Page 1

Joan Schatz


ENGINEERING BETTER CARE FOR VETERANS At Design Tree Engineering, we understand healthcare facilities encompass a wide range of types, from small and relatively simple medical clinics to large, complex, and costly specialized treatment and research hospitals. We have been working aggressively to better Veteran care and the VA medical facilities in St. Cloud by designing state-of-the-art treatment centers, along with safe and functional healing environment for patients, staff and visitors. From creation of the main drive and parking lots to building remodels and energy and water consumption metering, to a new data center and campus technology cabling, we were honored to be a part of these projects.

ST. CLOUD VA HEALTH CARE SYSTEM


Innovative Health Services

Well-Being Guidance

DISCOVER A FRESH APPROACH TO HEALTHY • Go further with our Sports Performance program. • Uncover the root cause of ongoing health issues like fibromyalgia and migraines with Functional Medicine. • Feel better with massage, acupuncture, meditation and other Integrative Health services. • Achieve long-term success through Weight Management. Whatever your goal, we’ll design a personalized experience, combining conventional and holistic medicine to help you discover your best self.

2001 Stockinger Drive, St. Cloud, MN 56303 320.534.3096

LifestyleHealth.com

Classes & Events

Retail Store LOCATED INSIDE THE NEW YMCA


JANUARY/ FEBRUARY 2018

6 16

CONTENTS

GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

President’s Letter Top Hats

8 18

Editor’s Note

Network Central

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 8 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

GROW

38 Cover Story BETTER TOGETHER In work and at home, communication is key for these business couples. PROFIT

25 Feature 2018 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW The Central Minnesota Farm Show, brought to you by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is the largest indoor show if its kind in the region.

44 Special Focus CUTTING EDGE Health care providers are using the latest in technology to serve and connect with patients.

49 Special Section HEALTH & WELLNESS ON THE COVER From Left: Jim Beck, John Malikowski, Kevin Vierkant, Krystal Vierkant, Jodi Erkens, Rich Erkens

38 10 UPFRONT Valuable information designed to guide and educate

20 BUSINESS TOOLS

Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business

50 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Arnie Kahara, Arnold A. Kahara, LTD

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2018 Business Central, LLC

• Listen up!

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• Business Loan Myths

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101,

• Successful webinars • Cybersecurity

Business Central is published six times a year

P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


320.293.6379 Looking for a commercial property? PremierCommercialSearch.com FOR SALE

FOR SALE

FOR LEASE

$ 1,575,000

$325,000

$2000, $2500, $450-$525

Located 4 blocks from St. Cloud hospital, off of Northway Drive. Medical office building had a major renovation completed in 2005.

Great building visible from Hwy 169 in Princeton. Currently an embroidery shop. This building is also FOR LEASE.

Beautifully finished professional office spaces in Sartell. Convenient location off Pine Cone Rd, parking at front door.

SALE PENDING

$900 1.4 and .68 Acres

$900-1st Month Free Rent

One unit with two garage stalls. Great for new or expanding business. Located in Sauk Rapids. SOLD IN 7 DAYS.

Two land sites well suited for many potential commercial uses. Both are located in Albertville near Outlet Mall.

Main floor in building near downtown St. Cloud. Large private office with private bath, two open work areas and a shared bathroom.

WENDY HENDRICKS

BUY SELL LEASE

BUSINESS BROKERAGE C: 320.293.6379

wendy@PremierHomeSearch.com PremierCommercialSearch.com


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

President’s Letter

Resolutions

A

re you a New Year’s resolution maker? I love

3. Assist members to enjoy Chamber activities

watching the calendar turn to January each year

to the fullest. Our members already seem to have more

and thinking about all the opportunity that lies ahead.

fun than other Chambers. New members, who have

My resolutions, along with 37 percent of all Americans,

transferred from other communities, tell us how unique and

usually feature eating better and getting more exercise.

wonderful our Chamber is. Maintaining this feeling within

According to a Nielsen survey, Americans resolve to: 1. Stay fit and healthy (37%)

membership is essential to our perceived member value. 4. Spend less, save more. We pledge to carefully

2. Lose weight (32%)

consider every membership dollar we spend to ensure it

3. Enjoy life to the fullest (28%) 4. Spend less, save more (25%)

brings the greatest value to our members. 5. Continue to provide a wide variety of activities

5. Spend more time with family and friends (19%)

and events so members can spend as much time as they

6. Get organized (18%)

find value in networking with other members. 6. Get organized. If you aren’t organized, the Chamber

As I reviewed these categories of resolutions, I thought about what an organizational spin on them would look

can seem like a vast array of opportunities with no

like. After all, the Chamber belongs to all of its members,

direction on where to start. We offer a quarterly New

so isn’t it in the members’ best interests to make some

Member Reception that any member may attend to learn

Chamber New Year’s Resolutions for 2018?

more about what is available.

So, during 2018, with the assistance of our 5-Star

Happy 2018! If you have questions about how to make

Accredited Chamber staff, I resolve to: 1. Keep our Chamber fit and healthy with continued

this YOUR BEST CHAMBER YEAR EVER, ask any staff

financial accountability, membership growth and retention,

Chamber fit and healthy!

excellence in programs and volunteer engagement. 2. Help our Chamber lose weight. Now how do we

member. We are here to serve you and keep our Happy New Year,

do this? I think there are some programs and events our Chamber hosts that may be extra weight for the organization. I resolve to work with staff to take a careful look at our events and programming ensuring a healthy Chamber PMI (Program Mass Index).

6

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

Teresa Bohnen Publisher


Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100

Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826 Program Hotline: 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com StCloudAreaChamber.com ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106 Special Events Coordinator: Sheri Wegner, ext. 131 Membership Sales Specialist: Rhonda Dahlgren, ext. 134 Administrative Assistant: Kellie Libert, ext. 124

2017-18 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Past Board Chair Marilyn Birkland, Times Media David Borgert, CentraCare Health Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Jim Gruenke, Traut Companies Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Bernie Perryman, Batteries Plus Bulbs Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Board Chair Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud, Board Vice Chair

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Main Phone: 320-251-4170 Executive Director: Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Director of Convention Sales: Lori Cates, ext. 113 Director of Sports & Special Events: Dana Randt, ext. 110 Sales Manager: Nikki Fisher, ext. 112 Social Media & Marketing Specialist: Emily Bertram, ext. 129 Sales & Marketing Coordinator: Rachel Thompson, ext. 128 Information Specialist Administrative Assistant: Lucas Anderson, ext. 100

Looking for part-time work? Enjoy helping others? With a non-education bachelor’s degree from an accredited college, you could work as a limited, short-call substitute teacher. Training in Sept., Nov., & Feb. Learn more or register online today! www.resourcetraining.com | (320) 255-3236

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

7


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Editor’s Note John's Sugar Cr ookies ga

1 cup powdered su 1 cup sugar 1 cup butter 1 cup canola oil 2 eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla 5 cups flour g soda 1 teaspoon bakin of tarter 1 teaspoon cream 1 teaspoon salt

Cookies!

I

f I can’t come back in my next life as a heavy equipment operator, I think I will come back as the Cookie Monster. Growing up, we always had homemade cookies in the cookie jar. My dad was a big fan of cookies. Cookies and pie. Before bed, while he watched the evening news, Dad would have a half cup of coffee and two cookies. Our standard chocolate chip cookie recipe came from my dad’s mother. She was recognized as a good cook and owned a restaurant where she practiced her craft. Adopting her recipe as the official family chocolate chip cookie recipe was a given. So you have to understand that in my cookie world, chocolate chip cookies always have oatmeal in them and never have nuts. If you change that up, it’s not a chocolate chip cookie. As I grew up, some of the cookie baking responsibility came to me. I enjoy baking and remember making muffins and cakes from an early age. Cooking equipment in our house was pretty basic. We had bowls, spoons, and a hand mixer. When dough became too heavy for the hand mixer, you had to stir it by hand. This was a chore I disliked intensely and I burned out more than one hand mixer in my attempt to avoid using a spoon. Several years ago for my birthday, Tom presented me with a card and an apprehensive smile. “I’m not sure this is a good present,” he said. “So if you don’t like it, just say so and I’ll get you something else.” Inside was a picture of a KitchenAid mixer.

8

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

ts into one bowl Mix wet ingredien wl ts into another bo Mix dry ingredien t we the o int dry Then combine the your 1 inch balls roll in Shape dough into s kle rin gar or sp favorite colored su ges 10 min. (or until ed Bake at 350 for 8) are golden brown m all at once. Try not to eat the

One of my friends recently said that she told her husband appliances were not gifts. We have to agree to disagree on this one. I was thrilled with the KitchenAid. Frankly, I still am. I would never have purchased one for myself, which made it an incredibly thoughtful gift. I still smile every time I use it. Recently I learned that John Malikowski, co-owner of Modern Barnyard, (see the story on page 38) and I have baking in common. He counts it among his hobbies and when I asked him to bring a prop to the photo shoot for Business Central he brought his mixing bowl and a few ingredients. (No cookies, though. Darn.) I asked if he had a favorite cookie recipe, which of course he does, and he’s letting me share it with you here. He says to feel free to tweak the directions. Until next issue,


Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jessica Bitz, Falcon National Bank Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Jill Copeland, SAP SuccessFactors Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Vicki Ikeogu, St. Cloud Area Planning Organization Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Diane Hageman, Hageman Communications Kellie Libert, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Lynn MacDonald, St. Cloud State University Mary MacDonell Belisle, mary macdonell belisle – wording for you Chris Panek, Christine R. Panek, CPA Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 BusinessCentralMagazine.com

ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund

For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320)656-3808

WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

ADVERTISING PARTNERS

YOUR BUSINESS BANKERS J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

9


INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Do it Now!

UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

• New at the Top • The Trouble with Business

Point of View • Getting Going • Top Hat Photos uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Shift!

NEWS REEL

Author Kristen Ulmer’s mindfulness tool, “Shift,” helps readers better understand the underlying cause of their fear-based problems. Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill

The Art of Fear; Why Conquering Fear Won’t Work and What to Do Instead by Kristen Ulmer, HarperCollins Publishers, New York, 2017, ISBN 978-0-06242341-2

K

risten Ulmer knows fear – for 12 years she held the honor of being the best extreme skier in the world! Now, in her book, “The Art of Fear; Why Conquering Fear Won’t Work and What to Do Instead,” Ulmer rebuilds our understanding of fear by exploring why we have come to view it as negative. She shows that it is just one of 10,000 voices that make up our reality.

10

From the book jacket: “Everything you ever wanted to know about fear. Ulmer takes a radical approach to an age-old problem and delivers smart, exciting, and extremely fresh ideas.” “For years, I dangled my ski tips over the edge of cliffs. Kristen got me to actually jump. Whether on snow, in your career, or just in life itself, no one knows fear better than Ulmer.” Ulmer developed a mindfulness tool called ‘Shift,’ which she uses to teach how to experience fear in a simpler and more authentic way -- a way that can transform our relationship with this emotion to one that is more in line with our true nature. For more than 15 years she has been a mind-set facilitator, teaching and empowering people to address the underlying cause of their fear-based problems, and setting them on a happier and more expansive future. The author disputes the idea that fear means one has an unnaturally weak character. Instead, she maintains that feeling

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

fear means that you are experiencing a natural, universal certainty that comes with being alive. Avoiding, ignoring, or trying to control fear is what prevents you from accomplishing the things you want. Ulmer’s book helps address relationships, performance, irrational fear, chronic anxiety, indecisiveness, insomnia, panic attacks, and depression issues. She can help you make the shift that changes everything. Shift is the process of rebuilding from avoiding fear to honoring fear. It is addressing the 10,000 voices, which she calls 10,000 wisdoms. Listen to the Voices and they will become the Wisdoms. Ask the right questions and the answers will find you. What exactly is Shift? Ah ha! Read the book and find out! It will be worth it! Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor of Learning Resources and Services, at St. Cloud State University.

BRAINERD BANK ACQUIRES PLAZA PARK BANK Plaza Park Bank, with branch locations in Waite Park and Sartell, is being acquired by Deerwood Bank in Brainerd. Plaza Park Bank opened in 1910 in Rockville. All of Plaza Park Bank’s 40 employees will join the Deerwood Bank team. Deerwood Bank was founded in 1910 and has full service locations in Baxter, Bemidji, Blackduck, Brainerd, Deerwood, Garrison, Grand Rapids, Inver Grove Heights, Mendota Heights, Northome, and St. Paul. The acquisition is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2018.

STEWART JOINS KENSINGTON BANK Tim Stewart joined the team at Kensington Bank. Stewart is responsible for business development and marketing, and leading the bank’s retail teams in St. Cloud, Cokato, Kensington, and Herman. He has a background in commercial and consumer banking.

BEAVER ISLAND RECEIVES NATIONAL AWARD Beaver Island Brewing Company’s OktoberfestMarzen Lager was awarded a bronze medal at the Great American Beer Festival in Denver. Winners were chosen out of 7,923 competition entries from 2,217 breweries. This is the second award in two years for the Oktoberfest beer.


DO IT NOW!

Improve Time Management “I need more time in the week!” said nearly every business professional at least once in the last few days. Lately it seems there are a million things to accomplish during the busy workweek. How do you find time to complete all of your required tasks and clock out at the end of the week feeling successful? Jillian Kramer, glassdoor, interviewed five CEOs for ideas to improve your time management skills:

emails, industry news, calendar review) within the first hour of your day. —Jack Barmby, founder and CEO, Gnatta

1 Get an early start. Make

3 Make time for yourself. Allow

yourself a morning person and accomplish the essential morning tasks (overnight

yourself to recharge and reprioritize. Turn off your phone when you’re with your family

2 Keep a to-do list. Keep a list of short-term and long-term todo’s so you can help determine what task to complete next. Being flexible about priorities and responding to change when needed is important. —Kelsey Doorey, founder and CEO, Vow to Be Chick

and keep yourself healthy. This allows you to work at your highest purpose and potential. —Daniel Cane, CEO, Modernizing Medicine, and co-founder, Blackboard, Inc. 4 Do the worst thing first. Stop putting tasks off until tomorrow or the next day. Get the difficult or tedious calls, reports, and meetings out of the way first to make the remainder of the day easier. —Drew Stevens, CEO, Orca Communications

coworkers about what times are appropriate to interrupt you. It’s also important to manage your electronic interruptions – turn off mobile notifications and set aside specific time to check email. —William Gadea, founder, IdeaRocket

For more information, visit glassdoor.com

5 Mitigate your distractions. If need be, find a quiet place to work or talk to your

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

11


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL MARCO RECEIVES AWARD, PURCHASES COMPANIES IN MISSOURI, MINNESOTA For the second year in a row, Marco received the “Triple Crown Award” from CRN®, a brand of The Channel Company. Forty North American solution providers had the necessary revenue, growth and technical expertise to be recognized on three of CRN’s solution provider lists, earning them the Triple Crown Award this year. Marco recently purchased Koestner Office Products, Inc. (KOPI), a copier/printer company based in Jefferson City, Missouri. Marco also purchased BusinessWare Solutions, an IT services and managed print company headquartered in Hutchinson, with locations in Owatonna, Willmar and Chanhassen.

WHEELOCK AMONG TOP WEALTH ADVISORS Brad Wheelock was recognized by Forbes magazine as one of ‘America’s Top Wealth Advisors’ for the second year. The list, which included all firms, across all platforms in all geographies, included only three representatives from Minnesota. Wheelock, a 30-year veteran, was the only out-state advisor to make the Forbes list. He’s also been ranked among the top 1 percent of wealth advisors in the nation for the last nine years by Barron’s magazine, a Wall Street Journal publication.

ESCH JOINS RINKE NOONAN Jayne Esch joined the Rinke Noonan law firm. She is a recent graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School and will focus her practice on agricultural law.

Why Care?

Enlightened self-interest is good for you… and good for business. By Greg Vandal

D

uring my years as a public educator, I occasionally encountered individuals who would rationalize a lack of interest in education in general, and public schools in particular, by saying “I don’t have any kids so why should I care?” My early response was primarily based on the argument that a healthy society has a shared obligation for the public good. While I still subscribe to that notion, it didn’t necessarily resonate with those who believed that the obligation belonged more exclusively to the current crop of parents. Today I’m more likely to respond with “It’s in your own best interest for children to be well educated so they can lead productive lives. Your economic health, and even your personal safety, are enhanced as a result.” This is what philosophers refer to as “enlightened self-interest.” Essentially, it is a belief that one can advance personal interests and, at the same time, have a positive impact on others. With children in the neighborhood, for example, I’m more likely to keep them from chasing across my lawn or messing with my stuff if I help ensure that they are

able to spend quality time in school, sports, or some other positive activity. This is good for me, good for the kids, and good for the neighborhood. Enlightened self-interest drives many successful business people I know into levels of civic engagement that surely add time and complexity to already busy lives. Eric, a banker with a young family and many personal and business responsibilities, served on the board for the Boys and Girls Club and did a stint as president of a local Rotary club. He is active in United Way and a willing community volunteer. Diane’s service resume is long and impressive. She sits on the United Way Board, was integral in fundraising for the new YMCA, and has volunteered her professional services for flood relief and other disaster response efforts. She is a genuine cheerleader – her own word – for all things Central Minnesota. And she has done this while always holding demanding professional positions and meeting the multigenerational needs of her family. There are so many others I know like Eric and Diane.

These fine people are surely driven by a spirit of altruism; a genuine desire to give to others. But they also understand that important connections are made through each of these interactions. Business relationships are built and positive professional reputations grow as a result of volunteer efforts. The return on the investment of time might not be so easily quantified for the bottom line, but it is tangible nonetheless. I trust this has been good for Eric, Diane and the countless other business people who regularly take time away from work and family for community service. It has certainly been good for all of us who they so graciously serve.

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@ voxliberi.com.

12

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8


POINT OF VIEW

Business Central asks readers:

What is your favorite memory of your first job?

My first job was as a dishwasher then cook at Kay’s Kitchen in St. Joe. I loved the rhythm of the kitchen, preparing, plating, serving. There is something so gratifying about seeing people loosen their waistbands because the food you made was so good they couldn’t stop eating."

Rachel Templin, Finken Water Treatment, Plumbing, Heating & Cooling

There are many favorite memories of my first job, but overall, I’d say some of my favorite days were when I handed stipend checks to the students who participated in our high school internship program. I will say I felt most proud of myself when Gail, my supervisor, asked me to edit Business Central for the first time. And when she assigned me my first cover story – that was a fun day!"

Whitney Ditlevson, Stearns Electric

My first job was a Minneapolis Sunday paper route. It was character building. The paper came in three sections so I had to put them together before delivering. They were thick and heavy (not like today), and I had to load them in a wagon to deliver them. It was especially challenging in the winter. Then I had to ‘collect’ the payment by going door-to-door. It was character building. Yes."

Michael Forsberg • Forsberg Investments and Insurance

In March we’ll hear a few more “First Job” stories!

Redefining Commercial Real Estate We’ll keep you engaged every step of the way.

LEASING | SALES | DEVELOPME NT

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

320.257.5400 | RICEPROPERTIES.COM

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

13


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

NEWS REEL FALCON NATIONAL BANK ADDS, PROMOTES STAFF Falcon National Bank hired Joe Bahen as the vice president of finance. He brings 12 years of finance, accounting and audit experience to Falcon, most recently as director of financial planning and analysis with UnitedHealth Group in Minnetonka. Derek Hemmer joined Falcon National Bank as a business banker with his primary office in Foley. Hemmer brings 13 years of commercial lending experience in both the Minnesota and Colorado Markets. Falcon Bank promoted Jennifer Volkmann to relationship banking supervisor. She has been with the bank for about two years. Falcon Leasing, a division of Falcon National Bank, hired Janelle Frank as the leasing sales coordinator. She brings 12 years of equipment leasing experience in sales and marketing.

KRUMP WINS TRIP TO HAWAII Independent insurance agent Deborah A. Krump, Waite Park, earned a trip to AFLAC’s 2017 National Convention at the Hilton Hawaiian Village in Honolulu, Hawaii. Krump qualified for the October incentive by selling more than $245,000 annualized premium of supplemental insurance during AFLAC’s 39-week qualification period ending August 2017. She is one of only nine Minnesota agents to secure the honor. Krump has qualified for the convention three times during her 14-year affiliation with AFLAC.

14

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

Business Expenses When you have a business, you can deduct many of the costs of operating your business. But do you actually know which ones qualify? By Chris Panek

I

f you are unsure about the deductibility of a business expense, simply ask yourself: Is it for business use? And second, is it an ordinary and necessary expense for your trade or business? Ordinary expenses are common and accepted in your field of business. Necessary expenses are helpful and appropriate for your business. Be sure you are capturing all of the business expenses you incur. Here are a few of which you may not be aware. General business expenses You are probably aware of general business expense such as office expenses or supplies, but be sure to keep track of any general business expenses that you

may be purchasing with personal money. If you pay cash for a quick trip to the office supply store, keep your receipt and deduct it. Meals and entertainment Although you only get to deduct 50 percent of these expenses, as long as you are documenting the businessrelated expenses that meet the IRS rules, they are deductible and often missed. Personal assets converted to business use Did you have personal assets that you used to get your business going? If the assets are being used for your business, you can use the fair market value in your business.

Automobile expenses If you are using your personal vehicle for business use, be sure to track your miles. Put a notebook in your vehicle to log and record each trip or download a tracking app. This expense might seem like it wouldn’t be much, but you will be surprised at end of the year to see how much it has added up. Telephone expenses You can deduct any portion of your telephone expenses that are used for business purposes. Home office deduction Do you use a portion of your home for a home office that is used regularly and exclusively for your business? If so, you may be entitled to deduct expenses which could include mortgage interest, property taxes, utilities and repairs. Petty cash If you have a small cash fund you use for items such as postage, parking or office items, be sure to capture where this money is going to record these business expenses.

contributor Chris Panek is a Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor and Certified Public Accountant at Christine R Panek, CPA with over 20 years of experience helping small businesses with accounting and bookkeeping, financial statement preparation, QuickBooks consulting and payroll services in the St. Cloud area.


STEARNS BANK CUSTOMER Self-employed health insurance With health insurance premiums on the rise, you don’t want to miss this deduction on your tax return. If you show a profit, you may be able to deduct these expenses.

Your Work. Your Legacy. There’s a sense of pride in doing the job right. We’ve been treating our customers like family for over 100 years and we’re ready to do the same for you!

NG B A MO

N

ON

IN THE NATI

A

BILLIO

2017

+

Employee business expenses Employees may also be able to deduct certain non-reimbursed work-related expenses such as business travel, use of your car, meals and entertainment, education, supplies, tools and use of your home. Accounting for all of your business expenses may seem like a huge task, but if you have a good system in place to record all of your transactions, you will see how simple and stress free it can be. Try to use your business checking account and business credit cards whenever possible and be sure to reconcile these statements. If you have questions, contact your accountant or tax preparer to get further clarification.

1 # BANK $2

Non-deductible expenses Items such as penalties and fines to a government agency, personal and family expenses, political contributions and bribes and kickbacks are not deductible.

S

ASSETS

Insurance premium expenses If it is a business-related insurance policy such as errors and omissions, general liability or workers’ compensation you can deduct these business expenses.

K

IN

N

For a business loan, call 1-888-320-2899. For equipment finance, call 1-800-247-1922.

Advertising and promotion You are working hard to get the word out about your business, so remember to record these business expenses such as newspaper, radio or online ads.

Owner: Williams Integracare Clinic Sartell, MN

Interest payments If you financed a loan for your business, the interest is deductible as a business expense.

Dr. Brownie Williams

follow us

| stearnsbank.com | Member FDIC

*Based on 3-year ROAA, “The Superstar 75.” Independent Banker, May 2017; Based on 3-year ROAE, “Metrics & Measures, Midtier Rankings.” American Banker, June 2017.

HUTCHINSON HIGH SCHOOL

BUILDING OUR COMMUNITY

BUILDING TOMORROW TODAY

As one of the leading education construction contractors in Minnesota, we pride ourselves on making sure the schools of today meets tomorrow’s needs. We balance budget constraints with the need to be scalable, adaptable and transformational for the students and the educators who teach them.

St. Joseph, MN | 320.363.7781 | wgohman.com

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

DESIGN BUILD

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

BUILDING REMODELING

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

15


TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

Boulder Ridge Golf Club, a 9-hole, par 35 friendly golf course located in south St. Cloud, 2750 County Road 74, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Zach Fuchs, Peg Imholte.

Bright Show International Consulting and Personal Finance, manufacturer and sourcing company for a wide range of products in almost all industries, 1661 Westwind Road, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Mike Bueckers, Dr. Mark Roerick.

Farm-Rite of St. Cloud, an authorized Bobcat dealer offering sales, parts, service, and rental of new and used Bobcat compact, 810 Mayhew Lake Road NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Dr. Mark Roerick, Jay Kockler, Caryn Stadther.

Mies Outland St. Cloud, full service Polaris Ranger, RZR, ATV, snowmobile dealer, victory motorcycle, used motorcycles, Yamaha watercraft, 3653 32nd Street SE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Rich Gallus, Shawn Kral, Steve Mies, Jeff Mies, Tammy Buttweiler.

TOP HATS: MILESTONES 30-year Chamber member Wollak Construction, Inc., residential building and remodeling, 6225 Lark Road NW, Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, Terri Wollak, Ernie Wollak, Julie Forsberg.

30-year Chamber member Northway Dental Associates, 1500 Northway Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Peg Imholte, Brent Deragisch, Bruce Kudak, Sarah Layne, Greg Lehman, Amanda Sperl, Jeff Flemming, Inese Mehr.

“Brian has given us tools that are easy to follow, easy to implement and it’s a no brainer, once he talks about it.”

Design. Build. Solutions.

CINDY JOHNSON MARKETING MANAGER PREMIER REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Development • Architectural Design • Construction Services • Single source. Superior service. Remarkable results.

320.251.4109 | 800.772.1758 | millerab.com

16

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

BRIAN HART

Sandler Training 26 8th Avenue South St. Cloud, MN 320-281-3056 www.BrianHart.Sandler.com


TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

St. Cloud Subaru, Subaru sales and service, 141 Park Ave. S, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Jake Hallerman, Bobby Konnight, Caryn Stadther.

Commercial Realty Solutions, a commercial real estate brokerage based in Buffalo, MN. Specializing in sales and leasing of commercial real estate as well as the sale of businesses. Pictured: Rick Poganski, Cheree Hoese, Wayne Elam, Eric O’Brien, Beth Putz.

Graphic Printing Solutions, Inc., a large format printing company, printing on a wide variety of materials, banners, billboards, yard signs and retail store signage, 24247 County Road 7 #243, St. Augusta. Pictured: Roger Schleper, Denise Clifton, David Kurilla, Tom Fenton, Matt Knutson.

The Sanctuary at St. Cloud, assisted living and memory care for all income levels for the older adult, 2410 20th Ave. SE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Rachel Salzwedel, Scott Ampe, Kristi Keller-Smith, Diane Diego Ohmann

TOP HATS: MILESTONES 30-year Chamber member Royl Masonry Company, commercial contractor specializing in all types of masonry construction, 2445 Imperial Drive, St. Cloud. Pictured: Inese Mehr, Kurt Lommel, Brian Jarl.

35-year Chamber member Quality Appliance and TV Center, sales and service of major appliances, electronics, heating and cooling equipment, 63 3rd Street NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Ron Harper, Kris Hellickson.

Speed & Service Matter Most - That’s Why We Make Priority Dakota Mailing’s Five-Star Service Makes YOUYOU OurOur Priority Tired BIG companies too distant and out-of-touch to deliver Whenof you’re ready to choose your next mailing system, why y responsive, reliable solutionsinfor your mailroom? Dakota a not ring for the best-in-class products and support? Dakota Mailing & Shipping Equipment Inc. is a locally owned, Mailing & Shipping Equipment Inc. offers complete menu of INDEPENDENT dealership that offers a fullamenu of mailing Pitney Bowes solutions products that help putting you save time and first. money— and shipping all while customers So— when choosing nextcompromise— mailing system don’t limit glove” yourself without making your a single truly “white to the lunch menu, ring for the best-in-class. service.

LOCAL Service with Expert Technicians Dakota Mailing’s service team Our service team is highly trained onisa thoroughly wide range of equipment from a varietyon of manufacturers. our local trained and certified Pitney BowesCall equipment officeisand you’llto speak to a live customer service specialist and ready support you for exceptional who will help resolve quickly as you possible, performance. Call your our issue localas office and will whethertothat means over-the-phone troubleshooting or speak a live customer service specialist for prompt scheduling of on-site service. prompt and reliable scheduling of technicians to handle your service needs in a flash.

NEW W Aggressive, A All-Inclusive nc clusive Pricing

On meters, folding and Onpostage postage ostage tage meters, meters folding inserting solutions, shipping shipping and inserting solutions, and software and and andreceiving receiving software mail software mailautomation automation software and and hardware.

hardware.

Thorough Consultation

Our sales will help Our salesconsultants consultants will you help you find the solution to suittoyour find theright right solution suit your needs now and in the future, no no needs now and in the future, matter who the manufacturer. matter who the manufacturer.

‘Ring Today -701.451.0663 Call Us’ Today: 701.451.0663 “The Dealer is the Difference” PO Box 9514 • Fargo, ND 58106 info@dakotamailing.com • www.dakotamailing.com

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

17


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

NETWORK

Sauk Rapids Chamber events provide opportunities to meet new people and make a difference.

Deb Huschle, Spirit 92.9

Cindy Battleson, Rapids Alterations (L); Dave Battleson; Jennifer Brown, St. Cloud Mortgage

Roy Dodds, Urban Lodge (L); and Ross Olson, City of Sauk Rapids at Business After Hours; at Urban Lodge Brewery and Restaurant

Carl Newbanks, UCP of Central MN; and John Uphoff, Benton Economic Partnership; help out at the Habitat for Humanity house in Sauk Rapids on behalf of the Sauk Rapids Chamber.

Joyce Solt, Mahowald Insurance (L); and Lynn Holmvig, Pilgrims

Getting ready to promote the Sauk Rapids Chamber in the community: Rory Cruser, Kernel by Spectrum Reach (L); Sam Lieser, Edina Realty; Carl Newbanks, UCP of Central Minn.; Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction; Rachel Johnson, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Central Minn.; Berni Halaas, New Century Real Estate; Robin Grote and Brenda Eisenschenk, InteleCONNECT.

WENDY HENDRICKS

BUY SELL LEASE

BUSINESS BROKERAGE C: 320.293.6379

wendy@PremierHomeSearch.com PremierCommercialSearch.com

18

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

Tammy Biery, Career Solutions


GROW

Members of the Chamber ’s Leadership class learn about themselves and each other at the two-day retreat in October.

Kevin Johnson, K. Johnson Construction, brought some welcome muscle to the Habitat for Humanity project. Speaker Bruce Miles, Big River Group

Katie Koester, Landwehr Tax and Accounting (L); April Diederich, Proviant Group

Scott Christman, DCI, Inc. (L); Cassandra Smith, Northland Capital; Josh Vraa, Viking Coca-Cola

Speaker Larry Logeman, Executive Express

WE’LL GET YOU THERE... PUNTA G FORT MYE ORDA/ RS, FLORID A

Standing: Volunteer Day Chairs Laurie Larson, Rasmussen and Jason Primus, BerganKDV

The Choice is Yours... Choose the Best!

WORKING WITH BUYERS, SELLERS, REALTORS, LENDERS AND BUILDERS THROUGHOUT CENTRAL AND GREATER MINNESOTA

• Professional Residential & Commercial Closing Services • Construction Disbursing Experts • Abstracting • Title Insurance • Tax Deferred 1031 Exchanges

Working with buyers, sellers, realtors, lenders and builders throughout Central and Greater Minnesota

WORKING WORKING WITH BUYERS, WITH SELLERS, BUYERS,REALTORS, SELLERS, REALTORS, LENDERS AND LENDERS AND BUILDERS THROUGHOUT BUILDERS THROUGHOUT CENTRAL AND CENTRAL GREATER AND MINNESOTA GREATER MINNESOTA • Professional Residential • Professional & Commercial Residential Closing & Commercial Services Closing • Construction Services Disbursing • Construction Experts Disbursing Experts • Abstracting ••Title Abstracting Insurance• Title • Tax Insurance Deferred •1031 Tax Exchanges Deferred 1031 Exchanges

, HOENIX MESA/P NA ARIZO

Sue Lentner, Sue Lentner,

Sue Lentner

St. Cloud Area Escrow St. Cloud Manager Area Escrow Manager

St. Cloud Area Escrow Manager

Brenda Roettger Brenda Roettger

Brenda Roettger

Brenda Roettger

Sue Lentner,

St. Cloud Area Escrow Manager

Mary Schneider

Mary Weis

Melanie Walz

Mary Mary Weis Melanie 122 12th Ave. N. I Sr. Cloud, MN 56303 I (320) 253-2096 Red River Ave. S. I Cold Spring, MN 56320 I (320) 685-4280 Schneider 2081-800-892-2399 Walz I www.tricountyabstract.com

Mary Schneider Mary Schneider Melanie Walz Mary Weis Mary Weis Melanie Walz

Choose your destination & BOOK NOW!

122 12th Ave. 122N. 12th I Sr.Ave. Cloud, N. I MN Sr. Cloud, 56303MN I (320) 56303 253-2096 I (320) 253-2096 208 Red River 208Ave. Red S. River Ave.Spring, S. I Cold I Cold MNSpring, 56320MN I (320) 56320 685-4280 I (320) 685-4280

Professional Residential & Commercial Closing Services Title Insurance / Construction Disbursing Experts Abstracting / Tax Deferred 1031 Exchanges

1-800-892-2399 1-800-892-2399 I www.tricountyabstract.com I www.tricountyabstract.com

stcloudairport.com

122 12th Ave. N / St. Cloud, MN 56303 / 320-253-2096 208 Red River Ave. S. / Cold Spring, MN 56320 / 320-685-4280

1-800-892-2399 / tricountyabstract.com

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

19


InSIDE THIS ISSUE: Management Toolkit • Entreprenuerism •

BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

Tech Strategies • Economy Central by Falcon Bank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

Kick-Starting Your Creativity New and unusual experiences may improve your problem-solving abilities.

By Jill Copeland

An individual’s unique skills, attitudes and motivation to think, as well as implement creative ideas, can be hampered by a lack of new experiences.

C

reativity comes from the most unexpected places… in fact, creativity comes from any unexpected place. Psychology research confirms that traveling to new environments and experiencing new adventures inspires creativity, benefitting individuals and the businesses for which they work. A study linking innovative contributions to individuals’ travel experiences is the first to confirm that new and unusual experiences of influential employees can impact a business’ success.

20

Innovation, problem-solving and improved output The study, published in the Academy of Management Journal (Adam Galinsky, 2015) addressed specific measurements by which professional foreign experiences translate into creative innovations for a business. By evaluating 11 years and 21 seasons of fashion industry collections, change in creativity was captured via assessed financial value and industry reviews. Findings indicate

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

organizations hiring individuals with travel experiences may be more capable of innovation. Findings show travel can channel large amounts of new information into minds that are adept at information absorption, leading to new ideas and increased risk-taking. Travelers are more likely to build cross-organizational teams to achieve their goals, and those who are successful travelers foster skills that enable them to more readily facilitate between business units, colleagues and partners. On the flip side, a lack of new experiences can be detrimental to a person’s creativity. An individual’s unique skills, attitudes and motivation to think, as well as implement creative ideas, can be hampered by a lack of new experiences, the study shows. Increasing creativity in everyday life Routine, then, could be the antithesis of creativity. To

enhance creativity, individuals can apply small changes to their everyday experiences, to prevent stagnation and force the brain to problem-solve. New experiences that could be incorporated into a daily routine include: • Take a new route to work. • Try an entirely new transportation method such as walking, biking, or public transportation. • Grocery shop in a different store or city. • Participate in a group expedition. • Enroll in a language immersion class. • Try an unfamiliar food or restaurant. The study confirmed that exposure to various environments makes individuals more capable of risk-taking. Risk-taking builds confidence, which leads to new innovations and “greater ability to recognize non-traditional opportunities in changing processes.” These innovative leaders are ripe


to lead teams and entire organizations to success. Creativity leads to success – personal and professional Sales and Marketing Manager Gretchen Winters, Bursch Travel, says travel encourages people to think differently about their lives, compare their lifestyles to alternative ones, and pick up new habits, hobbies and values. “During travel we must use what we have, so we have to adapt and be resourceful,” she said. Traveling helps with skills such as negotiation, compromise and patience. Individuals can participate in new experiences without traveling across the world, however. Nancy Krasean, marketing manager at Cragun’s Resort and Legacy Golf says midweek getaways can save money while providing a dose of adventure. “Even taking a walk or getting fresh air after a day of long meetings can help groups bond together in unexpected ways,” she said. “When you are at a destination where you can’t go home at night, it forces individuals to get to know each other.” Keep an open mind when searching for new experiences. Kathy Reichenbach, marketing director at Madden’s on Gull Lake, recommends travelers inject fun and creativity into their adventures by simply trying new activities, such as trapshooting, croquet, painting classes, or water-ski lessons. Reichenbach pointed out that there are nearby adventures such as race car driving, mountain biking and ziplining. “Exploring outside your comfort zone will refresh and renew just about anyone, anywhere.” Jill Copeland is a senior media analyst with SAP SuccessFactors, global

SARTELL COMMUNITY CENTER SARTELL, MN

www. s t r ackcom p ani es . com Commercial Construction • Project Management • Real Estate Services

www.scr-mn.com

Formerly St. Cloud Refrigeration

Central | Metro

St. Cloud • Twin Cities Wilmar • Alexandria 1-800-827-1642

REFRIGERATION

Northern

Brainerd • Baxter 1-800-273-9071

HVAC

Duluth | Superior

SERVICE

1-800-827-1642

BUILDING AUTOMATION FOOD SERVICE

Southern

Rochester 1-877-399-4546 Mankato 1-800-447-3259

provider of cloud-based human capital management (HCM) software. J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

21


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools ENTREPRENEURISM

Credit Lines

A business line of credit can be a valuable tool to help business owners manage cash-flow and grow their businesses. By Jessica Bitz

T

here are many different types of lines of credit offered by financial institutions. The two we will review are “revolving lines of credit” and “straight lines of credit.” When determining which type of line of credit best meets your needs, the first step is to determine the intended business purpose of the line. About Lines Lines of credit are short term in nature and typically have a

maturity less than 24 months. The interest rate on both types of lines is typically variable and tied to a known index such as the Wall Street Journal Prime, or LIBOR. “Interest only” payments are generally required on all lines of credit and are based on the amount of credit outstanding (balance owed) on a daily basis. Line of credit interest rates are based primarily on the borrower’s credit risk, assigned collateral, and servicing costs. They can be different for every line of

Edward Glaeser (Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University)

“Understanding Cities”

The Winter Institute is a celebration of economic education featuring: valuable networking opportunities, nationally recognized speakers, and current issues of interest.

Elite:

February 1-2, 2018

Pioneer: Institute for Humane Studies, Microbiologics, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, Times Media

St. Cloud State University and 912 Regency Plaza, St. Cloud, MN

Innovator: Anonymous Donor, Bill Schramm, Granite Equity Partners, Marco, National Joint Powers Alliance, Small Business Development Center

“Rediscovering Cities” Registration will open by December 1st

https://www.stcloudstate.edu/conferences/winter-institute/

22

Thank you to our generous sponsors!

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

Entrepreneur: Executive Express, Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation, MFP, Inc., Minnesota Council on Economic Education, Advocate: City of Waite Park, Falcon National Bank, Great River Federal Credit Union, Minnwest Bank, Sandler Training brought to you by Economics Department School of Public Affairs Center for Economic Education

St. Cloud State University is committed to legal affirmative action, equal opportunity, access and diversity of its campus community. (http://scsu.mn/scsuoea)

10% discount promo code: Chamber


credit, and may vary greatly between financial institutions.

credit depending on the type of collateral and business.

Revolving A revolving line of credit is used to fund working capital needs such as financing accounts receivables and inventory, both of which can fluctuate over time. Specific advance rates are typically established and if a business is seasonal the bank may require a resting period, meaning the line of credit would be required to be paid to a zero balance for a specific period. A revolving line of credit can be drawn on multiple times up to the maximum line balance. A bank may require principal payments on a revolving line of

Straight Straight lines of credit are used to fund a specific purpose, such as new construction, an addition to a building, or equipment purchases. Straight lines can be drawn on over a course of time to fund the construction or build-out and are termed out after the line has been drawn and the project is complete. The difference between a revolving line and a straight line is that a straight line can only be drawn to the line amount once.

Businesses should always use their lines of credit for the original intended purpose, such as short term working capital needs. Business owners who need to purchase a long-term asset should talk to a financial institution about a better suited financing alternative. If you believe you and your business could benefit from a line of credit, and are looking to take the next steps, it will be helpful to be prepared prior to approaching a financial institution. The typical required documentation includes three years of business

tax returns, a current interim income statement and balance sheet, three years of personal tax returns, and a personal financial statement. The financial institution will also want to visit your business and gain knowledge and insight into the management and history of your company. A line of credit can be a powerful tool. It can provide the opportunity for your business to cover short term cash flow shortages that are necessary to cover expenses, and they can also provide the opportunity for your business to grow and expand.

contributor Jessica Bitz is market president at Falcon National Bank.

Business Broker Sell your business Find a business

Access to over 300 Franchises Commercial Property If you are Selling or Buying Ø Ø Ø Ø Ø

Confidential Business Analysis Sale Structure Confidentially Network & Advertise the Sale Assist & Control Information Flow Support through Due Diligence to Closing

Marv Soldner 40+ Years of Business Experience in Minnesota 320 267-9626 msoldner@tworld.com www.tworldminnesota.com

Put our 50+ years of experience to work for your family! GARY / 320.980.3910 LISA / 320.980.3915

GARY AND LISA BARNIER REMAX Results 3950 3rd St. N. St Cloud, MN 56303

Real Estate Consultants Caring, professional real estate service!

Complimentary Equity Evaluation of Your Home

Lisaandgary@msn.com // www.stcloudhomefinder.com J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

23


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools TECH NEWS

Media organizations are getting rid of their comment sections entirely, saying that the volume of comments and aggressive speech make the forums too difficult for individuals to moderate. Google’s new subsidiary, JIGSAW, is piloting a set of tools called Conversation AI, designed to use machine learning to automatically spot and moderate hate speech online more accurately and efficiently than humans ever could. Source: WNYC

CONCENTRATE

Does switching between very different sorts of tasks eat into your productivity? Then consider CONCENTRATE, which lets you craft sets of tools for different types of work and switch cleanly between them. For instance, if you activate 'Writing,' the app can automatically close your email client and internet browser; block Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube; launch Microsoft Word; and set your instant messaging status to "away." That’s just one of several tools that can help you control the distraction epidemic. Learn about others at BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Good Germs A startup called Indigo is working on a way to boost crop yields by reintroducing microbes that have been killed by pesticides and other chemicals. The company, which has brought in $56 million in funding, says this approach led to 10 percent higher yields in one of its tests. Source: The Verge For more on the latest in agriculture, visit the Central Minnesota Farm Show, February 27-March 1 at the River’s Edge Convention Center. See the insert (next page) in this issue of Business Central for more information.

#HDM2018

january 19th & 20th lake george

Tickets available at area coborn’s / cash wise stores and at paramountarts.org 24

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

Source: Inc.

Machine Moderation


CULTIVATING FRIENDSHIPS

2018

CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW

FEBRUARY 27-MARCH 1, 2018 J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

25


WELCOME TO THE FARM SHOW

Welcome to the

2018 Central Minnesota Farm Show!

ANDY NOBLE

Advantage 1 Insurance Agency Volunteer Chair, Central Minn. Farm Show

BERNIE QUIST

Compeer Financial Volunteer Vice Chair, Central Minn. Farm Show

SHERI WEGNER

2018 Farm Show Coordinator St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

26

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

T

he Central Minnesota Farm Show, brought to you by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is the largest indoor show if its kind in the region. Why does such a show exist in this growing metropolitan area? Because agriculture is still one of the area’s leading industries! Since opening its doors 50+ years ago, the Farm Show has been a popular community event for Central Minnesota. The show offers something for everyone with an interest in agriculture. When you turn to the center of this program, you’ll find a complete map of the show and a list of vendors to help you make the most of your visit. The St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce is committed to helping area farmers through organization and sponsorship of the Central Minnesota Farm Show. And there’s something else we’d like you to know. As part of

our commitment to agriculture and education, each year the Chamber dedicates a portion of the proceeds from the Farm Show to student scholarships. Volunteers have worked hard to put together a show that you will find both valuable and fun. Enjoy your visit with us and if you have questions or suggestions, please stop by the information booth. We’d like to hear from you. Sincerely, Andy Noble, Bernie Quist, and Sheri Wegner

Thank you to our Champion Sponsor


JOBS

Growing Employees

Ag-related companies are wondering where their next employees will come from – and the Chamber is trying to help. SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE

B

usinesses throughout the country are struggling to find employees. In Central Minnesota almost everyone will tell you that they would hire if they could just find the right person. The shortage is becoming particularly acute in ag-related businesses. There is such a shortage of students in the agriculture colleges that the ag-related companies are recruiting students with degrees in other disciplines such as business and marketing. In fact, the opportunities are almost unlimited for students who are willing to relocate in the U.S., as well as overseas. With a competitive demand for students and teachers specializing in agriculture, Eric Welsh, of the American Society of Agronomy, says there is an annual shortage of at least 2,000 to 3,000 graduates specializing in agriculture. The St. Cloud Area Chamber is committed to doing our small part to help

address the shortage. Each year we dedicate some of the proceeds from the Central Minnesota Farm Show to student scholarships. In the past those scholarships have been targeted at high school seniors. Since the program started in 1982, the Chamber has awarded over 200 scholarships for a total of almost $75,000. Last year we expanded our scholarship program to include trade school, and college students, as well as high school students. And we broadened our service area to include 71 Central Minnesota high schools and 10 colleges and trade schools. This was well received and is now part of our annual scholarship program. All students are required to apply for the scholarships, which are awarded based on merit and a stated intent to continue their education by studying some area of agriculture. •

There will be five guaranteed scholarships worth $1,000 each awarded this year, and we’ll announce the recipients at the Farm Show on Wednesday, Feb. 28. This year the Central Minnesota Farm Show committee is encouraging businesses to support our agricultural scholarship program. We will match dollar-for-dollar up to the first $5,000 in scholarship donations we receive, in the hope of awarding ten $1,000 scholarships. For more information, or to apply for a scholarship, visit CentralMNFarmShow.com Application deadline is February 2, 2018.

PRINCETON AGENCIES INC. Rob Stay // Agribusiness Agent 320-968-6884 www.princetonins.com

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

27


2018 BOOTH FLOOR PLAN

BOOTH FLOOR PLAN

2018 Farm Show Seminar Schedule TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 27

Session 1: 10:30 - 11:45 a.m.; Session 2: 1:30-2:45 p.m. Carrying the Load: Is your equipment fit for the road? Desciption: Dave Busse, commercial motor vehicle officer with the Minnesota State Patrol will provide the latest rules and regulations on roadside inspections, load securement, transporting hazardous materials, road safety with farm equipment, federal farm exemptions and state statutes, and common paperwork and equipment violations. Water Quality/Buffer Zone Panel This panel will represent the legal side, the farmer’s point of view, and government agencies. ----------------------Presenters and topics are subject to change. For the most current information visit CentralMNFarmShow.com

28

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8


2018 Farm Show Seminar Schedule WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 28

Session 1: 10:30 - 11:45 a.m.; Session 2: 1:30-2:45 p.m. Market Trends on Equipment: Looking Forward Scott Steffes, Steffes Group, Inc., is a nationally recognized leader in the auction industry, engaged in the business of marketing farm, construction, and industrial equipment and real estate at public auction. HIs connection with agri-business gives him unique insight on current market trends.

THURSDAY, MARCH 1 Estate Planning Part 1: 10:30 a.m. – noon Estate Planning Part 2: 1:30 - 3 p.m.

Estate Transition: Planning Your Legacy Panelists Cathy Olson, senior credit officer, Compeer Financial; David Bau, University of Minnesota Extension educator; and Brian J. Schoenborn, attorney at Stinson Leonard Street; present key steps, tax strategies, and insights on developing and implementing a successful farm transition plan. ----------------------Presenters and topics are subject to change. For the most current information visit CentralMNFarmShow.com

Visit us at the Central Minnesota Farm Show Booth #B917 Customized equipment

Ag financing by a

finance & lease options:

Preferred FSA Lender:

1-800-247-1922

320-845-2151

Stop by our chance booth for a n bin ai gr to win a ! sh ca of ll fu

Craig

follow us

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

Chad

| stearnsbank.com

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

29


EXHIBITORSBY by NAME name EXHIBITORS

Company Name ..............Booth # A Ag Solutions......................... A102 Ag Spray Equipment............B811 Agri-King, Inc.........................B913 Agri-Plastic and Silo Repair......A6 Agri-Systems, Inc................ B1009 Albers Dairy Equipment, Inc........ .............................................. A206 Aldrich Tractor Inc......................... .............C4007-4010 C5000-5003 Alltech........................................A5 American Door Works..........B838 American Pressure, Inc........ A315 AMPI................................... C7022 AMPS, Inc..............................B810 Arnold's of St. Cloud..................... ................. B922-925 B1000-1003 Arnzen Construction and St. Rosa Lumber......................... ..........C3011-3013 C4004-4006

320.836.2284 888.276.1751

arnzenconstructioninc.com BOOTH# C3011-3013; C4004-4006

Artex..............................A316-317 Arvig.................................... C7011 Auto Value Parts Stores................ .................................. C7000-7001 Avon Ag Line.............................A2 B Bath Planet..................B8928-929 Belgrade Co-op................... A508 Besser's Bike Barn.........A401-404 Big Gain, Inc..........................B823 BigIron Auction Company.B1025 Blue Horizon Energy.....A429-431 Bongards Creameries...........B931 Boss Supply Inc........ C7002-7003 Byron Seeds......................... A603 C Carlson Wholesale, Inc................. .............C2011-2012 C3004-3005 Catholic United Financial..... A213 Cen-Pe-Co............................ A513 Centra Sota Cooperative.............. .............C5009-5013 C6002-6006 Central McGowan.............. C3003 Central Minnesota Credit Union......................... A117 Central MN Corn Growers........... ...............................................B812 CHS Prairie Lakes................. A202

30

Cloverdale Equipment.................. ......................B831-833 B910-912 Compeer Financial..... B821/B900 Complete Grain System............... .......................................B802-804 COUNTRY Financial.....A 509-510 CowKuhlerz...............B1033-1034 CSF Inc./Automation Plus.. C7004 Cutco-Jill Sieben.................... A12 D Dairy Farmers of America.... A122 Dairyland Seed, Inc.............. A512 Dairyland Supply........................... ..................... A612-622 A700-710 Dan's Custom Welding Tables, LLC................B1006-1007 Department of Nursing Science, St. Cloud State University.... A203 E Easy Fix Rubber Products North America...................... A602 Edward Jones..................... B1023 F Farm Bureau Financial Services..................B902 Farm Rite Equipment of St. Cloud, Inc.............A417-418 Farm System, Inc.......B1026-1029 Farmers & Merchants State Bank............................. A516 Feed Stuff Bagging...............B828 Finken Companies............. C7024 Forward Farm Lines...................... ..................... A426-428 A503-505 Freeport State Bank..............B824 G G3 Power Systems, LLC...... A515 Garage Door Store...............B830 Geringhoff.....................A412-416 Gilman Copperative Creamery Association................... ................. B932-934 B1010-1012 Gold Country Seed............ B1021 Granite Electronics............... A200 Grassland Solutions............... A11 Green Energy Products....... A519 Growers Mineral Solutions.. A517 H Hanson Silo Company.C3007-3009 C4000-4002 HotsyMinnesota............A713-714 Hubbard Feeds.................... A606 Husky Spring Company....... A105 Hydro Engineering................B834 J Jordan Ag Supply, Inc....... B1022

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

K K&S Millwrights Inc.........C2002

BOOTH# C2002

KASM-AM/KDDG-FM..............A1 Kuhn North America, Inc.............. .......................................A300-304 L LeafGuard/Minnesota Home Improvements, Inc.... A400 Lemken USA..........................B835 Lifestyle Lumber, Inc............ A719 Lumber One....................... B1020 M Mark J. Traut Wells, Inc........B809 McKay's Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram Fiat............................... ............C4011-4013; C5004-5006 MEDA/Chem-Star.........A500-501 Messer Repair and Fabricating.... .......................................A308-310 Midsota Manufacturing Inc.......... .......................................A419-422 Midwest Machinery....................... .................... A520-522; A608-610 Mies Outland........................ A112 Mimbach Fleet Supply......... A110 Minnesota Farm Guide........ A201 Minnesota Farmers Union... A314 Minnesota Veterinary Medical Reseve Corps..........B930 Minnwest Bank..................B808 Modern Farm Equipment............. Munson Hybrids, Inc.......... C7006 N NAPA Central MN................B816 National Farmers Organization.... ............................................ C7013 Nelson Agri Structures & Ultimate Ag, LLC.......B903-904 Nextire Inc................ C5007-5008 Northland Buildings..............B907 Northland Farm Systems, Inc....... ...............................................B829 O O'Reilly Auto Parts............. C7010 P PAI Insurance.....................B807 Patz Corp..B935-939 B1013-1017 Peterson Farms Seed....A506-507

Pluto Legal, PLLC................. A313 Polysheild Spray Foam & Polyurea.............................B813 Powerhouse Outdoor Equipment ................. B926-927 B1004-1005 Powerlift Doors by French Maufacturing, Inc..........A220-222 Prairie Brand Seed............... A109 Producers Hybrids................ A712 Prudential Advisors.............. A106 Q QC Supply.............................B822 Quality Sales & Service, Inc..B915 R R & S Tire Service..........A604-605 RDO Equipment Company.......... ..................... A319-322 A407-410 Real Tuff, Inc..................A717-718 RetroGreen Energy.............. A100 Rob-See-Co........................ C3010 S Schlenner Wenner & Co.......B909 St. Cloud VA..........................B908 Stearns Bank N.A. - Equipment Finance Division.................B917 Stearns Electric Association.A423 Steffes Group, Inc.............A14-15 Sterling Water Inc., dba Culligan. ...............................................B825 Stine Seed............................ A204 T The Boot Shack.................... A503 The Fine Twine Company....B837 Thomas Tool and Supply.... A115 Thunder Seed..................... C7021 TransAgra..................................A9 W Waytashek Seed Sales..........B815 Weatherstar Company.........B916 Weigh Rite Sale Co............ C6001 Wieser Concrete................A212 Woller Equipment......................... ..................... A217-218 A305-306 Worms Lumber & Ready MIx....... .............................................. A601 WVAL Tri-County Brodcasting..... ................................................ A13 WW Osakis Silo Repair...... C6000 Y Your Home Improvement Company.............................. A518 Z Zip's Diesel Injection Service, Inc.......................... C7005


TECH

This Business of Farming

With the right sensors and cameras, drones are a perfect match for agriculture. By Roger Strom

While it’s possible to get a professional size drone for $1,200, a bigger unit with all the sensors and cameras can cost as much as $4,500.

L

ike a lot of guys, I really, really want a drone. Not some little one you buy at Radio Shack or Toys R Us. I’m talking about a high definition camera, heat seeking missiles, lasers, and whatever other attachments I can get on one of those babies. The problem is, I can’t figure out how to convince my better half that the world would be a better place if I had a drone. I’ve even thought of buying a couple of acres and calling it a farm. Because if you’re a farmer, your chances of getting “drone approval” are much higher. Farmers actually have justifiable reasons to own a drone.

Drones, also known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, are a perfect match for agriculture. With the right sensors and cameras, a farmer can check plant size, crop maturity, stand density, nutrient needs, stress, and pests among other things. It’s a lot more efficient than wading through muddy fields with a ruler and notepad. With thermal aerial images, drones can even measure the temperature of a plant. And they’re great for checking on livestock, fences, and equipment with a bird’s-eye view. When we talk about precision agriculture and reducing the amount of chemicals needed to raise

crops, the drone can be invaluable. Combining the drone data with the on-theground information, farmers have an incredibly accurate picture of what’s happening on their farms and how to best use their inputs. I’ve had farmers tell me how a drone was able to show them exactly where they need fertilizer and insecticide. Instead of treating entire fields, they were able to pinpoint the area that actually needed it. They found the drone images were a lot more accurate than some of the other mapping systems. There are several programs out there that let farmers, crop consultants and agronomists transform

the drone’s images into what are called “Normalized Difference Vegetation Index” (NDVI) maps that actually show where there is live green vegetation or not, something that can’t be spotted from the road. As my wife has pointed out (many times), drones aren’t cheap. While it’s possible to get a professional size drone for $1,200, a bigger unit with all the sensors and cameras can cost as much as $4,500. If you don’t mind sharing, several farmers could easily use the same drone. A drone could come in handy to see how the neighbor’s crops are doing compared to yours. It would eliminate a lot of the arguments at the coffee shop about who made the best seed choice or who’s doing the best job of farming. …jus-sayn •

____________________________________

Roger Strom is part of the Morning Show on KASM Radio in Albany. You can reach him at jussayn@live.com. Reprinted with permission from Strom Communications.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

31


Cultivating the future of farming. Family and farming go hand in hand. We know that because a lot of us are farmers too. That’s why we

personalize ag-related banking solutions to fit not only your needs right now, but for the next generation as well. Come visit our booth to learn more about how our relationship-based banking can support the vision you have for the growth and sustainability of your farm.

Come to our booth and talk farmerto-farmer with our friendly staff. Enter to win a $100 dollar gift certificate to Mimbach Fleet Supply.

Sauk Rapids 320.252.5121

Pierz 320.468.6422

Eden Valley 320.453.2000

NMLS #528169

FMpierz.com

MEMBER FDIC

1301 2nd St N

80 Main St

359 State St N


BusinessTools TECH STRATEGIES

Farming’s Future From robotics to drones, today’s farmers are using computer technology to increase efficiency and profitability. By Mary MacDonell Belisle quickly helps keep farmers profitable and the food supply stable,” Johnson said.

DeLaval Voluntary Milking System (VMS) and Lely Automated Milking Machine (AMS) are robotic milking The Autonomous Concept Vehicle (ACV)

Photo credit: caseih.com

F

rom the invention of the plow in 4,500 BCE, to its 1838 reinvention by John Deere, brainpower has trumped brawnpower when it comes to farming. We continue to find ways to make farming more profitable, sustainable, and ensure that farms pass to the next generation. Today, computer technology has changed how farmers interact with machines and how data is used in farm management. Farming’s future is here. “Every farmer deals with digital/precision farming differently,” said Adam Johnson, crop advisor, Centra Sota Cooperative. “Depending on the age of machinery you are running, there is different ability to capture yield data. . . Many growers have the mindset that you need to get on board with big data or you will be left behind.” Here are some examples of forward-looking technologies that are used to operate and collect data from farm equipment.

The Autonomous Concept Vehicle (ACV) from Case IH is a “tractor” that operates remotely via a tablet. The

software plots the most efficient passes in the field, and real-time views of the field are available from mounted cameras. Obstacles are detected, and the vehicle will stop and issue an alert to the farmer. The tractor works traditionally or with total autonomy, with a cab or without. It also works with other farm equipment.

Precision Planter’s SmartFirmerTM for organic matter and furrow environment sensing drops seeds at selected intervals and depths into a V-shaped seed trench, and “firms” the seeds into the soil at a uniform depth for even germination and yield. An optical sensor also maps organic material, soil type, typography, drainage, and moisture content of the field.

ShaperPro from Soil-Max TM

smooths out and shapes soil unevenness and rough spots left by a tile plow so farmers don’t have to disc it. (The tile plow installs drainage tiles; soil often mounds around the tiles.) The PTO (power takeoff)-driven implement with shaping knives attaches to the tractor.

Vanguard VM-4600 Seed Population and Liquid Fertilizer Monitor analyzes seed population and liquid fertilizer flow rate, up to 32 rows. The 7” LCD touch-screen displays graph data needed by the farmer to uniformly seed, space, and fertilize. It also provides seeds- and gallons-peracre comparison to target rates pre-set by the operator and allows adjustments.

eBee SQ Drone by senseFly uses an RGB (red/green/ blue) camera and SequoiaTM multi-spectral integrated sensor to gather data for crop health monitoring and analysis, and GPS for precise mapping of a farm field. The fixed-wing drone covers up to 500 acres in one flight, and eMotion software easily designs a flight plan. Geo-accurate data works with farm management information systems (FMIS) and precision farming machinery. “If you are farming 10,000 acres, up-to-date satellite imagery of crop canopies will help determine which farms may be lagging behind. Catching insect damage or weed growth or disease

systems (RMSs). Robotics provide time and labor savings, and increased production. The voluntary RMS “knows” each cow – level of milk production, cow size, teat placement, milking schedule. The RMS sanitizes and initiates milk flow with a soft spinning brush on a robotic arm. Another laser-guided arm places vacuum tubes, and milk is pumped at the cow’s production rate. The milk is then assessed as fit or unfit for human consumption and routed to the correct processing system. “If a grower doesn’t have the capital to always have the newest technology, they can partner with a supplier who does. Centra Sota has access to the newest technology, statistical software, and replicated yield data to help growers make informed decisions,” Johnson said. Mary MacDonell Belisle is a freelance writer-for-hire with mary macdonell belisle—wording for you.com, St. Cloud. You can find the sources used in this story at BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Editor’s Note: You can learn about these and other changes in the farming industry at the 2018 Central Minnesota Farm Show.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

33


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

Triumph of the City

If you think of cities as dirty, crime-ridden metropolises, think again. Research is showing that cities are actually the engines of progress and centers for innovation. By Lynn MacDonald

E

conomics is so cool. It’s a discipline with nearly limitless applications. Over the years economists have used the tools of economics to study a wide variety of topics ranging from the usual (capital investment) to the unusual (religion, romance, interstellar trade). One such economist is Edward Glaeser who specializes in understanding cities. Nobel Prize winning economist Gary Becker once said that before Glaeser, "urban economics was dried up. No one had come up with some new ways to look at cities." Growing up in New York, Glaeser fell in love with cities. He converted that passion into his life’s work as an economist. “I find cities so engrossing because they pose fascinating, important, and often troubling

questions,” Glaeser said. His book, Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier, explores intriguing questions like “What’s Good About Slums?” and “Is There Anything Greener Than Blacktop?” Don’t you want to know? In 2010, about 3.5 percent of U.S. land area was urban. “On a planet with vast amounts of space (all of humanity could fit in Texas—each of us with a personal townhouse), we choose cities,” according to Glaeser. Even though only a relatively small portion of land is devoted to urban areas, 80.7 percent of the U.S. population lived in urban areas in 2010. Between 2000-2010, the U.S. urban population growth rate was 12.1 percent compared to

a 9.7 percent growth rate in total U.S. population. We are choosing cities and Glaeser endeavors to explain why. Throughout the book, he expertly navigates a wide variety of topics ranging from workforce and productivity issues to the reasons why some cities decline while other cities succeed. He explores cities as engines of progress and centers for innovation. Cities connect people and allow for the exchange of ideas. Though there are major differences across cities and countries, and there are many different factors that contribute to whether or not a city succeeds, there is one common thread connecting successful cities. Glaeser insists that “to thrive, cities must attract smart people and enable them to work collaboratively.” The real heart of a city is its people. Glaeser intently wants us to understand that cities are people, not structures. It’s not about the buildings, but rather about bringing people together. Glaeser is telling us a human capital story -- human capital (education) helps cities succeed. Collaborative work and the benefit of proximity create productivity advantages. “On average, an extra year of schooling for a country’s entire

contributor Lynn MacDonald, Associate Professor of Economics and Director of the Winter Institute, St. Cloud State University, lcmacdonald@stcloudstate.edu

34

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

population is associated with a more than 30 percent increase in per capita gross domestic product,” according to Glaeser. Additionally, workers in U.S. metropolitan areas that include a large city earn 30 percent more than those outside of the metropolitan areas. The substantial income gap between urban and rural areas holds true across countries whether the country is rich or poor, and “on average, as the share of a country’s population that is urban rises by 10 percent, the country’s per capita output increases by 30 percent.” Glaeser’s work reflects his passion and love for cities and for people, because after all, cities are people. For the sources used in this story, and for more about SCSU’s Winter Institute, visit BusinessCentralMagazine.com

EDITOR’S NOTE: To hear more of Glaeser’s musings, grab a ticket to SCSU’s Winter Institute February 1-2, 2018. Glaeser will keynote with “Understanding Cities.” For more information, visit: stcloudstate.edu/ winterinstitute.


60,898*

November

December

Home Sales C

2016 October

September

August

March

July

June

$100M

October April

May

Residential

$80M

April

TOTAL:$62,060,898* $60M

March

$40M

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

TOTAL:$64,832,866

TOTAL:$84,908,072

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

2015

2016

2017*

1,151

986

571

2015 August #/$ #/$ #/$ February

St. Cloud

July $21,854,833 $32,774,443 $29,605,734 2017 January 0

500

Sauk Rapids 321 345 262 June $15,843,450 $22,647,287.40 $13,544,415

St. Augusta

March

79 $4,720,246

102 84 $9,180,779.85 $6,080,145

St. Joseph 142 186 108 February $2,293,565 $4,796,650.51 $3,557,958

$60M

$80M

$100M

December Total as of 12/8/17 January *St. Cloud totals are not final for 2017 at time of print.

Commercial Building Permits

$600k

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$900k

October

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

TOTAL: $158,247,150*

St. Augusta

5 66 September $871,000 $0 Mar

St. Joseph

TOTAL: 1556

$200M

140 October $18,735,131 Apr

TOTAL: 1752

$150M

Food and Bev

ST. CLOUD 106 71 $3,9550,295.02 $6,376,622

Waite Park

TOTAL: 1655

TOTAL: $79,916,621

TOTAL: $158,247,150*

$100M

ST. CLOUD

Sartell 35 33 31 November $11,485,611 $13,013,812.00 $13,708,688 May 2016

151 August Feb $8,057,329

$250M

13 $2,107,200

2015

71 43 $32,698,175.09 $9,902,023

July Total as of 12/8/17 Jan *St. Cloud totals are not final for 2017 at time of print June

2000

$50M

Food and Be

Sauk Rapids 567 555 36 December $16,890,519 $15,684,403.00 $45,137,030 June

TOTAL: $150,360,393

1500

$1.5M

TOTAL: $1,333,423

TOTAL: $1,326,730

$1.2M

$0M

500

St. Cloud 444 464 301 2017 $94,320,804 $138,751,046 $81,015,587 July

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

2015

0

Commercial 2015 2016 2017* August #/$ #/$ #/$

Commercial Building Permits TOTAL: $1,011,008*

2016

November

1000

2017

2015

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

78 55 $2,197,512.66 $1,841,420

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$40M

2017

$20M

April $1,552,641

500

$300k

$0M

2016

Waite Park

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

2015

113

2016

2017

2016

2015

$0

TOTAL:$64,832,866

2015

Sartell 329 252 180 May $18,168,133 $13,311,388.85 $7,431,326

2016

2017

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

2017

July December June

November May

Residential Building Permits

$0M

908,072

COLOR KEY:

Compiled by Kellie Libert, data current as of 12/8/17

2015 2017

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

TOTAL:$84,908,072 2016

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL:$62,060,898*

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS 2017

October

$100M

$250M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

832,866

47,150*

360,393

916,621

Residential Building Permits

2017

$0

$300k

TOTAL: $150,360,393 Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph.

2016

May

2016

Unemployment Rates 2016-2017

2015

Apr

TOTAL: $79,916,621

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

September

October

M

J

J

1.0%

December

August

A

Jan

November

July

June

May

$250M

Feb

April

$200M

March

December

5%

$150M

November

$100M

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

$50M

1.5%

February

2.0%

January

6%

$0M

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com 2015

2016 - 2017 % CHANGE

$300k

A

S

O

$0

0.5% 0.0%

4%

-0.5% -1.0%

3%

-1.5% -2.0%

2% O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

-2.5% O

N

D

J

F

M

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

35


0,898*

BusinessTools

08,072

32,866

$100M

7,150*

0,393

6,621

$250M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

October

August

September

August

July

June

May

TOTAL: 1556

April

September

ST. CLOUD

October

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

D, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

September

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

lding Permits

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

September

2017

TOTAL: $1,011,008*

July

TOTAL: $158,247,150*

August July

TOTAL: 1752

June

2017

May

2016

TOTAL: $1,333,423

June

TOTAL: $150,360,393

April May

December

$900k

May

2017 TOTAL: $1,326,730

FOR MINNESOTA AND OTHER UPPER MIDWEST CITIES April COST OF LIVING INDEX CITY

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office $0 $300k $600k $900k $1.2M Total as of 12/8/17.

Lodging Tax Dollars

$1.5M

2000

$1.5M

Stearns Co. 181 158 72 2015 Benton Co. 54 39 23

TOTAL: 1556

2016

250

TOTAL: 1752

2015

200

TOTAL: 1655

2016 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS Residential

TOTAL: $1,333,423

150

October

$1.5M

he St. Cloud area experienced a below average cost September of living during the third quarter for 2017, according to the Cost of Living August Index of 265 urban areas. The composite index is based on six components – housing, utilities, grocery items, transportation,Julyhealth care, and miscellaneous goods and services. The "all items"June index for St. Cloud was 94.7, 5.3 percent below the national average (100.0) for the quarter. 1500

100

TOTAL: $1,011,008*

TOTAL: $1,333,423

TOTAL: $1,326,730

$1.2M

50

T

1000

Housing, utilities keep Central Minnesota’s November cost of living below average.

TOTAL: 221

0

$1.2M

Cost of Living

TOTAL: 95

TOTAL: $1,011,008*

2017 2015

$900k

500

$600k

2016

$600k

Total as of 12/8/17.

Food and Beverage Tax Collection TOTAL: 235 ST. CLOUD

$300k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions

2017

January

$0

Housing/Real Estate St. Cloud Area AssociationJan of Realtors, $150M $200Msources:$250M http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics. Total as of 12/8/17.

STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

St. Cloud, MN 3rd Qtr

March

All Items February

Grocery Housing Utilities Transpo- Health Misc. Goods Items rtation Care & Services

January 94.7

114.3

75.7

82.9

103.9

122.4

99.8

St. Cloud, MN 2nd Qtr

96.2 112.1 71.9 87.6 96.4 122.2 108.5

St. Cloud, MN 1st Qtr

96.1

117.4

74.5

87.7

101.9

120.8

102.7

Minneapolis, MN 104.9 106.7 102.7 91.1 106.1 105.2 109.5 107.8

Mankato, MN 92.8 98.3 70.2 88.2 99.2 116.4 105.2

TOTAL: $1,508,301

Cedar Rapids, IA 91.6

93.4

84.2

103.1

94.7

100.9

91.4

Eau Claire, WI

93.3

92.5

78.6

103.6

106.2

112.2

96.6

Pierre, SD

98.5

104.1

105.1

95.9

96.0

97.4

92.6

December

105.1

November

October

105.1

September

89.5

August

July

102.3

June

104.4

May

April

103.6

March

St. Paul, MN

February

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

TOTAL: $1,090,850

January

ST. CLOUD

2017

2015

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

2000

Feb

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

1500

TOTAL: $1,326,730

0

$300k

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

1000

2017

February

ST. CLOUD

500

2016

2015

2017

March

TOTAL: $79,916,621

0

2016

Apr Mar

$0

$100M

2016

2015

2015

TOTAL: 1655

2016 TOTAL: $1,454,374 2015

$0

$500k

$1M

$1.5M

$2M

The Cost of Living Index, which is compiled and published quarterly by C2ER - The Council for Community and Economic Research, measures regional differences in the cost of consumer goods and services, excluding taxes and non-consumer expenditures, for professional and managerial households in the top income quintile. It is based on more than 90,000 prices covering almost 60 different items for which prices are collected three times a year by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce. Small differences should not be interpreted as showing any measurable difference, according to C2ER.

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Total as of 12/8/17.

36

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

Economy Central presented by


x

Troy Cameron SVP Senior Lender

MAKING DREAMS A REALITY WITH SBA PREFERRED LENDING We’re proud to be an SBA Preferred Lender who offers real opportunities that fuel growth and small

business expansion. We understand the needs of local businesses, which is why we have a reputation

for providing personal service, a knowledgeable staff with SBA lending expertise, local decision making with prompt loan funding, and customized financing options. That’s reality.

Reality Banking

FalconNational.com


R E T T E B ETHER G TO T

IN WORK AND AT HOME,

COMMUNICATION IS KEY FOR THESE BUSINESS COUPLES. By Vicki Ikeogu // Photography by BDI photo

38

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

he success rate for the average marriage in the U.S. can be likened to a coin-flip. Fifty percent will end up making it, the other half not so much. But throw in a business partnership and things can quickly spiral out of control. Modern Barnyard owners Jim Beck and John Malikowski, Audio Video Extremes owners Jodi and Rich Erkens, and Rock On Enterprises Inc.

owners Krystal and Kevin Vierkant have seen it all when it comes to blending long-term relationships and business. The late nights. The stress. The juggling of household bills along with business expenses. Not to mention the regular day-to-day responsibilities of maintaining a home. These three Central Minnesota couples take their commitments to their businesses and their customers just as seriously as they take their commitments to each other.


R

BUSINESS PROFILE MODERN BARNYARD 7285 County Road 75 // Saint Cloud, MN 56301 (320) 253-8033 // modernbarnyard.com Email: modernbarnyard@gmail.com Business Description: A retail store selling repurposed, reimagined furniture, home decor and gifts. Number of employees: 2.5 including Jim and John

PERSONAL PROFILES JOHN MALIKOWSKI, 38 Co-Owner/Creative Director, Modern Barnyard Hometown: Foley Education: Hennepin Technical College Work History: Co-Owner Blooming Creations Floral & Gifts; Florist - St. Cloud Floral; Florist - Daisy a Day Floral; Server- Jack & Jims Family: Mother and Father, 1 brother, 1 sister, 6 nephews Hobbies: Traveling, shopping, movies, baking Jim Beck and John Malikowski

WITH YOUR FAULTS AND WITH YOUR STRENGTHS “We have very different tastes, but yet very similar,” Jim Beck said. “So it makes it fun to work together.” After being together for 16 years, Jim Beck and John Malikowski know how to make work an enjoyable experience. For most of their romantic relationship, the two have been partners in business. Their first business, Blooming Creations floral shop, was for the most part solely under the direction of Malikowski. At the time, the two had been dating for about 18 months.

Beck’s role in Blooming Creations was more behind the scenes. Beck had a full-time job at a local school and was Malikowski’s silent partner in the business. “I was only there for evenings and weekends,” Beck said. But in their most recent endeavor, furniture and home décor store Modern Barnyard, both partners have a more vested interest in the business – the store is their sole source of income. Since purchasing the 7,000-square-foot building at 7285 County Road 75 in Waite Park in November 2015, the couple has had to rely upon and trust one another in ways they were

Advice to a couple thinking about starting a business together: Have fun, keep work at work and home at home. ––––––––––––––––––––––––

JIM BECK, 47 Co-Owner/Sales & Marketing Director, Modern Barnyard Hometown: Bessemer, Michigan Education: Brown College, Globe University Work History: Campus Director - Minnesota School of Business, Co-Owner Blooming Creations Floral & Gifts, Operations Manager - New Horizon Computer Learning Center Family: 2 sisters, 1 brother, 6 nieces and nephews Hobbies: traveling, auctions, movies Advice to a couple thinking about starting a business together: Define your roles and remember your partner is always right.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

not used to doing with Blooming Creations. “I’ll see something and he’ll be like, ‘Are you sure?’” Beck said. “And he’ll pick out something and I’ll go ‘huh?’ And he’s like ‘Trust me’ and I’m like ‘Trust me’ and then we get it and then both things sell. So, people like that we have different styles.” The two have found their niche within their business. Similar to Blooming Creations, Malikowski’s main focus is on the creative aspects: painting and repurposing the furniture. “John has the creative eye,” Beck said. Beck has taken on the front end store management, marketing, and sales portions of the business, which opened to the public in April. “With the store being so big we have totally different jobs, but yet we have to work together to get everything done,” he said. “So we complement each other really well with our strengths.” Beck and Malikowski run Modern Barnyard with the help of one part-time employee. They said it can be challenging, especially during busy times of the day. “Before we opened, we were both painting and doing

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

39


BUSINESS PROFILE AUDIO VIDEO EXTREMES 1131 2nd St S // Waite Park, MN 56387 (320) 217-5877 // audiovideoextremes.com Email: Info@audiovideoextremes.com Business Description: Residential, commercial and mobile audio/video needs, including home theater, home automation, custom lighting, remote starts, and more. Number of Employees: 10

Jodi and Rich Erkens

TO LOVE AND TO CHERISH

things,” Beck said. “But after we opened, we didn’t realize how fast it would take off.” Even with all of the chaos of opening a business, the couple still carves out time to do things together. “One of our favorite things to do is picking out merchandise for the store,” Malikowski said. Trips to flea markets before the Modern Barnyard opens or sitting on the couch together flipping through a catalog while watching their favorite TV show “Survivor” are how Beck and Malikowski not

40

only stock their shelves, but squeeze in time for themselves. Malikowski said the hardest part of adjusting to working full time with Beck is understanding and balancing each other’s strengths and weaknesses. “I think you just have to identify roles and appreciate each other for what you do,” Beck said. “You know, you both can’t do the same things. And you’re not going to be as good at the same things.”

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

When Rich and Jodi Erkens were first married Rich worked for Ultimate Electronics. When the St. Cloud store closed, the Erkens were at a crossroads. With a young family to provide for, the couple took the leap into entrepreneurship. “I said to Rich, ‘All of your customers have always come to you, you’ve always put the big systems together,’” Jodi Erkens said. “I said ‘We have enough in savings for six months, let’s get it done. Let’s start a business.’” So 13 years ago, the Erkens became the founders of Audio Video Extremes. Audio Video Extremes specializes in helping clients outfit their homes and vehicles with the latest in audio and video technology. The company, which employs nine people, provides in-home installation of theater systems, surround sounds, home automation and security systems. Those systems can range

PERSONAL PROFILES JODI ERKENS, 41 Owner/Business Manager, Audio Video Extremes Hometown: St. Joseph. Minn. Education: AAS Degree from the St. Cloud Technical and Community College Work History: Worked at the help desk for DeZurik right out of college for a few years, spent a few years at a computer consulting company , worked in administration for an advertising company then left that after Audio Video Extremes was started so I could do bookwork from home and spend time with our children. Family: Husband Rich; Riley, 13; Jack, 11; Reid, 7; Jacob, 2 Hobbies: Traveling in our motor home with my family. Attending the boys’ school and sporting events. Advice to a couple thinking about starting a business together: Make sure that you have strong lines of communication and a strong marriage as it can be trying, but the rewards are great. Once you throw children into the mix make sure you are flexible and learn how to plan and organize. ––––––––––––––––––––––––

RICHARD “RICH” ERKENS, 43 Co-owner/Chief Manager, Audio Video Extremes Hometown: Cold Spring Education: High School, School of hard knocks Work History: My parents’ company, Erkens All Season Service, Kirby, Radio Shack, Circuit City, Audio King/ Ultimate Electronics, Audio Video Extremes since 2005 Family: Married to Jodi Mohs Erkens 10/21/2000, four great boys with a great wife Hobbies: Motor home vacations with family and seeing the wonders of the United States


from a few hundred dollars to over $100,000. They also help customers with remote starts and other automobile technology, and provide commercial installations for area businesses. In the Erkens household, the roles are clearly defined. “I’m the primary parent,” Jodi Erkens said. “If a kid gets sick, it’s almost always going to be me handling it. If there’s something crazy that goes on with the business, it’s almost always going to be Rich.” Seventeen years of marriage and four kids later, that arrangement has worked well for them. “Since Rich started the business, I’ve always been there,” Jodi Erkens said. “I’ve always been working in the office and doing accounts payable and receivable and invoicing and helping with ordering and what not. So we’ve always felt that we have been partners in that way.” But about four years ago, Jodi and Rich decided to buy out Rich’s business partner, transitioning the couple into a partnership, both in marriage and now in business. “I think my hair started turning grayer a whole lot faster,” joked Rich Erkens. “Seriously, it was about compromise. You’ve got to always be willing to understand where your partner is at -- both with the business and at home. And know that the best interest is always there to be served.” The transition to coownership was not a radical one. For the most part, the Erkens agreed, their roles with the business remained the same. “We always had that understanding that if there was a sick child I would take care of him because I can pay bills from home. I can log on to the bank accounts and email. I don’t

physically go out to a client’s house,” Jodi Erkens said. Throughout the course of running Audio Video Extremes, Rich Erkens has traveled around Minnesota helping outfit people’s homes with the latest in video technology. In addition to clients within the state, Erkens has traveled to see clients throughout the upper Midwest, including some as far away as Montana. “Jodi is far and away the biggest managing partner of our home,” Rich Erkens said. “I could never do what I do without that.” In 2014 the couple opened their retail store showroom, 113 Second St. S in Waite Park. Business has been steady ever since. But by no means does business come before quality family time in the Erkens household. “We haven’t done a good job lately, but we try and have a date night at least once a month,” Jodi Erkens said. “We have our two big events that we go to as a couple: Winstock (a county music festival in Winsted) and Holly Ball. Family dinners are no TV, no cell phones. And on the weekends we aren’t business partners. That’s family time.” The Erkens incorporate their kids into the business as much as possible. This past summer the family of six traveled to Ames, Iowa for a job Rich had lined up. “I worked retail for a lot of years,” Rich Erkens said. “I’m talking 60-hour work weeks. I would never have gotten to know my kids if I didn’t have this company. It’s given me the flexibility so I can know my kids -- and my spouse -- that I never would have had otherwise. In a world where everything is so hectic and running a million miles an hour, we’re able to spend time together.”

Krystal and Kevin Vierkant

IN GOOD TIMES AND IN BAD January 26, 2017. What was supposed to be a relaxing getaway from the office and recognition for an employee celebrating a milestone with the company, turned into a nightmare for Krystal and Kevin Vierkant. From a Facebook post at a beach in Mexico, the owners of the trucking business, Rock On Enterprises Inc., watched as their shop building literally went up in smoke on a cold Thursday morning in January. “My initial reaction when the guy held the phone in front of me was

disbelief of course,” said Kevin Vierkant. “And that lasted for about 10 seconds. And then you go into owner mode. You immediately have a lot of questions and you want a lot of information. You want to make sure everybody is all right. And then you start the reaction mode of ‘What have I got to do.’” The first flight out of Punta Cana, Mexico was two days later. Krystal and Kevin were on it. “By the time we got home it was really late and dark so we knew we wouldn’t be able to see anything,” Krystal Vierkant

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

41


BUSINESS PROFILE ROCK ON ENTERPRISES 3100 7th St S // Waite Park, MN 56387 (320) 230-2998 // rockontrucks.com/aboutus.html Email: info@rockontrucks.com Business Description: Certified DBE trucking company and licensed and bonded aggregate truck brokers, with end, side, and belly dumps; dump trucks; flatbeds; stepdecks; and dry vans // Number of employees: 57

PERSONAL PROFILES KRYSTAL VIERKANT, 41 Owner/CEO, Rock On Enterprises Hometown: Becker, MN Education: Graduated from Becker High School; some college Work History: Owner – Rock On Companies – 16.5 years. Prior to Rock On - finance manager, accounting, and banking positions Family: Married, 2 adult step sons, 16 year-old-step son, daughter, 12, and son, 10 Hobbies: Spending time with family, scrapbooking Advice to a couple thinking about starting a business together: Set home/work boundaries and stick to them. Make time for each other outside of work. ––––––––––––––––––––––––

KEVIN VIERKANT, 58 Operations Manager, Rock On Enterprises Hometown: Sauk Rapids, MN Education: Sauk Rapids High School Work History: Trucking industry for 40 years Family: Married, 4 boys and 1 girl Hobbies: Working Advice to a couple thinking about starting a business together: Communication and compromise are huge.

42

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

said. “We came together on Sunday morning and looked at it. I’m a crier, so I cried a lot. Kevin tends to clam up, so I went to church and cried and he took some time to himself.” The couple was thankful that no one was hurt during the fire, which took several fire crews hours to put out. But as for the business that the Vierkants had spent 16 years building, it was shaken to the core. “The shop was my baby,” Kevin Vierkant said. “I dreamt about a shop and wanted a shop and never thought in a million years that I would have a shop like I had. I mean, that was a big building. It had everything I wanted.” It was a building that represented the years of hard work and commitment the couple had invested, not only in the company, but in each other. Rock On Enterprises Inc. began as a one-man trucking company back in 2001. Krystal Vierkant had worked at another trucking company in the finance department for several years before leaving to pursue a career in banking. “I took a big pay cut by switching to the bank,” Krystal Vierkant said. “So, I was trying to look for something to supplement my income. Kevin was a friend

“Before, when we were smaller, Kevin and I were the team, but now we have a team, so we don’t do nearly as much one-on-one working together anymore.” — KRYSTAL VIERKANT of mine from that trucking company, so I bought the truck and he drove it. It was good team work.” In the midst of starting a new trucking company, Krystal and Kevin began dating. “We were dating for about six months before we started Rock On,” Krystal Vierkant said. “And it just fit. He was driving the truck and I would come home on my lunch breaks, check the mail, get the deposits, and bring them back to the bank. Then I’d do billing when I got home from work.” That worked up until about 2003 when Krystal decided to leave her job at the bank and run the company full time. It was a small operation up until 2005 when the Vierkants began adding additional trucks. Almost from the get-go, Rock On created signature cab designs. “We began with the NASCAR theme when we first started,” Krystal Vierkant said. “We had to come up with a theme for the truck I bought and Kevin liked Dale Earnhardt at the time so we put the big number three on it.” After the NASCAR themes, the Vierkants started venturing into kid-friendly character trucks – conveniently coinciding with the

couple having kids after their marriage in 2007. Together the couple has two children ages 11 and 10. Kevin Vierkant has three older boys from a previous relationship. The Rock On Enterprises team has grown to close to 60 employees based out of the Waite Park office at 3100 Seventh St. S. In addition to owning and managing a fleet of trucks, Rock On Enterprises operates several divisions. Rock On Trucks Inc. provides trucks to customers; Rock On Rocks supplies road construction materials; Rock On Properties owns and manages Rock On properties; Other divisions which include Rock On Repair and Minnesota Tarp and Liner. “Before, when we were smaller, Kevin and I were the team,” Krystal Vierkant said."But now we have a team, so we don’t do nearly as much one-on-one working together anymore.” What keeps the couple grounded, in both their business and their personal lives, is the constant support they receive from one another, for better or for worse. “We’ve got a strong relationship,” Kevin Vierkant said. “I think we can walk through fire and back. You


SOUND OFF lean on each other a lot. I don’t think business makes you have a stronger relationship. I think it tests you a lot more. And you better have a strong relationship because if you are on a weak foundation you’re going to crash and burn.”

Communication is key

‘TIL RETIREMENT AND BEYOND “Communication, communication, communication. It’s the biggest thing,” Jodi Erkens said. “Open communication. And be ready for the good, the bad and the ugly.” It can be as simple as picking up on a spouse’s agitation with a customer or as difficult as a fullblown disagreement on the way something is being handled. Communication, the couples agree, will make or break a business or a marriage. “I think the best advice for anybody would be that you have to realize that you have to agree to disagree,” Kevin Vierkant said. “Because you are not going to agree on everything. And if you keep fighting about it you’ll never survive.” Separating the work arguments from the personal disagreements is also important. “Our arguments might be a little different at work than they would be at home,” Beck said. “But when we are at work, we are in work mode.

It’s about the store and the customer service and what we need to get done. We can argue about the dishes when we get off work, but at work it’s ‘Here’s the list. These are the things that we need to get done today.’” For the Erkens, resolving disagreements quickly is a must. “Each of us is pretty good at explaining what’s going on and why we are frustrated and talking through it,” Jodi Erkens said. Arguments and fights will happen, but, Beck said, it is how you deal with those disagreements – in a respectful manner – that will benefit the business and ultimately the relationship. “You have to deal with it,” he said. “You know you’re going to argue, that you are going to fight. But you can’t hold a grudge.” Along with communication, clearly defined roles within the business and a respect for those boundaries helps keep conflict at bay. At Rock On Enterprises, Krystal Vierkant is in charge of the bookwork and finances. Kevin Vierkant is in charge of day-to-day operations with the drivers. “What makes us a good team is Krystal is virtually the opposite of me,” Kevin Vierkant said. “I’ve run my own business since I was 18 years old and was always missing that link. When we got going with this thing, it was a relief to me that I had somebody that took

an interest and cared. And she’s good at what she does.” “He’s always been more of the entrepreneur,” Krystal Vierkant said. “He challenges me to grow.” At the Modern Barnyard, Beck and Malikowski divided their roles by jobs they loved to do. “Jim does the stuff that I don’t like to do,” Malikowski said. “You have to have those boundaries when you start a business.” But what matters most for all of these couples is remembering their love for one another and the fact that they are committed to their partner first and the business second. “Every now and again there’s a wake-up call,” Rich Erkens said. “What I mean by that is there are periods of time when the business can be completely overwhelming. When that happens, you have to step back and say, ‘OK, let’s leave the computers off. Let’s spend time with the kids instead of focusing on the business.” With a little luck and a lot of commitment, these couples say they plan to run their businesses until retirement…and their relationships until death do they part.

What's the best advice you've ever received?

Vicki Ikeogu is a freelance reporter and transportation planner with the Saint Cloud Area Planning Organization.

JOHN // Enjoy what you do and it’s not really work. —Teacher in school

JIM // Always work harder than the person next to you and you will be successful. — my wonderful mother Pat Beck

RICH // Work hard, be honest and the rest will come. –Chris Coborn

JODI // Always treat people how you want to be treated. —A former employer

KRYSTAL // Surround yourself with good people and companies — an accountant, attorney and bank. —Can’t remember who told me — it was a long time ago

KEVIN // Position yourself to do business with everyone. —Mike McCormick

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

43


Special Focus

Cutting Edge

By Diane Hageman

L

ike many industries, health care is undergoing rapid change. We regularly hear about advances in technology and medical

Health care providers are using the latest in technology to serve and connect with patients.

improvements, but there are also changes in the way health care providers interact with patients and the general public -- much of which has occurred in the last 10 years.

Robotics Orthopedic surgery has seen significant strides through the use of robotics. Since 2004, St. Cloud Orthopedics’ surgeons have been pioneers in using computer-assisted devices for joint replacements. Dr. Joseph Nessler uses Mako®, Robotic-Arm Assisted technology, for total-hip, total-knee and partial-knee replacements. The technology allows Nessler to create a 3-D model of the hip or knee location to pre-plan the surgery. Through a CAT scan and the 3-D modeling, Nessler simulates the patient’s knee or hip on the screen and maps out

the procedure using infra-red cameras that help with the placement of the new joint. “There is never a surprise,” Nessler said. “This technology helps improve the actual function of the hip with a more exact position. The patients gain more strength and range of motion when we use the robotics.” The results are impressive. Nationally, the dislocation rate is 2.8 to 3 percent on Medicare patients. St. Cloud Orthopedics is less than one quarter of a percent. Four of the six Mako® robots in use in the state are CONTINUED ON PAGE 46 >>

Holistic Healing for Joint Pain Isn’t it nice to have options? At St. Cloud Orthopedics, we’re dedicated to treating your joint pain in the way that’s best for you, whether that be through physical therapy, injections, minimally-invasive surgery, or Regenerative Medicine. Regenerative Medicine uses your body’s own stem cells to empower your natural healing process. And because it’s administered by our musculoskeletal experts, your health is in the best hands possible. Wondering if it’s right for you? Call today for a consultation, and start living better.

LiveBetter

StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100 1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell

44

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

Photo credit: St. Cloud Surgical Center.

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu


CLOSE-UP: REJUV MEDICAL

Regenerative procedures are life-changing experiences for patients

Dr. Baumgartner examines Mary Levinski’s shoulder after a recent PRP injection.

W

ith a true pioneering spirit, Dr. Joel Baumgartner and his Rejuv team are changing lives, one patient at a time. Ben Leber Former Minnesota Vikings Linebacker Ben Leber dealt with chronic knee pain for 10 years. Too young for a knee replacement, Leber turned

to Rejuv for a solution to his nagging injury. In 2016, he underwent a stem cell transplant at Rejuv Medical in Waite Park. Dr. Baumgartner used Leber’s own stem cells to help regenerate his arthritic knee, which was causing him to experience bone-on-bone pain. “Three months after my procedure, I ran a mile walking

my dog in the rain with no pain,” Leber explained. “When I woke up the next day, I wasn’t sore or swollen. That’s when I knew this really worked.” Leber appreciated that the stem cell transplant was a minimally invasive treatment that didn’t involve drugs or surgery. “It’s really hard to describe how different my life is now,” he said. “I can now chase around my three young kids, free of pain.” Mary Levinski Mary Levinski spends long days teaching culinary arts and quilting to students at Sauk Rapids High School and loves it. In 2007, her knees were swelling from standing on

concrete floors and the extra weight she was carrying. Also too young for a knee replacement, she turned to Dr. Baumgartner looking for answers. He suggested Platelet Rich Plasma injections, another effective treatment. With her busy schedule, Mary needed something that didn’t involve significant down time, a huge benefit with regenerative medicine. One week following her procedures, she had a significant reduction in pain, which allowed her to lose more than 70 pounds with Rejuv’s Weight Loss program. Levinski’s life has been dramatically changed. “I don’t feel tired and have a lot of energy,” Levinski said. “My students think I am a lot younger than I am. I attribute all of this to everything I have learned at Rejuv.” •

Dr. Joel Baumgartner trains physicians in injection techniques and the future of regenerative medicine. As a best-selling author, he calls on physicians worldwide to join in the mission to redefine healthcare through proper nutrition, regular exercise and conservative treatments that address root causes.

901 3rd St N, Waite Park, MN 56387 • 320.217.8480 • rejuvmedical.com

SPONSORED PROFILE

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

45


uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

insight

About Anna

“I have two adopted children from Ethiopia, and there wasn’t a ‘dry eye’ in the house when we brought them home.” As you may have guessed, I am passionate about Dry Eye treatment. I head up a Dry Eye clinic at Insight Eye Care, where we take special care to take a thorough history and determine the best treatment plan for each patient. We then follow up with our patients and modify treatments as needed since each patient’s dry eye is unique. I am excited that there are so many emerging options for dry eye patients, especially really difficult cases. Ask us today about your symptoms. I don’t suffer from dry eye, but tired eyes, chasing two kiddos. Schedule your appointment with

Anna E. Malikowski, O.D.

Stay connected. Waite Park 320-253-0365 46

Becker

763-244-1700

Paynesville 320-204-6400

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

Special Focus

at the St. Cloud Hospital and the St. Cloud Surgical Center. The only other locations in Minnesota are in Burnsville and Rochester so Nessler has seen patients from around the state and as far away as Alaska. He has also traveled to North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin to train other surgeons.

Online clinics and scheduling After hearing feedback from patients that accessing care and clinics was difficult, CentraCare Health rolled out a new service called CentraCare CONNECT in March 2017. The health system serves roughly 500,000 patients. “The navigation of a health care system can be complicated,” said Kenny Bechtold, director of CentraCare CONNECT. “The main objectives of CentraCare CONNECT are to improve access for patients and reduce the number of avoidable emergency room visits.” By logging on to centracare. com/connect, patients can connect with a nurse to discuss medical concerns or a scheduler to make an appointment. The options to connect include online chat, text, call or eClinic. Patients can also access their MyChart to review their records, send a secure message or make an appointment with their primary provider. While other large health care providers have nurse lines and scheduling systems, CentraCare’s is a unique hybrid that offers both services in one model. Through the eClinic, a group of physicians work in queue to diagnose and treat a variety of minor ailments for just $25, ranging from colds, sinus infections and diaper rash to pink eye and medication refills for mild asthmas, allergies and birth control. CONTINUED ON PAGE 48 >>

insighteyecare.us


CLOSE-UP: ST. CLOUD SURGICAL CENTER

MORE PATIENTS ARE CHOOSING ST. CLOUD SURGICAL CENTER hospital-grade operating rooms and a dedicated team committed to clinical quality, St. Cloud Surgical Center consistently experiences lower rates of surgical site infections than hospitals.

O

n any given day, as many as 100 people in Central Minnesota will choose to have their surgical procedure performed at St. Cloud Surgical Center, an outpatient surgery facility, as opposed to a hospital. That’s more than 10,000 people per year. Today, going home after surgery with general anesthesia is commonplace; not so when St. Cloud Surgical Center was founded in 1972. Having

anesthesia meant you had to stay in the hospital for several nights. But surgical advancements along with high deductible health insurance plans are influencing patients to choose outpatient surgical centers. “For appropriate patients, outpatient surgery has been shown to be safe and effective, achieving similar outcomes while allowing patients to spend less,” said Darci Nagorski, CEO.

On average, St. Cloud Surgical Center patients save 40-50 percent on the cost of their procedure, resulting in lower out-of-pocket costs. While cost can be a driving factor, there are many reasons patients choose St. Cloud Surgical Center. Better Outcomes St. Cloud Surgical Center’s focused and trained staff work closely with surgeons to ensure an excellent patient experience. With

On average, St. Cloud Surgical Center patients save 40-50 percent on the cost of their procedure, resulting in lower out-of-pocket costs.

More Efficient & Convenient Efficient operating room management, easy “in-andout” access for patients, and coordinated postoperative care make St. Cloud Surgical Center a more efficient and convenient option for patients. In fact, research shows that procedures performed at outpatient surgical centers typically take 31.8 fewer minutes than those performed at hospitals. Quicker Recovery Patients of St. Cloud Surgical Center return home as early as the same day of surgery. They also receive personalized care to ensure that their discharge goals are met. Variety of Specialties Many different surgery specialties can be performed at the St. Cloud Surgical Center, including: • Ear, Nose, Throat • Oral / Dental • Gastroenterology • General Surgery • Gynecology • Ophthalmology • Orthopedics, including Joint Replacement • Podiatry • Spine

St. Cloud Surgical Center is a multi-specialty outpatient surgery center celebrating 45 years of excellence. 1526 Northway Drive, St. Cloud, MN 56303 • 800.349.7272 • stcsurgicalcenter.com SPONSORED PROFILE

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

47


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Special Focus

The advent of social media has changed the landscape of most industries and health care is no exception. Bechtold is pleased with the early indicators. During the first six months without heavy marketing, an average of 200 patients a month have used the system. “We’ve seen a 20 percent increase in service level in which calls are answered in 30 seconds or less and the abandoned rate (hang ups) has dropped in half,” he said.

Social media The advent of social media has changed the landscape of most

industries and health care is no exception. Many larger systems have internal marketing staff dedicated to promoting their companies via the many social media channels available. But what’s a small clinic to do? Dr. Tom Johnson, optometrist and owner of Infinite Eye Care in Sauk Rapids, was an early adopter. He had a Facebook presence within the first year of opening his clinic in 2009 – an account he managed himself. “Our goal

have some fun with holiday was to get 100 likes and we hit recognitions and cartoons. 150-200 within the first couple Is social media a good of years,” he said. “We thought marketing tool for a small that was pretty great.” eye clinic? “Without a doubt,” By 2012, Johnson realized OPEN FOR TOURS FROM 10 AM TO 2 P Johnson Assisted said. It’sLifestyle also a and Memory Care Comm he needed to turn over the An Affordable significant part of his marketing management of his clinic’s budget. He spends 4 percent of social media presence to outside experts. He was an early his expenses on marketing and advertising. Social media is client of DAYTA Marketing, based in St. Cloud. With 30 percent of that budget. DAYTA’s guidance, Infinite Eye Johnson finds that they Care now has a presence on get the most traffic from the Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, personal insights and photos. Google Plus, Google Places, “The more personal you make LinkedIn, Bing along with the post, the more people are blogs and email campaigns. going to respond,” he said They are considering Instagram Diane Hageman is owner of Hageman to promote their eyewear. Marketing & Communications, a Infinite’s social channels communications consulting firm OPEN FOR TOURS FROM 10 AM TO 2 PM EVERY DAY offer a variety of tips on eye specializing in public relations. An Affordable Assisted Lifestyle and Memory Care Community for the Older Adu care, promote eyewear and

Veterans Welcome

NOW OPEN WEEKE

Veterans Welcome!

NOW OPEN WEEKENDS

48

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8


chasing two kiddos.

HEALTH & WELLNESS DIRECTORY

Schedule your appointment with

Anna E. Malikowski, O.D.

CentraCare Diabetes Center

Stay connected. Waite Park 320-253-0365

Becker

763-244-1700

1900 CentraCare Circle St. Cloud, MN 56303

C

320-204-6400

insighteyecare.us

Insight Eye Care Doctors (l-r) Dr. Ben Nelson, Dr. Anna C. Malikowski, Dr Greg Friederichs, Dr. Burt Dubow

320-202-7759 centracare.com

entraCare Health provides a full range of diabetes care for patients and families in our region through education, leadership, health promotion and preventive services. We help you manage your diabetes so you can maintain the best possible health and quality of life. Ask your provider for a referral. Our team of experts include: • Endocrinologists (specialist who care for patients with diabetes) • Certified Diabetes Educators (registered nurses, registered dietitians) • Pharmacists • Internal Medicine • Family Practice

Paynesville

Rejuv Fitness 901 3rd St. N, Waite Park MN (320) 217-8480 // rejuvfitness.com

320-253-0365 insighteyecare.us

I

W

comprehensive eye care Holistic Healingeforprovide for Joint Pain all ages via diagnosis, treatment and management of eye conditions.We are equipped to handle eye trauma and most eye injuries as well as treatment for more Isn’t it nice tosuch have as options? At St. Cloud Orthopedics, we’re common aiiments red, itchy, to treating your joint pain allergendedicated related symptoms or pink eye.in the way that’s best for whether that be through physical therapy, injections, We offeryou, three convenient locations, minimally-invasive surgery, or Regenerative Medicine. St. Cloud, Paynesville and Becker. For over 30 yearsRegenerative we have delivered top quality eye care Medicine uses your body’s own stem cells to our patients. Thank you for trusting us. And because it’s to empower your natural healing process. administered by our musculoskeletal experts, your health is

f you want to lose weight, become pain-free or get in the best shape of your life, Rejuv Fitness can help. Through a full-scale approach, our staff will assist you in achieving your goals to live a healthier life. Using medically integrated techniques including metabolic and food sensitivity testing, we’ll provide the tools you need to be successful. Our service offerings include: • Unlimited Access Memberships • Personal Training • Boot Camps • Studio Classes • Infrared Hot Yoga • Infrared Sauna

in the best hands possible. Wondering if it’s right for you? Call today for a consultation, and start living better.

StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100

LiveBetter

1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell

S

The Sanctuary at St. Cloud Assisted Living & Memory Support

H

ere you’ll find everything you need to live each day to its fullest – your own personal sanctuary that offers an exceptional quality of life, a comfortable and inviting community of peers and the assurance of a helping hand and affordable lifestyle ...now and in the future.

Veteran’s Welcome

Scott Ampe, Marketing Director 320-252-6325 marketing@thesanctuary-stcloud.com thesanctuary-stcloud.com

St. Cloud Orthopedics Orthopedic Trauma Surgeon & Regenerative Medicine Specialist Timothy G. Hiesterman, D.O. (320) 259-4100 StCloudOrthopedics.com

D

r. Hiesterman, a fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeon, takes a holistic approach to orthopedic care. A musculoskeletal expert, he specializes in orthopedic trauma and complex fracture care as well as regenerative medicine. Because Dr. Hiesterman is committed to personalizing treatment for each patient’s needs, he offers the most advanced surgical and non-operative treatments available. He is accepting new patients by appointment at St. Cloud Orthopedics, where he has worked since 2011.

t. Cloud Surgical Center is one of only four facilities in Minnesota that offer Robotic-Arm Assisted Joint Replacement. This innovative technology provides a personalized surgical plan based on the patient’s unique anatomy. After a 3D model of the joint is created, it is used to pre-plan and assist the surgeon in performing the joint replacement procedure. During surgery, the surgeon guides the robotic hand piece based on the patient-specific plan. This allows the surgeon to remove only the diseased bone, preserving healthy bone and soft tissue, and assists in positioning the implant based on the patient’s anatomy.

St. Cloud Surgical Center Specialists in Outpatient Surgery 800.349.7272 STCSurgicalCenter.com

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

49


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Business Spotlight

Satisfaction Accountant Arnie Kahara enjoys providing a service that is often necessary – and always helpful – to small businesses owners. By Gail Ivers PERSONAL PROFILE TIMELINE Spring 1978 Kahara graduates from UMD and takes a job auditing cooperatives. The job requires considerable travel. December 1978 Kahara moves to St. Cloud and joins Cote Kern Poganski, now BerganKDV 1983 Kahara purchases an accounting franchise called Comprehensive Accounting Services

50

Business Central: How did you decide to go into accounting? Kahara: I also have a degree in chemistry. I graduated in 1970 and got married shortly after that, right in the middle of the Vietnam War. I had a low draft number, so I joined the Naval Reserves. I had one year of inactive duty, and two years of active duty. It was hard to get a job in chemistry so toward the end of my tour of duty I started searching for a field with potential. I worked at a grain elevator for 2.5 years after I was discharged and then decided to go back to school on the GI bill in accounting.

BC: Why did you purchase a franchise? Kahara: I didn’t get a lot of client contact at Cote Kern Poganski. That was mostly handled by the partners, and the work was mostly seasonal. I was anxious that I didn’t have enough to do and I wanted more client contact so I decided to make a change. Comprehensive Accounting Services had a large main frame computer – this was pre-desktop computers – that provided a way to get financial statements done for businesses. They also had a system for training us how to go out and get clients.

BC: What do you like about accounting? Kahara: I like helping small business owners understand where they are financially. It helps them make good decisions. And there’s some satisfaction in getting things organized so they balance and come out right.

BC: How did that work for you? Kahara: When you’re in training, you anticipate that it’s going to be easier than it actually is. Essentially I went door-to-door with a sample financial statement and showed businesses what I could do for them. I had a pretty large financial obligation with the

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 8

1984 Kahara moves out of his home office into the Roosevelt Office Park 1997 Kahara moves out of Roosevelt Office Park, purchasing a building behind Kollman Monumental 2004 Kahara purchases Payroll Services of Minnesota, an accounting, tax and payroll service in St. Cloud. He transitions out of the franchise and expands his services to include payroll processing. 2006 Kahara consolidates his two offices and moves to his current location at 2854 7th Street N, St. Cloud.

franchise and the agreements are written so they’re hard to get out of. So you go door-to-door until you build up your clientele.

Arnie Kahara, 68 Hometown: Cromwell, Minnesota, 40 miles west of Duluth Education: Degree in chemistry; degree in accounting from the University of Minnesota-Duluth; CPA Family: Wife Bonnie; two daughters and a son; six grandchildren Hobbies: Vacation every-other-year with the entire family; a little fishing; lake home near Cromwell

AT A GLANCE Arnold A. Kahara Ltd. 2854 7th Street N PO Box 7395 St. Cloud, MN 56302 (320) 252-4259 arnie@kaharaltd.com Kaharaltd.com Business Description: Accounting, payroll services, QuickBooks consulting, tax planning and preparation Owner: Arnie Kahara Opened: Jan. 1, 1983 Number of Employees: Five fulltime, one part-time; during tax season employment climbs to six full-time, three part-time employees, plus Kahara Chamber member since Dec. 4, 1991


A tradition of COMMERCIAL BUILDING American Heritage Bank offers a full service line of business banking products and commercial real estate loans. Because getting a mortgage loan doesn’t have to be difficult. That’s why American Heritage Bank helps you find the right financing with the right lender. Whether this is your start-up loan or expanding your growing business, you will be prepared with us!

Call for a FREE CONSULTATION LET US HELP YOUR FUTURE

ST CL OUD 2915 SE CO ND ST S | 320.654.955 5 5 25 H W Y 10 S | 320.257.5000


Be in Control OF YOUR Health Care

Make a Better Choice. Outpatient surgery has been shown to be safe and effective, achieving similar outcomes while allowing patients to spend less. On average, St. Cloud Surgical Center patients save 40 - 50 percent on the cost of their procedure, resulting in lower out-of-pocket costs.

Better Care, Better Costs, Better Recovery… Better YOU. • Ear, Nose, Throat • General Surgery • Orthopedics, including Joint Replacement • Oral / Dental • Gynecology • Gastroenterology • Ophthalmology • Podiatry • Spine

1526 Northway Drive, St. Cloud, MN 56303 PH 800.349.7272 | stcsurgicalcenter.com

January/February 2018  
January/February 2018  

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Central Magazine