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Joan Schatz


EARLY CHILDHOOD AND COMMUNITY CENTER

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MAY/JUNE 2018

6 20

CONTENTS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

President’s Letter Top Hats

8 22

Editor’s Note

Network Central

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C E L E B R AT I N G 1 8 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

GROW

34 Cover Story OPPORTUNITY KNOCKING When opportunity knocks at Midsota Manufacturing, you can bet owners Joel Bauer and Tim Burg will grab it and run. PROFIT

40 Feature TEACHER, TRAINER, TUTOR, GUIDE Wouldn’t starting out in a career be easier if someone could help guide you along the way? Enter…the mentor.

46 Special Focus UN-TAPPED

Businesses are overlooking an important resource: older workers

Special Sections 44 WOMEN IN BUSINESS 48 SENIOR HEALTH & LIVING

34 10 UPFRONT Valuable information designed to guide and educate

24 BUSINESS TOOLS Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business

50 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Rita, John and Brian McCooley, Shipshape Services

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2018 Business Central, LLC

• Funding for female entrepreneurs

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• Co-working for women

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101,

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Business Central is published six times a year

P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


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President’s Letter

Thriving in Chaos

Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826

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here is nothing I enjoy more than unpacking my bag for an extended stay on a Royal Caribbean cruise ship – preferably in a back junior suite with a big balcony, lulled by the gentle engine noise with the wake disappearing into the horizon. A few years ago, we landed in Cabo San Lucas. Our plans included touring the area and stopping for lunch at a quiet beach restaurant. When we found the beach, it was anything but quiet. We found a table near the front, which exposed us to every beach vendor that came by. The waiter approached and I ordered a margarita. I took in the environment. It was LOUD. Two bands were playing at full volume. Latin music was pounding out of the restaurant speakers and a drinking game was going on next to us with a man shouting instructions to participants. As I sipped (ok, maybe I was gulping) my drink, I watched motorboats speeding by in the surf. Multiple parasailors were in the sky, at least eight jet skis were shooting through the waves, sailboats were on the horizon, and colorful kayaks dotted the sea. Every vendor that walked by pleaded with us to buy, coming close to the table, as we Minnesota nicely said, “No thank you, no thank you . . . “ And then another band started playing. My husband said something I couldn’t hear. I looked down at my drink and it was mostly gone. My head was spinning with the action, noise and tequila. I turned to look at the ocean . . . A vendor dressed as a clown and loaded down with hunks of carved wood was right in my face with a GIANT buffalo, shaking it at me, as if it was doing

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8

Program Hotline: 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106

a little dance. For an instant I thought Stephen King’s IT character, Pennywise, had found his way to Mexico. I said, “No, no, no . . .” turned to my husband and shouted, “Do I LOOK like I NEED a giant wooden buffalo right now?” I started laughing so hard tears were rolling down my face. The clown scampered away with his buffalo and my daughter said, “Mom, are you OK???” That evening, I thought how similar that afternoon in Cabo was to our Chamber. Many days everything comes at our staff with dazzling speed. Members need support and desire full attention; hard working volunteers seek input and assistance in completing their commitments; committee meetings, training programs, networking events, planning, staff coordination; and often, lots and lots of noise. I realized I needed that carved buffalo to remind me that, indeed, some days you DO need a wooden buffalo. At the next port, I found one – a smaller version of the one Pennywise shook at me – and bought it. He sits by my computer and helps me focus on the most challenging days. I believe ALL of us need a wooden buffalo some days. I hope you have yours.

Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator: Kelti Lorence, ext. 130 Special Events Coordinator: Sheri Wegner, ext. 131 Administrative Assistant: Kellie Libert, ext. 124 Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100 2017-18 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Past Board Chair Marilyn Birkland, Times Media David Borgert, CentraCare Health Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Jim Gruenke, Traut Companies Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Board Chair Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud, Board Vice Chair CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Main Phone: 320-251-4170 Executive Director: Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Director of Sports & Special Events: Dana Randt, ext. 110 Sales Manager: Nikki Fisher, ext. 112

Teresa Bohnen Publisher

Social Media & Marketing Specialist: Emily Bertram, ext. 129 Sales & Marketing Coordinator: Rachel Thompson, ext. 128


Same great team. New bank name.

Plaza Park Bank is now Deerwood Bank.

Jim Schleper

Jacki Templin

Bill Eickhoff

Bethany Schwinghammer

Denise Rosin

When you stop in and visit us at Deerwood Bank—formerly Plaza Park Bank—in Waite Park or Sartell, you’ll see the same financial team you’re familiar with. We are excited to continue and to grow our legacy of community, relationships, and superior service in central Minnesota. Come and see us at Deerwood Bank in Waite Park or Sartell.

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Editor’s Note Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman

MENTORS

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Margaret Wethington Arnold, Independent public relations specialist Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Vicki Ikeogu, Area Planning Organization Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Kellie Libert, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Doug Loon, Minnesota Chamber of Commerce Kelti Lorence, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Donniel Robinson, Robinson Writes Melinda Sanders and Ron Brandenburg, Quinlivan & Hughes Dawn Zimmerman, The Write Advantage

MENTORING HAS BEEN ON MY MIND LATELY.

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Editor Gail Ivers with the owners of Midsota Manufacturing, Tim Burg (L) and Joel Bauer.

intern supervisor called and said she had some writing work for me if I was interested. Interested!?! She kept me busy for several months as I regained confidence and got on my feet. From her I learned to look for opportunities to offer a helping hand. We have been fortunate at the Chamber to have several young people move in and out of our entry-level communications position. One was particularly good with people. Another knew how to set appropriate boundaries. One took creativity to new heights. From them I learned that mentoring is a two-way street. Both Joel Bauer and Tim Burg, Midsota Manufacturing, (see the cover story on page 34) talk about the people who encouraged them. Gave them chances. Challenged them to try something new … to think differently. They don’t use the word ‘mentor,’ but as they talk about these life-influencers, and think back on their experiences, they grow quiet. And then they smile. Until next issue,

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ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman ADVERTISING PARTNERS

Photo by Joel Butkowski, Butkowski Digital Imaging

In my early career you never heard anyone talk about mentors. Today it’s hard to read a business journal, listen to a blog, or watch a TV program without someone bringing up mentors. This issue of Business Central is a perfect example – our feature story is on mentors and mentoring (see page 40). While I have never thought of myself as either mentor or mentee, I now realize that I have been surrounded by mentors all my working life. Mostly, I’ve called them bosses. One of my first jobs was as a swimming instructor. If you remember back to your days of swimming lessons, you may recall that to advance to the next level you have to pass a swimming test. One of my students didn’t pass and the parent called my boss to complain. He met with me, listened to what I had to say, then met with the parent. The student retook the class. From this boss I learned to listen to both sides of a story. My first professional job was as a news reporter for a radio station. Most of our news interviews were done on the phone. I shared an office with my boss and was embarrassed to make calls when she was listening. It was amazing what I found to occupy myself. No paper went unfiled. Now and then she would pack up and leave the office, at which point I was a phone calling demon. Later she told me she recognized that I didn’t want to make calls in front of her and left the office on purpose to give me space. From her I learned to watch body language, live up to my commitments, and talk out problems. At one point in my career, I found myself unemployed with no immediate prospects. On my first day of unemployment, a previous

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320)656-3808 Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Your Voice in Government

UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

• People to Know

Do it Now! • Top Hat Photos • Regional Roundup uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

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NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Mindfulness

NEWS REEL

Clarity and discernment at work can lead to improved relationships and greater success. Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill

Real Happiness at Work; Meditations for Accomplishment, Achievement, and Peace by Sharon Salzberg, Workman Publishing, New York, 2014, ISBN 978-0-7611-6899-7

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haron Salzberg has been a leading meditation teacher for over 40 years. In this book she offers an expert, easy-to-use guide to cultivating mindfulness, compassion, and awareness at work. She shows how to be committed without being consumed; how to stay competitive without being cruel; and how to manage emotions to counterbalance stress and frustration. Margaret J. Wheatley, author of Leadership and the New Science, says Salzberg is a superb guide, offering practices that serve as a

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strong, trustworthy lifeline, lifting us from the drowning depths of meaninglessness, thoughtlessness, fractured relationships, and cynicism to discover how momentto-moment presence offers us clarity, discernment, effectiveness, and joy. This book is organized in eight chapters, with a list of sources for each chapter at the end of the book. Chapter 1: Balance Chapter 2: Concentration Chapter 3: Compassion Chapter 4: Resilience Chapter 5: Communication and Connection Chapter 6: Integrity Chapter 7: Meaning Chapter 8: Open Awareness

Each chapter contains mediations, exercises, and specific categories of content and interests. For example, Chapter 4: Resilience, is organized as the following: 1 Practicing Self-Care to Avoid Burnout 2 The Illusion of Control 3 Patience and Perspective 4 Resilience in the Face of Great Pain. The Meditation is “Loving-Kindness for Caregivers.”

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8

There are three Exercises: Patience 2 Everything that comes to mind when it comes to stress 3 Self-care. The eight chapters form what Salzberg calls The Eight Pillars of Happiness in the Workplace. The meditations require 10 to 20 minutes each and can be done at home. Once a person feels confident in using them they can be incorporated into the workday in the form of minimeditations. The exercises can be done either through reflecting or journaling, and are designed to help harness our creative thinking, refine the lessons learned through meditating, and apply them to our work life. Here is an example of a simple meditation: seat yourself in a relaxed, easy posture, and think of one good thing you did yesterday…maybe you smiled at someone. 1

Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor at St. Cloud State University

SKALICKY NAMED PRESIDENT OF STEARNS BANK Kelly Skalicky, daughter of Stearns Bank CEO Norm Skalicky, was promoted to president of the bank. Skalicky has provided legal counsel to Stearns for more than 20 years and served as the general counsel for Stearns Bank for the past six years.

NEW EMPLOYEES JOIN ROTOCHOPPER Rotochopper, Inc. welcomed five new employees to the team: Paul Gapinski, Chase Eiden, and Orvie Hagen joined as fabricators/welders. Thomas Willing joined as a painter and Andrew Birr joined on the machine refurbishment team.

HINNENKAMP ELECTED AS BERGANKDV CEO Dave Hinnenkamp, CPA, has been selected as BerganKDV’s chief executive officer, effective July 1. Hinnenkamp has been with the firm since 1984, becoming a partner in 1992. In 2002 he was responsible for the launch of BerganKDV Wealth Management, LLC as a startup entity.

GASLIGHT CREATIVE RECEIVES AWARDS Gaslight Creative took home 13 awards at the 2018 American Advertising Awards. Among the 13 awards, they also received the People’s Choice award for their work for United Way of Central Minnesota.


IF YOU GO

Lunchtime Learning Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge. Meets the first Wednesday of the month, noon-1 p.m., at the Chamber office, 1411 W St. Germain Street, Ste 101. Registration is required: $20 for Chamber members, $30 for the general public. May 2: Michelle Henderson, BadCat Digital Marketing, presents “What Does Google See?” sponsored by Mahowald Insurance Agency. June 6: Sarah Noble, Northwestern Mutual, presents “Perfectionism and Productivity,” sponsored by Pro Staff.

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. May 10: Hosted by Holiday Inn & Suites, 75 37th Ave. S, St. Cloud

June 14: Hosted by D.J. Bitzan Jewelers, 203 Waite Ave. N, Waite Park

May 8: Business Awards Luncheon

11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn & Suites. This annual luncheon honors the 2018 St. Cloud Area business awards recipients: Small Business Owners of the Year Joel Bauer and Tim Burg, Midsota Manufacturing; Business Central Mark of ExcellenceEntrepreneurial Success Award recipient Dan Pearson, PleasureLand RV Center; and Family Owned Business of the Year Rollie Anderson, Anderson Trucking. $23 for Chamber members; $33 for the general public; registration is required. For information on these or other business events, call 320-251-2940.

mysentrybank.com M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8 //

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UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

NEWS REEL

Business Benchmarks If we lead from ahead, we’ll stay there

By Doug Loon

KEY FINDINGS TRI-CAP RECEIVES AWARDS Tri-CAP received two Minnesota Community Action Partnership’s (MinnCAP) Best and Promising Practice Awards for the organizations innovation in providing assistance to people living in poverty. The awards were for the Home Energy and Resource Advisor Program, which conducts home visits to improve energy conservation and for a pilot vehicle repair program that assisted 244 households with operational and safety vehicle repairs.

KUSCHEL JOINS ADVISORY BOARD Brandon Kuschel, assistant branch manager of St. Cloud Federal Credit Union, was elected to Minn. Credit Union Network’s CREW Advisory Board. CREW is a group of young professionals (under 40) committed to strengthening and bringing awareness to the credit union movement.

KRAMER RECOGNIZED BY LPL PATRIOT’S CLUB James Kramer III, an independent LPL Financial advisor at Kramer Financial in St. Cloud, was recognized for his inclusion in the LPL Patriot’s Club for the fifth consecutive year. This award is presented to less than 8 percent of the firm’s about 15,000 advisors nationwide.

PLEASURELAND RV CENTER NAMED TO TOP 50 RVBusiness magazine named PleasureLand RV Center as one of its 2017 Top 50 RV Dealers in North America. The company has received this award each year since its inception.

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innesota has the tools to lead the nation in economic change and growth with tremendous workforce and innovation strengths, according to the annual Minnesota Business Benchmarks. Yet the state lags in many key economic indicators, partly due to selfimposed barriers. Those are the chief takeaways of the third annual report produced by the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce and local Chamber Federation partners. Positioning Minnesota for a prosperous future requires preventive maintenance borne from awareness and informed conversation on our state’s economic strengths and challenges. To be certain, it’s tough to evaluate

Minnesota’s economy by following the state’s disparate performance in national business rankings. How can we be on CNBC’s list as the third best state for business, yet 47th in the Small Business Policy Index? That makes the clarity of Business Benchmarks especially timely and valuable. By aggregating objective data measuring Minnesota’s health and competitiveness against other states, we can build on our many strengths and mitigate threats. Business Benchmarks provides an excellent springboard for our legislative agenda to grow our state’s economy. We encourage policymakers and business leaders to

Minnesota continues to shine in innovation. This success should be used as a catalyst to close the gap with other states on entrepreneurship and start-up activity. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Our workforce continues to be one of Minnesota’s greatest assets. Working to close the achievement gap and keeping an open door to incoming talent will continue to fuel economic growth. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Minnesota’s tax environment threatens our other competitive advantages. Working to lower rates and simplify the tax structure will make other elements of our business climate even more inviting to grow jobs and our economy for the long term. –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Minnesota’s affordable cost of living helps recruit and retain talent.

IN THE NEWS

ESSIG JOINS STEARNS HISTORY MUSEUM Carie Essig is the new executive director of the Stearns History Museum. Most recently she was the professional historian for the YMCA of the Rockies in Colorado, where she helped develop museum programs at YMCA properties and oversaw operations of two YMCA museums.


use the report to spark meaningful conversations on how to improve Minnesota’s position in key business and economic climate rankings. Minnesota is a homegrown economy built on innovation. We are home to 17 Fortune 500 companies and the largest privately held company in the nation. Almost all of them started and succeed here. We need public policies that encourage continued change and growth of businesses of all sizes.

Business Benchmarks helps us set a course for adopting policies that will propel the state’s economy forward and sustain our cherished quality of life. We look to policymakers in St. Paul to understand our statewide business climate, support policies that facilitate change and encourage job growth, and remove barriers to long-term economic success. If we lead from ahead, we will remain there.

contributor Doug Loon is president of the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce

ONLY ONLINE You can find the full Business Benchmarks report at BusinessCentralMagazine.com

IN THE NEWS

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Jeremy Salzbrun, H&S Heating and Air Conditioning, (above, center) has been inducted into Central Minnesota Habitat for Humanity's (CMHFH) Business Partner Hall of Fame for demonstrating a consistent, long-term interest in helping the organization reach its goals. H&S has partnered with CMHFH on about 25 homes and is a regular sponsor of Habitat fundraising events.

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320.259.4100 StCloudOrthopedics.com M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8 //

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UpFront PEOPLE TO KNOW

NEWS REEL SCHATZ RECEIVES STEP AWARD

Joan Schatz, co-president of Park Industries, was one of 130 honorees selected across America to receive the Women in Manufacturing STEP (Science, Technology, Engineering and Production) Ahead Award for excellence in manufacturing.

MARCO PURCHASES GOVERNOR BUSINESS SOLUTIONS Marco purchased Governor Business Solutions, a leading managed print services, wide format, copier, barcode, and A/V solution provider in Michigan, expanding the coverage of Marco’s technical services across state lines.

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS EARNS TOP AWARD Express Employment Professionals received the Circle of Excellence International award, a top honor, at the staffing firm’s 35th annual International Leadership Conference.

LARAWAY RECOGNIZED Steve Laraway, an independent financial advisor with Laraway Financial Advisors, Inc. has been recognized at Cambridge’s Premier Club 2018.

St. Cloud Area Leadership Graduates Congratulations to the following people who graduated from the St. Cloud Area Chamber Leadership program in May. If you are looking for volunteers to serve on boards and committees, these individuals are a good place to start. Abdishakur Issack American Axle & Manufacturing

Devin Larson Minnwest Bank

Julie Schomer Marketing Concepts

Tyler Bieniek St. Cloud VA Health Care System

Nate Lommel Park Industries

Cassandra Smith Northland Capital Financial Services, Inc.

Catherine Brattensborg-Brown Playhouse Child Care, Inc.

Kristie Majette The Village Family Service Center

Jacki Stockinger Marco

Scott Christman DCI, Inc.

Joseph Mueller St. Cloud Area Planning Organization

Nancy Tenney Mahowald Insurance Agency

Todd DeWenter Netgain

Blair Popham Waite Fusion

Cyndy Thayer Executive Express

Dan Edelbrock U S Bank

Sarah Putnam Coborn's Superstore

Jenna Traut Sysco Western MN

Jeremy Forsell Premier Real Estate Services

Clare Richards Leighton Enterprises

Josh Vraa Viking Coca-Cola Bottling Company

Alli Herold Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest

Sam Ross, Central Minnesota Council-Boy Scouts of America

Sheri Wegner St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Charity Hovre St. Cloud VA Health Care System

Andy Sailer St. Cloud State University

SERVICE ENTERPRISES The College of Saint Benedict, CentraCare Health, Catholic Charities of the Diocese of St. Cloud, Ruff Start Rescue (RSR), WACOSA, St. Cloud Area School District 742, and United Way of Central Minnesota have each received certification as a Service Enterprise by the Points of Light Foundation. Each organization is the first of its kind to receive certification in Minnesota, and the College of Saint Benedict is the first college in the country to receive the certification.

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DID YOU KNOW? St. Cloud Area Leadership

Seth Kauffman City of St. Cloud

Brian Schellinger Schlenner Wenner & Co.

is designed to help current and emerging leaders understand the dynamics of the community and the role

Jackie Klehr, Country Inn & Suites St. Cloud West/Sand Hospitality

Paul Schermerhorn Park Industries

Chase Larson American Heritage National Bank

Amber Schoenherr Marco

leadership shares in building healthy communities. This program brings together men and women of diverse backgrounds who share a common commitment to the future of the St. Cloud area.


ABOUT THE LEADERSHIP CLASS

IN THE KNOW

Grooms leaders who will contribute to your company.

Helps employees develop greater personal vision and confidence.

Provides professional networking opportunities and enhanced community connections.

Reinforces skills and imparts new knowledge to employees.

Provides greater understanding and a broader perspective of key issues in Central Minnesota. Encourages networking among emerging and established leaders.

April Diederich, Proviant Group ____________ Chair, St. Cloud Area Chamber Leadership Program (320) 654-6715 april.m.diederich@ampf.com

____________

Mike Paulsrud,

HOW TO APPLY Applications for the Leadership program are available at StCloudAreaChamber.com, select “Programs” then “Leadership Development.” Applications must be submitted by May 31 to the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, PO Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302 or vlenneman@StCloudAreaChamber.com. ____________

Individuals who represent an ethnic/minority community perspective are encouraged to apply. For more information about participating in the 2018-19 St. Cloud Area Leadership program, call Gail Ivers at 320-656-3809 or givers@StCloudAreaChamber.com.

Coborn’s ____________ Vice Chair, St. Cloud Area Chamber Leadership Program (320) 252-2141 StoreDirector.2001 @cobornsinc.com

____________

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M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8 //

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UpFront DO IT NOW!

QUINLIVAN & HUGHES ELECTS SHAREHOLDER, BOARD OFFICERS, HIRES ATTORNEYS

Quinlivan & Hughes has elected Cally Kjellberg-Nelson, as a shareholder of the firm. Laura Moehrle has been elected to the board of directors as secretary. Dyan Ebert has again been named chief executive officer. She is the first woman to hold this position for Q&H.

Steve Schwegman, shareholder since 1991, was named chief financial officer. Attorneys Chad Staul and Michelle Draewell join the Q&H Employment Insurance Defense Teams, respectively.

LUNNING RECEIVES TOURISM AWARD

Julie Lunning, executive director of the St. Cloud Area Chamber’s division, Visit St. Cloud, was named “Outstanding Individual in Tourism” for her long-term work on behalf of the Minnesota tourism industry.

HINKEMEYER ELECTED TO BOARD OF TRUSTEES The Minnesota Optometric Association elected Dr. Stacy Hinkemeyer, CEO of PineCone Vision Center, Sartell, to its board of trustees. Send News Reel items to Gail Ivers, givers@businesscentralmagazine.com for possible inclusion. News Reel is compilied by Kelti Lorence.

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Creating an inclusive workplace requires intention.

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s our world continues to diversify, inclusivity becomes increasingly important. “It’s not enough to hire people of different nationalities, races, genders and sexual orientations. Everyone needs to feel like they are truly welcome, safe and free to be themselves in the workplace,” said Nicole Fallon, managing editor, Business News Daily. But how, exactly, can we begin to create a culture of inclusivity in our workplace? Fallon offers these tips: 1 Start from the top. Without the backing and support of an organization’s leaders, creating an inclusive workplace might not be possible. If you’re a president or owner, are you committed to creating a culture of diversity and inclusion in your workplace? “Once your company’s leadership sets the tone, it’s easy to extend that attitude throughout

the organization,” Fallon said. In addition to internal culture, remember to stay inclusive throughout your recruiting and hiring processes, too. 2 Provide safe spaces for employees. “Inclusive workplaces go the extra mile to consider the safety and comfortability for all employees, especially those from marginalized groups,” she said. Ideas to help create safe spaces for your employees include providing unisex bathrooms in your office, encouraging social time for everyone to get to know each other, or, for larger companies, creating in-office support groups or networks for those who are interested. 3 Connect with employees (but be sensitive). One of the best ways to connect with your employees is to be transparent about your own life, she said. Try connecting with your coworkers on a personal

“Once your company’s leadership sets the tone, it’s easy to extend that attitude throughout the organization.” level by asking about “spouses” or “partners” instead of “husbands” or “wives.” Simple language shifting can encourage individuals to be more open about their personal lives and feel included in non-work discussions. Track your progress by coordinating employee surveys or discussions, encouraging feedback and creating dialogue. Revisit your policies and programs as needed to continue creating a culture of inclusivity.

For more information, visit businessnewsdaily.com

IF YOU GO

June 8: Legislative Connections

Friday, June 8, 7– 9 a.m. at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids. This wrap-up of the 2018 Minnesota Legislative Session gives area legislators a chance to share the successes and answer questions. There is no charge for Chamber members; $20 for the general public. Breakfast is included and registration is required by June 5.

Source: “A Culture of Inclusion: Promoting Workplace Diversity and Belonging” by Nicole Fallon, posted on Business News Daily

NEWS REEL


POINT OF VIEW

Business Central asks readers:

In all your working experience, what was the one task that was most nerve-racking?

The first time I had to cash a check over $10,000. That’s a lot of bills to keep track of!”

Wendy Siebenahler, Sentry Bank

I’m still in my most nerve-racking experience. I bought my company two years ago, and am hoping to survive!” Marie Lego, St. Cloud Cartridges

The first time I designed a water treatment system. I was relying on others to have done their jobs correctly and provide me with accurate information to build the system. I was still learning, but had to project confidence to my client on something I was not experienced in.” Jim Gruenke, Traut Companies

It was my first time teaching. I earned my certificate while teaching, so it was actually my very first time in front of a class. It got easier with practice though, and I stayed in the profession for 39 years.”

Pegi Broker-Relph, Jerry Relph for State Senate

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UpFront REGIONAL ROUNDUP

Priorities

City staff shared annual highlights, plans for the future at the Waite Park State of the City address.

Secure state funding for the amphitheater. That’s at the top of the City of Waite Park’s legislative agenda for 2018, according to Waite Park Mayor Rick Miller. Miller talked about the project and its potential economic impact during the 2018 Waite Park State of the City Address. The annual event is hosted by the Waite Park Chamber, with support from Falcon National Bank. To date, the city has put $7.3 million into the project, including in-kind donations. The goal is to receive $5 million in state funding during the 2018 legislative session. “This will be a multi-purpose amphitheater,” Miller said. “It will be a unique recreational destination for Central Minnesota and we expect it to attract regional and national entertainment, as well as be used for local activities.” The

proposed facility will have outdoor seating for 4,000-5,000 people. “If we receive the funding, we’ll be able to begin construction this summer with a planned opening in 2020,” Miller said. “Out of business signs, or closed signs aren’t generally what people think of as economic development highlights,” John Noerenberg said. Noerenberg is the planning and community development director for the city. “But open land in the city generates development opportunities.” Noerenberg pointed to the redevelopment of the former K-Mart site, which today boasts multiple new stores. Highlights in 2017 include a new Kwik Trip, new

The Waite Park Police Department deployed body cameras and smart phones for all officers in 2017. FUN FACT

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8

senior apartments, and the hotel/ convention center project that is well underway. For a city with a resident population of about 8,000, Waite Park has more than its share of public safety challenges, according to Police Chief Dave Bentrude. “The shopping-working-visiting population is closer to 25,000,” he said, “and it comes with all the challenges of that larger population.” All the same, Bentrude emphasized, Waite Park remains a safe city. There were 10,119 total calls to the police in 2017, Bentrude said, “which is down about five calls from 2016.” The Waite Park Police Department has taken the lead in Central Minnesota to deal with human trafficking. “It’s a much bigger problem in the region than people realize,” Bentrude said. Waite Park is playing a key role with the Central Minnesota Human Trafficking Investigative Task Force and has purchased a safe house for victims of sex trafficking. In March two

ACTIVITIES

Community Outreach In 2017, the Waite Park Police Department reached out to community members in a variety of ways: Summer Youth Soccer Program ––––– Senior Center Activities – Senior Cookout Event ––––– Dine & Dialogue Event / Coffee Talks ––––– Night to Unite ––––– Metro Citizens Police Academy ––––– Active Shooter/Threat Training with Businesses

Photos courtesy of the City of Waite Park

By Gail Ivers

police officers, one from Waite Park and one from St. Cloud, began working fulltime on sex trafficking cases. “Public works isn’t really the most exciting topic to end with,” Public Works Director Bill Schluenz said as he took


the podium. Schluenz then announced, to applause, that the Lake Wobegon Trail from River’s Edge Park to St. Joseph will be finished this spring, making it one of the longest, continuous trails in the state. Somewhat more

ONGOING

controversial, the 10th Avenue and 13th Avenue water towers are scheduled for repainting and the well-known yellow smile will be replaced with a contemporary look sporting Waite Park’s new logo.

City Infrastructure Waite Park has developed a 20-year plan for pavement maintenance

that will cost approximately $1-$1.3 million per year to implement.

BY THE NUMBERS

29%

Statewide average for clearing active cases

Waite Park Police 63%

Waite Park’s average for clearing active cases

2

Number of new officers added in 2017

10,119

Total calls in 2017

10,124

Total calls in 2016

Park & Trail Improvements River’s Edge Park ––––– Lake Wobegon Trail ––––– Pickle Ball Courts ––––– National Fitness Court

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TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

El Loro Mexican Restaurant, 1001 S Division Street, Waite Park. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Miguel Arellano, Moises Morales, Jose Monterrosa, Liz Kellner.

Minnesota Truck Headquarters, a pre-owned truck dealership with a full service shop, detail shop, and accessories department, 1805 Hwy 23 E, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Mat Jordet, Denis Czech, Peg Imholte.

H & R Block, year round tax, bookkeeping and payroll services, 111 2nd Street S, Waite Park. Pictured: Peg Imholte, David Lundborg, Liz Kellner.

Princeton Insurance Agency, commercial, home, auto, and life insurance, 104 S Rum River Drive, Princeton. Pictured: Peg Imholte, David Haugen, Liz Kellner.

TOP HATS: MILESTONES 40-year Chamber member W. Gohman Construction Co., general contractors, construction managers, commercial and industrial construction, 816 E County Rd 75, St. Joseph. Pictured: Amanda Groethe, Inese Mehr, Mike Gohman, Kris Hellickson

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35-year Chamber member First Fuel Bank, Inc., prepay fuel discounts, bulk fuel delivery, sandblasting, used oil and anti-freeze recycling, 625 Lincoln Ave. SE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Dan Feneis, Jim Feneis, Tammy Buttweiler.


TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

St. Cloud School of Dance Ultimate Gymnastics, offering dance and gymnastic classes, 3027 Southway Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Patrick Hollermann, Sue Arnold, Beth Putz.

Premium Waters Inc., complete bottled water and coffee solutions for all home and office needs, 1301 10th Street N, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Chris Panek, Chris Slanga, Peg Imholte.

Ehlinger & Associates, Inc./American Family Insurance, personal and professional insurance agency providing home, auto, life, commercial, and farm for over 30 years, 719 2nd Street S, Waite Park. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Thomas Ehlinger, Caryn Stadther.

FASTSIGNS of St. Cloud, signage, graphics and visual communications solutions for companies of all sizes, in any industry, 2719 W Division Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Joelene Calvert, Chris Calvert, Tanja Goering.

TOP HATS: MILESTONES 30-year Chamber member Quality Inn, 63 rooms, wireless high speed internet, pool, fitness center, and whirlpool, 4040 2nd Street S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Beth Putz, Nathan Sieve, Crystal Dirks, Mark Roerick.

30-year Chamber member Central Hydraulics, hydraulic service, parts, and repair shop; sales and service of Boss and Western snowplows, 7245 Old Hwy 52, St. Cloud. Pictured: Rory Cruser, Scott Gronseth, Margie Gronseth, Mark Roerick.

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UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

GROW

Raising money for the Chamber ’s high school scholarship program brought members together for “Taste,” a food and wine event featuring local culinary artists.

Ryan Zerull, Jules’ Bistro

Teresa Bohnen, Chamber president (L); Jeff Gau, Marco; Melinda Sanders, Quinlivan & Hughes

Kevin Aho (L) and Randy Vogel, The Sanctuary

Volunteer Josh Vraa, Viking Coca Cola, passed Scotch eggs created by Justin Berhow, Olde Brick House

Wine donated by Westside Liquor and taste treats from Roberto Lopez, Courtyard by Marriott-St. Cloud and Ken and Betty Maritsch, Food Ecstasy Deli Diner & Catering, rounded out the evening.

Amanda LaFranz, Remedy Beauty & Body and Master Distiller Dave Pickerell offered fine whiskey samples and education. Joseph Volek, Urban Lodge Brewery & Restaurant

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Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8


PROFIT

The 2018 Central Minnesota Farm Show attracted thousands of visitors to the River ’s Edge Convention Center.

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InSIDE THIS ISSUE: Management Toolkit • Entreprenuerism •

BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

Tech Strategies • Economy Central by Falcon Bank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

ENTREPRENEURISM

Help Wanted Hiring your first employee is more complicated than simply posting a job opening. By Melinda Sanders and Ron Brandenburg

While there is no requirement that employers offer paid time off, you should establish through written policy any such benefit you will provide. for reporting of state and federal income tax and FICA 2. Documenting the employee’s federal employment eligibility using an I-9 form 3. Completing the Minnesota New Hire Reporting form

G

oing from a sole proprietor to hiring your first employee is a big step, not only in terms of how your business will operate, but also in terms of your many newfound legal responsibilities as an employer. Here are several for you to consider:

Required Reporting You need to perform the more technical legal requirements associated with being an employer, including: 1.Obtaining an Employer Identification Number (if you do not already have one), and a state tax identification number,

Payroll and Withholdings To pay your employee, determine if your accounting system can handle payroll requirements, such as tracking and depositing withholdings of the employee’s share of state and federal income tax and FICA tax, and your business’ share of those taxes. In addition, you will need to file quarterly and annual returns to document you have collected and deposited the required

withholdings. You may need to upgrade your accounting software, or consider hiring an external service to administer your payroll. You should also decide how much to pay your employee, and how frequently. Minnesota law requires that an employee be paid at least once every thirty-one days, and that employees be paid at least at the rate of the current minimum wage. You should have policies in place that assure you are tracking hours worked and documenting payment of wages earned, including the payment of overtime wages. Required Benefits Employers must make sure employees are covered by the state’s unemployment

contributors Ron Brandenburg and Melinda Sanders practice employment and business law at Quinlivan & Hughes law firm. They advise and represent for-profit and not-for-profit, public and private organizations, with a wide range of legal issues. Learn more about them at www.quinlivan.com.

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GRO WTH

IS

GREAT

UNTIL YOU insurance program and by workers’ compensation insurance. Depending on their status as exempt or non-exempt, employees are entitled to restroom and meal breaks and certain kinds of leaves of absence. While there is no requirement that employers offer paid time off, you should establish through written policy any such benefit you will provide. You should also acquaint yourself with the anti-discrimination laws that apply to all size employers, and adopt a written Equal Opportunity Employer and an anti-harassment policy. Many laws protecting employee rights require that employers post notice of these rights. State and federal agencies have many of these posters available on their websites at no charge. Hiring Practices Finally, as you make your first hire, consider vetting tools you will use, such as pre-employment testing, and background and reference screening. Confirm that your hiring procedures, including application forms and interview questions, are nondiscriminatory and otherwise legally compliant. All of these responsibilities require a certain amount of planning before you undertake the hiring process. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, so plan wisely. Consider putting together a team of knowledgeable resources, such as an accountant, insurance agent, and attorney, who can help make these responsibilities more manageable.

RUN OUT

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BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Etiquette 101

Don’t confuse after-hours business events with hanging out with your college buddies. By Donniel Robinson but it’s a bad idea to prioritize your phone over your boss or co-workers. Let’s be honest, giving your phone more attention than the people you are with is always rude and it can be a deal breaker when meeting with clients or co-workers. If you do need to check your phone, give an apology and a brief explanation. Checking your phone to see if childcare has called is much different than giving the perception that your phone is more interesting than the person sitting across from you.

M

any people spend more hours with co-workers and clients than their own families. Building positive relationships with these people is important to supporting a good working environment. Socializing outside of the office can be a great way to bond with co-workers and create more comfortable relationships. But don’t confuse after-hours business events with hanging out with your college buddies. There are some basic rules for creating career and business success outside of the office. Dress for Success It may sound obvious, but even if you’re off the clock it’s important to maintain a level of formality when going to afterhours work functions. Tennis

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shoes and sport clothes might be completely appropriate for the corporate fun run, but not for brunch with the boss. When in doubt opt for business casual. On the other hand, if your office is a construction site it’s perfectly fine to show up at Happy Hour in a t-shirt and work boots. Timing is Everything Meeting after work is not the time to be fashionably late. People are busy in every area of their lives. Be sure to respect everyone’s time by showing up when expected. Don’t risk leaving people sitting by themselves or waiting to order. Showing up on time is important, but knowing when the party is over is critical. It’s better to gracefully leave an

after-hours get-together a little early rather than risk staying too late. Perception is everything in business. Don’t be the party animal. Be Careful with the Cocktails Many after-hours events take place at bars and restaurants where alcohol is readily available. Be aware of your company’s culture when it comes to having drinks together. If no one orders alcoholic drinks it’s probably better to stick with the iced tea. If drinks are part of the fun, be sure not to go overboard. No one will be impressed if you stumble out of a restaurant or jump in your car over the legal limit. Leave the Phone Alone You might be off the clock,

Boundaries Please The line between work life and private life can become blurred during after work events. Be careful not to over share or tell co-workers overly intimate information. Keep conversations light and suitable for public consumption. It’s fine to chat about yourself, but make sure you can live with the same information being shared in your office. Following a few simple rules of etiquette can be the difference between career suicide and building great business relationships. Keep if fun, keep it light and you’ll keep climbing the ladder of success. Donniel Robinson is a commercial copywriter and owner of Robinson Writes, a freelance writing firm in St. Cloud.


TECH NEWS

Stress Less

S

tartup Empatica has developed

a smartwatch

designed to track seizures in people with

epilepsy. In February it became the first smartwatch certified as a medical device by the FDA. But that’s just the beginning. The company wants to expand its focus to other neurological conditions, like autism and depression — and may one day be able to help people without medical conditions manage their day-to-day stress.

WWW.DESIGNELECT.COM

Source: Fastcodesign.com

Source: Marketing Land

Marketing Myth Busters Even the smartest marketer can make a terrible marketing decision if that decision is based on an outright falsehood. Myths about the e-commerce industry:

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BusinessTools TECH STRATEGIES

News Agents Learn to leverage social media and share your own business news.

By Dawn Zimmerman

like a natural option, but it has yet to establish itself as a news source. Since its inception, Twitter has been a natural go-to news source. President Donald Trump routinely sidesteps traditional media and makes big announcements on Twitter. It’s been a way for his voice to be heard – unfiltered.

3) Build a news engine into your website.

H

ow does your organization share your big news? Just a decade ago, most organizations heavily relied on traditional media – newspapers, radio and television. While those outlets continue to provide increased visibility and credibility, they are not the sole source. They’re rarely the first source. With the rise of social media, organizations now can be their own news agents. Social media has become a pervasive part of the daily human experience with 81 percent of adults using it, compared to just 7 percent in 2005. More people made it their go-to news source in 2017 with 67 percent of adults reporting they now get their news on social media, according

to a recent report from Pew Research Center. That jumps to 87 percent for adults under the age of 50. Those over 50 also shifted their patterns in 2017. For the first time in the Pew Research Center’s survey, more than half of that age group (55 percent) reported getting their news on social media, up 10 percent from the prior year. How are you leveraging social media to share your news? Here are a few steps to better position your organization to be a news agent:

1) Keep the content high quality. This can be challenging in the social media culture of instant, constant access. The key is not

getting lost in the daily grind of posts and effort to keep up with the social machine. Remain thoughtful, strategic and intentional about each post. More is not always better.

2) Choose your core tools. You don’t need to use all the social tools – or even the newest to be effective in this area. Determine where your core users get their news and start building your audience there. Snapchat and YouTube grew the fastest in the portion of users last year, according Pew Research. Facebook still retained a stronghold with the top spot because of its sheer number of users logging on each day. LinkedIn may seem

contributor Dawn Zimmerman is CEO of The Write Advantage, a St. Cloud-based strategic communications company that specializes in social media. She can be reached at dawn@writeadv.com

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In most cases, you have a limited number of characters to share your news on social media. Even when organizations are not technically limited, it’s typically more effective to keep the news to 1-2 sentences and then direct people to click to your website to learn more. In this information age, organizations see bottom line results when they make sharing news a cornerstone on their website.

4) Become storytellers. Meaningful storytelling remains a hallmark for generating sales. Go beyond the straightforward facts of your news and the who, what, where, when and why that you learned in school. Focus on sharing the impact and telling the stories of the people behind it. Use pictures and even video to capture these stories – just like a journalist. How will you take the lead telling your story better this year? Social media has reshaped the news and given individual organizations an opportunity to be their own news agents.


TECH NEWS

Robo-Falconry Police in the Netherlands have been testing the possibility of using eagles to capture drones. After all, why program a complicated machine when you've already got a natural resource adept at midair interception? On the other hand, hunter drones capable of catching smaller rogue drones are pretty cool, too. Source: How Stuff Works Watch videos showing real and robo-falconry at BusinessCentralMagazine.com

WHAT’S FOR DINNER? CommonSense Robotics, based in Israel, is making grocery delivery cheaper and faster with small fulfillment centers that use robots to pick requested items. Because it avoids sending someone to hunt down products in the aisles of a store, the system makes it possible to get a 20-item order ready in five minutes. The first center will open in Israel this year, followed by a center in the U.S. ... though probably not in St. Cloud. Source: Fast Company

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Mary Schneider Mary Schneider Melanie Walz Mary Weis Mary Weis Melanie Walz

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BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

BY THE NUMBERS

Women’s Entrepreneurship

Significant Growth

Women-owned businesses have been on the rise for decades and St. Cloud is no exception.

M

innesota has an estimated 170,300 women-owned businesses, employing 202,100 people and generating more than $27 billion in revenue, according to the seventh annual State of Women-Owned Businesses Report, commissioned by American Express OPEN. This comprehensive report analyzes data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Survey of Business Owners, factoring in relative changes in Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

Nationally, the number of women-owned firms increased by 114 percent from 1997 to 2017, compared to just a 44 percent increase among all businesses. Therefore, over the past 20 years, the number of women-owned firms has grown at a rate of 2.5 times faster than the national average. Although Minnesota is ranked 42nd in growth of number of women-owned firms over the past 20 years, the state is ranked fourth in growth of jobs created and 25th in growth of firm revenues. The Twin Cities have followed the state trend, ranking 42nd in growth of number of women-owned firms among the top 50 U.S. metropolitan areas over the past 15 years, third in growth of jobs created and 26th in growth of firm revenues. The table (below) compares the national numbers for women-owned firms to Minnesota, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and the St. Cloud area (where data is available).

For the last twenty years, women of color have turned to entrepreneurship at an astounding rate. Firms owned by women of color have grown at more than four times the rate of all women-owned business.

467% Increase in firms owned by women of color during the last 20 years

5.4 million Businesses owned by minority women. That’s almost half of all women-owned firms.

2 million Workers employed at businesses owned by minority women

$361 billion

Source: The American Express 2017

Annual revenue of firms

State of Women-Owned Businesses Report

owned by women of color

WOMEN-OWNED FIRMS % CHANGE, 1997-2017 Total US

1997

2002

2007

2012

2016 (est.)

2017 (est.)

% Change, 1997-2017

Number of Firms

5,417,034

6,489,483

7,793,139

9,878,397

11,313,900

11,615,600

Employment 7,076,081 7,146,229 7,579,876 8,431,614 8,976,100 8,985,200 Sales ($000) Minnesota

$818,669,084

$940,774,986

$1,202,115,758

$1,419,834,295

$1,622,763,800

$1,663,991,700

114.40% 27% 103.30%

Number of Firms 108,417 123,905 133,237 157,821 169,000 170,300 57.10% Employment 124,616 123,233 140,525 182,229 201,600 202,100 62.20% Sales ($000)

$13,457,542

$16,251,660

$18,635,862

$24,621,142

$27,373,000

$27,175,100

101.90%

Number of Firms

N/A

81,607

90,372

109,300

119,600

121,900

49.40%

Employment

N/A 87,843 102,421 131,010 147,100 150,000 70.80%

Sales ($000)

N/A

Minneapolis/St. Paul MN/WI

$11,760,385

$14,093,497

$17,841,743

$20,104,000

$20,278,900

72.40%

St. Cloud MSA Number of Firms

N/A

3,883

3,642

5,102

*

*

31.40%

Employment

N/A

4,437

4,247

6,666

*

*

50.20%

Sales ($000)

N/A

$510,795

$470,151

$801,457

*

*

56.90%

*Data is unavailable for the St. Cloud MSA; Women-owned businesses are defined as businesses that are at least 51 percent owned, operated and controlled by one or more females.

30

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8


880,396

$80M

$100M

December

$60M

November

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

Home Sales C

2017 October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

October April March

TOTAL:$4,452,334* $40M

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

TOTAL:$84,908,072

TOTAL:$70,880,396

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Residential 2016 2017 2018* 2016 August #/$ #/$ #/$ February

St. Cloud 986 622 66 July $32,774,443 $32,230,127 $2,403,574 2018 January

0

500

Sauk Rapids 345 299 38 June $22,647,287 $15,947,945 $806,050

$100M

January December Total as of4/13/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of 0 print.

500

October

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

TOTAL: $11,470,209*

Food and Be ST. CLOUD

2018

$900000

St. Cloud 464 341 53 $138,751,046 $89,192,774 $5,887,250 July

Sauk Rapids

TOTAL: $221,316,488

555

1500

Waite Park

5 $4,301,500

106 October $3,9550,295.02 Apr

ST. CLOUD 16 $644,026

73 $6,403,398

TOTAL: 1789

TOTAL: 1752

TOTAL: 1655

TOTAL: $11,470,209* $200M

44

Food and Bev

2016 St. Augusta 66 13 2 September $0 $2,107,200 $17,563 Mar St. Joseph 71 56 4 August 2018 Feb $32,698,175.09 $19,525,262.01 $52,446 $0

$500k

July Total as of4/13/18. *Totals Jan are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

2000

TOTAL: $133,773*

$1500000

TOTAL: $1,272,176*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

$1200000

TOTAL: $239,669,534

$150M

December $15,684,403.00 $89,959,156 June

2017 Sartell 33 32 4 November $13,013,812.00 $14,128,688 $567,423 May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$100M

500

Commercial 2016 2017 2018* August #/$ #/$ #/$

Commercial Building Permits

$50M

November

1000

$600000

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$0M

2016

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$80M

Commercial Building Permits

2016

102 88 5 $9,180,780 $6,116,630 $540,757

March

St. Joseph 186 140 4 February $4,796,651 $4,433,502 $43,869

$60M

2018

2017

St. Augusta

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$40M

2017

$20M

2017

Waite Park 78 70 2 April $2,197,513 $4,244,281 $18,750

0

$300000

$0M

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

2016

2016

2018

2017

2016

$0

TOTAL:$84,908,072

2015

Sartell 252 199 13 May $13,311,389 $7,908,010 $639,335

2017

2018

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

2018

July December June

November May

Residential Building Permits

$0M

908,072

COLOR KEY:

Compiled by Kellie Libert, data current as of 4/13/18

2016 2018

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

TOTAL:$70,880,396 2017

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL:$4,452,334*

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS 2018

October

$100M

$250M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

832,866

316,488

669,534

111,110

Residential Building Permits

$250M

June TOTAL: $221,316,488 Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

2017

May

2017

Unemployment Rates 2017-2018

2016

$500k

December

November

1.0%

$0

October

Jan

September

August

July

June

May

Feb

April

March

$250M

February

$200M

1.5%

January

December

$150M

November

October

September

$100M

August

July

June

May

April

March

$50M

2016 Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

2017-18 % CHANGE 2.0%

February

January

5%

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

6%

$0M

Apr

TOTAL: $239,669,534

0.5% 0.0%

4%

-0.5% -1.0%

3%

-1.5% -2.0%

2% J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

-2.5% J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

S

O

N

D

J

F

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8 //

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31


80,396

BusinessTools

08,072

32,866

$100M

6,488

9,534

1,110

$250M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

2018

August

June

July TOTAL: 1789 June

November

October Despite evidence that links diversity and improved performance,

1000

$900000

gender diversity in leadership is shifting at a painfully slow rate. September

Benton Co. 39 27 17 $0 $500k $1M $1.5M

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office Total as of4/13/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

March February January

$2M

BY THE NUMBERS

Minority report As of 2017, estimated firms owned by women of color were:

Lodging Tax Dollars

$500k

$1M

$1.5M

$2M

Native American/Alaska Native women-owned enterprises

Latina-owned businesses

34,200

1 million

Native Hawaiian/ Pacific Islander women-owned firms

Asian American womenowned companies

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Total as of4/13/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

32

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8

Economy Central presented by

December

$0

November

2016

October

TOTAL: $1,508,301

September

Almost 2 million

2017

August

TOTAL: $1,623,035

161,500 July

African American, women-owned firms

June

May

April

March

2.2 million February

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

TOTAL: $117,630*

January

ST. CLOUD

2018

April

For a copy of the report, visits BusinessCentralMagazine.com. 2000

$1500000

TOTAL: $1,333,423 Residential 2016 2017 2018 2016 Stearns Co. 158 84 11

TOTAL: 1789

strategies for the May sustainable growth of dynamic businesses.

200

TOTAL: 1752

150

together, theseJune diverse perspectives facilitate effective risk TOTAL: 1655

SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

July

different ways, and that they act differently as a result. Brought 1500

100

Research conducted by Grant Thornton International in 2017 August

reveals that men and women perceive risk and opportunity in

TOTAL: $1,523,946

TOTAL: $133,773*

TOTAL: $1,272,176*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

$1200000

50

$2M

Source: Grant Thornton 2017 report “Women in Business: New Perspectives on Risk and Reward.”

500

$600000

20170

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$300000

Risk and Reward

TOTAL: 221

2016

$1.5M

PRODUCTIVITY December

TOTAL: 28*

TOTAL: $133,773*

2018

$1M

Total as of4/13/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

Food and Beverage Tax Collection TOTAL: 235 ST. CLOUD

$500k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions

2017

January

$0

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2000

Feb

Total as of4/13/18. *Totals are cummulative and up to date at time of print.

2018

2017

1500

Housing/Real Estate St. Cloud Area AssociationJan of Realtors, $150M $200Msources:$250M http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics.

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

February

TOTAL: $1,333,423

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

1000

2016

2016

ST. CLOUD

$0

500

2015

Apr Mar

0

April March

2018

2017

2016

TOTAL: $239,669,534

2017 TOTAL: 1752

The American Express 2017 State of Women-Owned Businesses Report. For a copy of the report visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

TOTAL: $221,316,488

May

$100M

TOTAL: $1,523,946

May

2016

TOTAL: $133,773*

July

TOTAL: $11,470,209*

2017

December

2018

November

September

October

August

September

August

July

June

May

TOTAL: 182*

April

September

ST. CLOUD

October

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

September

D, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

lding Permits

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH


x

Jessica Bitz Market President

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BUSINESS PROFILE Midsota Manufacturing Inc 310 Blattner Drive, Avon, MN 320-356-2407 info@midsotamfg.com midsotamfg.com 34

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8

Owners: Joel Bauer and Tim Burg Other Significant Leadership: Derek Hentges, Todd Schultz, Don Meredith

Business description: Commercial and retail trailer manufacturer Total number of employees: 110


OPPORTUNITY

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KNOCK ING | P ho tos

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KNOCKS AT MIDSOTA

TIM BURG AND JOEL BAUER WILL GRAB IT AND RUN.

J

oel Bauer and Tim Burg are not interested in the status quo. If they are not creating new products, establishing new relationships, or exploring new opportunities, they are falling behind. For the two owners of Midsota Manufacturing in Avon, “complacency” is not part of their vocabulary. You can see the most obvious manifestation of the ambitious growth plans

for the trailer manufacturer in the new 30,000-square-foot sandblasting, paint, and finishing facility that was completed in the midst of the early March snowstorm. And in the remodel of the welding facility. And in the new office space, also purchased and occupied during the snowstorm. But the story for Bauer and Burg actually begins in the late 1990s when each of them recognized that opportunity was knocking on their doors.

FUN FACT:

Tim Burg (left) and Joel Bauer This particular type of trailer – half of the trailer is a flatbed and the other half is a dump trailer – was invented by Midsota Manufacturing. It is now an industry standard.

Midsota has added over 100 employees in 10 years. M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

35


TIMELINE 1994 After working part-time at Rotochopper in high school Tim Burg accepts an offer from company owner Fred Peltz for a full-time job as a welder

1997 Burg becomes shop foreman at age 21

2000 Peltz dies in an industrial accident; Burg stays to help the family run the company

2001 Joel Bauer graduates from St. Cloud State University with a degree in Environmental Studies. He is offered a job at Midsota Manufacturing, where he has been working part-time during college. Bauer turns it down for a job in his field in Olivia, Minn.

FALL 2002 Bauer leaves the job in Olivia and accepts a fulltime position at Midsota in sales 2003 Rotochopper is sold; Burg accepts a job at a metal working shop in Freeport

2004 Midsota purchases its first robot; Bauer becomes a one-third owner, with Todd Schultz and Brad Rodenwald; Midsota has 11 employees, and produces about 500 trailers per year

2004 Burg moves to Central McGowan doing sales and automation

2005 Midsota relocates from Albany to Avon

2007 Midsota has 14 employees, and offers eight models of trailers

PERSONAL PROFILE

Joel Bauer, 39 Owner, president/sales and finances

36

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8

B

auer, an Albany, Minn. native, was a student at St. Cloud State University in the late 1990s. While getting a haircut, he told his barber that he needed a part-time job to help pay for school. It turned out that the barber had a friend who had just purchased a business and needed employees. “He stopped right there and called the guy who said I should go over right away,” Bauer said. The new business owner, Todd Schultz, hired Bauer on the spot and taught him to be a welder. In 2001 Bauer graduated from SCSU with a degree in Environmental Studies. Schultz offered him a full-time job, but Bauer wanted to pursue what he had studied. He took a job as an environmental consultant in Olivia, Minn., only to discover that it wasn’t his calling. “I liked the outdoor work well enough,” Bauer said. “But there are a lot of government regulations in that industry. Red tape you have to work through, office time, filing, paperwork… and I knew the higher I went in the profession the more of that stuff there would be.” He decided to go back to SCSU for a teaching degree, but to do that he needed a part-time job. So he went back to Schultz and asked if he could have his old job back. Schultz said no. But it was a funny kind of no. Schultz said he wouldn’t take Bauer back as a part-time welder, but there was a full-time sales position available and it was Bauer’s if he wanted it. “I’d never done sales,” Bauer said. “I liked working for Todd and I thought ‘How will I ever know if I like sales or not if I don’t give it a try?’ So I agreed and it JOEL BAUER

Hometown: Albany, MN Education: Bachelor of Science in Environmental Studies from St. Cloud State University

turned out I enjoyed it and I had some success at it.” That was in 2002. In 2004 Schultz approached Bauer and another employee, Brad Rodenwald, offering each the opportunity to buy one-third of the business. “Ownership wasn’t on my radar,” Bauer said. “I’d just barely started doing the sales job and I was enjoying that. But I guess I believe that if there’s an opportunity in front of you, you should take it and see where it goes. You only get so many opportunities in life and you don’t want to walk away without giving them a try. “Todd pretty much told us it was a five year plan,” Bauer said, “and then he’d want out.” That was ok, because who knew what might happen in five years. Within a year, it was clear Midsota had outgrown its space and needed to make a move, but the company was land-

Work History: Part-time at Midsota while going to college, 1.5 years at BEI Environmental Consulting in Olivia, MN. Sales, 2002 – present at Midsota; owner in 2004

Family: Wife Danielle, married 13 years, daughter Cameron 11, sons Colton 9, Mason 5 Hobbies: Farming, hunting, basketball


locked. Schultz knew about a building in Avon that had been empty for some time. He had investigated it earlier, but the owners weren’t interested in selling. This time was different. The building was owned by Polar Tank and just that week they decided to put it up for auction. Polar told Schultz that if he was serious and could put a proposal together immediately, they would try to get out of the auction contract. Schultz was serious, the deal was done, and Midsota relocated to Avon. The building, which formerly housed a tank manufacturing company, was just what they needed. They knew they wanted a retail and customer service space, which required some limited remodeling. “The power was there. We had to put in a paint booth and add some cranes, but it was a pretty easy move,” Bauer said.

Eventually the company was sold and Burg moved on to a metalworking shop in Freeport for 18 months before landing at Central McGowan. “They were looking for someone to work in sales and automation. I was ready for a change, so I did that for about four years,” Burg said. “That’s how I met Todd, Joel and Brad… they were customers.” That changed in 2008. Todd Schultz was ready to sell his shares. Tim Burg was looking for a business to buy. “I’d been looking for a few years, but was really serious about it when Todd approached me. It was perfect timing,” Burg said. He became an owner on May 1, 2008. Something else changed in 2008. The booming trailer business came to a halt.

W

hile Bauer was learning the business at Midsota Manufacturing, Tim Burg was in his native St. Martin working at what is now known as Rotochopper, then called Peltz Manufacturing. He worked part-time during high school, then made plans to attend the technical college in Willmar to study welding. “Fred Peltz offered me what was good money at the time and said if I stayed at Peltz, rather than go to school he’d teach me how to weld,” Burg said. “So I did. I was a shop foreman by the time I was 21. I stayed and helped grow the company until he passed away and then I became plant manager and helped run the business for three or four years.” TIM BURG

PERSONAL PROFILE

Tim Burg, 42 Owner/production

Hometown: Avon Education: High school and on-the-job training Work History: Rotochopper 12 years, Central McGowan

4 years, became an owner at Midsota in 2008 Family: Married to a great lady! Lori Burg, 3 sons Jacob 15, Isaac 13 and Mitch 7

PRIDE OF PLACE

H

ometown means something to Joel Bauer and Tim Burg. The two owners of Midsota Manufacturing in Avon were named the 2018 St. Cloud Area Small Business owners of the Year by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce because of their business success and community engagement. Both men grew up in rural Stearns County and that’s where their hearts – and their business – remain. They boast of good employee longevity and use local vendors whenever possible. “We take our role as an employer seriously,” Burg said. “That’s probably the best part of owning this business – watching the people we employ succeed. They know we’ll do whatever we can for them… and they want to help us, too.” “When an employee comes in with a new car or goes on vacation, we know we played a part in giving them those opportunities,” Bauer said. “We’re serious about running this business because we don’t want to jeopardize those jobs for our employees.” The two feel the same about being part of the community. “We like that we’re able to give back,” Burg said. They help out with both cash and in-kind donations, mostly focusing on public safety and schools, particularly in the Avon-Albany area. “We’re lucky to be in a position to make a difference. It’s fun to help our employees and the community.”

Hobbies: Fishing, hunting, time at the cabin and I also spend lots of time farming with my family.

M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8 //

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37


TIMELINE SPRING 2008 Schultz sells his business shares to Tim Burg; Midsota has 18 employees, and produces about 600 trailers per year 2008 Recession strikes Midsota Manufacturing. Employees go on 3-day, 10-hour shifts to prevent layoffs. This lasts about a year before trailer sales begin to recover.

2010 Midsota purchases three acres to expand retail trailer space

2011 Midsota adds a cold storage warehouse facility

Midsota produces about 2,600 trailers per year.

2013 Bauer and Burg buy out

“Fear. Extreme fear,” Burg said, recalling the recession. “We had 43 dump trailers lined up in the yard. I remember looking out there and thinking ‘What are we going to do?’” They devised a plan to keep people employed, dividing the employees into two groups, each working three 10-hour days. “One group worked Monday through Wednesday, the other worked Wednesday through Friday,” Burg said. “We kept their benefits in place, including health care. We told them we understood if they needed to get a second job. We were hoping the parttime schedule would allow them to do that and stick with us.” As they discuss the recession, Bauer picks up an 18-inch piece of metal from a shelf. “When someone comes in and says they need a little piece of steel like this, we cut and sell it,” he said. “I have employees who ask me why we still do that. We certainly don’t need to now. I tell them, ‘There was a time I would have hugged that guy who bought that piece of steel because it was money. Pieces

Rodenwald, now owning the company 50-50.

2014 Bauer and Burg add a 50,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Avon. This is in addition to their existing 40,000-square-feet of manufacturing, retail, and service space.

2017 Midsota has 90 employees, sells 29 models of trailers between two brands, and produces about 2,600 trailers per year

2018 Midsota expands into a newly completed 30,000-square-foot sandblasting/paint/finishing facility in Avon; Bauer and Burg are selected as the 2018 St. Cloud Area Small Business Owners of the Year

like that made payroll. It paid health insurance.’” The worst of the recession was over for Midsota by 2009. “It took us two years to get back on track,” Burg said, helped in part because most of their employees stuck with the company. “And that recession was the best thing that could have happened to us. It made us who we are today. It taught us to keep our options open.” By options Burg means keeping an eye to diversity by cultivating relationships with other manufacturers who can use their expertise, offering full service and maintenance on any retail brand of trailer, offering DOT inspections, reselling five other brands of trailers in their retail store, and manufacturing a variety of skidsteer attachments. Though trailers are by far the majority of their business “we won’t forget 2008,” Burg said. “Diversification is good.” Business came roaring back following the recession. By 2010 the Midsota owners purchased neighboring land to expand their retail trailer operation. In 2011

BEST ADVICE JOEL BAUER RECEIVED Don’t ever forget the value of a dollar! Take advantage of EVERY opportunity given to you! 38

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8


they put up a cold-storage warehouse. By 2013 they were looking for additional manufacturing space, purchasing a 50,000square-foot building in the spring of 2014, which more than doubled their capacity. “That was a big jump for us,” Burg said. “I never thought we’d fill it and three years later we were busting at the seams.” “Keeping up with demand has been one of our biggest challenges,” Bauer said. “These last five years we just can’t produce fast enough.” But in the backs of their minds the recession still lingers. “We don’t ever want to overextend ourselves,” he added. “We have 110 families that need us so they can make house payments and go on family vacations and buy cars.”

I

t’s been 15 years since the first robot joined the Midsota welding team. Since then, with Burg’s background in automation from his days at Central McGowan, the company has become a leader in the use of automation among trailer manufacturers. The goal, Burg said, is to use robots and automation to eliminate the repetitive and boring jobs that welders have traditionally been required to do. “Cutting out small parts. Beam welding. If it was a car instead of a trailer you’d call it the chassis. That work is boring. We’ve automated most of that which has opened up opportunities for more skilled jobs for our employees.” Skilled jobs like assembling the trailers, putting on swing doors and sides, and adding accessories to customize the trailers. “Most of our employees didn’t know how to work with robots,” Burg said. “A few did, but most didn’t. We trained them. Joel and I take a lot of pride in that. We INNOVATION

want to offer these training opportunities and higher skilled jobs to our employees.” Midsota is also always on the lookout for the next new thing in trailer design. “We put in as standard on our trailers, things that no one else does,” Bauer said. “Other manufacturers think you don’t need it, or it’s too expensive, or too hard to sell to the customers. We do it and two or three years later everyone’s doing it. That used to bother us, but it doesn’t anymore. It just pushes us to stay on top of our game.” Their goal, according to Bauer, is to arrive at their annual national trailer tradeshow with something new every year. “A new model, a new feature, a new trailer…something. We have people who come to our booth and ask us what’s new this year,” he said. “We pride ourselves on staying on the cutting edge.” Their new ideas come from a variety of sources, including the draft and design team that has a whiteboard full of ideas waiting to be moved forward, and, of course, from customers. “We’re one of the few trailer manufacturers who do custom work,” Bauer said. “Most want to streamline their processes, but we still tell our customers yes, we’ll do that for you. You learn a lot from customers – they know what makes it easier, more convenient, or more effective for them.” As an example, Bauer and Burg show off their flatbed and dump trailer combination. “Everyone thought about it, but no one did it,” Bauer said. “We decided to take the best parts of the dump trailer and the best parts of the flat bed trailer, and put them together. We were the first to do that and now it’s common.” That determination to be the first to introduce the next new thing is critical to their business plan. “We set lofty goals,” Burg said. “We always have. Our plan for

20 percent annual growth is extremely high and our employees know that. We probably aren’t going to hit those goals every time, but if we hit them 75 percent of the time, we’ll be doing great.” Right now growth is not a problem at Midsota Manufacturing. Meeting customer demand is the bigger concern. Four dealers who don’t currently carry Midsota trailers attended the company’s 2018 dealer meeting. “We aren’t signing new dealers right now,” Burg said. “We need to be sure we can take care of the ones we have. But they don’t care, they came anyway. They’re willing to wait until mid-summer to sign with us.” What makes Midsota so attractive to the dealers? Aside from the quality, of course, Bauer and Burg believe it is the personal touch. “There’s not a lot of customer service left in this industry,” Bauer said. Many trailer manufacturers have been bought out by investment groups, changing their culture and service. “Tim and I go to all the dealer shows and dealers like that a lot. We’ve stood on their lots and talked business with them. I was on vacation and stopped to see a new dealer and introduce myself and see his lot. He really appreciated it.” “People know that they can get ahold of an owner if they want to,” Burg said. “They know there’s someone here who really cares about the product.” Caring isn’t limited to Bauer and Burg, they are quick to add. “We have good people here who want us to grow,” Burg said. “When we moved into the new space in March production never faltered. That’s the kind of people we have working here.” Gail Ivers is vice president of the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce and managing editor of Business Central Magazine.

BEST ADVICE TIM BURG RECEIVED Fred Peltz, founder of Rotochopper, told me "Believe in yourself!"

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Feature

TEACHER, TRAINER, TUTOR, GUIDE Wouldn’t starting out in a career be easier if someone could help guide you along the way? Enter…the mentor.

BY THE NUMBERS

MENTORING WOMEN By Margaret Wethington Arnold

I

t’s not uncommon for young professionals to have a shaky start. Often times they leave the security of home, friends and an academic community and discover they need to find their new “professional pack.” They might launch an emerging professional network, onboard with a new organization and boss, and jump in to build successful relationships with co-workers and customers. Even with these new relationships, and the longstanding ones at home and at school, who can young people turn to for guidance in uncertain and unstable times in their careers? Who can

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they trust to ask career advice without the fear of sounding uninformed or maybe full of doubt? Who do they turn to when they feel stuck and need a sounding board to point them in the right direction? Where are they safe when they hear important advice they may not want to hear? Enter the mentor, possibly the most important person in their professional pack. If you are just starting in your career, make it your goal to find a mentor to help guide and train you as you get more established. If you are an experienced professional, connecting with a young person and agreeing to become a mentor, it may be one of your career’s greatest rewards.

Below are some ways to establish and make the most out of the relationship: Stay awake and stay in tune Your in-person and virtual career connections are the best place to start. Are you part of a professional association or industry organization that matches experienced professionals with new, younger members? Is there a person you met and enjoyed during a job search and want to circle back to keep in touch in a more formal way? Have you observed others in your organization who have mentors, or have served as mentors, who you could learn from? Is there a partner organization or service

78% Women in senior roles who have served as formal mentors 63%

Women in senior roles who have never had a formal mentor

71% Women who report they always accept invitations to be a formal mentor at work 73% Women who mentor other women Source: Development Dimensions International


provider in your profession who you work with and feel comfortable asking the question about mentoring or finding a mentor? Whether they are in your in-person or online network, a mentor or protégé relationship won’t just materialize. However, the possibilities can be easy to identify if you stay awake and stay in tune throughout your day and work encounters. Before requesting a meeting with a possible mentor or protégé, do your homework to find out more about who you will be meeting with and have your questions ready. In addition to your professional interests, a long-lasting relationship between a mentor

and protégé often reflects the values and life interests you have in common, whether it’s reading, travel, outdoor activities, sports or other hobbies. A mentor and protégé who enjoy similar interests can be a bonus in the relationship. Establish goals for communication and check-ins To make the most out of the mentoring relationship and your time together, the mentor and protégé will need to establish an agreement that works for both. Is it best to meet by phone or in person? How often and for how long? (Often times, a 30-minute phone call or coffee together

every few months may work the best.) In addition to an established meeting schedule, the protégé may want to briefly let the mentor know how things are going between checkins. Even a brief touch-base is important to building the relationship over time. What are the most important tasks for the protégé? To come prepared to use the mentor’s time wisely. Write down a short list of items to cover. Pay attention to the mentor’s advice, whether you decide to follow it or not, and be open and flexible. You sought this person out to serve as your teacher and tutor. Remember, beyond everything, you are in a mentoring

relationship for the mentor’s wisdom and insight. What are the most important tasks for the mentor? To commit to getting back to your protégé, to listen first, and to know that your advice may only inform and guide your protégé, as opposed to be followed in detail. Like other young adults in your life, give protégés the space to make their own decisions as they ultimately know what’s right for them. Maintain a relationship over the course of a career You often hear that you have different friends for different reasons or seasons. But what about a mentor-protégé

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relationship? How does it endure? And should it? As a young worker starting out, a mentor may be the most important professional relationship you have over the course of jobs, work friends, bosses, projects, and career accomplishments. It can be a long-lasting relationship if the mentor and protégé find what works best for them. But the relationship may change, evolve or end depending on career and life situations. A mentor may retire, move away or become too busy. A protégé may change jobs or industries where the mentoring relationship isn’t

as relevant. A mentor may even hire the protégé, or have another conflict of interest. Like careers, the relationship will change. During the time you are in this professional pack and “pact,” protégé, make sure you capture all the great knowledge that your mentor is offering, and mentor, enjoy your protégé’s success as it is a reflection of your best self. Margaret Wethington Arnold is a solo public relations practitioner with 33 years of public relations and project management experience. She can be reached at mjwarnold@ mjwarnoldpublicrelations.com.

LIFE SKILL

REVERSE MENTORING When the students become the teachers, good things can happen. Take a look around your office and you will see a multigenerational workforce. There is a growing trend in reverse mentoring and with good reason. There are many 20 and 30-somethings with skills they can provide to more established staffers. This flip on the traditional “senior worker mentoring a junior worker” results in the young professional mentoring the more senior leader. In such a relationship, valuable conversations can take place around the latest technology, newest industry research and more. Many relationships begin with technology needs, i.e., social media, online platforms, etc., but soon grow to picking up other new skills or hearing fresh ideas. Like the more traditional mentoring relationships, the same rules apply: Agreement on what career matters to discuss, commitment to the relationship, and openness and flexibility.

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SMART BUSINESS: QUINLIVAN & HUGHES

L

Quinlivan & Hughes Attorneys Share Best Advice

ike many industries, the number of women holding leadership positions in the legal field continues to lag behind men. That’s not the case at Quinlivan & Hughes. The full-service law firm is setting a new standard in the legal profession with its long line of leading female attorneys and its leadership by a female CEO. Serving as leaders in their industry and community, these attorneys share some of the best advice they’ve received:

Be part of the solution, not part of the problem.”

Never stoop to conquer.” Laura Moehrle

Insurance Defense, Professional Liability

Dyan Ebert, CEO

Employment Law, Insurance Defense

“ “ “ “ “ Experience is what you get when you didn’t get what you wanted.”

There is no substitute for preparation.” Jessie Sogge

Premises Liability, Personal Injury

Don’t limit yourself.” Michelle Draewell

Insurance Defense, Professional Liability

Be yourself (everyone else is taken).” Melinda Sanders

Employment Law, Estate Planning

Jolene Schley

You can plan a pretty picnic, but you can’t predict the weather.” Cally Kjellberg-Nelson

Estate Planning

Employment Law, Insurance Defense

Established more than 90 years ago, Quinlivan & Hughes, P.A., ranks among the oldest and largest law practices in Central Minnesota. The firm’s legal teams are known as leaders in both their industries and the community, serving organizations and individuals in these key areas: 1740 WEST ST. GERMAIN STREET, ST. CLOUD, MN 56301 305 CEDAR STREET, SUITE 101 MONTICELLO, MN 55362

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Learn more at Quinlivan.com or by calling (320) 251-1414.

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2018 WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY INTRODUCES YOU TO SOME OF THE WOMEN WHO ARE REDEFINING BUSINESS

Cathy Juilfs

CFP,® AIFA, CEBS

PRESIDENT / OWNER

GB & Co. Hair-Skin-Spa is the most respected salon/spa in this area. The women at GB & Co. are a team striving together to be the best. They work in a business that respects their skills and are treated as professionals. ________________

Cathy is a leader in the Retirement Planning industry as one of only a few Accredited Investment Fiduciary Analysts in Minnesota. As an AIFA, Cathy has the knowledge in prudent investment processes and has the fiduciary qualifications to tackle most plan administrative issues, complex investment structures or compliance and regulatory issues. Cathy is fueled by her passion to create plans for companies that allow their employees the best opportunity possible to be prepared for retirement.

The choice is clear. Choose GB & Co. Hair-Skin-Spa.

320.252.6552 80 37th Ave. S. (Across from Holiday Inn) 253-4832 • www.gbcosalonspa.com

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aisplanning.com


2018 WOMEN IN BUSINESS DIRECTORY INTRODUCES YOU TO SOME OF THE WOMEN WHO ARE REDEFINING BUSINESS

Experience What Our

One Focus Can Do for You

LeAnn Rummel

President and Chief Executive Officer

For more than 30 years, Cetera® Investment Services has focused on helping banks and credit unions build thriving investment programs. Join a team that recognizes the value of women in leadership roles. Be part of an experience that helps you realize your full potential while creating a stronger future for yourself and your family. Visit cetera.com/careers.

Kim Holweger Chief Operations Officer

400 First Street South, Suite 300, St. Cloud, MN 56301

800.245.0467 Securities and insurance products are offered through Cetera Investment Services LLC, member FINRA/SIPC. © 2018 Cetera ® Investment Services 18-0204 4/18

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Special Focus By Vicki Ikeogu

I

Un-Tapped Businesses are overlooking an important resource: older workers

t is one of the fastest growing segments of the labor market. And no, it’s not Millennials. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), about 40 percent of people ages 55 and older were working or actively looking for work in 2014. And that number is expected to climb over the next few years. The BLS projects about 41 million of the estimated 164 million people nationwide in the work force will be 55-years-old or older by 2024, and 13 million are expected to be 65 and older. “Older workers are frankly becoming a bigger pool of people than most of us think,” said Gail Cruikshank, talent director for the

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“I moved to Chateau Waters because I was tired of keeping house by myself. I feel so wonderfully serene here. The top-notch staff take care of everything, and there are so many entertainment options and amenities at your fingertips. I don’t have to recommend Chateau Waters to my friends. They come visit me and tell me right away that they want to move in!” - Donna, Chateau Waters tenant

Call today to schedule your private tour! 320.345.3331 | CHATEAUWATERS.COM 46

Business Central Magazine // M AY/J U N E 2 0 1 8


Greater St. Cloud Development Corp. “And many of these folks are not ready to sit on the beach or at home and retire. They are very active and engaged.” A good majority of the job seekers at GSDC sponsored career events fit into this older workforce demographic, according to Cruikshank. “Some may have been recently downsized,” she said. “Others are looking for that next new opportunity either actively or passively. And we have plenty of people who are anxious to get back into or stay in the workforce.” But finding that next career can be especially intimidating, according to James Tan, St. Cloud State University

Department of Management and Entrepreneurship. Tan has found that many individuals who fit the older worker demographic tend to look for more managerial and professional jobs. However, advertisements for those types of careers tend to be riddled with buzzwords and underlying tones that can be a turn off for many aged 55 and older. “The terms that companies use when they post ads might unintentionally screen out older workers,” Tan said. “Words like ‘fast-paced,’ ‘high potential,’ or ‘GPA requirements’ might be seen as code for ‘young.’ For those older workers it might seem as if the job was not meant for them.”

In addition, Tan said, employers who only post open BY THE NUMBERS positions online might also A RISING TIDE be unintentionally screening out older workers. “The PEW America’s future OPEN FOR TOURS FROM 10 AM TO 2 P Research Center has found An Affordable workforce may Assisted Lifestyle and Memory Care Comm that the older and/or retired depend on demographic does not have as seniors. much access to the Internet as younger generations,” he said. 20% The share of But attracting older Americans ages 65 workers to your business is to 74 who were in the only one side of the coin. nation’s workforce in Cruikshank and Tan both 2002 said retaining the knowledge and experience of seniors 40% The share of already in your company Americans ages 65 to has become top priority for 74 who are expected business leaders. “It’s so to be in the nation’s simple, but so many people workforce by 2022 OPEN FOR TOURS FROM 10 AM TO 2 PM EVERY DAY overlook this,” Cruikshank An Affordable Assisted Lifestyle and Memory Care Community for the Older Adu said. “Instead of just accepting

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Special Focus

“People who are close to or at retirement age don’t necessarily want to work full-time, they want flexibility. Maybe it could mean working a few hours here or there or having the ability to work from home.” —JAMES TAN, ST. CLOUD STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP.

a person’s resignation, how about offering them the chance to work on a parttime basis. Or offer them some sort of perks. Look for opportunities to stretch out their employment.” Tan said most older workers – not just millennials – are

seeking added flexibility from their employer. “People who are close to or at retirement age don’t necessarily want to work full-time,” he said. “They want flexibility. Maybe it could mean working a few hours here or there or having the ability to work from home.”

Tan and Cruikshank said developing mentoring programs – where senior staff partner with new employees – is also a good way to capitalize on the institutional knowledge of the senior worker and the nuances of the younger one. “But you can’t take a one-size-

fits-all approach to retention,” Cruikshank said. “You need to have conversations with your employees to see what’s important to them. Explore what your business can do to really take advantage of all those years of experience. There are endless ways to

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approach this and employers need to think creatively.” So, what can older workers provide a business, especially in today’s world of everchanging technology? “This workforce brings with it a lot of skills,” Cruikshank said. “Many have very strong leadership skills. They are reliable, so you know they are going to be there when they say they will. They are willing to do and try different things. They are extremely loyal and hard working. And a lot of the skills and experiences they do have are very transferrable.”

BY THE NUMBERS

76%

The share of 20- to 24-year-olds who were in the workforce in 2002.

And for employers in the market for new talent, older applicants might just provide the solution businesses are seeking. “I’ve been saying for years that in this labor market we need everyone who is able to work, to work,” Cruikshank

67% The share of 20- to 24-year-olds who are expected to be in the workforce in 2022. This would be the lowest rate since 1969.

said. “And older workers are a critical component. They are a very active and very large population, one of the fastest growing pockets of people in our midst. And we as a community need to come up with strategies to keep them

AGE 55: THE DIVIDING LINE Labor force participation is expected to fall for those under 55 and rise for those over 55.

in the workforce for as long as possible.” Vicki Ikeogu is a freelance reporter and transportation planner with the Saint Cloud Area Planning Organization.

The following organizations provide resources for Senior Health & Living within our community.

The Sanctuary at St. Cloud Assisted Living & Memory Support

H

Mike Toussaint Market President

ST. BENEDICT’S SENIOR COMMUNITY Planning to break ground for a new building? Upgrading your equipment? Whatever you envision for your business, Minnwest is here to help. Your local, St. Cloud location provides convenient service and draws on the combined strength of

Convenience, independence and lifestyle are important aspects when choosing a senior community. Whether it’s simplifying your life to make more time for activities, or needing assistance with everyday tasks, our campuses in St. Cloud, Monticello, and Sartell offer choices for vital aging.

ere you’ll find everything you need to live each day to its fullest – your own personal sanctuary that offers an exceptional quality of life, a comfortable and inviting community of peers and the assurance of a helping hand and affordable lifestyle ...now and in the future.

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Scott Ampe, Marketing Director 320-252-6325 marketing@thesanctuary-stcloud.com thesanctuary-stcloud.com

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Business Spotlight

Team Players

PERSONAL PROFILES

They may work behind the scenes, but Shipshape Services’ McCooleys treat every client like a partner. By Gail Ivers

AT A GLANCE Shipshape Services, Inc. Rita, John and Brian McCooley 4956 150th St. NW Clearwater, MN 55320 320-558-6778 Business Description: Commercial cleaning and maintenance Started: 1991 Joined the Chamber:1998 Number of Employees: Three: Rita, John and Brian Advice to Clients: Don’t put anything on the garbage can that isn’t garbage. Keep food in the lunch room. John (L), Rita and Brian McCooley

Business Central: How did you get started in the cleaning business? John McCooley: I worked at a radio station in Stillwater. When deregulation occurred it created a lot of consolidations. I got cut and jobs were scarce. Rita McCooley: We went to career counseling and they said, “Reinvent yourselves. Find something that you can do that you’re good at.” We decided we could clean. John: We started out with a condo complex in Plymouth – 16 buildings. We did all the cleaning, even the swimming pools, and minor repairs. But

we wanted to move closer to home so it would be more convenient. Brian McCooley: We used to have employees when we had some bigger clients, but when those jobs went away we decided to stick with smaller accounts. Rita: It’s easier to communicate with smaller businesses and we can rely on ourselves. We do hire when we need extra help – people we know who say they’d like to make some extra money on the side. BC: What have been some of your challenges in business?

John: You can be the best at what you do and still lose an account for reasons beyond your control – the company changes hands, new management comes in. Brian: Getting your name out is a challenge. We’re a smaller company and people don’t see us at work. BC: What do you like best? Brian: I can work at night and just come in and do the work. There’s no office politics. John: You’d be surprised how many good ideas come to you when you’re cleaning.

Brian is currently converting his master’s thesis into a book.

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Hometown: Big Fork, Minn., north of Grand Rapids. Education & Work Experience: Started college at St. Cloud State in American Studies. Became a registered nurse and worked in the field for a number of years. Rita does a lot of gardening in the summer. “It adds to our activity and income. I sell at the farmers’ market in Monticello.” Hobbies: Gardening, knitting, sewing ––––––––––––––––

John McCooley, 76 Hometown: Gary, Ind. Education & Work Experience: Joined the Navy at 18, was a radio man on an aircraft carrier. Worked in commercial radio for a number of years. Served as the law librarian for Wright and Sherburne counties for 15 years. Hobbies: Ham radio, reading ––––––––––––––––

Brian McCooley, 44 Hometown: Clearwater, Minn. Family: Married with one daughter Education & Work Experience: Has been working in the restaurant business for 25 years. Completed a Master’s Degree in English in 2017 and hopes to teach at a two-year college, possibly online. Hobbies: Reading, studying for school, writing

FUN FACTS: BRIAN

Rita McCooley, 73

JOHN

John hosts “Legal Happenings” Sundays at 10:30 a.m. on KRWC radio, 1360 AM

RITA

Worked at the Alexander Ramsey House in St. Paul for the Minnesota Historical Society. She was hired because she knew how to cook on a wood stove. “John and I lived in an old farm house and bought an antique wood stove for the kitchen so I knew how to cook on one.”


can you imagine our community without

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show sponsorships

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Ticket sales cover just 60% of the cost to produce our live theatre productions. From the presenting sponsor to the specific effects sponsors, our sponsors collectively help us produce shows of the highest artistic quality and in return gain brand exposure for making this possible.

Program underwriting

Support levels // $1,000 - 25,000

We believe in building life skills through stage skills and ensuring accessibility and inclusion for all. Your support allows us to offer programs for little to no cost and gives the opportunity to experience live theatre to thousands of youth and adults who may not otherwise have that chance.

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Sponsors help cover the cost of events to ensure 100% of the funds raised go directly towards GREAT’s education initiatives and annual operating costs. Whether it is by offering a matching gift, a product giveaway, or through logo recognition, you’ll gain brand exposure while ensuring all funds raised go directly to programming.

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May/June 2018  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine

May/June 2018  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine