Rice Companies has experienced substantial growth, and we know it’s because of customers, vendors and friends like you. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank you for your continued support, and share the exciting news that we have moved and expanded our space in Glencoe to better serve you.

320.252.0404 RICECOMPANIES.COM

Architecture · construction management · skilled field crews maintenance services · real estate & development

46

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7


C

onstruction was hit harder during the Great Recession than any other industry. As the industry shed jobs, many people left it altogether, retiring or finding jobs in other industries. At the same time, many high schools and colleges dropped construction and vocational programs that helped to feed the workforce pipeline. Without any experience or background in the field, fewer young people are showing interest and the sector is having a more difficult time recruiting. Construction tends to be a young industry, with more people retiring or leaving the industry before age 55 than is typical across all industries. This means that within the next decade a larger share of workers in construction will retire than across all industries. These are also the workers with the most skill and experience. The industry is now attempting to rebuild its workforce. The number of job vacancies in construction grew from 710 during second quarter 2009 to 6,700 during second quarter 2016. Construction is an attractive industry for workers, particularly those who want a career option that does not require post-secondary education. The industry pays above-average wages, though only about 20 percent of construction vacancies required post-secondary education. Fifty percent of construction vacancies required experience of at least a year, and 25 percent required a license or certificate.

Diversification It will not come as a surprise that the construction industry is still dominated by men, who represented 86.4 percent of the workforce in 2015. This is down less than 2 percentage points from 1995. The industry has increased its share of people of color each year since 2011, when it began to rebuild its workforce after the recession. Minority hiring in construction, however, has just barely kept pace with the rate of


uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Special Focus

JOB OUTLOOK

A Different Model Education requirements in construction tend to be low because the industry follows a different model for training workers, not because the jobs are low skilled. Employers and unions routinely provide training in the form of entry-level jobs that provide informal training as well as more formal on-the-job training arrangements such as apprenticeships. Formal apprenticeships are available in a range of construction occupations. Construction-related certificates and associate degrees are available through technical schools and community colleges in a number of different programs. But many workers pursue these only after years on the job as a way to qualify for more skilled and higher-paying positions.

48

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

diversification of Minnesota’s workforce overall. As hiring continues, the industry inevitably will diversify, both in terms of the race and gender of its workers. The current slow pace of diversification, however, means that the industry is losing out on a young and growing workforce. Construction is not an industry that women or certain minority groups, including blacks, traditionally have seen as a viable career option. Many within these demographic groups are not familiar enough with the work to feel comfortable applying for jobs or feel excluded based on the current and historic demographics of the industry. This might make it more difficult for employers to recruit and even retain workers from these groups.


BY THE NUMBERS

Design. Build. Solutions.

129,400

The number of construction jobs in Minnesota during its peak employment period in 2005

37,600

The number of construction jobs that were lost between 2006 and 2010 (That’s 32% of all construction jobs.)

Development •

7%

Architectural Design •

Construction Services •

Annual growth in construction in Minnesota in 2014 and 2015

1.4%

Minnesota’s all-industry growth in 2014 (1.5 percent in 2015)

Single source. Superior service. Remarkable results.

320.251.4109 | 800.772.1758 | millerab.com

MarApril.indd 1

2/1/17 12:02 PM

10,300

The number of jobs expected to be added in construction between 2015 – 2024

121,700

Construction employment in Minnesota in July 2016

$61,500

Average pay for Minnesota’s construction workers

16,100

The approximate number of construction firms in Minnesota Sources: AGC of America; Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED)

General Contracting DesignBuild Commercial Remodeling Tenant Buildouts

320-251-4956 ad.indd 1

DaleGruberConstruction.com

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

2/3/17 11:25 AM 49

www.businesscentralmagazine.com


ST. CLOUD PUBLIC LIBRARY

uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu uuuuuuuu

Special Focus

WHAT’S NEW? Planning for a new building in 2017? Or maybe you have an office remodel in the budget. If so, consider these trends as part of your planning.

HUSKY STADIUM U.S. BANK

Going The Extra Mile.

BONESTROO

WE ARE COMMITTED TO SATISFYING OUR CUSTOMERS. For 65 years, our philosophy and attitude has been to constantly

REPURPOSE Bring the outdoors inside…with reclaimed wood panels, natural flora patterns and exposed concrete. __________

adjust to meet our clients needs through personal involvement and teamwork. Our teamwork approach helps us reach our number one goal: to provide people with places to live, work and play.

STONEHOUSE TAVERN & EATERY

COLLABORATE Designate lounge areas…and encourage collaboration and creative problem solving. __________

St. Joseph, MN | 320.363.7781 | info@wgohman.com GENERAL CONTRACTOR

| DESIGN/BUILD | CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT | BUILDING + REMODELING

78

PROUD OF

WGOHMAN.COM

COLOR COORDINATION Integrate pops of color … boosting productivity and creativity. Think accessories and furniture. __________

YEARS

SPEE DEE DELIVERY | MANKATO, MN

FOCUSED ONTHE FUTURE

RIVER’S EDGE CONVENTION CENTER | ST. CLOUD, MN

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT REAL ESTATE SERVICES 320.251.5933 | 888.678.7225 | StrackCompanies.com

50

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

COMMUNITY TABLES Heighten collaboration... by creating a community table – literally. Large, shared tables help create a relaxed, more congenial and collaborative workplace. __________ CUBELESS ENVIRONMENT Replace the cubicle…with multi-purpose spaces used for everything from presentations to spontaneous meetings and casual breaks. __________ VARIED TEXTURES Be bold, or not... by using color and texture to create a rich work environment. Learn more about these and other design trends at fastcompany.com


PROPERTIES & INVESTMENTS

LEADING THE WAY Construction led all sectors in November, gaining 3,400 jobs.

More Jobs The region gained just over

1,400 net new jobs in 2015, an 8.5 percent increase, compared to a 1.7 percent increase across all industries combined.

6,280 Annually Construction added 6,280 jobs (4.9 percent growth) in 2016.

Experienced. Friendly. Reliable.

PUTTING BUSINESSES IN THE RIGHT LOCATION.

It’s all about location—our lease-out portfolio includes urban and suburban properties perfect for office, retail, and mixed use. Looking for property to buy? Miller has several choice locations for you to choose from, ideal for commercial and industrial facilities. • Only Lease and Sell Properties we Own and Manage • Prime Locations for Lease • Commercial Lots and Land for Sale 320.251.4109 | www.millerproperties.com | tomb@millerproperties.com MarApril_Miller Properties.indd 1

2/6/17 10:39 AM

$14 billion The amount construction contributes to Minnesota’s GDP of $333 billion

$7.3 billion Wages and salaries paid by Minnesota’s construction industry annually

Growth An extra $1 billion in nonresidential construction spending adds about $3.4 billion to Gross Domestic Product (GDP), about $1.1 billion to personal earnings, and creates or sustains

28,500 jobs. Sources: AGC of America; Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED)

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

51


COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION DIRECTORY Special Focus:

Commercial Construction

Dale Gruber Construction Jim Dees, LLC West Campus LOCATION Sauk Rapids, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Dale Gruber Construction

Continue reading to learn more about the variety of commercial construction companies providing growth in Central Minnesota.

Independent Senior Living Apartments and Memory Care Apartments LOCATION: St. Joseph, MN ARCHITECT: GLTArchitects

GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Alliance Building Corporation

SIZE OF BUILDING: ~162,000 SQ FT.

COST: $16-19 Million

PROJECT COMPLETION DATE: November, 2017 DATE OF COMPLETION March 2017 DESCRIPTION Project consists of 14,000 sqft building remodel. Space features office, warehouse, large overhead doors, superior levels of insulation, three-phase power, plenty of parking and secure lot. Contact Jim at 320-250-7575 for leasing information.

WEBSITE: www.gltarchitects.com PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Woodcrest of Country Manor will consist of an upscale 60-unit senior apartment bldg and a 24-unit memory care apartment facility. The commons area will include dining & lounge spaces, commercial kitchen, community room, chapel, fitness room, beauty shop & convenience store/coffee shop.

Miller Architects & Builders

Strack Companies

HMA Architects

134 Crossing Luxury Apartments

SARTELL COMMUNITY CENTER

Mississippi Lofts Apartments

LOCATION St. Cloud, MN

ARCHITECT HMA Architects, St. Cloud, MN

LOCATION Sauk Rapids, MN

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Miller Architects & Builders

COST $11 million

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Torborg Builder’s

ARCHITECT Cole Group Architects

DATE OF COMPLETION August 1, 2017

ARCHITECT HMA Architects

WEBSITE www.millerab.com

WEBSITE www.strackcompanies.com

DATE OF COMPLETION Fall/Winter 2017

SUMMARY Project consists of a 53,000 square foot single story facility with mezzanine level containing common areas, recreational gymnasium, elevated walking/running track, multi-purpose meeting rooms, senior center, resource center, offices, and kids play area.

DESCRIPTION The Mississippi Lofts Apartments will be Sauk Rapid’s newest and most unique multi-family housing project. The project includes 57 living units with heated underground parking. Situated at the intersection of Benton Drive and 2nd Street North, the project will have an urban character with close proximity to downtown shopping and other services. West side units will have views to the Mississippi River.

DATE OF COMPLETION September 2017 DESCRIPTION Partnership between Miller Architects & Builders and Brutger Equities. 101-unit apartment community with amenities often found in upscale single family homes.

52

WEBSITE dalegruberconstruction.com

Woodcrest of Country Manor

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7


COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION DIRECTORY

Miller Properties

Heritage Business Center

Rice Companies

LOCATION 2835 W. St. Germain Street NAME OF OWNER 1997 Miller Heritage Ltd. Part. SIZE OF LOCATION - SQFT 1,500 sf to 3,000 sf COST Varies depending on length of lease, etc. WEBSITE millerproperties.com CONTACT tomb@millerproperties.com

Coborn’s, Inc.

Winkelman Building Corp.

Bethel University Wellness Center

LOCATION: Isanti, Minnesota

LOCATION St. Paul, MN

GENERAL CONTRACTOR & ARCHITECT Rice Companies

ARCHITECT DLR Group

WEBSITE: www.ricecompanies.com COMPLETION DATE: August 2017

COST $9 Million

: s r a e Y n e d l o G e Th gets better with age

DESCRIPTION: This “next generation” store format is a first of its kind for Coborn’s, Inc. The 45,000 SF store will focus on fresh selections and an updated modern industrial design. The store’s focal point includes a new centerpiece deli area called “The Kitchen,” serving made-to-order entrees that are packaged in-store for easy, quick at-home preparation. The store will also include brick-oven fired pizza, a 65 foot service meat case, a pharmacy, Caribou Coffee, convenience store and car wash.

DESCRIPTION Bethel University’s Wellness Center is a 3-Story Addition (23.160 SF) connecting to three existing buildings. The atypical foundation for the concrete superstructure uses 19 drilled piers 60” in diameter and over 58’ deep. The Wellness Center houses the athletic department weight room, student fitness center/studios and a new bio-kinetics department.

Senior care

DESCRIPTION Great central location with easy access on busline with heated sidewalks, picnic area, and good neighbors

-MAKERS.

H THE DECISION

TION AND REAC UR SPECIAL SEC

O KNOW? IN YOU W. Gohman Construction ADVERTISEDID St. Cloud Area YMCA & Aquatics Center LOCATION St. Cloud, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR W. Gohman Construction ARCHITECT HMA Architects

Older groups spend the highest percentage on ? d the DID YOU KNOW health care and housing. Older groups spen dy ea on st a ge ta ow en sh rc Studies highest pe pectancy ing.2 ex us e ho lif d in an se re ea ca cr in Centralr Minnesota has health 85 fo at ages 65 and 27 percent more Older .1 en m wo d men an Americans as compared to the Metro.

TISING SECTION

SPECIAL ADVER

ta has Central Minneso Older e or m t en 27 perc pared m Americans as3 co . to the Metro

SENIOR HEALTH

Projec growt is 50 m 2010-

CARE & LIVING E

COMPLETION DATE May 2017 COST $25 Million

COMING NEXT ISSUE: SENIOR HEALTH & LIVING

WEBSITE wgohman.com SUMMARY 106,000 total square feet, 8,100 sf of aquatics, 3 gyms, 2 racquetball courts, walking track, Kids Zone with indoor and outdoor play areas.

For more information call Wendy Hendricks at 320.656.3808 or whendricks@BusinessCentralMagazine.com Deadline: March 24, 2017 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

cial se ction e sp r u o in d a r u Plac e yo are & Livin g. on Senior Health C n $800 value) (a g n ti is L E E R F er Ge t a Square ad or larg 1/3 with purchase of

ill s Each profile w Care & Senior Health

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7 //

professional ph Profiles include a e out in www.businesscentralmagazine.com 53 a sp editorial – all laid


Business Spotlight

Artistry in Action

At Northway Dental Associates the doctors apply creativity and science to keep their patients smiling. By Gail Ivers

At A Glance Northway Dental Associates 1500 Northway Drive St. Cloud, MN 56303 (320) 253-7700 northway-dental.com Business Description: Advanced family and cosmetic dentistry for every dental need. Number of employees: 25 Established: 1974 Original dentists still with the practice: Drs. Bruce Kudak and Gary Thompson Owners: Drs. Sarah Layne, Bruce Kudak, Gary Thompson, Greg Lehman, Jeffrey Flemming, and Brent Deragisch

n, Sarah Layne, From left: Drs. Amanda Sperl, Greg Lehma d). (seate isch Derag Brent ing, Jeffrey Flemm

Locations: St. Cloud and Clearwater Chamber member since 1987

Business Central met with several of the dentists at Northway Dental Associates and asked “Why dentistry?” Business Central: What got you into dentistry? Dr. Flemming: I had a very nice result from my orthodontist when I was in high school. I liked biology and I wanted to be a business owner. Dr. Deragisch: I enjoy working with my hands, fixing things. I was always interested in healthcare. Dr. Lehman: I majored in biology and chemistry in college. I really enjoyed the sciences and medicine. Dentistry offered a career based in the sciences, as well as a way to be of service to people. I am also mechanically and artistically inclined, and dentistry uses those skills. 54

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 7

Dr. Layne: My dad was a dentist (retired after 42 years). I wanted a career in healthcare -something with variety everyday and working with people. BC: What has been your biggest challenge? Dr. Flemming: The education, in terms of time and cost. Dr. Deragisch: Every person, every tooth is different Dr. Lehman: I think being a business owner, as well as a clinician, is the biggest challenge. In dental school, we were not taught how to run a business. That’s not why I went into the profession, and is why I chose to practice in a group setting. We have a wonderful staff here who expertly run the business on a daily basis, and allow us to focus on the clinical aspect. I know too many colleagues who have to bring

the business aspect home with them at the end of the day. I feel fortunate to have such an excellent business manager and support staff to do that for me. Dr. Layne: Finding a good life/ work balance. Helping people overcome their anxiety and fear of visiting the dentist. We’re nice people! <grin> BC: What do you like best about dentistry? Dr. Flemming: Helping someone achieve better health. Dr. Sperl: The daily interaction with patients. And I like the artistry involved in restorative dentistry. Dr. Lehman: Dentistry, like medicine, is such a dynamic profession. New advances in technology, material sciences, and biology require you to continually educate yourself to stay abreast of those changes.

I love to learn and incorporate that knowledge in my practice. I also enjoy the daily interactions with my patients. Dr. Layne: Getting to know my patients and their families. Learning from them and talking to them about more than teeth. BC: What’s the best part of being a business owner? Dr. Flemming: The freedom to set your own schedule, plus working with some really great partners and staff. Dr. Deragisch: I’m my own boss. I get to set my own hours and schedule. Dr. Layne: Working with my partners to create an environment that is productive, fun and somewhere we all want to be on a daily basis.


A tradition of HOMES for HEROES Home Loan Rewards Program: Service members of the following professions will qualify for discounted lender fees with any home purchase loan or refinance!

Firefighters

Law Enforcement

Military

Active, Reserves, and Veterans

Healthcare Workers/EMS

Teachers

Call

TIM SMITH

(HOMES FOR HEROS SPECIALIST)

320-529-4230 ST CLOU D

2 9 1 5 S E C O ND S T S | 3 2 0 . 6 5 4 . 9 5 5 5

525 HWY 10 S | 320.257.5000

March/April 2017  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you