Issuu on Google+


Sue Swanson Manager Managed IT Service Marco, Inc.

passionate employees Loving what you do is a powerful thing and, at Marco, it shows. We’re ranked as one of the top workplaces on local, state and national levels. Passionate employees translate to more satisďŹ ed customers. As proof, more than 90% of our customers surveyed say they would recommend Marco. Our performance-driven attitude empowers our customers to work smarter, dream bigger and take technology further. That’s a partnership everyone will love. Learn more and get empowered at marconet.com.

marconet.com

#mpowering

taking technology further


MARCH/APRIL 2016

6 President’s Letter 8 Editor’s Note 22 Business Calendar 26 Network Central

CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 6 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

PROFIT

38 Cover Story ALL IN THE FAMILY Manea’s Meats’ success is firmly rooted in its family values, recipes and service.

44 Feature TWO HEADS ARE BETTER THAN ONE Collaboration will be the key to your business success in the workplace of the future.

48 Special Focus THE ULTIMATE OFFICE EXPERIENCE

38

Effective workplace environments help employees balance focus and collaboration.

51 Special Section COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION

10 UPFRONT Valuable and important information designed to guide and educate.

28 BUSINESS TOOLS Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business.

54 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Robert Gardetto, Westview Dentistry

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2016 Business Central, LLC

• Guide to Starting a Business in Minnesota

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• Small Business Borrowers’ Bill of Rights

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101,

• Eliminating Bad Habits • Effective Online Campaigns

Business Central is published six times a year

P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


YOUR AFTER HOURS ALTERNATIVE Now has expanded hours

Visit the Urgency Center for common health concerns typically treated in the ER — without the wait or cost!

Common health concerns treated:

Monday – Friday 2:30-10 p.m. Weekends & holidays noon-8 p.m. No appointment needed.

• broken bones • cuts requiring stitches • dislocations, sprains and strains • fast-onset joint and back pain • fever, dehydration, nausea or vomiting • headache/migraine • mild chest pain with no cardiac history • minor injuries from motor vehicle collisions

Visit centracare.com for current wait times.

• pediatric illness and injuries • respiratory issues including asthma

CentraCare Health Plaza | 1900 CentraCare Circle, St. Cloud


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

President’s Letter

The Shiny New Thing

I

t seems the hottest topic in business these days is

forward to receiving the print magazine and

how to boost your sales with social media. Indeed, it

checking out our website. We reach the people here in

seems every chamber in the nation – including us – is

your market, where you likely have most of your sales.

offering training about how to put Facebook, Twitter,

Furthermore, money invested in Facebook (or

Instagram, and Pinterest to work for your business,

Google or any of the other national search engines)

increasing sales and revenue. We all want to be on top

flies out of this community never to return. Dollars

of the next big thing.

invested in local media support local journalism,

Sometimes I wonder if we’re short changing

your local chamber, local businesses, and our local

traditional advertising methods, like this fine magazine,

non-profits. Facebook doesn’t even bother to

as we clamor to master the new. I don’t fault Facebook

join the Chamber.

for their efforts to boost sales and revenue. After

As you consider your marketing investments,

all, magazines aren’t the shiny new thing in media

please keep us in mind. We’ve worked hard to establish

marketing. They’re more of a tried and true solution.

ourselves as a reliable source of news and advertising

But I cringe a bit when presenters suggest cutting print

for business people in Central Minnesota, and are

advertising to free up funds to “try Facebook” because

committed to this community in a way that our national

it’s “so much cheaper and more efficient.”

competitors aren’t. Contact our Associate Publisher,

Now, I would never discourage someone from trying something new. And I admit that I have been guilty of helping raid an advertising budget so a prospective member can find money for membership or event

Wendy Hendricks, and she’ll be happy to fill in the details. Until next time,

sponsorship. Still, I feel compelled to remind you of our benefits — Business Central Magazine’s benefits — as an advertising medium. We don’t have a billion people logging-on all over

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

the world, but we do have thousands of influential people right here in Central Minnesota who look

P.S. Special thanks to Mike Corbett, Editor and Publisher of Hamilton County Business Magazine, for the sentiment and many of the words presented in my column this month.

6

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6


Main Phone 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line 320-656-3826 Program Hotline 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com www.StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator Whitney Bina, ext.130 Special Events Coordinator Sheri Wegner, ext. 131 Administrative Assistant Kellie Libert, ext. 124

Administrative Assistant Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100 CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Main Phone 320-251-4170 Executive Director Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Director of Convention Sales Lori Cates, ext. 113 Director of Sports & Special Events Dana Randt, ext. 110 Director of Visitor Services Jean Robbins, ext. 129 Sales Manager Nikki Fisher, ext. 112 Sales & Marketing coordinator Rachel Granzow, ext. 128 Administrative Assistant Carrie Zwack, ext. 100

THE ART

2015-16 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Board Chair Dan Bittman, Sauk RapidsRice School District David Borgert, CentraCare Health Neil Franz, Franz Hultgren Evenson, Professional Association Jim Gruenke, Mark J. Traut Wells, Inc. Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning John Herges, Falcon National Bank Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care Dolora Musech, Batteries Plus Bulbs Kris Nelson, Custom Accents, Inc., Past Board Chair Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Board Vice Chair Melinda Vonderahe, Times Media Dr. Bea Winkler, retired business owner Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud

an d s cience of ener g y e f f icienc y.

Xcel Energy helped the Minneapolis Institute of Arts upgrade to a new generation of LED lighting by providing rebates to offset up-front costs. Whatever your business or facility needs might be, trust Xcel Energy to help you find solutions that save energy and money. Contact an energy efficiency specialist today at 1-855-839-8862, or visit xcelenergy.com/Business. xcelenergy.com © 2015 Xcel Energy Inc.

15-XCL-01147-D_OC_Biz_MNCaseStudy_7.5x4.875_4C_FNL.indd 1

9/25/15 8:57 AM M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

7


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Editor’s Note

Making bread over an open fire at the Norstead Viking Village.

Our guide, Canadian native Tony assured us Oxford, who there is no such thing bacon. He’ as Canadia s standing n in front of a pa dry cod, kn llet used to own in New foundland flake mad parlance as e of longer s. a

Making ‘Fish & Brewis’ from hardtack, dried cod and salt fat pork in Newfoundlan d. Canadian bacon is better.

A Sausage by Any Other Name I ’m a carnivore. Well, technically, I suppose I’m an omnivore. Meat…potatoes…fruit…chocolate… I like it all. Which is handy since Central Minnesota is meat-market heaven. I never thought much about meat markets until I moved to this area. Apparently they exist elsewhere, but not nearly to the extent that you’ll find them here. I’m told it has something to do with the region’s German roots. A number of years ago my husband and I bought half a pig. As a result I spent a few happy days driving to all the meat markets and taste testing bacon as we decided where to take ours for processing. What I learned is that the bacon at every meat market has its own unique flavor and choosing just one was ridiculously hard. Aside from bacon, one of the delights our meat markets are known for is sausage. At one time there was a bar in rural Stearns County that put on a sausagetasting contest as a fundraiser for a local charity. They would ask all the meat markets to donate a variety of sausages, then cook them up with sauerkraut (of course) and beer (of course). For a small fee at the door, you could eat sausages to your heart’s content. Tom and I went one year to join in the fun, complete with a scorecard, though we never heard anyone declare a winner. Aside from the food, my favorite part was being able to tell people “I had a great weekend. We went to a sausage-tasting contest at Goat Ropers in Farming.” Where else but Stearns County could you say a sentence like that and have people understand it?

8

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

I recently learned that Manea’s Meats (see the story on page 38) manufacturers Canadian-style bacon for the pizza industry. A lot of it. I don’t know where I thought Canadian bacon came from, but it never occurred to me that it came from a meat market in Sauk Rapids. There are several peculiarities regarding Canadian bacon. It turns out that Canadian bacon is just a really big, fat sausage. Who knew? It can only be called Canadian bacon if it comes from Canadian hogs, otherwise it is Canadian-style bacon. But my favorite little secret about Canadian bacon is that there is no such thing. A few years ago I was on a group tour of Newfoundland and Labrador. After eating in all of the small, local restaurants for two weeks, we ended our stay by stopping for pizza. The conversation turned to favorite toppings and I said mine was Canadian bacon and pineapple. This was greeted by stunned silence from everyone in the room. “What did I say?” I asked. Finally, someone said, “What’s Canadian bacon?” Not a Canadian in the room – and there were many – had ever heard of such a thing. I pointed out a piece of Canadian bacon on my pizza. Again, the stunned silence. “What do you call it?” I asked. They looked at each other and then one ventured… “Ham?” Until next issue,


Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Whitney Bina St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Teresa Bohnen St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Julie Fisk and Melinda Sanders, Quinlivan & Hughes Luke Greiner, Minn. Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) Sharon Henry St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Tracy Knofla, High Impact Training

Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle–wordingforyou Kelly Radi, Radi To Write Mike Roth, Reventus Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320)656-3808 Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

Attained her MBA to realize a sweet dream. MBA graduate Amanda Henke and her husband Justin dreamed of owning their own business. When the opportunity arose to take over Annie B’s Popcorn and Caramels, they pounced. After media mogul Oprah Winfrey crowned Annie B’s handcrafted caramels one of her “Favorite Things” in 2014, Amanda used her education to meet demand for the 700% sales spike.

As one of the Top-10 largest MBA programs in the state of Minnesota, The College of St. Scholastica develops leadership and change management skills while reinforcing the ethics needed for next-level success. Visit go.css.edu/CSS-MBA to see what makes our MBA exceptional.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

9


UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

12 16

Your Voice in Government New at the Top

22

13

People to Know

Business Calendar

24

14

Getting Going

The Trouble with Business

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Be Present

NEWS REEL

Learning the art of being in the right gear at the right time will improve your influence and respect. By Dr. Fred Hill

CENTRACARE HEALTH EXPANDS, HIRES, EMPLOYEES RECOGNIZED

P

eople around the world struggle with work/ life balance. It is difficult to be productive and manage the relational dynamics of staying connected with others, while consistently recharging personally. 5 Gears came to light as Jeremie Kubicek and Steve Cockram applied what they learned through their own experiences and their work with leaders from around the globe. It is a powerful concept that has the ability to radically change the way you live and lead. —5 GEARS; How to Be Present and Productive When There is Never Enough Time 5 GEARS consists of three sections and 15 chapters. They are: Section One – Connectivity. Chapter 1: Driving Too Fast; Chapter 2: Reality Check. Section Two – 5 Gears For Practical Connection. Chapter 3: Getting in Gear; Chapter 4: 5th Gear - In the Zone; Chapter 5: 4th Gear – Leading in a Task World; Chapter 6: 3rd Gear – Why Being Social Matters;

10

5 GEARS; How to Be Present and Productive When There is Never Enough Time, Jeremie Kubicek and Steve Cockram, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, New Jersey, 2015, ISBN 978-1-119-11115-3

Chapter 7: 2nd Gear – Connecting Deeply; Chapter 8: 1st Gear – Learning to Recharge; Chapter 9: Reverse – Being Responsive in a Resistant World; Chapter 10: Ranking Your Gear Order. Section Three – Living and Leading Connected. Chapter 11: Master Your Settings – Right Time, Right Place; Chapter 12: Shifting Well – Learning How to Transition; Chapter 13: Intentional versus

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

Accidental; Chapter 14: Making the U Turn – Challenge and Plan; Chapter 15: What Is Your Story? Kubicek and Cockram share stories that will help you master the art of being present with those you lead. They feel their work will help add stories of what being in the right gear at the right time does for one’s influence and respect. The authors suggest that whether from a boss, co-worker, or family member, people put up with far too much drama because one person doesn’t understand how to shift gears and become present. Being present is an art form. People can learn how to connect well. One executive said, “When I first heard about the Gears I thought it was hokey, until it hit my reality and then everything changed.” Hmmm, what’s the reality of our work/life balance? Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor from St. Cloud State University

Albany Medical Center joined CentraCare Health as CentraCare Clinic - Albany. Five providers and 35 staff members transitioned to the clinic. Awards: CentraCare Health received a Distinction Award for Best Intranet from nearly 1,000 entries, during the 19th Annual Healthcare Internet Conference in Orlando, FL. Minnesota March of Dimes awarded Linda Chmielewski, vice president/CNO, St. Cloud Hospital Operations, and Sharon Schwantz, RN, CentraCare Health – Long Prairie, with 2015 Nurse of the Year Awards. Chmielewski received the Leadership Award; Schwantz received the Rural Nurse Award. Marilyn Peitso (left), MD, pediatrician and pediatric hospitalist, received the 2015 Betty Hubbard Maternal and Child Health Leadership Award for her statewide leadership and advocacy on behalf of mothers and children in Minnesota. Staff Changes: Brad Konkler (left), joined CentraCare Health as the vice president of philanthropy and community health. Daniel Leslie, MD (left), joined CentraCare Weight Management as a board-certified bariatric surgeon, specializing in weight loss surgery. Darla Mergen has been named director of development for CentraCare Health Foundation.


POINT OF VIEW

Business Central asks readers: What is one method you use to balance your work life and your personal life?

We try to reserve every day after 5:30 p.m. and all day Sundays for family time.”

John Kron • Signmax

I make time for a hobby – for me that’s golf.”

I take my weekends and completely devote them to family. And I cook a real dinner every night for my family.”

Troy Cameron • Falcon National Bank

I leave work when I’m supposed to. It helps me draw the line between home life and family life.”

I take little mini-vacations with my family.”

Sue Carlson • The Legends at Heritage Place

Doug Danielson

Hilary Teiken • Waxing The City

Michael Grogan • Sentry Bank

Mike Grogan

Ryan Holthaus

at your SBA Preferred Lender bank. 320-363-7721 www.mysentrybank.com M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

11


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL CENTRAL MCGOWAN EXPANDS Allan Holst joins Central McGowan as the director of automation, overseeing the company’s new 12,000-square-foot automation manufacturing facility in St. Cloud. The staff and equipment Central McGowan gained from its acquisition of Pro-Fect Automation in 2015 moved from Little Falls to the new facility.

PREFERRED CREDIT EARNS ETHICS AWARD The Better Business Bureau of Minnesota and North Dakota recognized Preferred Credit (PCI) with the Torch Award for Ethics for employers with over 175 employees. The award recognizes companies that display ethical behavior and integrity in interactions with employees, vendors and the community.

BANKVISTA RECEIVES LENDING AWARD Minnesota Business Finance Corporation (MBFC) awarded the FY2015 MBFC Third Party Lender of the Year Award to BankVista. The award recognizes the lender with the highest dollar amount of 504 debentures approved by the MBFC and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) within the fiscal year.

CREDIT UNIONS MERGE St. Cloud Federal Credit Union and St. Cloud City and County Employees Credit Union have started the process to merge. Final regulatory approval is anticipated in the coming months. The merged credit unions will become one organization under the St. Cloud Federal Credit Union name, with assets exceeding $140 million serving over 18,000 members with three branches.

Be an Advocate!

S

t. Cloud Area Evening at the Capital is April 20. Essentially, it’s Business After Hours held in St. Paul, with a legislative focus. The St. Cloud Area Chamber invites all of Minnesota’s senators and representatives to the DoubleTree to meet our business leaders and hear what’s most important to them.

By Teresa Bohnen

This is your opportunity to meet policy makers, gain an understanding of the legislative process, and talk about what matters most to your business. Legislators continuously encourage constituents to let them know what matters most. The more they hear about an issue, the greater interest they take in it.

HERE ARE TALKING POINTS IF YOU NEED A JUMP START.

PRIORITY: Enact meaningful business property tax relief. WHY: Minnesota businesses pay a disproportionate share of the property tax. They have 12 percent of the market value, but pay 32 percent of the total property tax. Much of that disparity is due to the classification system and the state levy that businesses pay, in addition to their local property taxes. WHAT TO SAY: If you own your business property, come armed with your property tax statement. You may not need to pull it out, but simply stating you brought it with you is more than enough to open a discussion. If you lease your property, ask your landlord what portion of your lease payment is state property taxes. You may be surprised to learn how much that amount is of your total lease payment. Share that number with legislators. They may be surprised, as well.

PRIORITY: Transportation investment. WHY: Our Chamber has a long history of advocating for transportation investment. Our Central Minnesota location is great, but it means frequent movement through the Twin Cities, whose roadways become more clogged with each passing legislative session. A long term, comprehensive funding package that provides increased investment in the state’s transportation infrastructure is critical to Central Minnesota’s economic growth. WHAT TO SAY: In cooperation with the Minnesota Chamber, the St. Cloud Area Chamber has signed onto a package that includes: Use of general fund revenues generated from the statewide sales tax on auto parts and rental cars to fund increased investment in our system –––– An increased focus on efficient use of resources;

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

And, don’t forget about the state’s transit needs in both the metro area and Greater Minnesota.

PRIORITY: Wage and Benefit Mandate Preemption WHY: An automatic inflation index was written into the 2014 legislation that raised Minnesota’s minimum wage. This means minimum wage will automatically increase with no consideration or oversight by lawmakers. WHAT TO SAY: Oppose the annual minimum wage automatic inflation index that begins in 2018 and request that our legislators remove the inflator from the current law.

Teresa Bohnen is president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

12

–––– Use of trunk highway bonding to help fund road and bridge projects; –––– Use of general obligation bonding to support local infrastructure projects throughout the state.


PEOPLE TO KNOW

Brian Jarl

Jenifer Odette

David Christians

Bonnie Rodness

Advantage 1 Insurance Agency - 2nd Street ––––––––––––––––

Brandl Motors ––––––––––––––––

Wells Fargo Bank ––––––––––––––––

Holiday Inn & Suites ––––––––––––––––

(320) 632-2908 jenifero@brandlmotors.comChair, Chamber Connection

(320) 229-3738 David.P.Christians @wellsfargo.com Chair, Chamber Open

(320) 253-9000 brodness@histcloud.com Chair, St. Cloud Area Chamber’s Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB) Advisory Board

(320) 253-3525 brian@advantageoneins.com Top Hatters Club

–––––––––––––––– The Top Hatters are the Chamber’s ambassadors, welcoming new members, congratulating members who have expanded or relocated, and serving as greeters and hosts at Chamber events.

–––––––––––––––– Chamber Connection is the premier networking event for businesses in Central Minnesota. Hosted by a different Chamber member every Friday morning, Chamber Connection attracts 120 -150 people each week to network and share information about their businesses, all for the price of $1 at the door.

–––––––––––––––– The Chamber Open is an annual networking and fundraising event for the Chamber. Volunteers organize the day’s activities, sell sponsorships, and help the day of the Open. This year the Chamber Open is Monday, August 8 at the Territory Golf Club.

Rory Cruser Charter Communications ––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––– The CVB is dedicated to promoting the St. Cloud area and to encouraging community improvements that benefit residents and increase the economic impact of visitors. Members of the Advisory Board approve budgets, marketing campaigns, and recommend policy positions.

(320) 229-7352 rory.cruser@spectrum.com Chair, VIP Committee

–––––––––––––––– The VIP (Value Information Promotion) Retention Committee calls on Chamber members to share information about coming events, inquire about membership satisfaction, and encourage businesses to take full advantage of their Chamber membership.

I DW E S T R E GION C H O O S E A L E AMD E R I N T H E I N D U S T RY. Multi Year INC 5000 Award Winner

39 Awards Won To Date

158.74% 5 Year Growth

Roofing | Sheet Metal | 24/Service | Maintenance | Inspections | Waterproofing | Composite Panels

.57 Safety Mod Rating

(320) 252-1608

(612) 333-1481

In Business Since 1976

horizonroof inginc.com M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

13


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL LARAWAY EARNS TOP FINANCIAL AWARD

Worry at Your Own Expense Developing trust – and a written plan – can take worry off the table. By Greg Vandal

Steve Laraway (left), independent financial advisor, Laraway Financial Advisors, qualified for Cambridge Premier Club 2016, which honors a financial advisor’s independent business accomplishments in delivering the highest levels of client service and productivity.

LARSON JOINS UNITED WAY Daniel Larson(left) joined United Way of Central Minnesota as vice president of community impact. Larson spent the last 15 years developing youth and community programs in Los Angeles and San Francisco. He brings a strong background of community engagement, volunteer management, youth development and program implementation to Central Minnesota.

SCENIC SPECIALTIES COMPLETES RESTORATION

Scenic Specialties Landscape Co. celebrated its 19th year in business with a restoration and business transformation project at their St. Joseph location. The 120-year-old historic barn and garden center were transformed into Rolling Ridge Wedding & Event Center.

INITIATIVE FOUNDATION INVESTS $2.3 MILLION The Initiative Foundation approved $2.3 million in direct financial investments in the first three quarters of 2015. Investments support new and existing ventures while also helping to create and retain 224 jobs in Central Minnesota.

I

t was not so long ago, in a school district where I was helping build a strategic plan… A young principal boldly assured me that all would be well with an important project for which he had responsibility. As he put it then, “They pay me to worry about stuff like that!” I couldn’t help but reply: “No, they pay you to get the job done right. That you choose to worry comes at your own expense.” No doubt, this eager new leader was trying to project strength and determination, to assure those around him that the particulars of the project would be managed so that all would end as it should. But that confidence was not born of experience, nor did it in any fashion reveal the plan to get it all done. His comment was merely a variation on the old and dangerous saw: “Just trust me!” Genuine trust is earned over time. In the work I do,

new clients most often grant a measure of that important commodity at the outset based on my own track record of performance in other places, essentially a reputation built from past success. But I’m keenly aware that, especially in an emerging client/consultant relationship, trust is best secured when a carefully outlined and prescribed course of action is developed at the start. If “the devil is in the details,” it is best to make sure that those demons are revealed before you begin. Sometimes this is not so easily done when the customer’s true needs might not be known until a project is well underway. Often, it is important for everyone to maintain the ability to remain nimble enough to change direction when there is merit in a course correction. But even the prospect that a change in plan might be in order

should be part of any initial agreement. Too often trust is tested in a time of surprise, and many otherwise strong relationships simply fail the test. I have come to rely on a tried and true method to secure trust. I have the client carefully outline the objectives of a given engagement. (Surprisingly, not every potential customer knows what the outcome of our work together is intended to be.) Then, with that common definition in mind, we generate a work plan with benchmark dates and expected deliverables. Any required “fudge factor” – that effort to address the potential for adjustment along the way – is included in the plan. The resulting document is attached as part of the client work agreement for all to see. This work scope serves several purposes. It codifies, in a sense, the agreement on the work to be completed and it provides direction for client and consultant on how that work will unfold. Following the plan provides the foundation for trust. Worry is further cast out as a result.

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@voxliberi.com.

14

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6


IT HAPPENED WHEN?

MARCH 12, 1993 | EARTH DAY TASK FORCE

(L-R) “Everyone’s pitching in!” The Chamber’s Earth Day Task Force recycles old phone books, 1993 Students and business leaders clean up at Whitney Park, 1992 Earth Day 1990 at Riverside Park

I

n March 1993, the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Earth Day Task Force, with the help of phone book provider U.S. West Direct, recycled phone books for the Chamber’s annual Earth Day clean-up. Several

volunteers helped collect phone books from local businesses in order to make room on the shelves for an updated version. This project was just a warmup for the annual Earth Days activities, which took place that

year from April 19 to May 22. St. Cloud area businesses, students and residents partnered together every day for park clean-ups, an Earth Day Fair, and other community-wide projects to beautify the St. Cloud area.

F I N E L A W Y E R S T O H E L P W I T H T H E F I N E P R I N T. By focusing on the legal concerns of businesses and institutions, Hughes Mathews Greer has earned a reputation for being the businessperson’s law firm. Our knowledge of law is seasoned by over fifty years of experience and hard work. We are proud of our reputation for careful, competent representation. We are very pleased to serve our clients and are proud of their achievements. We read the fine print. Talk with us.

THE BUSINESSPERSON’S LAW FIRM

Hughes Mathews Greer A T T O R N E Y S 622 ROOSEVELT ROAD, SUITE 280 J P O BOX 548 J ST. CLOUD, MINNESOTA 56302-0548 ATTORNEYS@HUGHESMATHEWS.COM J 320.251.4399 J HUGHESMATHEWSGREER.COM

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

15


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront NEW AT THE TOP

NEWS REEL COLATRELLA RECEIVES RECOGNITION, PROMOTES Nicholas Colatrella, OD, FAAO, (left) PineCone Vision Center, earned Diplomate status in the Anterior Segment Section of the American Academy of Optometry. He is one of only two optometrists in the country to achieve this designation.

Tammy Biery Executive Director, Stearns-Benton Employment & Training Council, age 42. When did you start in your current position? June 1, 2015 Previous employer: I was director of administrative services for Resource Training & Solutions.

Jennifer Novak, PineCone Vision Center, was promoted to vice president of operations. Cathy Vande Vrede was named community outreach and project manager.

GRANT HELPS PATIENTS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS CentraCare Health and the Central Minnesota Mental Health Center (CMMHC) received a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). The $1.6 million grant, spanning four years, will place a primary care provider in the St. Cloud location of the CMMHC, providing 2,000 individuals from Stearns, Benton, Sherburne, and Wright counties with holistic behavioral health and primary care services.

Fun fact: My first job was a two-week temporary position at Creative Memories that I ended up staying at for 13 years.

FISK NAMED VICE PRESIDENT OF HR Microbiologics named Aaron Fisk (left) vice president of human resources. He holds a Juris Doctorate from the University of Minnesota Law School, and a Master of Business Administration from St. Cloud State University. His responsibilities include leading Microbiologic’s recruiting and retainment efforts, onboarding program, leadership development, employee engagement, and succession planning.

16

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

DID YOU KNOW?

What do you miss most about your previous position? The relationships built with employees and members/customers. I also miss the educational events offered to youth, but I volunteer to work at some of those events to stay involved. What are you enjoying most in your new position? Overcoming the challenges the organization faces to comply with a new law that governs the work

we do with youth and dislocated workers. I see SBETC as a conduit between businesses and education (K-12 and post-secondary) and there are many connections to be made. I am also excited to work on a rebranding initiative in 2016 to better educate the community on the work we do at SBETC to serve our clients and businesses. Where did you grow up? Born and raised in St. Cloud! What are your hobbies? Spending time with my family on our pontoon, riding ATVs, traveling and whatever activity our 11-year-old son gets us involved in!

ProcessPro announces acquisition

ProcessPro, a St. Cloud based ERP software company, recently announced that it has been acquired by Open Systems, Inc. of Georgia. The merger positions ProcessPro to access new markets by expanding their geographical presence and leveraging a large development organization in order to remain at the forefront of technology. ProcessPro will become a division of Open Systems, which provides accounting, CRM, ERP, and mobile software solutions in many industries, including distribution, manufacturing, and nonprofit. ProcessPro is a mid-market ERP software solution designed specifically for manufacturers.


TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS

UMC, manufacturer of precision machined parts and assemblies, 500 Chelsea Road, Monticello. Pictured: Shannon Templin, Jaci Dukowitz and Don Tomann.

Great River Regional Library, 1300 W St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Ryan McCormick, Karen Pundsack, Julie Henne and Roger Schleper.

Molitor’s Quarry, an event venue for anything from corporate parties, to wedding showers and birthday parties, 425 35th Street NE, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Tauna Quimby, Tammy Molitor, Don Molitor, Cara Kaschmitter, Ronnie Molitor, Caden Vickstrom and Brian Jarl.

Gustin Schumacher Photography, commercial photography specializing in advertising, food, and real estate photography, 1514 15th Ave. S, #207, St. Cloud. Pictured: Beth Putz, Gustin Schumacher and Diane Diego Ohmann.

St. Cloud Area Roller Dolls, a competitive women’s flat track roller derby league, PO Box 2294, St. Cloud. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Helga On Wheels, Road Block, Hula Tallulan and Beth Putz.

TXT4 Life/Central Minnesota Mental Health Center, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing a wide array of mental health services to meet diverse community needs, 1324 13th Street N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Chad Rhoads, Ashley Nieland, Nikki Wieberdink and Peg Imholte.

M & H Appliance, appliance sales and service, 125 29th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Shannon Templin, Pete Matter, Bob Regan and Peg Imholte.

American Advertising Federation of Central Minnesota, a non-profit organization comprised of advertising professionals in the sales, marketing, creative, publishing, print, radio, television, video and photocopying industry, PO Box 744, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Katie Sczublewski and Peg Imholte.

Stronger Returns BACK TO WORK Back pain is the second most common cause of missed workdays due to illness, and the most common cause of disability. Which means the specialists at our Spine Center are always helping patients regain mobility and comfort. Whether it’s spondylolisthesis or spondylolysis (or something else altogether), we’ll help you understand what’s wrong–then help you return to your active lifestyle.

StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100 1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell

Knee & Shoulder • Joint Replacement • Sports Medicine • Hand Center • Trauma • Spine Center • Foot & Ankle • Physical & Occupational Therapy M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

17


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront TOP HATS : NEW MEMBERS

Val’s Rapid Service, family owned, limited menu fast food restaurant, 628 E St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Logan Henning, Aaron Henning, David Henning and Sheri Moran.

Personal Delivery Service, Inc., delivery, courier, transportation, dispatch, 38105 County Road 10, Albany. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Baylen Becker, Judy Becker, Chris Panek, Mark Roerick.

Cartridge World specializes in refilled and remanufactured ink and toner. 3411 W Division Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Marie Lego, Inez Mehr.

Aerotek, staffing agency, 3315 Roosevelt Rd, Ste 200B, St. Cloud. Pictured: Rachael Bonn, David Jonas, Laura Dunlop, Inese Mehr.

Next Monday, executive coaching, consulting, business planning, leadership, EOS, Ladies 2.0, peer groups, 23430 Terrace Hills Ct, St. Augusta. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Kelly Sayre, Michelle Pape, Brenda Eisenschenk.

Fitness Evolution, fitness center, personal training, corporate wellness, 805 County Rd 120, Sartell. Pictured: (back row) Cat Barnes, Jake Hutt, (front row) Peg Imholte, Kevin Hardy, Cass Revermann, Lori Fuchs, Rusty Deters, Mark Roerick.

FAST

The Bridge-World Language Center, Inc., language interpretation and translation services, projects big or small, 110 2nd Street S, Ste 213, Waite Park. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Adalberto Villalobos, Jan Almarza, Francisco Almarza, Mark Roerick. NEW MEMBER Tom Kraemer, Inc., recycling, waste disposal, portable restrooms, portable storage containers, roll-off dumpsters, demolition, landfills, concrete washout, 16820 County Road 158, Cold Spring.

COMING IN MAY 2016

EDUCATION S C I S A BUSINESS LOAN EXPERTS B S S E N TRAINING USEdorIuclessation, Training &AND Consultants FASTTrack Approvals in hours on SBA loans B $350,000 s COMING IN MAY

ines who are rede

FEATURING:

Busthe job done! and in days on loans up to $5 million! We get finng businessDATA MINING, SMART BUSINESS

For a quick answer, call 1.888.320.2899

FEATURING: GROW

& FACE OF LEADERSHIP IP PROFILE SH FACE OF LEADER IGHTEST • PROFILES BEST AND THE BR

NETWORK

PROFIT

IAL SECTION: MAY ISSUE SPEC

ion, Business Educat ants ult ns Co & ing Train

AD SIZES AVAIL

ABLE:

ge, 1/2 Page, Painformation For, 2/3 more Full Page ads Paatge 1/6 d an call Wendy 320.656.3808 Page,Hendricks 1/3

E UNIVERSITYor whendricks@BusinessCentralMagazine.com ST. CLOUD STAT Deadline: March 24, 2016

FRE00EvaLlue)isting

www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com Gail M. Ruhland

Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. 18

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

g Director of Trainin pment Program Develo -5759 Phone: (320) 308 d@ Email: gmruhlan stcloudstate.edu Website:

udstate.edu

(an $8 larger 1/3 square ad or with purchase of

*

a Smart Business OR Get featured in ship Profile or Face of Leader ur story unity to present yo


TOP HATS : NEW BUSINESSES

Clean Sweep By Kristi, all natural housecleaning service, cleaning products infused with Young Living Essential oils, 27810 141st Street NW, Zimmerman. Pictured: Brenda Eisenschenk, Kristi Pettersen, Brian Jarl.

TOP HATS : MILESTONES

SERVPRO of St. Cloud, residential and commercial restoration, cleaning, water and fire damage, upholstery cleaning, and mold remediation, 14843 31st Street, Clear Lake. Pictured: Dianne Ohmann, Kris Reichle, Chris Panek.

Waxing the City, professional, affordable full body waxing for men and women, 2822 West Division Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Julie Forsberg, Hilary Teiken, Jane Haubrich Casperson, Jo Haubrich, McKenzie Melrose, Mark Roerick.

Refresh Nutrition, offering healthy shakes throughout the day, plus free wellness evaluations and community events and challenges, 102 2nd Street N, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Melissa Brenny, Diane Ohmann.

25 year Chamber member. The Johnson Group Marketing, full-service marketing and advertising agency, 15 16th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Mark Roerick, Scott Raden, Pam Raden, Julie Forsberg

20 year Chamber member High Impact Training, customized learning experiences for higher education, business, and not-forprofit organizations, 2700 1st St N, Ste 201, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Amanda Henry, Kathryn Fumie LeBlanc, Mark Geller, Lisa Saari, Tracy Knofla, Sheri Moran.

Two names,

one law firm you can trust.

For over 90 years, two names have been synonymous with quality legal representation in central Minnesota. Quinlivan and Hughes. Today our firm has grown to 20 attorneys practicing with proven success in nearly every aspect of law. From business and employment, to trust and estate planning, to representing clients in personal injury and business lawsuits, there are two names you can trust for all of your legal needs. Quinlivan and Hughes.

Located in the heart of St. Cloud.

320-251-1414

quinlivan.com

1740 West St. Germain Street, St Cloud, MN 56301

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

QuinlivanHughes7.5x4.875.indd 1

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

1/18/16 1:38 PM

19


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront TOP HATS : NEW LOCATIONS, OWNERSHIP & EXPANSIONS

Preferred Credit, Inc., national consumer finance company for direct marketers, 628 Roosevelt Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann and Greg Windfeldt.

Courtyard by Marriott St. Cloud, full service hotel with banquet and restaurant facilities, 404 St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Jill Magelssen, Nate Kessler, Chriss Wohlleber, Mike Adkins and Peg Imholte.

CW Technology, provider of managed IT services and system procurement including VOIP phone systems, servers, workstations and related infrastructure, 2700 1st Street N, Suite 202, St. Cloud. Pictured: Shannon Templin, Chad Weirens, Noel Schewe and Peg Imholte.

Dijital Majik, computer sales and service, network sales and service, basic computer training, 553 25th Ave. N, St. Cloud. Pictured: Chris Panek, Derek Blonigen, Luke Cesnik, Don Blonigen, Eric Chesney, Dustin Chesney and Diane Diego Ohmann.

Meta 13, website development, programming, graphic design, hosting, email, 330 Highway 10 S, Suite 4, St. Cloud. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Josh Gauerke, Justin Gauerke, Nathan Batdorf and Jill Magelssen.

Gaslight Creative, full service advertising, marketing and communications agency, 713 W St. Germain Street, Suite 200, St. Cloud. Pictured: Diane Diego Ohmann, Jodie Pundsack, Kelly Zaske, Chris Panek.

Bob Feuling has been awarded the MLBA Board Member of the Year for 2014 Liquor, Beer & Wine is all we do!! There’s One Near You!! ********************************* Westside Liquor offers the best selection of Beer & Craft Beer, Wine & Liquor in the State ********************************* Our temperature controlled atmosphere offers the freshest products at everyday low prices. *********************************

7 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! 8 AM - 10 PM Monday - Saturday 763-497-7789 Albertville.................... 218-822-4190 Baxter........................... 320-632-2582 Little Falls.................... Rice............................... 320-393-4513 St Cloud....................... 320-259-7740 Sauk Centre................. 320-352-5920 Waite Park................... 320-253-9511

Visit our web site at: www.westsideliquor.com

Bob & Linda are also owners of other businesses in Sartell: Liquid Assets, MacKenzie’s, Westside Learning & Events Center and The Pantry

L o o k i n g fo r a p la c e to h o ld y o u r e v e n t ...Yo u h a v e fo u n d i t h e r e ! Westside Learning and Event Center is great for showers, breakfast or lunch business meetings, staff education meetings, anniversaries or any type of party you are doing. We also hold various many of our own events you are encouraged to attend.  See our website for details. www.westsidelearningcenter.com or call 320-257-5097

More than just a coffee house. Come for the coffee, bakery goods, homemade soup, paninis and more We have FREE high speed wireless internet service, outdoor patio seating and a very comfy atmosphere.

Mon thru Fri, 6am - 7pm Sat, 7am - 4pm Sun, 8am - 4pm

2nd St S, Suite 600 Sartell, MN 56377 320-230-5201

Monday - Friday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am - 3:00 pm Sunday - Closed

Brian Hart 26 8th Avenue South St. Cloud, MN • 320-281-3056 www.brianhart.sandler.com S Sandler Training Finding Power in Reinforcement (with design) and Sandler Training are registered service marks of Sandler Systems, Inc. © 2016 Sandler Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

20

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

MacKenzie’s is your place to find everything you need to enhance your unique style. Stop in today and look through our exclusive designs, hand picked just for you! We get in new items every week and only get a couple of each to ensure the items you are buying are original. 1091 2nd Street South, Sartell, MN 56377 | 320.259.7713

The Place to Fulfill Your Kitchen Needs!

From delicious gourmet foods and effortless baking mixes, to useful and unique kitchenware, you will find what you need in The Pantry. Whatever you are looking for, our friendly staff can help you find just what you need. 1001 2nd St S, Suite 200, Sartell, MN | 320-281-3447


TOP HATS : NEW LOCATIONS, OWNERSHIP & EXPANSIONS

Theisen Dental, PLLC, 22 2nd Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Dr. Erika Theisen and Shannon Templin.

First Choice Auto, used cars, 185 Roosevelt Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Mike Tenvoorde, Eric Tenvoorde, Casey Scharf, Ryan Tate and Shannon Templin.

Holiday Inn Express, lodging with meeting facilities, newly remodeled and renovated, 4322 Clearwater Rd, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Melinda Wicker, Kerri Beckman, Tracy Uttley, Scott Uttley and Caryn Stadther.

Hendricks Marketing, marketing consulting services, advertising, public relations, sales, 713 W St. Germain Street, Suite 100, St. Cloud. Pictured: Shannon Templin, Wendy Hendricks and Peg Imholte.

Envision Capital, providing mortgage loans for purchase and refinance of residential real estate, 921 1st St. N Suite 205, St. Cloud. Pictured: Beth Putz, Eileen Theisen and Diane Diego Ohmann.

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, professional business association and premier representative of the business community in Central Minnesota, 1411 W St. Germain Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: (front) Inese Mehr, Whitney Bina, Brian Jarl; (2nd row) Gail Ivers, Shelly Imdieke; (3rd row) Sheri Wegner, Teresa Bohnen, Judy Zetterlund; (back) Vicki Lenneman and Sharon Henry.

Keeping you on the job. Midwest Occupational Medicine (MOM) is a department of St. Cloud Medical Group located in our St. Cloud south campus. So while we focus on workplace health and safety, you also get access to our full clinic services, including imaging, lab, and specialty providers. From DOT physicals, rapid drug testing, and hearing conservation programs to full worker’s compensation treatment, MOM is the answer to keeping both employees and their employers well cared for. It’s the genuine care and respect we have for our patients that makes all the difference.

MidwestOccupationalMedicine.com | 320-251-WORK (9675) 1301 33rd Street South, St. Cloud, MN A department of St. Cloud Medical Group

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

21


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NEWS REEL

BCCalendar

BREMER HIRES

GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT Bremer Bank added three new personal banking specialists in St. Cloud: (left to right) Jen McCormack, Lisa Olmscheid, and Lindsey Oleson.

MILLER JOINS INITIATIVE FOUNDATION Michele Miller joined the Initiative Foundation as a controller on the finance team. She has over 15 years of experience in the banking and nonprofit finance fields and holds a finance and banking degree from Buena Vista University in Storm Lake, Iowa.

OELRICH NAMED PARTNER Attorney Eric Oelrich is a new partner at Rajkowski Hansmeier. Oelrich joined Rajkowski Hansmeier in 2007.

PROCESSPRO HONORED ProcessPro received Gold recognition in the category of Best ERP Vendor Blogs in the 2015 ERP Software Writers’ Awards. The company also received nominations in Best Writer and Best Article categories.

FRANKLIN OUTDOOR ADVERTISING GROWS Franklin Outdoor Advertising purchased Minnesota Billboard, LLC, allowing the company to expand into Bemidji, Crosby, Staples and other communities in greater Minnesota. With this acquisition, Franklin has over 750 advertising bulletins across Minnesota and Wisconsin.

WAYNE NAMED PARTNER Laraway Financial Advisors named Chris Wayne vice president and partner. Wayne has over 13 years of experience in the financial industry. Compiled by Whitney Bina. For consideration in News Reel send your news release to givers@ BusinessCentralMagazine.com

22

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

u

M A RC H/A PRI L 2016

CAN’ T M IS S O PPO RT U NIT IES TO INF LU E NC E , PRO M OT E , A ND L E AR N . Visit events.StCloudAreaChamber.com for a detailed calendar.

SPOTLIGHT

APRIL 20

St. Cloud Area Evening at the Capital Interact with state legislators and make your voice heard in St. Paul on April 20 from 5-7 p.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton St. Paul Downtown, 411 Minnesota Street, St. Paul. Cost is $250 to sponsor a table. Individual registrations are also available. Registration is required to Kellie, klibert@ StCloudAreaChamber.com. This event is sponsored by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and unrelated to the Minnesota Chamber’s Business Day at the Capitol.

MARCH 2 & APRIL 6

MARCH 8

Lunchtime Learning

Session Priorities

Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge. Meets the first Wednesday of the month at the Chamber office. Registration is required: $15 for Chamber members, $22 for the general public, 320.656.3826 March 2, noon-1:30 p.m.: Sponsored by Great River Federal Credit Union with John Justin, St. Cloud Police Department, presenting “Protecting Yourself from Identity Theft.” Please note this session goes until 1:30 p.m. April 6, noon-1 p.m.: “Building Stronger Teams and Managing Conflict” presented by Melissa Kron, St. Cloud State University, sponsored by St. Cloud Rox.

A reception and dinner for Minnesota business and legislative leaders from 4-9 p.m. at the Minneapolis Convention Center, 1301 2nd Ave. S, Minneapolis. Session Priorities serves as the kickoff event to the annual legislative session. Cost is $125 per person, register to Kellie, klibert@ StCloudAreaChamber.com.

MARCH 8 & APRIL 12

NEXT – Chamber’s Emerging Leaders Professional development, leadership and networking opportunities for emerging leaders in Central Minnesota. Meets the second Tuesday of every month, noon-1 p.m. Cost is $195 for an annual membership.

Register with Whitney, wbina@ StCloudAreaChamber.com. March 8: “Waite Park City Update” presented by Jon Noerenberg, City of Waite Park. Location TBD. April 12: Professional development, networking and review of March meeting; at the Chamber office.

MARCH 11 & APRIL 8

Government Affairs A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, 7:30 - 9 a.m. at the Chamber office. March 11: Sauk Rapids and Sartell Superintendents provide district updates. April 8: : Area mayors provide city updates.


MARCH 16 & APRIL 20

Waite Park Chamber For businesses interested in Waite Park issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance at WaiteParkChamber.com 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. March 16: Hosted by Audio Video Extremes on-site at 1131 2nd St. S, Waite Park. Includes a presentation by Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning, on “Five Tips for Improving Your Financial Life.” April 20: Hosted by CentraCare Health at the Moose Family Center, 1300 3rd St. N, St. Cloud. Includes a presentation on “Word and Image Use on Social Media” by Tiffany Clements, CSB/SJU.

MARCH 24 & APRIL 28

Sauk Rapids Chamber For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance at SaukRapidsChamber.com 11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. Meetings are held at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. March 24: Hosted by Big Brothers Big Sisters. Includes a presentation on the “Neighborhood Watch Program” presented by Sauk Rapids Police Chief Perry Beise.

April 12: Business After Hours EXTRA! hosted by St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and cosponsored by over 50 businesses, at the Best Western-Kelly Inn, 100 4th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Corporate sponsors are Indigo Signworks and Inventure Properties.

MARCH 30 & APRIL 20

Business Day(s) at the Capitol Annual event presented by the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce. Lobby with Minnesota leaders from 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton St. Paul Downtown, 411 Minnesota Street, St. Paul. Registration is required to Joan Rausch, Minnesota Chamber, jrausch@mnchamber.com. Cost is $95 per person.

Whether you need to finance a new venture or expand your existing business, our trusted advisors will focus on finding a solution to fit your business’ needs. Talk to Business Lender Chad Hess today! 888.330.8482 | myCMCU.org |

Centered on you.

Equal Opportunity Lender | Federally Insured by NCUA

St. Cloud State of the City Address Annual address to the community presented by Mayor Dave Kleis from 12:30-1:30 p.m. at the River’s Edge Convention Center, 10 4th Ave. S, St. Cloud. Free and open to the public. Registration is not required.

MARCH 24

Meet with Minnesota senators and representatives, receive business briefings from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and sightsee in historic Washington, D.C. Registration is required to Kellie, klibert@StCloudAreaChamber.com.

March 24: Hosted by Blackberry Ridge Golf Club, 3125 Clubhouse Rd., Sartell

- Senior Commercial Lender

APRIL 5

APRIL 11-14

A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Chad Hess

April 28, Waite Park Chamber After Hours hosted at La Casita, 314 Division St., Waite Park

April 28: Hosted by The Godzalla Brenny Team at Edina Realty. Includes the annual volunteer showcase.

Business After Hours

Business lending centered on you.

St. Cloud goes to Washington, D.C.

For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940. The Chamber office is located at 1411 W St. Germain Street, Ste 101, St. Cloud. Free parking is available on-site. M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

23


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

Culture Matters

Creating a great work environment is instrumental in hiring and retaining good people. By Mike Roth enhancing your overall business. Your core values define your culture so it is important to make an honest assessment of your organization. If your work environment isn’t what it could be, maybe it’s time to change it. In a recent USA Today article by Rhonda Abrams, she outlined five reasons why culture is important and why you should not allow yourself to become numb to it. She states that a good culture: ____ Boosts employee loyalty. Employees who are a good fit with your culture are likely to be loyal and satisfied, reducing employee turnover. ____

W

hen I start working with my clients, I tell them one of my goals is to make them SMART and HEALTHY. Smart - meaning they are the best at providing their product or service (The fact is most companies are pretty smart, otherwise they wouldn’t survive). Healthy - meaning they have a disciplined, accountable, functional, and cohesive organization that is focused on executing the company vision (This is where many organizations struggle).

The healthy part comes from creating a great work environment and is instrumental in the ability to hire and retain good people. Finding and retaining good people is the biggest challenge facing most companies today. I often hear comments like: The millennials don’t care. ____ Nobody has company loyalty anymore. ____ The work ethic today is not what it used to be.

My question when I hear these comments is: “Have you created the kind of environment that deserves loyalty and ignites passion?” There are two things that attract and retain talent -- an inspiring mission/vision and a great culture. If we can’t find the “right people” maybe it’s because we don’t have the right culture. Words like “Core Values” and “Culture” get so much press today that you can become numb to them. However, they are key to solving the “People Problem” and

contributor Mike Roth is the president of Reventus, a business consulting firm, and a certified implementer for the Entrepreneurial Operating System. He can be reached at Mike.Roth@reventusllc.com.

24

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

Helps recruiting efforts. What attracts the best new applicants? A business in which people feel good about going to work — a company with integrity, respect for all, and, perhaps, a reputation as a fun place to work. ____ Attracts customers. Much as your culture can attract new talent, it can also draw new customers. When you treat employees with respect, they treat customers with respect, and that keeps them coming back. ____ Drives decision-making. If you’ve nurtured a business culture that is committed to integrity and honesty, then you already have a framework in place for making decisions. ____ Establishes a positive community reputation. You may not realize it, but the word gets


There are two things that attract and retain talent – an inspiring mission/ vision and a great culture. If we can’t find the “right people” maybe it’s because we don’t have the right culture. out to customers, vendors, and fellow business owners about how you run your business. When you are seen as a fair and decent employer, as well as a good businessperson, it enhances your reputation in your community. In addition to that, I’ll offer a sixth reason why culture is important. Companies with a great environment are simply more fun places to work. We can all look

back over our careers and reflect on places that we liked to work and those we didn’t. How many of us stay very long at places we don’t like? Creating a good company culture is a journey. It’s not as easy as changing your janitorial service and it definitely does not happen overnight. The sooner you start your journey, the sooner you solve the people problem

TECH NEWS

Drop-Dead Simple Are you looking for a new online meeting service to try? Join.me describes itself as ‘drop-dead simple’ and, of course, has way more features than just online meetings and screen sharing. There’s free audio conferencing, the ability to record meetings through your computer’s camera, meeting scheduling… and the list goes on. Source: SmallBizTrends.com

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

25


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

GROW

The Chamber’s Business, Education and Technology Expo and Workshop provided participants with a variety of opportunities to learn and network.

Katie Wayne, College of St. Scholastica, volunteer chair of the 2015 BET Expo and Workshop.

Brian Hart, Sandler Training, presented on generations in the workplace.

Mike Roth, Reventus, explained how employers can “Get the Right People Doing the Right Stuff.”

Expo exhibitors gave participants a variety of hands-on experiences.

26

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

Jacqi Glenn, Success Training & Consulting, chatted with an expo participant.

Jennifer Potter, St. Cloud Technical and Community College, spoke to a packed room about improving productivity.


NETWORK

Business After Hours with hosts Boser Construction and Inventure Properties

Dave Jacobs (L) and Aaron Zimmer, Jacobs Financial

John (L) and Lizzy Packert, Ron’s Cabinets, and Doug Boser, Boser Construction

Bill Hatling, HatlingFlint (L); Eric Heipel, Fresh Coat Painters; and Roy Dodds, Flying Pig Pizza

Gail Ruhland, St. Cloud State University (L), and Paula Capes, Falcon National Bank

Rachel Lolmasteymaugh, FaceTime Business Resources (L); Ashley Nieland, TXT4Life; Rhonda Dahlgren, Weichert Realtors Tower Properties; and Luke Cesnik, Dijital Majik Rich Gallus, City of St. Cloud (L); Brenda Eisenschenk, InteleCONNECT; and Mark Kroska, AGC Agency

Amy Sip, Express Employment Professionals (L), and Tanja Goering, Pro Staff Margaret Kotula, Direct Insurance Services of MN, and Lance Barthel, Batteries Plus Bulbs

Paul Ravenberg, Boy Scouts, and Emily Bertram, Hatling Flint

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

27


BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

28 30 34

Tech Strategies Management Toolkit

29 32

Tech News Entreprenuerism

Economy Central by Falcon Bank

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

TECH STRATEGIES

Facebook for Business

Facebook’s new business tool is designed to foster workplace collaboration and productivity. By Dawn Zimmerman

W

hat if there was a Facebook for business? You know a place where you could collaborate with coworkers, connect with clients and build new relationships. That soon will be a reality with the official roll out of Facebook’s new professional version of its social networking platform called Facebook at Work. Facebook launched this new platform last year on an invitation-only basis to test and refine the offering. So far, it has been free, but the expectation is that it will come with a small monthly

per-user fee when it’s officially rolled out this year. This is not just another app or tool from Facebook. It signals a bold move by the social media giant to enter the “enterprise” world in business. Here’s a look at this new tool and other advancements coming from Facebook just for businesses. What’s the purpose? The goal of the new Facebook at Work tool is to foster workplace collaboration and productivity so not all the common apps like Candy Crush will work in Facebook at Work.

How will it work? Users would create a separate profile for their workplace and maintain both personal and professional profiles through Facebook. How users see this in comparison to LinkedIn, which also has upped its game in the past two years, will be something to watch in 2016. Is this a first? This isn’t Facebook’s first move to appeal more to businesses. Its advertising platform has been progressively geared toward helping organizations of all sizes reach and engage specific target audiences. That

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based communications company that specializes in social media.

28

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

tool has grown so significantly and been used so extensively by organizations that Facebook more recently introduced a new Business Manager. Through this new Facebook back-end platform, administrators can create multiple ad accounts with different payment methods, organize activities by objectives or around their reporting needs, assign specific rolebased access to a variety of team members, and see who’s working on what. But it does not just stop with Facebook. Business Manager also allows administrators to bring in apps, Instagram accounts and other assets. What’s next? These changes are most likely just the beginning of Facebook’s advancements for businesses in 2016. The company’s earnings remain strong and the ad prices will, too. Demand continues to grow and with that competition comes a higher price tag. Facebook continues to be the major player in social media marketing with its ability to continue to adapt, grow and give businesses new ways to achieve their goals.


TECH NEWS

TECH NEWS

Photo Sightly.com

MICRO-TARGETING The video advertising platform, Sightly, provides businesses with a way to create localized, programmatic video ads that are personalized based on consumers’ “personas.” Using Sightly’s DIY toolset, businesses can generate short promotional videos that include maps, addresses, contact details, and offers. Ad campaigns are displayed on networks like YouTube and Google, viewable on any screen. The company claims this will make ads more relevant and less annoying. More relevant, perhaps, but less annoying?

Compostable Clothing A lot of clothing says it’s made from natural fibers, but most of it has bits and pieces that don’t belong in the compost environment, like buttons, dyes, and polyester tags. Enter Swiss manufacturer,

Freitag, which has designed a new line of clothing that’s safe for the garden compost bin. The new fabric is made from a mix of hemp, flax, and modal, a fiber made from wood. Adding to its green footprint, Freitag opted to skip cotton completely because it takes so much water to grow –

Source: StreetFightMag.com

10 times as much water as that used for linen. Source: Fast Company

Continuing to Make a Difference!

EXPERIENCE MATTERS

WILLIAM BUCKENTINE, Partner, CPA

Celebrating 44 Years of Excellence in Caring for You! Accredited by Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, Inc.

Over 18 years of public accounting experience. Specializing in Business and Personal Tax, Business Consulting, Financial Statement Preparation and Accounting.

Over 30 years public accounting experience. Specializing in Tax Accounting and Management Consulting Services, Personal Management Consulting, Business Start-ups and Acquisitions.

Voted BEST ACCOUNTING FIRM in Central MN by St. Cloud Times Readers

St. Cloud Surgical Center 1526 Northway Drive • St. Cloud • 251-8385 • 800-349-7272 www.stcsurgicalcenter.com

MICHAEL WENNER, Partner, CPA

Working with people, not just numb3rs.

Albany 320.845.2940

Little Falls 320.632.6311

Monticello 763.295.5070

St. Cloud 320.251.0286

An Independently Owned Member, McGladrey Alliance

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

Maple Lake 320.963.5414

www.swcocpas.com

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

29


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Employment At Will

Employers can terminate employees for no reason at all‌but should you? By Julie Fisk and Melinda Sanders

Documenting At-Will Status Employers who wish to maintain their at-will status should specifically assert this doctrine in applications, offer letters, handbooks, performance evaluations, disciplinary notices, termination letters, and other personnel records. practical and legal, on the doctrine of employment at will.

T

he presumption under Minnesota law is that employees are employed at will. This means that employees are free to terminate their employment at any time, for any or no reason, and with or without notice, and an employer has the right to terminate an employee at any time, for any or no reason, and with or without

notice. However, employers rarely exercise their right of employment at will. While it is important for most employers (some exceptions are noted below) to maintain the at-will status with their employees, and to make this relationship clear in all of their personnel documents, it is equally important for employers to consider limitations, both

The Costs For one, terminating an employee without cause is almost always an unwise business decision. Terminations typically lead to increased costs associated with finding, hiring, and training a new employee. In addition to increased costs, the effort is time-consuming and does not always result in the new hire being a better fit for the employer. Moreover, the myriad of laws protecting employees’ rights can be overwhelming to navigate and expensive to litigate. Sound business principles and a variety of employment laws, in effect, trump the at-will presumption. The Protections Before terminating an at-will employee, employers should consider the anti-discrimination laws protecting employees based on their status: race, gender, religion, age, disability,

color, creed, national origin, sexual orientation, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, membership or activity in local commission, immigrant status, familial status, military status, genetic condition, etc. Employers also need to consider, for example, whether the at-will employee recently asked for or took a protected leave of absence due to military duties, due to his or her own medical condition, a medical condition of a close family member, or because of a birth or adoption of a child. They also need to consider whether the at-will employee recently complained of harassment, unfair pay practices, unsafe working conditions, reported a workrelated injury, or requested an accommodation to his or her job duties. The Case So is employment at will alive and well? If you ask us to defend you in a lawsuit, you can bet that we

contributors Melinda Sanders and Julie Fisk, attorneys at Quinlivan & Hughes, advise organizations on a variety of workplace and employment law matters. The information presented here is for educational purposes only. It is not offered as, and does not constitute, legal advice or legal opinions. Readers should seek legal counsel for specific questions.

30

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6


DID YOU KNOW?

NOT ALL ARE CREATED EQUAL Some employees are exempt from the at-will rules. Union employees would not be considered “at-will” as the employment relationship is governed by a collective bargaining agreement. Public employers have to provide employees due process prior to terminating their employment, and may not terminate a veteran without notifying the veteran of his or her veteran’s preference rights. Also, in certain circumstances, usually with high-level executives, employers may want to enter into a contractual relationship to dictate when and with what specific consequences an employment relationship may be terminated.

are going to assert this doctrine. But if you call and ask for advice before terminating an employee, we will explore all the reasons the particular at-will employee may be protected, and press you for details about the reason you would like to terminate the employee.

If you cannot articulate a clear business reason for wanting to terminate the employee or eliminate the employee’s position, we are going to recommend that you notify your insurance carrier or simply work at bringing the employee into compliance

with whatever expectations he or she is not meeting. We will also press you to articulate and produce documentation of objective, performance-based reasons for any termination you are contemplating. The bottom line is to proceed cautiously when

H

relying solely on employment at will as the basis for your termination decision. In today’s human resources world, this presumption may be alive, but it’s subject to many limitations.

New Americana Selections H MAHI-MAHI to

MOMMA’S MAC ‘N’ CHEESE

Have you tried our Americana selections? Sure, we still have your Italian-inspired Ciatti’s classics, but we’ve also added our signature style to several Americana dishes from Beer-Battered Mahi-Mahi to Ciatti’s Mac ‘n’ Cheese and more.

RISTORANTE

2635 West Division Street • Saint Cloud • 320-257-7900 CiattisRistorante.com

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

31


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

Recharge

Avoid burnout by scheduling time away from work.

By Kelly Radi

SMALL TALK

After a hectic day of managing a busy anesthesia practice, I find it both relaxing and stimulating to immerse myself in a good book.” Diane Zoeller, Anesthesia Associates of St. Cloud

“Technology has allowed me to be more productive and more flexible. It actually makes it easier to get away, while still being available if necessary.”

SMALL TALK

The simplicity of the outdoors is where I get recharged. I’m inside all week, so getting outside is a nice change of pace.”

Ryan Wimmer, Wimmer Opticians

32

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

C

lients, employees, kids, commitments – these vital parts of daily life bring both satisfaction and challenges. But together they can suck your energy. Add the short, dark days of a long Minnesota winter and, like that Chevy you drove in college, you may find yourself needing an occasional jump-start. Power Up! Ideally, a week (or three) in the Bahamas would do the trick.

But if a lengthy vacation to a tropical island isn’t in the cards, why not create a mini staycation of your own? Often all it takes is a day away to rejuvenate. Jeff Gau, CEO of Marco, keeps his Fridays as unscheduled as possible so he can head up north to his cabin. “I go into ‘lake mode’ by the time I hit Little Falls,” he says. “My cabin is where I relax and decompress.” Gau can still take care of business while he’s out.

Solar Energy By March, the dark days of winter can have even the most productive people feeling depleted. While you may not have access to a sunny beach, you do have the sun and its energy-giving, mental healthboosting Vitamin D right here. Replenish your energy levels with solar power by getting outside for some fresh air and sunlight. Sweat Equity The midwinter slump is when you need to get up and move the most. Exercise is consistently proven to enhance productivity and reduce energysucking stress. Look at Jodi Gertken’s calendar and you’ll see her workouts are time-blocked, just


like her meetings. The director of Wellness for CentraCare Health and active hockey mom makes fitness a priority. “Balancing home and work life can be challenging, so looking at my schedule ahead of time to say ‘here’s 30 or 60 minutes’ makes exercise a priority and part of my regular routine,” she explains. “It’s my ‘me’ time where I reboot to ensure I’m ready to tackle all that lies ahead. Exercise makes me more productive, less stressed, a better employee, wife and mom.” Not sure where to start? Schedule at least three

SMALL TALK

Spending time with my ‘little brother’ (through Big Brothers, Big Sisters) is a way I recharge. It’s time focused on having fun and building a relationship outside of work that is both refreshing and rewarding!” Erin Bitzan, D.J. Bitzan Jewelers

30-minute workouts every week. Make it fun! Think ballroom dancing, yoga or snowshoeing in the park. Creative Connections Hobbies bring balance to busy lives. Dust off your bowling ball, take a cooking class or head to the library. Studies show that

people with outside interests bring more creative energy to the conference table.

really is like a battery—it requires a good night’s sleep to recharge. Kelly Radi is a freelance writer,

Rest to Reboot In addition to exercise and creative stimulus, you need rest in order to function optimally. If your circuits are overloaded, catch some zzzz. The brain

public speaker and owner of Radi To Write, a public relations writing firm. radi.to.write@gmail.com.

DO

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

33


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Going, Growing, & No Signs of Slowing

Manufacturing continues to be a powerful economic engine in Central Minnesota, driving profits, prosperity and job growth. metal products (up 319 jobs) and transportation equipment (up 246 jobs). _______ Central region manufacturers had 610 job openings in the second quarter of 2015, with a median wage offer of $14.95; that’s 31 percent higher than the wage offer for all jobs. _______

By Luke Greiner

I

n the past year alone, manufacturers added nearly 1,300 new jobs, more than any other industry in the region, continuing a four-year growth trend that shows no signs of slowing. Almost 30 percent of all new jobs in Central Minnesota are in manufacturing, and the industry has continued to move toward pre-recession employment levels. Though the region still has 2,623 fewer manufacturing jobs now than in 2006, full recovery is

within reach. If recent growth trends continue, manufacturing could top its pre-recession employment in the next two years or so. A closer look at manufacturing in the central region shows: Twelve of the 18 manufacturing subsectors in the region gained jobs in the last year and two remained level. _______

The highest average annual wages in manufacturing in Central Minnesota are earned by workers in paper ($63,232), chemical ($61,828), and computer and electronic products ($57,772). _______ Only 10 percent of manufacturing openings were part-time, compared to 58 percent for all jobs.

The largest job growth was found in miscellaneous (largely medical device) products (up 394 jobs), followed by fabricated

A larger share of manufacturing openings required postsecondary education and prior work experience than the total of all jobs, indicating the high quality of jobs that manufacturers are striving to fill.

Some of the most highly concentrated industries in Central Minnesota are in manufacturing. While Central Minnesota accounts for only about 1 in every 10 jobs in the state, the region provides 28 percent of all employment in furniture products manufacturing. Central Minnesota also provides about a quarter of Minnesota’s transportation equipment manufacturing jobs, and plays a pivotal role in numerous other manufacturing subsectors.

contributor Luke Greiner is DEED’s regional analyst for Central and Southwestern Minnesota.

COST OF LIVING MINNESOTA AND OTHER UPPER MIDWEST CITIES OF COMPARABLE SIZE TO ST. CLOUD

Accra Index

COST OF LIVING INDEX CITY

All Items

St. Cloud, MN 1st Qtr

95.1

113.7

76.4

89.4

92.2

114.3

103.6

St. Cloud, MN 2nd Qtr

98.0

110.7

77.2

107.6

97.0

115.0

105.7

St. Cloud, MN 3rd Qtr St. Cloud, MN ANNUAL 2015

34

Grocery Housing Utilities Transpo- Health Misc. Goods Items rtation Care & Services

Among the 265 urban areas participating in the first quarter of 2015, the after-tax cost for professional/managerial standard of living ranged from more than twice the national average in New York (Manhattan) NY to just over 20 percent below the national average in McAllen, TX.

95.3

112.1

79.4

81.3

97.6

116.9

102.5

96.1

111.8

77.7

92.8

95.9

115.2

103.9

Minneapolis, MN 108.2

108.0

111.8

93.0

112.1

105.5

108.9

St. Paul, MN

107.4

105.9

110.2

91.5

112.6

105.3

109.1

Mankato, MN

94.4

104.5

78.1

76.3

95.2

113.0

107.3

Cedar Rapids, IA 94.6

95.6

84.9

105.8

95.3

100.5

98.0

Eau Claire, WI

97.0

105.4

79.3

94.9

106.1

109.3

104.6

Milwaukee WI

100.3

101.3

99.4

108.2

97.9

117.3

96.8

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

Least Expensive U.S. Cities in Which to Live

Most Expensive U.S. Cities in Which to Live New York (Manhattan) NY

227.4

McAllen TX

78.3

Honolulu HI

188.2

Harlingen TX

79.7

San Francisco CA

176.4

Richmond IN

81.2

New York (Brooklyn) NY

173.2

Norman OK

81.5

Hilo HI

149.0

Ashland OH

82.3

The Cost of Living index measures regional differences in the cost of consumer goods and services, excluding taxes and non-consumer expenditures, for professional and managerial households in the top income quintile. It is based on more than 90,000 prices covering almost 60 different items for which prices are collected three times a year by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Small differences should not be interpreted as showing any measurable difference, according to ACCRA.


$70M

$80M

St. Augusta

March

St. Joseph

February

100 $4,437,367

128 $1,702,322

176 $1,353,832

500

November

$600k

September

#/$ August

2014 #/$

St. Cloud

$87,075,891 July

425

397 $57,715,070

48

409 $7,465,381

Sartell

174 November $3,531,780 May

30 $3,600,047

Waite Park

90 October $4,377,148 Apr

84 $7,151,019

St. Augusta

11 September $6,945,494 Mar

7 $202,027

78 August Feb $3,102,294

82 $3,783,078

2000

July Total as of 1/31/16. Jan

$200M

TOTAL: 1655

TOTAL: 1429

December $12,027,944 June

St. Joseph

500

321 $15,843,450

329 $18,168,133

2014

113 $1,552,641

79 $4,720,246

2013

142 $2,293,565

0

500

Food and Be ST. CLOUD

2015 #/$

Sauk Rapids

TOTAL: 1411

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19

2013

1500

TOTAL: $1,450,612.70

$1.5M

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

$150M

Commercial

1000

$900k

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$100M

99 $3,327,830

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

Commercial Building Permits

$50M

116 $1,803,560

October

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

$0M

80

December Total as of 1/31/16. January

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19

2013

291 $8,129,708

April $879,943

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2014

438

May $11,560,121

Waite Park

Commercial Building Permits

2015

447 $19,206,069

December

$60M

382

June $18,539,531

November

Sauk Rapids

1,151

$21,854,833 2015 0

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$50M

1209 $26,145,498

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

2015

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$40M

1227

July $18,425,316 January

October

St. Cloud

Home Sales C

2014

2013 #/$

2015

$30M

2014 #/$

2014

$20M

2013

August #/$ February

0

$10M

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

$300k

$0M

ST. CLOUD

2013

March

Residential

2013

2015

2014

2013

$0

TOTAL: $54,435,063

September

$80M

August

$70M

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

Sartell

2014

832,866

$60M

July

$50M

June

$40M

October April

May

$30M

April

$20M

March

TOTAL:$64,832,866

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

TOTAL: $54,435,063

TOTAL: $62,358,547

2015

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$10M

2015

July December June

November May

Residential Building Permits

$0M

358,547

COLOR KEY:

Compiled by Sharon Henry, data current as of 1/31/16

2013 2015

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

TOTAL: $62,358,547 2014

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL:$64,832,866

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS 2015

October

$80M

$200M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

435,063

0M

,393.19

,621.69

,554.11

Residential Building Permits

444

2015 $94,320,804 567 $16,890,519

Food and Bev

35

$11,485,611 2014 140 ST. CLOUD $18,735,131

5 $871,000

2013

151 $8,057,329

2015

$0

$300k

June

$79,916,621.69 Sources: Building departments for the following cities:TOTAL: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph. 2014

May

2014

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

2014-2015

2013

Apr

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

Unemployment Rates

September

October

J

A

S

0.5%

December

August

J

Jan

November

July

June

1.0%

May

$200M

April

$150M

Feb

March

December

November

$100M

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

$50M

February

1.5%

January

8%

7% $0M

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com 2013

2014-2015 % CHANGE

$300k

O

N

D

$0

6% 0.0%

5%

-0.5% -1.0%

4%

-1.5%

3% -2.0%

2% N

D

J

F

M

A

J

J

A

S

O

N

-2.5% D

J

F

M

A

M

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

35


32,866

BusinessTools

58,547

$80M

35,063

M

93.19

21.69

54.11

$200M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

October

August

September

August

July

June

May

TOTAL: 1655

April

September

ST. CLOUD

October

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

D, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

September

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

lding Permits

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

September

2015

TOTAL: $1,450,612.70

July

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19

August July

TOTAL: 1429

June

2015

May

2014

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

June

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

April May

500

$300k $600k

2014

350

2015 $1,326,730.36 TOTAL:

168

181

53

54

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office $0 $300k $600k $900k $1.2M Total as of 1/31/16.

95%

May

April

expect productivity March to increase or stay February the same.

$1.5M

expect profits to increase or stay the same.

expect orders to increase or stay the same.

Source: Minnesota Manufacturing Business Conditions Survey. You can find the entire report at BusinessCentralMagazine.com

$2M

Source: MoneyTree

Total as of 1/31/16.

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

Economy Central presented by

December

$1.5M

November

TOTAL: $1,336,559.26

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

36

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

Did you know? Minnesota startup companies had their 7th-best year on record for raising venture funding in 2015, attracting $371 million.

2013

$1M

––––––––––––––––––––––––

84%

TOTAL: $1,454,373.86 2014

$500k

February

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

TOTAL: $1,508,301.02

January

ST. CLOUD

––––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––January ––––––

80%

Lodging Tax Dollars

$0

––––––––––––––––––––––––

2000

$1.5M

70

300

expect investments in plants or equipment to increase or stay the same. TOTAL: 1655

2013 246

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

August expect exports July or stay to increase the same.June

TOTAL: 1429

Residential Stearns Co. 2013 Benton Co.

250

79%

September

TOTAL: 1411

200

91% 1500

150

TOTAL: $1,450,612.70

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

100

2014 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

2015

December

1000

$900k

50

$1.5M

Most Minnesota manufacturers expect business November conditions to remain stable or improve in 2016, accordingOctober to a recent survey.

TOTAL: 316

0

$1.2M

Optimistic about Manufacturing

TOTAL: $1,450,612.70

2015 2013

$900k

BY THE NUMBERS

Food and Beverage Tax Collection TOTAL: 221 ST. CLOUD

$600k

Total as of 1/31/16.

TOTAL: 235

2014

$300k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions

2015

January

$0

Estate sources:$200M St. Cloud Area AssociationJan of Realtors, $100M Housing/Real $150M http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics. Total as of 1/31/16.

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

2013

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

2000

Feb

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

1500

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

$0

1000

2015

February Mar

500

2014

2013

Apr

TOTAL: $117,060,554.11

0

2014 March

2015

2014

2013

2013

TOTAL: 1411


Troy Cameron Senior Vice President of Lending

BUILDING OUR BENCH STRENGTH TO HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW At Falcon National Bank, we’re continuing to grow the best professional banking team in town. As we welcome our new Senior Vice President of Lending, Troy Cameron, we’re even better equipped to help your commercial or agricultural business thrive. With local decision making, Preferred SBA Lending, and customized financing options, our expert staff has the strength to help your business prosper. That’s Reality Banking!

Member FDIC

www.FalconNational.com • 320-223-6300


AL I TH F AM I Don Manea

Alina Manea

38

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6


LL N HE LY

Juan Castellanos

Manea’s Meats’ success is firmly rooted in its family values, recipes and service. By Gail Ivers Photos by Butkowski Digital Imaging

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

39


D

on and Alina Manea agree. The biggest challenge they have faced in business was relocating their business because of the new Sauk Rapids Bridge. It’s not that the previous buildings were perfectly suited to their needs. Or that the relocation options were inadequate. Or that they would lose customers because of the move. It was simply the magnitude of the project.

“We had our building paid for,” said Alina Manea. “So you ask yourself, do you quit? Sell out? That might be an option for some people. That was not an option for my dad. With my dad you never quit.” Selling also would have meant finding new jobs. Not just for the five family members who owned the business, but for the 10 employees who worked there. “If you close what happens to them?” said Don Manea. “When you shut down a business with 10 employees that makes an impact on the community.” So they moved. As one of the first businesses required to relocate, Manea’s had their pick of locations. Their first choice was the old Sauk Rapids City Hall where Walgreens stands. No, that wasn’t an option, the city said. Their second choice was 2nd Avenue N on the east side of the street. That was ok, the

BUSINESS PROFILE Manea’s Meats 114 2nd Avenue N Sauk Rapids MN 56379-1606 Phone: (320) 253-8683 Fax: (320) 253-6135 Email: info@maneasmeats.com Website: maneasmeats.com Ownership: Alina and Don Manea, Juan Castellanos Business Description: Family-owned meat market located in Sauk Rapids, with a large selection of brats, steaks, sausage, beef, pork, and poultry; wholesale and retail Number of employees: 30

40

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

city said, but how about moving to the west side of the street. “I told them no,” Don Manea said. “That would mean a left turn to get to the store and a left turn leaving the store. Who wants to do that on their way home from work? No one.” After two years of planning and building, the business relocated to 114 2nd Avenue N in May 2007. That spring the city tore up 2nd Avenue to put in new sewer and water. Work finished in the fall. “The next spring they tore up the other road and put in new sewer and water,” Don said, shaking his head. “Thanks to the community we made it through that,” Alina said. “We have good customers.” Today, business is booming. “Our growth right now is exciting,” said Juan Castellanos. “The opportunities we’ve been given by our customers and our growth potential is pretty amazing.” This makes Juan identify a different challenge. “The last three or four years, it’s been a challenge to manage our growth,” Juan said. “You want to be financially responsible, but you don’t want to miss any opportunities.” And with growth comes the perennial challenge of finding the right employees. Juan calls that a huge challenge. “We have an excellent, excellent crew right now,” he said. “But it can be hard to find people who like this industry and want to stay.” One of the positive outcomes of relocating was being able to design their building for growth. “It’s not often you get to build exactly what you want,” Don said. At the time they did a significant amount of specialty processing, such as smoking venison and turkeys for customers. Because this service takes a lot of space, they designed the building with room to accommodate the requests.

But today, Manea’s no longer offers this service. What happened? Canadian bacon happened. Pueringer Distributing in Rice sold cheese to pizza outlets. They were looking for a complimentary product to expand their distribution line. They approached Manea’s to see if they were interested in developing a wholesale line of Canadianstyle bacon. Alina’s father, Rolando Castellanos, had a good recipe for New England ham and a deal was made. Though this was many years before the company moved to their current location, it set the foundation for Manea’s rapidly expanding wholesale business. “When they first moved into that new building, they had lots of overhead,” said John Herges, Falcon National Bank. Herges has worked with Manea’s since the 1970s. “I think they saw the wholesale business as a way to create some volume and diversify. The retail meat business goes up and down with the economy. Wholesale is a little more stable.” As the wholesale business took up more and more space, the specialty processing was pushed out. “It takes up a lot of room and we just didn’t have the space anymore,” Don said. Plus, the busy time of year for specialty processing is November. “That runs into the holidays, which is our busytime. So we stopped doing it.” At about this time Coborn’s decided to close its commissary in order to focus on its retail business. “We went in pursuit of quality suppliers who could use our recipes to produce our signature line of Smokehouse products,” said Mike Richter, Coborn’s senior director meat-seafood and fresh. “We tried several suppliers and liked Manea’s best.” “Their big boost into wholesale came from that Coborn’s connection,” Herges


Donald Manea, Jr. cuts bacon for packaging and sale in the retail store.

TIMELINE 1968 – Rolando and Aleida Castellanos move their family from Cuba to the United States. They settle in Hartford, Conn. Don Manea joins the military service. 1970 – Castellanos opens a meat-processing business. 1972 – Don Manea and Alina Castellanos marry.

1974 – Don and Alina move to Sauk Rapids. Rolando and the Castellanos family follow five months later. 1975 – Don and Rolando open Manea’s Meats in Sauk Rapids 1977 – Manea’s Meats expands with a location in St. Cloud on 2nd Street S, across the street from Tenvoorde Ford.

1988 – Manea’s Meats in St. Cloud closes.

2012 – Aleida Castellanos passes away.

1989 – Manea’s purchases a building next door to the Sauk Rapids location and expands their retail operations

2015 – Rolando Castellanos passes away. The business is now owned by Don and Alina Manea and Juan Castellanos.

2007 – Construction of the new Sauk Rapids bridge forces Manea’s to move to their current location at 114 2nd Avenue N, Sauk Rapids.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

41


Rolando and Aleida Castellanos, 1949

The Beginning

I

n 1949 Rolando Castellanos married Aleida Marichal in Cuba. It didn’t take long before he joined Aleida’s family business, a meat-packing plant called El Rosario that went back three generations. In 1961 Castro and the Cuban government took over the company. “We moved to the family farm,” said Alina Manea, Rolando and Aleida’s daughter. “Four years later they came and took that away, too. They said, ‘You don’t own this anymore.’ ” In 1968 the family was able to move to the United States, settling in Connecticut. Alina was 15 years old. Here, too, Rolando showed his business skill, opening a meat-processing plant where he made bacon, ham, pork hocks and other products using the old family recipes he had brought from Cuba. Meanwhile, Sauk Rapids native Donald Manea was an electrical operator on a nuclear powered submarine stationed on the east coast. After two months without a break, he was given leave and suggested to a buddy that they go out. The friend’s girlfriend promised to find Don a date. It wasn’t until they were on their way to meet their dates that the friend mentioned that Don’s date didn’t speak English. “She didn’t speak English and I didn’t speak Spanish. But we figured it out,” Don said. Don and Alina were married in 1972. “Rolando said to me ‘If you’d like to start a business, I’d be interested in doing it with you,’” Don said. Don was open to the idea, except he and Alina had plans to make their home in Sauk Rapids. “Rolando told us

42

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

‘Then I’m coming, too,’” Don recalled. Family was extremely important to Rolando. He had had to leave a son behind in Cuba and he wasn’t about to lose his daughter. “He spent 10 years working to get his son to the U.S. He finally did.” Don and Rolando started Manea’s Meats in Sauk Rapids in 1975. This was a family endeavor that included Alina, and Rolando’s sons Oscar and Juan. Family and friends remained important to Rolando throughout his life. “You knew he liked you when he greeted you with a hug and ‘Amigo,’” said John Herges, president of Falcon National Bank. “‘Amigo John.’ My colleagues didn’t get the hug. He was as honest and sincere and delightful a person as you could ever hope to meet.” From the original five family members – who were also the employees – the company has grown to 30 employees and is now owned by Don, Alina, and Juan. Rolando passed away in November 2015. “He was still doing invoicing and billing up until about two months before he passed,” Don said. Every family member has worked in the business at some point, Juan said. Juan’s children have chosen different career paths, but the Manea’s son, Don, Jr., currently works in the business. Sundays were – and remain – family day. Don and Alina always prepare dinner for everyone who can come, including Don’s mother, their siblings, children, grandchildren, even nieces and nephews. “When they’re all there, we have 54,” Don said. And they can always make room for one more. – GMI

said. “Now they’re lucky to have that space so they can grow.” Coborn’s has always been a friendly neighbor. When Don Manea returned to Sauk Rapids after six years in the Navy, he was surprised at what he saw. “When I left home, Sauk Rapids was robust. When I came back it was a ghost town,” he said. Don had planned to use his nuclear submarine training to find a job in the nuclear industry in Central Minnesota. Instead, a big nuclear accident shut down all of the programs in the U.S. Everyone coming out of the service with skills for nuclear power plants was looking for work. “That kind of threw a wrench into my plans.” Rolando had already suggested that the two go into business together, and now that sounded like a pretty good idea. Rolando had an extensive background in the meat industry and family recipes that dated back three generations. The two decided to open a meat market, even though Coborn’s was about to open a large store just down the street. “The meat inspector said, ‘Are you sure you want to do this?’” Don recalled. “I said, ‘Yes! I’m sure.’ I grew up here and I knew how much people liked sausage. I knew the kind of products Rolando made and I knew we could do something of high quality. He was that good.” Coborn’s Richter agrees. “We have a product line called ‘Four Brothers.’ This is a truly high quality product sold only in Coborn’s stores. Manea’s is committed and capable of meeting that high standard.” Coborn’s also particularly likes that Manea’s is flexible. “The fact that they are willing to work with us on new product development is another reason we love working with them,” Richter said. That works both ways, as Don Manea enjoys working on new products. “A lot of our recipes Rolando brought from Cuba and we still use them,” Don said. “But I want to be leading, not following so we have to have something new all the time.” Herges, from Falcon Bank, has been a customer for years. “They have interesting


“Some of our customers have been shopping here for 40 years. Their children shop here, and now we’re seeing their grandchildren.”

PERSONAL PROFILE

—DON MANEA, MANEA’S MEATS

Juan Castellanos, Partner Age: 55

products that you don’t necessarily find elsewhere,” he said. “All kinds of different flavors and old family recipes. High quality and still competitively priced.” Between what people see on TV and request, and all the new spices and cheeses on the market, the ideas are almost endless, according to Don. He gave an example of someone who wanted to start a distribution line for Tasso Ham. Don didn’t know what Tasso Ham was so he went online, learned about it, and created a recipe. The customer was delighted, but was never able to create the level of distribution to make it profitable. “We also worked on an East African wholesale recipe,” Don said, “but it just wasn’t large enough – there was no organized market for distribution.” Still, you’ll find plenty of new products to try. “We make something new. Sample it out. If it’s popular we make more,” Don said. “We change them out throughout the year.” But don’t go to Manea’s expecting them to make 25 pounds of your grandma’s secret sausage recipe. Those days are behind them. “We don’t do anything under 200 pounds now,” Don said. “We just can’t. The smokehouse is busy all the time. It’s hard to slot in small batch product ideas into the schedule.” Don recalled his first sausage stuffer. It took 25 pounds of meat, had a hand crank, three stuffing horns and cost $280. Today he pays $400 just for one horn. “Things are so specialized now.” And expensive. “The two smokehouses we have today cost more to build that the two buildings we had in the old location.” That’s not all that has changed in 40-plus years. “We used to buy meat by the quarter

and had to cut it,” Don said. “Now we can buy the specific cuts that we want. It’s much easier to control inventories. If you needed 100 hams you had 100 pork loins, whether you wanted them or not. Now you can order 100 hams.” For Juan Castellanos the biggest change is the pace of the business and the company’s growth. “We’re so jam-packed we don’t know where to put stuff when it comes in,” he said. That means there are challenges, but also opportunities. “People ask what’s new at your job and you have all these new things that are happening.” Some things haven’t changed. You can still buy Rolando’s chorizo, made from the original Cuban recipe. Sausage is still king. “And bacon,” Don added. And the business is still family owned and run. “We’re still acting like a family,” Juan said.“We all have different ideas, and that’s a good thing. We listen to each other. You don’t get to where we are without working together.” “I learned everything I know about this business from my father-in-law,” Don said. “Very few businesses make the number of products we make. Rolando had a handle on all of that. Let me think,” he said and paused for several seconds. Finally, “I’m trying to remember if we ever had an argument in 40 years of working together. I can’t think of one. We always had a good time. “Getting to work with family, that’s always been a plus for me,” Don said, “a big plus.” Gail Ivers is vice president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and managing editor of

Hometown: Elia, Cuba Education: 5 years – St. Cloud State University Work History: Manea’s Meats Family: Wife Marian, Daughter Nicole (Nathan) Rueter; Son Chad (Carley) Castellanos; granddaughters Ella, Addie and Amelia Hobbies: Going to the cabin Advice to would-be entrepreneur: Work hard, believe in what you do and you will succeed.

Alina Manea, Partner Age: 65 Hometown: Elia, Cuba Education: High School Work History: Manea’s Meats Family: 1 son, 2 daughters: Donald, Cristina and Susana Hobbies: Flower gardens, cooking, spending time with family Advice to would-be entrepreneur: Always set goals. Best advice you’ve received and who gave it to you: My Dad: “Always work and take care of each other.”

Don Manea, Partner Age: 68 Hometown: Sauk Rapids Education: 4 years college Work History: 6 years US Navy; 41 years Manea’s Meats Family: 2 girls, 1 boy: Donald, Cristina and Susana Hobbies: Fishing, Hunting Advice to would-be entrepreneur: Set your goals, work hard to reach them. Best advice you’ve received and who gave it to you: Always do your best, someone will notice. — Rolando Castellanos

Business Central Magazine.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

43


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Feature

Two Heads are Better than One Collaboration will be the key to your business success in the workplace of the future. By Tracy A. Knofla

D

on’t get too attached to your corner office or cubicle. The workplace of the future has no room for barriers between people. In fact, oceans, continents, and time zones will be of little consequence as you conduct business in the years to come. How quickly you can tap into the expertise and energy of your stakeholders, including employees, vendors, and customers, to solve a problem or brainstorm new initiatives, will determine how quickly your business will triumph.

A New World of Work What will the workplace of the future look like? Consider this: Top-down organizational charts will be replaced with

44

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

spider-web-like connections between people whose job titles no longer define their place within the organization. Work groups will form for a finite project and disband at its conclusion. New groups will emerge as business dictates. Ideas will be solicited from throughout the company, not just within a specific department. The goals of the company are everyone’s business and are created to reflect each employee’s specific contribution. Personnel will become nimble workers, able to re-train or re-tool as needed for goal attainment. People will be hired for their brains, energy, and attitude, and not just for technical skills.

Employees will work in a variety of venues. Portability will be the norm. In the company’s building there will be fewer personal office spaces and more shared spaces to promote intentional and accidental collaboration. Technology will continue to support communication and collaboration through new programs and applications and across all manner of devices. An eagerness to learn and incorporate these new tools into everyday operations will distinguish the high achievers. Analytics will play an increasingly important role in determining sales, marketing, and production goals as the digital world makes gathering this data so much easier.

Is Your Business Ready for a Collaborative Future? To what extent do your operational practices invite collaboration among departments or with interested others? If I asked your executive team, would they all nod and say, “Yes, of course, we collaborate in many areas.” And what if the same question was asked of your employees? Would their perspective be the same? I recently heard this story about a business that professed to be collaborative. They wanted to create a name for a new service they were about to launch. They invited all employees to submit their ideas for the name. They ended up with 148 ideas. A committee was appointed to select the semifinalists.


They submitted their top three choices to the CEO. The CEO declined to choose any of the employee-generated ideas and instead picked one of his own. This CEO not only broke the spirit of the employees, he lost their trust and proved, beyond any doubt, that collaboration was not a core driver in his business. Yet, in workplaces where collaboration is a core value, we see results such as these reported by IBM: How does collaboration yield results? By fostering innovation. In fact, true innovation is virtually impossible without collaboration. And innovation is indispensable to success.

People will be hired for their brains, energy, and attitude, and not just for technical skills. Business leaders recognize this. In IBM’s recent CEO study, more than three quarters of the 765 chief executive officers queried cited collaboration and partnering as very important to their innovation efforts. In today’s competitive environment, sharing information and expertise can be critical in driving both individual and organizational success. From forward-thinking business leaders to younger workers who have grown up in the Web-based world, working collaboratively is now business as usual.

Are You Convinced Yet? The future is calling you to collaborate. Innovation is best achieved through collaboration, and employees feel more connected to companies that encourage collaboration. There is no downside to creating a stronger practice of collaboration. Here are six ways for you to increase collaboration and the positive outcomes it will produce.

engage in collaborative events with staff and others. Their role modeling will engender goodwill from staff and greatly influence middle managers to do the same with their staff. Create methods to identify great collaborative thinking and recognize and reward those who are successfully collaborating throughout the organization. Hold these instances up for all to see and emulate.

1.Gain buy-in from the CEO and other senior staff. Have them lead the charge for collaboration and

2 Invest in technology. Look to your IT professionals to advise you on the best new products

April 9 5pm-9pm

Sports Arena East Building (at the Benton County Fairgrounds)

Free admission, courtesy of

We’ll have 36,000 wings to try, sauced by area pro & amateur contestants Details at www.wjon.com under “Events”

ELECTRONICS

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

45


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Feature that make information sharing, virtual meetings, real-time collaboration, and cross-device efficiency, seamless. Collaborative technology is a burgeoning industry – take it seriously, and incorporate as much as you can into your business.

3 Create spaces in your building for collaboration to occur naturally. Maybe you are

One of the greatest benefits reported from open-air concept employees is the ability to instantly connect with others.

not ready to knock down all of your walls - that IS rather extreme! However, one of the greatest benefits reported from open-air concept employees is the ability to instantly connect with others. Snippets of overheard conversations provide opportunities for co-workers to add their thoughts and engage

MOBILE | SEO | CMS CHECK OUT THE NEW ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SITE. BUILT AND SUPPORED BY JDB IT. SITE DESIGN BY THELEN ADVERTISING.  – WWW.STCLOUDAREACHAMBER.COM

JDB IT IS YOUR ONE STOP SOURCE FOR ALL OF YOUR WEB DEVELOPMENT NEEDS.

46

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6


Innovation is best achieved through collaboration, and employees feel more connected to companies hat encourage collaboration. in real-time problem solving. Offer space for distance workers to use when they want to touch base with the home office.

4 Hire more millennial generation employees and let your current millennial workers lead the charge. They are experts at using technology to stay connected and will be early adopters of other new technologies. You will also need to educate other members of your workforce on the benefits of collaboration and how it will

help them be more effective in their positions. After all, they have had years of experience in a workplace that emphasized individual accomplishments.

5 Create opportunities for employees to build relationships throughout the organization in ways that seem organic. This

could include community service projects, departmental competitions or get-togethers, annual meetings, or social events. Employees who feel a level of personal comfort with

each other will be more willing and able to collaborate.

6 Remember to include your customers and vendors in your collaborative goals. Their perspectives on your business policies and practices can be invaluable. Plus, the additional

contact between your employees and vendors and customers can further cement your business relationship. Intentional and celebrated collaboration will bring higher employee engagement, stronger ties to your customers and supporters, and untold business success. How soon can you begin? For the sources used in this story, visit Business CentralMagazine.com

contributor Tracy Knofla is the co-owner and featured consultant of High Impact Training. She has been presenting to audiences across the country for more than 25 years.

VISIT US ONLINE

BusinessCentralMagazine.com M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

47


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Special Focus MANUFACTURING & COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION

The Ultimate Office Experience Effective workplace environments help employees balance focus and collaboration. By Mary MacDonell Belisle Here’s a laugh. Dilbert complains his cubicle is two inches smaller today than it was yesterday. Pointy Head Boss explains “real-time status adjusters” in cubicle walls adjust cubicle size in proportion to Dilbert’s value to the company. The final comic strip frame shows Dilbert and two other employees sitting in their individual cubicles, each cubicle barely big enough to accommodate their bodies. Not so funny is that from 2010 to 2012, the average square foot of workspace per person dropped from 225 to 176, with the number predicted to fall to 100 square feet by 2017, according to Gensler’s 2013 U.S. Workplace Survey. This employer trend

is counter-intuitive, however, because the U.S. unemployment rate is holding at five percent, making for a competitive employee market. And even though wages continue to remain flat, enhancements to the employee experience will entice individuals to leave companies where they don’t feel valued. Consider the following physical space recommendations that help improve an employee’s experience. 1. Evaluate work modes. Gensler speaks of four work modes: focus, collaborate, learn, and socialize. Plan for these when designing/remodeling your office.

Single source construction services at its best.

Architecture and DESIGN

Development

and BUILT-TO-SUIT

Construction 320.252.0404 48

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

|

Field Service

www.RICECOMPANIES.com

STEEL ERECTION

Maintenance |

SAUK RAPIDS • GLENCOE


2.Reduce distraction. Workers are struggling to work effectively in the face of multiple distractions, Ensler said. Companies can help their employees be more effective by better structuring the work environment. Gensler noted that 35 percent of respondents worked 100 percent of the time in the office, while 36 percent spent 75 to 99 percent of their time in an office. 3.Design for the activity. Effective workplaces balance focus and collaboration. Technology and the diversity of staff locations make for new challenges to space planning. Study booths, team rooms, work lounges, and one-person touchdown places for workers on the go help accommodate this new reality.

HMA Architects

|

“ In a world where money is no longer the primary motivating factor for employees, focusing on the employee experience is the most promising competitive advantage that organizations can create.” –– Jacob Morgan, Forbes Magazine, “Why the Future of Work is All About the Employee Experience”

4.Offer employees options. No one likes to be stuck in a cubicle all day. Gensler found employers who provide choices for when and where to work are seen as more innovative and have higher-performing employees. The freedom and flexibility to use all kinds of space allows employees to decide what’s best and most productive at the time. “Workspaces (today) are becoming a mixture of workstations with

lower heights,” said Karen Kirt, owner of Suite Spaces of Baxter and St. Cloud. “Also small sit-down or stand-up areas of impromptu conversations get thoughts and ideas flowing …” 5.Reflect corporate culture. When the company’s personality is not reflected through the floor plan, furnishings, floor coverings, colors, lighting, etc., there

Designing tomorrow’s newest landmark projects

St. Cloud YMCA and Aquatics Community Center Sartell Community Center

St. Joseph Government Center

The Lofts Condominiums

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

HMA Architects 700 W. St. Germain Street Suite 200 St. Cloud, MN 56301 320.251.9155

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

49


uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

Special Focus

is a disturbing disconnect. Modern, classical/traditional, no-frills, hightech, and green are design styles that help deliver your cultural message. Reception areas should especially reflect the values of the organization, Kirt said. 6.Create mood with light and color. Fluorescent lighting can easily and economically be changed to appealing fixtures, said Brenda Fedor, owner of Focal Point Decorating, St. Cloud. Natural lighting and skylights can be incorporated into a space plan. Bright and bold colors energize busy work areas to create more fun, while subdued tones prompt reflection and focus. Give employees some choice. Fedor often develops a palette of six coordinating colors with commercial clients, and then instructs each employee to choose a main color and an accent for his/her space. 7. Mix ‘n’ match furniture. Cubicles remain necessary as private workspaces, but trending are more relaxed atmospheres and collaborative workspaces, Fedor said. Comfortable, cushioned chairs with arms can replace plastic stack-ables. Furniture is more flexible today, according to Kirt, including mobile with casters, height adjustable, adaptable to the person or job function, and engineered with plugin features for portable electronics and information sharing. Focus, balance, and choice in the workplace are drivers of employee satisfaction, performance, and innovation according to the Gensler study. When you invest in improvements to the physical office space your efforts should pay off in employee acquisition and retention. Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance copy and content writer with mary macdonell belisle - wordingforyou. She specializes in business articles and profiles, web content, and book editing.

For the sources used in this story, visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com 50

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6


Special Focus:

Commercial Construction

Enjoy the Experience! Continue reading to learn more about the variety of

Integrity.

commercial construction companies providing growth in Central Minnesota. Turn the page to learn more.

The Cornerstone.

Commercial Construction | Project Management | Real Estate Development

St. Cloud

Twin Cities

320.202.1300

Williston ND

shingobee.com

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

51


COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION

Miller Architects & Builders Liberty Square Monument

LOCATION City of St. Cloud and Liberty Savings Bank Downtown St. Cloud GENERAL CONTRACTOR & ARCHITECT Miller Architects & Builders PROJECT COMPLETION June 2015 WEBSITE www.millerab.com DESCRIPTION The “Downtown St. Cloud - Liberty Square Monument” features a decorative bell, four decorative piers, new ironwork and pavers along with additional landscaping.

Strack Companies Trinity Logistics LOCATION Sartell, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Strack Companies

ARCHITECT Negen & Associates

PROJECT COMPLETION June 2015 WEBSITE www.strackcompanies.com DESCRIPTION The new home for Granite Logistics Services, LLC, an agent for Trinity Logistics, is as stunning as it’s setting on the water’s edge at Sartell’s Pine Lakes Development. This high-tech 13,000 square foot facitlity is loaded with amenities and offers a pleasant and modern environment with numerous architectural features for its growing employee base.

52

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6


Donlar Construction Company West River’s Edge Parking Ramp LOCATION St. Cloud, Mn

Rice Building Systems, Inc. Coborn’s Support Center LOCATION St. Cloud, MN

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Donlar Construction Company ARCHITECT HMA Architects Ltd.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Rice Building Systems, Inc. ARCHITECT Rice Building Systems, Inc.

PROJECT COMPLETION 2016

PROJECT COMPLETION November 2015

WEBSITE www.donlarcorp.com DESCRIPTION When completed, this five-level parking facility will have 401 stalls, multiple stair and elevator towers, with three levels of parking spanning 5th Street North.

WEBSITE ricebuildingsystems.com DESCRIPTION New 85,000 SF, 3-story support center for Coborn’s, Inc.

Shingobee Builders, Inc.

Ecumen TCU & Wellness Center LOCATION Detroit Lakes, MN GENERAL CONTRACTOR Shingobee Builders, Inc. ARCHITECT RSP Architects, Ltd. PROJECT COMPLETION January 2015 WEBSITE www.shingobee.com DESCRIPTION Addition of 18,300 SF Wellness Center / Transitional Care Unit, and renovations in existing facility. The campus includes nursing care, independent, assisted, and memory care living options.

HMA Architects

Winkelman Building Corp.

River’s Edge Parking Ramp

GATR Truck Center

LOCATION Elk River, MN

Minnwest Bank

LOCATION Downtown St. Cloud Adjacent to the River’s Edge Convention Center

LOCATION Minnwest Bank - St. Cloud, MN

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Donlar Construction

GENERAL CONTRACTOR W Gohman Construction

ARCHITECT HMA Architects

W Gohman Construction

ARCHITECT Mahler and Associates WEBSITE www.wgohman.com

COMPLETION DATE December 2014 COST $544,000

DESCRIPTION The 2155 Sf. addition and remodel of the bank. New addition includes 5 offices, a conference room and 3 work stations. Existing offices remodeled to include a new server room and access to new addition.

PROJECT COMPLETION October 2016 WEBSITE www.hma-archs.com DESCRIPTION 400 stall precast parking ramp spanning 5th Avenue. The parking ramp is designed to complement the existing River’s Edge Convention Center and will allow for future parking additions, future Convention Center additions and direct connections from the ramp to the Convention Center. It will also serve the greater downtown St. Cloud area.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR Winkelman Building Corp. ARCHITECT Hagemeister Mack Architects PROJECT COMPLETION December 2015

COST $6.8 Million

WEBSITE www.winkbuild.com DESCRIPTION This fourth location for GATR consists of a 46,380 sf full-service heavy and medium truck center situated on 15 acres of land in the Nature’s Edge Business Center just off of Hwy 10 in Elk River. The building and site – which was constructed using the design/build process – incorporates sales, leasing/rental, service, parts, body shop and a truck wash, has room for 130 trucks new, used, & service.

M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

53


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Business Spotlight

Science at Work

At A Glance

When Robert Gardetto decided to pursue a career that combined science and people, his logical outcome was dentistry. dental office. That might have helped, too. BC: What has been your biggest challenge? ______________

By Gail Ivers

Personal Profile Robert P. Gardetto, 55 Hometown: Racine, WI; currently lives in Big Lake Education: Graduated from high school in Racine; graduated from the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry Family: Wife, Barb; son Dominic Hobbies: Hunting, fishing, camping, bike riding. “I like to be outside.” Best advice you’ve received: Be honest and do your job well.

Fun Fact:

It takes about 1,500 to 2,000 patients to keep a full-time dentist busy. 54

Business Central Magazine // M A R C H /A P R I L 2 0 1 6

Business Central: How did you happen to come to St. Cloud? ______________ Dr. Gardetto: I wanted to make a change. A dentist I knew in St. Cloud suggested I talk to Barry Peterson. I’d known Barry for a long time. He was going through cancer treatment and needed someone to help him with his practice. BC: Did you always plan to go into dentistry? ______________ Gardetto: Pretty much. I like working with my hands. I like science. I like working with people. Science, art, dexterity, people – it all comes together in dentistry. I also broke my front teeth in the 5th grade and spent lots of time in a

Westview Dentistry 1521 Northway Drive, Ste 105 • St. Cloud, MN 56303 • 320.252.8363 Fax: 320.252.9962 westviewdentistry.com Business Description: Full service, family dental practice Owner: Robert P. Gardetto, D.D.S.

Gardetto: When I decided to go into dentistry, I didn’t perceive I would be a business owner. I guess you know it, but it’s not your focus. And it’s hard to teach because it’s so abstract. I do the business management, of course, but I find it less interesting than the science end of the work.

Number of Employees: One dentist; two dental assistants; two dental hygienists; and an office manager

BC: Do you think of yourself as a small business owner? ______________

1979 Robert Gardetto graduates from high school in Racine, WI; he then attends three years at the University of Minnesota before being accepted into the School of Dentistry. About 10 percent of students who meet the necessary requirements are accepted into the School of Dentistry after three years of undergraduate study.

Gardetto: Definitely. I’ve been very active in the Big Lake Chamber of Commerce and am a past president. I’ve served on the Big Lake Economic Development Authority. I’m interested in business and the decisions that impact business. I’m interested in learning how to do things better or more efficiently. I’m on the board of the Minnesota Dental Association and was in charge of our annual conference this year. I like to find speakers who cause you to think differently – I think that’s exciting. BC: How have things changed since you started practicing? ______________ Gardetto: Technology has had a huge impact, but you have to be careful. I focus on three things: Will it help me be a

Joined the Chamber: The practice was started by Barry Peterson, D.D.S., who joined the Chamber in 1995; Robert Gardetto joined the practice in 2005.

Timeline

1986 Gardetto graduates from the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry 1993 Gardetto moves to Big Lake and joins an existing dental practice May 2005 Gardetto leaves the Big Lake practice and joins Barry Peterson, D.D.S., in his St. Cloud practice July 2005 Barry Peterson passes away from cancer 2015 Gardetto celebrates 10 years as owner of Westview Dentistry

better dentist, will it make me more efficient, and will it make the patient more comfortable. If the answer is yes to all three, I look at it.


W

e are happy to partner with the St. Cloud Area YMCA and begin construction on this 105,000 SF facility in early 2016. Members and visitors will be greeted by significant areas of glass and open space that will immediately reveal the various activities within the space.

SAINT CLOUD AREA

YMCA & COMMUNITY

Unique to the project is the inclusion of the CentraCare Bariatrics Clinic; other spaces in this state-of-the-art facility include:

AQUATIC CENTER

fAMILy RECREATIONAL pOOL EIGHT-LANE LAp pOOL LOCkER/SHOWER ROOMS kIDS ZONE THREE GyMNASIUMS TWO RACqUETBALL COURTS CLIMBING WALL pERSONAL TRAINING AREAS STAGED SpIN ROOM yOGA ROOM RUNNING/WALkING TRACk fREE WEIGHTS AREA MULTI-GENERATIONAL ZONE MULTI-pURpOSE SpACES vARIOUS ADMINISTRATIvE AND SUppORT SpACES

St. Joseph, MN | 320.363.7781 | info@wgohman.com GENERAL CONTRACTOR

| DESIGN/BUILD | CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT | BUILDING + REMODELING

WGOHMAN.COM


NOW OPEN! NEW CLEARWATER BANK BRANCH Located 800 Nelson Drive (next to Nelson Bros.)

New! Clearwater 800 Nelson Drive (320) 558-2021

St. Cloud West 2915 2nd St. South (320) 654-9555

St. Cloud East 525 Hwy 10 South (320) 257-5000

Bank offices also in Long Prairie and Browerville Visit us at www.LogBank.com


March/April 2016 Issue