Issuu on Google+


st. Cloud PubliC library

husky stadium

u.s. bank

bonestroo

Built Around You.

stonehouse tavern & eatery

We are builders. Our tools, techniques and technology have advanced over the years to keep up with ever-changing trends. But after 65 years, are still creating places for people to live, work and play.

St. Joseph, MN | 320.363.7781 | info@wgohman.com GENERAL CONTRACTOR

| DESIGN/BUILD | CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT | BUILDING + REMODELING

WGOHMAN.COM


JANUARY/ FEBRUARY 2017

6 14

CONTENTS

GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

GROW

President’s Letter Business Calendar

8 22

Editor’s Note

Network Central

uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

C E L E B R AT I N G 1 7 Y E A R S I N B U S I N E S S

32

32 Cover Story POWERING UP After a lifelong career in the beer industry, Bernie Perryman is flipping the switch to try batteries and bulbs. PROFIT

45 Feature THE SECRET SAUCE To engage your employees, create an engaging workplace.

48 Special Focus BEYOND WELLNESS Implementing a well-being program can positively impact your bottom line.

Special Sections 37 2017 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW

53 HEALTH & WELLNESS

10 UPFRONT Valuable and important information designed to guide and educate

24 BUSINESS TOOLS Marketplace intelligence and useful tips on how to continue to grow your business

54 BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Ben Boo and Eric Sannerud, Mighty Axe Hops

Only Online // www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com

© Copyright 2017 Business Central, LLC

• DIY Design

by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce,

• Text-Message Marketing

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101,

• Good Advisors • IRS Free File

Business Central is published six times a year

P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 • Fax (320) 251-0081 Subscription rate: $18 for 1 year.


Same-day appointments available

Preventive check-ups today make for a healthier tomorrow. Visit hpcmc.com or call 320-253-5220 to make an appointment.

We welcome most insurance plans.


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

President’s Letter

Engagement

A

s chair of our Chamber’s Board of Directors, Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, identified three goals for the

Chamber to focus on this year: 1 Expand the Chamber’s diversity efforts

Each of our Board members serves as a liaison to a Chamber committee to ensure open communication between the Board and committees.

2 Expand the Board’s understanding of committee work 3 Educate and recruit larger businesses to the Chamber The response I received from last issue’s

Each of our Board members serves as a liaison to a Chamber committee to ensure open communication between the Board and committees.

column about your Chamber’s diversity efforts was

More importantly, the liaisons are at the meetings

encouraging. It let me know the high interest this

to hear from you and make sure your Board stays

goal holds for Chamber members and volunteers, as

in tune with our members. In addition, the Board of

well as for our greater community. I even received an

Directors also reviews the work of our committees

email from Mick Fleming, president of the American

through monthly written reports prepared by staff,

Chamber of Commerce Executives (ACCE) in

with input from the Board liaisons.

Washington, D.C., applauding our efforts and making

With five Chamber divisions and almost 20 active

sure we are aware of ACCE’s diversity initiatives, which

committees, it takes intentional coordination and

fit well with our own.

communication to keep everyone in sync. If you

Roger’s second goal is to ensure our Board of

aren’t involved with a committee yet, and think you

Directors has a thorough understanding of the work

might like to give it a try, we would love to find the

being accomplished through Chamber committees.

perfect spot for you. Please contact staff members

Each month we invite two or three committee chairs

Whitney Bina at wbina@StCloudAreaChamber.com

and vice chairs to attend our Board meeting. They

or Gail Ivers at givers@StCloudAreaChamber.com to

have an opportunity to share information about the

find the opportunity that fits you best.

goals and progress in their committees, as well as

I hope to Meet You at the Chamber soon!

engage with Chamber Board members in discussion about issues being heard by the Board. Since Board members often come from committee leadership, it’s a great way to introduce the types of issues covered at Board meetings to potential future directors. And since committee members come from a variety of industries and Chamber experiences, it is a way for directors to observe the breadth of our Chamber’s work through the people who are actually guiding it – our committee leaders.

6

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

Teresa Bohnen Publisher


Main Phone: 320-251-2940 Automated Reservation Line: 320-656-3826 Program Hotline: 320-656-3825 information@StCloudAreaChamber.com www.StCloudAreaChamber.com

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU STAFF Main Phone 320-251-4170 Executive Director Julie Lunning, ext. 111 Director of Convention Sales Lori Cates, ext. 113

ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF President: Teresa Bohnen, ext. 104 Vice President: Gail Ivers, ext. 109 Director of Administration: Judy Zetterlund, ext. 106

Director of Sports & Special Events Dana Randt, ext. 110

Communications & Workforce Development Coordinator: Whitney Bina, ext.130

Sales Manager Nikki Fisher, ext. 112

Special Events Coordinator: Sheri Wegner, ext. 131

Social Media & Marketing Specialist Emily Bertram, ext. 129

Membership Sales Specialist: Rhonda Dahlgren, ext. 134 Administrative Assistant: Kellie Libert, ext. 124 Administrative Assistant: Vicki Lenneman, ext. 122 Administrative Assistant: Shelly Imdieke, ext. 100

Sales & Marketing Coordinator Rachel Thompson, ext. 128 Administrative Assistant Carrie Zwack, ext. 100

2016-17 BOARD MEMBERS Jason Bernick, Bernick’s, Past Board Chair Dan Bittman, Sauk RapidsRice School District David Borgert, CentraCare Health Neil Franz, Franz Hultgren Evenson, Professional Association Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac Jim Gruenke, Mark J. Traut Wells, Inc. Jason Hallonquist, AIS Planning Dennis Host, Coborn’s, Inc. Willie Jett, St. Cloud School District Diane Mendel, Playhouse Child Care Bernie Omann, St. Cloud State University Mark Osendorf, Xcel Energy Roger Schleper, Premier Real Estate Services, Board Chair Melinda Vonderahe, Chamber Board Vice Chair Allison Waggoner, DCI, Inc. Chriss Wohlleber, Courtyard by Marriott-St.Cloud

Redefining Commercial Real Estate We’ll keep you engaged every step of the way.

LEASING | SALES | DEVELOPMENT

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

320.257.5400 | RICEPROPERTIES.COM

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

7


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

Editor’s Note

Editor Gail Ivers (L) with Bernie Perryman, owner of Batteries Plus Bulbs St. Cloud Federal Credit Union staff during their “Community Day” outing

Generosity A

s I write this we are in the midst of the holiday season. I’m a big fan of holidays – all holidays. The 4th of July with fireworks and overt demonstrations of patriotism. Memorial Day with ceremonies honoring those who defend our country. I even like Arbor Day (ok, not actually a holiday) because I like trees! At this time of year I seek out the holiday lights and Christmas music. There are so many heartwarming songs that have been written for Christmas, but if you listen to them in August, people think you’re odd. So I try to soak up as much “Silent Night” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” as I can, to tide me We are sad over until next year. to share that Mike That period between Thanksgiving Moores, owner of and New Year’s Day tends to bring JM Companies, out the best in us. Many people and passed away in November 2016. We companies go out of their way to extend our sympathy donate time, money, and products to to JM Companies, those in need. That happens yearthe employees of the round, of course, but it seems to me local Super America it’s especially present in December. stores, and to Mike’s This year I’ve heard from family and friends. Mike was featured ProcessPro, a local ERP software in the Novembercompany, that is raising money December 2015 to support Community Action issue of Business Programs … St. Cloud Federal Credit Central. Union, which closed for a day in

8

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

October so employees could donate their time to area non-profits…Shingobee Builders, which donated money to a local non-profit as part of hosting Business After Hours…and even our own NEXT-Chamber’s Emerging Leaders brought gifts to Anna Marie’s Alliance. (See Doing Good on page 27.) One of the most generous people I know is Bernie Perryman, owner of Batteries Plus Bulbs. (See the story on page 32.) When Bernie worked at C&L Distributing, she opened her training room to the Sauk Rapids Chamber – free of charge – because we had run out of spaces large enough to hold our meetings. While Chairperson of the Chamber’s Board of Directors, she made it her mission to take the Chamber’s largest delegation ever to Washington, D.C. And she did. She also donated her own frequent flyer miles to help some of our members who would otherwise have not been able to participate. Now, as owner of Batteries Plus Bulbs, Bernie reached out to the St. Cloud Police Department, offering to donate portable external cell phone battery chargers to the department. This is a gift not just to the police department, but to us all. A crisis is not the time for a police cell phone to quit...especially if it’s YOUR crisis! As you read this, the holiday lights have been shut off, I’m no longer listening to Christmas music, and the “Season of Giving” has ended. But I know there are many businesses that are doing good all year long. Please share your stories and photos with me. We’ll post them on our Facebook page and who knows, you may find yourself in a future issue of Business Central! Until next issue,


Publisher Teresa Bohnen Managing Editor Gail Ivers Associate Editor Dawn Zimmerman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Whitney Bina, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Teresa Bohnen, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Dr. Fred E. Hill, St. Cloud State University Gail Ivers, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Kellie Libert, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Betsey Lund Ross, Lund Sauter, P. A. Lynn MacDonald, St. Cloud State University Bruce Miles, Big River Group Jeanine Nistler, freelance writer Chris Panek, CPA John Pepper, freelance writer Kelly Radi, Radi To Write Greg Vandal, Vox Liberi

ADVERTISING Associate Publisher/Sales Wendy Hendricks, Hendricks Marketing Ad Traffic & Circulation Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media ART Design & Production Yola Hartmann, Hazel Tree Media Cover Photo Joel Butkowski, BDI Photography ACCOUNTING Judy Zetterlund WEBSITE Vicki Lenneman

1411 West St. Germain Street, Suite 101, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487 Phone (320) 251-2940 Fax (320) 251-0081 www.BusinessCentralMagazine.com For advertising information contact Wendy Hendricks, (320)656-3808 Editorial suggestions can be made in writing to: Editor, Business Central, P.O. Box 487, St. Cloud, MN 56302-0487. Submission of materials does not guarantee publication. Unsolicited materials will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

9


INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

UPFRONT GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

Getting Going • Your Voice in Government • People to Know

Business Calendar • Top Hat Photos • The Trouble with Business uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

u

NEWS & PEOPLE THAT MAKE UP THE CHAMBER NETWORK

BOOK REVIEW

Stories

NEWS REEL

A well-told story is the first step in persuading others to follow your lead. Reviewed by Dr. Fred Hill Today, everyone – whether they know it or not – is in the emotional transportation business. More and more, success is won by creating compelling stories that have the power to move partners, shareholders, customers, and employees to action. Simply put, if you can’t tell it, you can’t sell it. And this book tells you how to do both. Historically, stories have always been igniters of action, moving people to do things. But only recently has it become clear that purposeful stories – those created with a specific mission in mind – are absolutely essential in persuading others to support a vision, dream, or cause. – From Tell to Win; Connect, Persuade, and Triumph with the Hidden Power of Story

P

eter Guber’s book shows how to move beyond PowerPoint slides, facts, and figures to create stories leading to action. Among his techniques are 1 Capture your audience’s attention first, fast, and foremost.

10

Tell to Win; Connect, Persuade, and Triumph with the Hidden Power of Story by Peter Guber, Crown Publishing Group, • New York, 2011, ISBN 978-0307-58795-4

2 Motivate your listeners by demonstrating authenticity. 3 Build your “tell” around what’s in it for them. 4 Change passive listeners into active participants. 5 Use state of the art technology online and offline to make sure audience commitment remains strong.

To validate the power of telling purposeful stories, Guber includes a diverse number of “voices” – master tellers – with whom

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

he has shared experiences. The voices include a “who’s who” list of athletes, celebrities, business leaders, CEOs, and others. The book has two parts: Part One, There’s No Business without Story Business. Part Two, The Art of the Tell. Here are a few salient points from Part One, Story Business: Move your listener’s hearts, and their feet and wallets will follow. The story isn’t the icing on the cake, it is the cake. Lead from the heart, not the head. Employ the element of surprise. The marketplace wants stories. And, from Part Two, The Art of the Tell: Show you’ve got skin in the game. Stories have heroes; choose heroes that fit your goal. Persist and turn “no” into “on.” Be interactive and engage your audience’s senses early and often. Add “state-of-the-heart” technology to state-of-theart technologies. An entertaining and helpful read. Dr. Fred E. Hill is an emeritus professor from St. Cloud State University.

CENTRACARE ANNOUNCES BOARD MEMBERS The following people have joined various boards for CentraCare Health and its affiliates:

CentraCare Health: Mike Benusa, Carlson Advisors; Dr. Robert Stocker, CentraCare Clinic; Joe Uphus, The Mutual Fund Store

St. Cloud Hospital: Dr. Eileen Dauer, St. Cloud Ear, Nose and Throat; Dr. Richard Jolkovsky, CentraCare Heart & Vascular Center; Dr. Albert (Joseph) Mercuri, CentraCare Health; Bob Thueringer, retired, Coborn’s, Inc.; Patricia Sniezek, St. Benedict’s Monastery; Lisa Helmin Foss, St. Cloud State University; Bob Kovell, Miller, Welle, Heiser & Co., Ltd.

CentraCare Clinic: Bridget Faber, Mahowald Insurance Agency; Dr. Don Jurgens, Coborn Cancer Center; Patrick Lynch, Granite Logistics Services, LLC

CentraCare Health Foundation: Julie Esselman, CentraCare Health – Monticello; Andy Fritz, El Jay Plumbing and Heating; Dr. Nicholas Reuter, Coborn Cancer Center; Yvonne Kremers, community volunteer; Christy Gilleland, Gilleland Chevrolet Cadillac; Hon. Elizabeth Hayden, retired, senior district court judge; Mark Kranz, community volunteer; Dr. Kevin Smith, Regional Diagnostic Radiology

St. Benedict’s Senior Community: Maureen Gaedy, Goodwill Easter Seals; Jacqueline Schuh, Attorney at Law


POINT OF VIEW

Business Central asks readers:

“As an emerging leader, how are you making a difference in your workplace?”

By taking initiative to lead other coworkers and colleagues and by getting involved in community projects and programs.”

Kalie Schuster • Leighton Enterprises

By busting through the ‘I want it right now’ stereotype and working hard to move up.”

Alex Cameron • Bremer

IN THE NEWS

Chateau Waters opens in Sartell

At our non-profit, we don’t have a lot of extra money for recycling, so I’ve taken it all home.”

Teresa Farrell • United Way of Central Minnesota

By trying to forge more relationships within the community.”

Paul Ravenberg • Central Minnesota Council – Boy Scouts of America

St. Benedict’s Senior Community, a branch of CentraCare Health, opened its new location, Chateau Waters, in Sartell. The apartment-style senior housing community offers 72 apartment homes with 12 different floor plans. Amenities include a fullservice spa and salon, dining and club venues, a movie theatre, and a heated pool.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

11


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront GETTING GOING

NEWS REEL JAHN ELECTED TO NATIONAL BOARD Teresa Jahn, clinical nurse specialist, CentraCare Heart and Vascular Center, was elected to a three-year term on the national board of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Certification Corporation.

QUINLIVAN & HUGHES RECOGNIZED

Quinlivan & Hughes shareholders Steve Schwegman and Dyan Ebert were named 2016 Super Lawyers while Laura Moehrle, shareholder, and Julie Fisk, associate attorney, were named

2016 Rising Stars. Super Lawyers annually recognizes Minnesota attorneys for credibility and achievement.

CMCF ELECTS BOARD MEMBERS The Central Minnesota Community Foundation elected John Herges, Tohow Siyad and Steve Windfeldt to a second three-year term on its Board of Directors. Brad Wheelock was elected to a third three-year term on the Board. Board members govern the Central Minnesota Community Foundation, conduct marketing and development activities and approve grant decisions.

PROCESSPRO RECOGNIZED CIP Review named ProcessPro one of the 20 Most Promising Food and Beverage Technology Solution Providers of 2016. ProcessPro also earned this recognition last year for experience working with a variety of batch process manufacturers in the food and beverage industry.

12

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

The Bang and the Buck If you’re facing change, take time to evaluate your resources. By Greg Vandal

O

ne of the biggest precipitators of change involves the bottom line. Occasionally, that “bottom” is dropping out. More likely, board members, stakeholders, or a general organizational commitment to continuous improvement beg that change is in order. A simple exercise can help determine the merits of change when it is largely driven by resources. The exercise involves analyzing the cost of inputs – time, capital, and the like – versus the relative worth of the outputs – goods and/or services. At least nine scenarios can emerge from these variables: 1.LESS BUCK = LESS BANG:

If fewer resources are invested and a lower level of volume and/or quality of output results, the change is not desirable unless true austerity is the primary objective. ––––––––––– 2.LESS BUCK = SAME BANG: If less is invested and current output levels still result, there is probably a positive outcome to that change. ––––––––––– 3.LESS BUCK = INCREASED BANG: If less is invested and a greater output is secured,

VARIABLE EXERCISE

the change is surely worth exploration. ––––––––––– 4.SAME BUCK = LESS BANG: If the investment of resources remains constant, but the change produces a lower level of goods and services, this course of action is surely suspect. ––––––––––– 5.SAME BUCK = SAME BANG: If a consistent investment results in the same level of output, change should be examined on a different set of metrics. Perhaps a change in the type of output is necessary to better achieve the organization’s mission. ––––––––––– 6.SAME BUCK = INCREASED BANG: If investments remain constant and a greater level of production is the result, the change appears warranted. ––––––––––– 7.INCREASED BUCK = LESS BANG: It would be a

bad outcome if an increase in organizational investment resulted in a diminished level of output. ––––––––––– 8.INCREASED BUCK = SAME BANG: If the output is merely the same as before, but the investment has increased, perhaps it’s right to be suspicious of that change. Yet, market forces or mission realignment may require this to be the case. ––––––––––– 9.INCREASED BUCK = INCREASED BANG: Change that requires a greater investment, but at the same time produces an increase in organizational output, might be worth exploring based on the merits of those outputs. A simple “bang for your buck” analysis like this one can help determinate the merits of change, as long as deliberations are couched in the overall mission of the organization.

contributor Greg Vandal is the sole proprietor of Vox Liberi, a consulting business that delivers planning and project management services to clients in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. He can be reached at greg.vandal@voxliberi.com.


PEOPLE TO KNOW

Sheri Moran

John Bieringer

Kara Tomazin

Mary Swingle

Mark Osendorf

Gabriel Media (320) 251-1780 sheri@gabriel media.info Chair, Membership & Workforce Development Division ––––––––––– The Membership Division is responsible for all marketing and membership activities, including workforce development, networking programs and all of the Chamber’s special events.

Dairyland Supply (320) 352-3987 john@dairyland supply.com Chair, Central Minnesota Farm Show Committee ––––––––––– This committee is responsible for planning and organizing the Central Minnesota Farm Show. For more information on the Farm Show, see the special section beginning on page 37 in this issue of Business Central.

St. Cloud Hospital/ CentraCare Health (320) 229-5199 x71390 tomazink@ centracare.com Chair, Marketing Committee ––––––––––– The Marketing Committee is responsible for the over-all marketing efforts of the Chamber of Commerce.

Rasmussen College (320) 251-5600 mary.swingle@ rasmussen.edu Chair: Business Development Council ––––––––––– The purpose of the Business Development Council is to provide training and education for Chamber members and their employees to help their businesses survive and thrive.

Xcel Energy (320) 255-8610 mark.f.osendorf@ xcelenergy.com Chair, Government Affairs Committee ––––––––––– The Government Affairs Committee provides opportunities to interact with area legislators on issues important to business. See Your Voice in Government on page 18.

“We’re taking care of business.”

To honor the new year, Grand Casino is changing for the better! Upgrades include new restaurants and improvements to the gaming floor. Plus, with flexible meeting spaces and experienced event planners, Grand Casino is the ideal location to host your next event. Visit GrandCasinoMN.com for more information. Grand Casino Mille Lacs Events & Convention Center: 800-626-5825 Grand Casino Hinckley Events & Convention Center: 800-472-6321

GrandCasinoMN.com

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

13


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NEWS REEL THOLEN JOINS PALMER PRINTING Patty Tholen joined Palmer Printing’s sales and marketing team as account manager. Tholen provides account services for Palmer and branding and design guidance to Palmer’s internal marketing team. She brings 30 years of experience in the marketing industry and most recently served as graphic designer and brand manager at Marco.

LARSON JOINS HUGHES MATHEWS GREER Kelly A. Larson joined Hughes Mathews Greer, P.A. as an associate attorney. Larson practices in the areas of business, employment, commercial, construction, and real estate/land use law and litigation.

KLETTKE JOINS REGIONAL DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Dr. Scott Klettke recently joined Regional Diagnostic Radiology. He earned his doctorate from the Medical College of Wisconsin and specializes in general, prostate and musculoskeletal MRI.

HONDL RECOGNIZED BY INDUSTRY MAGAZINE Mary Hondl, CEO of Regional Diagnostic Radiology, was named one of 100 Influential Minnesota Health Care Leaders by Minnesota Physician, an independent magazine featuring regional news reports and information on the business of healthcare. Hondl was recognized for developing new practices and policies to meet and exceed compliance standards.

BCCalendar GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

JAN/FEB 2017

CAN’ T M IS S O PPO RT U NIT IES TO INF LU E NC E , PRO M OT E , A ND L E AR N . Visit StCloudAreaChamber.com for the most current and detailed calendar. SPOTLIGHT

JANUARY 24

Supervisor Development Certificate Program Training for new supervisors or those who want to strengthen their leadership skills. Courses begin January 24 and run through April at the Chamber office.

Cost is $325 for Chamber members, $525 for the general public, and includes five core courses and one elective.

JAN 2, 25 & FEB 2

“Critical Employment Law Series: Keeping Your Business Out of Trouble” Designed for business owners and managers, this new series offers information and details on human resource topics to help your business stay out of legal trouble. All sessions are held from 8-9:30 a.m. at the Chamber office. Cost is $20 per session or $50 for all three. January 17: “A Hazy Issue: Medical Marijuana AND the Workplace” presented by Dr. Philip Bachman, Workmed Midwest, and Chad Staul, Rinke Noonan. January 25: “PreEmployment Screenings – When, How and What?” presented by Jacqueline Schuh, Engelmeier & Umanah

February 2: “Considerations Before You Fire” presented by Dorraine Larison, Gray Plant Mooty

JAN 10 & FEB 14

NEXT – Chamber’s Emerging Leaders Leadership and networking opportunities for emerging leaders in Central Minnesota. Meets the second Tuesday of every month, noon1 p.m. Cost is $195 for an annual membership. Register to Whitney, wbina@ StCloudAreaChamber.com. January 10: “Benefits of Philanthropy and Giving Back” presented by Coborn’s Inc. at Coborn’s Corporate office, 1921 Coborn Blvd., St. Cloud. February 14: Small group activity and networking event. Location: Boy Scout office, 1191 Scout Dr., Sartell

JAN 11 & FEB 1

Lunchtime Learning Educational networking events that give busy professionals a chance to stay on the cutting edge. Meets the first Wednesday of the month, noon-1 p.m., at the Chamber office. Registration is required: $15 for Chamber members, $22 for the general public. January 11: Sponsored by Sentry Bank with Augie Rodriguez and Joe Erickson, St. Cloud Rox, presenting “Leading Your Team: Lessons in Leadership for Coaches On and Off the Field.” February 1: “Workplace Violence – Staying Safe: Identifying Potential Risks and How to React” presented by St. Cloud Police officer Mike Warner, sponsored by KEEPRS.

The Chamber office is located at 1411 West St. Germain Street, suite 101 in St. Cloud. 14

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7


JAN 12 & FEB 2

Business After Hours A complimentary open house for Chamber members and guests. Bring lots of business cards and prepare to grow your network! 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. January 12: Hosted by GrandStay Residential Suites Hotel, 213 6th Ave. S, St. Cloud February 2: Hosted by Country Inn & Suites, 235 Park Ave. S, St. Cloud

JAN 18 & FEB 15

Waite Park Chamber For businesses interested in Waite Park community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

January 18: Hosted by the College of Saint Benedict Gorecki Center at Waite Park City Hall, 19 13th Ave. N, February 15: “Waite Park State of the City Address” by Waite Park Mayor Rick Miller, hosted by Falcon National Bank at Pizza Ranch, 110 2nd Street S, Ste 119, Waite Park.

JAN 26 & FEB 23

Sauk Rapids Chamber For businesses interested in Sauk Rapids community issues. Lunch is provided by the host when you register at least two days in advance. Meetings are held at the Sauk Rapids Government Center, 250 Summit Ave. N, Sauk Rapids, from 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. January 26: Details TBD.

February 23: Details TBD.

the Chamber of Commerce, outlining the economic outlook for Central and greater Minnesota. This year’s Winter Institute focuses on “Ideas and Innovation,” February 23-24. Cost is $60 for both days.

FEB 8

Business Education & Technology (BET) Workshop & Expo Annual conference featuring training in business, education and technology areas. Cost is $10 per person and includes a boxed lunch, keynote address and four breakout sessions. 7:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Registration is required at StCloudAreaChamber.com. Visit BET-Expo.com for more information. February 8: Best Western Kelly Inn, 100 4th Ave. S, St. Cloud

FEB 23 & 24

Winter Institute Annual economic summit, organized by St. Cloud State University and sponsored by

Feb. 23: Annual Economic Outlook, 5-6:30 p.m. at the 912 Regency Plaza Feb. 24: St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Business Panel, 12:30-1:45 p.m., Atwood Memorial Center, St. Cloud State University.

FEB 28-MARCH 2

Central Minnesota Farm Show Free and open to the public from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. at the River’s Edge Convention Center. More on the Farm Show on page 37.

MOBILE | SEO | CMS CHECK OUT THE NEW ST. CLOUD AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SITE. BUILT AND SUPPORED BY JDB IT. SITE DESIGN BY THELEN ADVERTISING.  – WWW.STCLOUDAREACHAMBER.COM

JDB IT IS YOUR ONE STOP SOURCE FOR ALL OF YOUR WEB DEVELOPMENT NEEDS.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

15


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront THE TROUBLE WITH BUSINESS

NEWS REEL BREVER JOINS SKINFITNESSMD Courtney Brever recently joined SkinFitNessMD as an injection therapist. Brever holds a master’s degree in clinical exercise physiology from the University of Wisconsin – La Crosse. She is also a board certified physician assistant.

Money Mistakes

There are plenty of ways business owners can get into trouble when it comes to handling money. Here are a few of the more common mistakes and how to avoid them. By Chris Panek which helps your cash flow. If you require a down payment or deposit, make sure you are receiving at least the value of any materials you need to purchase or any out-of-pocket expenses you may be incurring.

ERICKSON RECOGNIZED ERP named Daniel Erickson, manager, product strategy, ProcessPro, a finalist in the Best Writer category for the ERP Software Writers’ Awards 2016. The annual awards recognize excellence in ERP community writing including articles, blog posts and reviews.

INITIATIVE FOUNDATION RECOGNIZED, AWARDS GRANTS The Minnesota Council of Nonprofits awarded the Initiative Foundation, and its sister organizations, a Responsive Philanthropy Award. The Initiative Foundation awarded 93 grants totaling $302,242 to support projects and organizations throughout Central Minnesota. Recipients included the United Way of Central Minnesota, St. Cloud State University Foundation, Greater St. Cloud Development Corporation, City of Sartell, and the Stearns-Benton Employment & Training Council.

BLATTNER FAMILY FOUNDATION RAISES $45,000 The 15th annual Blattner Family Foundation Golf Tournament Fundraiser raised $45,000 in donations for the Avon and Albany Fire Departments in Central Minnesota. Over 115 companies participated in this year’s tournament. The annual tournament has raised over $521,000 for the Albany and Avon Fire Departments since 2001.

16

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

A

s a business owner, you have many roles. Some feel comfortable and others tend to get little attention from you. If you own a business, try to keep these tips in mind to help your overall success. Money Management: If you receive cash payments in your business, make a daily bank deposit to eliminate the risk of fraudulent transactions or getting robbed. Make sure you have a safe for your cash storage when it is not possible to get to the bank. –––––––––– When customers pay with a check, be sure to see a

photo ID and write their driver’s license number on the check. To ensure payments are good, see if the customer can provide a certified check instead. –––––––––– If you accept credit and debit cards, shop around and compare pricing on fees and discounts. There are many options to choose from. Take the time to find the one that best fits your business. –––––––––– If you extend payment terms to your customers, look at what others in your industry are doing. Many require payment up front or short payment terms,

Controlling Costs: Whenever possible, keep your costs low. Only order items you need and track how all of your money is being spent. Look for ways you can reduce expenses – even the small expenses. Every penny counts! –––––––––– Monitor your money coming in and going out with accounting software such as QuickBooks. Online solutions give you access to your data from anywhere you have an internet connection and the availability to update your information easily. –––––––––– Create a budget to help you get an overall picture of your income and expenses. Tracking your money will help you understand your costs. It’s hard to control your money when you have no idea where it’s going. ––––––––––

contributor Chris Panek is a Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor and Certified Public Accountant at Christine R. Panek, CPA. She has over 20 years of experience helping small businesses with accounting and bookkeeping, financial statement preparation, QuickBooks consulting and payroll services in the St. Cloud area.


business Keep tabs on your income and expenses by comparing the previous year to your current year to help gauge how your business is doing. Common Mistakes to Avoid: Don’t draw more money out of your business than you need. This can lead to low operating cash. Leave the remaining money in your business accounts to help cover future costs. –––––––––– Don’t hire staff until you know you absolutely need them. Payroll is a big expense you don’t want to incur if the work can be absorbed by you or your existing staff. Look into outsourcing work to other professionals, which may save you money until you are ready to hire someone in-house. –––––––––– Keep your personal and business finances separate. Open business and personal accounts for checking, savings and even credit cards. Use the appropriate account whenever you make a purchase. You will simplify your business bookkeeping by doing this, since it eliminates the entries of personal non-deductible items. It will also give you a clear picture of your business accounts since they are all business transactions. –––––––––– Don’t get behind on paying your taxes. Whether it’s income tax, sales tax or even payroll taxes, be sure you are making your payments and/or estimates on time. When you pay on time, you don’t incur a large tax bill all at once, or the penalties and interest payments that can add up quickly on unpaid taxes.

financial

technology We solve complex business, financial and technology challenges, all under one roof.

WE ARE BERGANKDV bergankdv.com

YOUR EQUIPMENT FINANCE & LEASING EXPERTS!

Agriculture l Specialty Vehicles l Healthcare l Construction

CALL US TODAY

1.800.247.1922 follow us

stearnsleasing.com

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

17


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront YOUR VOICE IN GOVERNMENT

Save the date!

NEWS REEL DOWNTOWN COUNCIL NAMES URBAN HEROES

There are a number of events scheduled in the next few months that will help you share your opinions and concerns with our area legislators.

The St. Cloud Downtown Council named its 2016 Downtown Urban Heroes: Legacy Award: Boser Construction/Inventure Properties

JANUARY 4

Session Priorities

Ambassador Award: The Barth family, Dan, Mark and Nick, which includes Diversified Media Resources and Beaver Island Brewing Company Champion Award: Capital One and its employees Vision Award: The Mississippi Riverwalk St. Cloud Task Force, a partnership including the City of St. Cloud and the Downtown Council Newsreel compiled by Whitney Bina. For consideration in News Reel send your news release to givers@ StCloudAreaChamber.com

A reception and dinner for Minnesota business and legislative leaders on January 4 from 4-9 P.M. at the St. Paul RiverCentre, 175 West Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul. Session Priorities serves as the kickoff event to the annual legislative session. Cost is $145 per person. Register to Kellie, klibert@StCloudArea Chamber.com. ––––––––––

JANUARY 13 & FEBRUARY 10

Government Affairs A discussion of local government issues on the second Friday of the month, 7:30 - 9 A.M . at the Chamber office, 1411 W St. Germain St., Ste 101. ––––––––––

FEBRUARY 8

Evening at the Capital Interact with state legislators and make your voice heard in St. Paul on Feb. 8 from 5-7 P.M. at the Best Western Capitol Ridge, 161 St. Anthony Ave., St. Paul. Cost is $300 to sponsor the event. Individual registrations are also available. Registration is required to registrations@ StCloudAreaChamber.com. ––––––––––

Design. Build. Solutions.

Development • Architectural Design • Construction Services • Single source. Superior service. Remarkable results.

320.251.4109 | 800.772.1758 | millerab.com

Brian Hart 26 8th Avenue South St. Cloud, MN • 320-281-3056 www.brianhart.sandler.com S Sandler Training Finding Power in Reinforcement (with design) and Sandler Training are registered service marks of Sandler Systems, Inc. © 2017 Sandler Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 18 Jan_Feb BC.indd 1

12/12/16 4:29 PM


TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

Kelly Services, Inc., staffing agency, 4150 2nd Street, suite 425, St. Cloud. Pictured: Beth Putz, Lori McGuire, Diane Diego Ohmann.

Simonson Lumber, a family owned lumber and building material dealer since 1913, 535 1st Street NE, St. Cloud. Pictured: Sheri Moran, Mark Klaverkamp, Jen Peters, Julie Forsberg.

Healing Hooves Family Farm LLC, equine assisted fun and learning that inspires, challenges, encourages and empowers individuals and families; custom pony parties, fundraisers and business events, 14995 120th Street NE, Oak Park. Pictured: Tammy Buttweiler, Tracy Zhykhovich, Roger Schleper.

Palmer Wireless, locally owned mobile phone and internet provider in Central Minnesota, 2848 2nd Street, suite 195, St. Cloud. Pictured: Julie Forsberg, Laura Kangas, Lonna Christensen, Karie Kerfeld, Jayne Greeney Schill.

The Tom James Company, personal clothiers who meet with busy professionals at the convenience of their schedule in their home or office, 2523 Wayzata Blvd., suite 100, Minneapolis. Pictured: Mark Roerick, Rebecca Garsys, Julie Forsberg.

ClearPay Financial Solutions delivers affordable, fully integrated one-stop payment solutions, 12929 Maywood Ln., Hopkins. Pictured: Gary Verkinnes, Ken Lindsay, Chris Panek.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

19


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

Benusa Appliance Sales & Service, Inc., top quality appliances, electronics and mattresses, 2525 County Road 74, St. Cloud. Pictured: Rick Poganski, Jeff Seifert, Rachel Templin, Jack Stang, Chris Panek.

Ko-Z's Eats and Sweets, featuring homemade soups, sandwiches, deli and sweets, 601 2nd Street S, Waite Park. Pictured: Rick Poganski, Andrea Saatzer, Chris Panek

Central Minnesota SCORE #468, provides free and confidential business counseling, 355 55th Ave. S, suite 135, St. Cloud. Pictured: Rory Cruser, Darold Berreau, Tom Schlough, Liz Kellner.

Hjort Chiropractic, offering acupuncture, therapeutic massage, AUT, physical rehabilitation, and other therapies, 3700 Division Street W, suite 101, St. Cloud. Pictured: Beth Putz, Dr. Terrence Osterman, Dr. Stefan Stoebe, Tammy Buttweiler.

TOP HATS : NEW LOCATIONS, OWNERSHIP & EXPANSIONS Cohlab Digital Marketing, certified Google partner handling everything from strategy to implementation. Services include: responsive (mobile-friendly) website design, SEO, PPC/ AdWords, inbound marketing, social media and more. The company has moved to 925 1st Street S #101A, St. Cloud. Pictured: Kris Hellickson, Cliff Robbins, Julie Forsberg.

W WENDY

HENDRICKS COMMERCIAL CONSULTANT BUY | SELL | LEASE BUSINESS BROKERAGE C: 320.293.6379 O: 320.251.1177

wendy@cbcorion.com

20

FOR SALE

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE BUILDING ON HWY 10 SOUTH, ADJACENT TO HWY 23 EXIT. 11,300 SF

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

Mighty Axe Hops, growing local hops for local breweries. The farm is located just outside of Foley. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Ben Boo, Beth Putz.


TOP HATS: NEW MEMBERS

Duck’s Sport Bar and Grill, food, beverages, and home of Granite City Golf - Central Minnesota's Premier Indoor Golf Simulator, 3606 W Division Street, St. Cloud. Pictured: Caryn Stadther, Jeff “Duck” Spanier, Colleen Jeffrey, Rich Gallus.

Your Creative, helps businesses and organizations communicate their brand and messaging in consistent and meaningful ways, 701 W St. Germain Street, suite 301, St. Cloud. Pictured: Brian Jarl, Donella Westphal, Kimberly VanDusen, Rory Cruser.

TOP HATS : NEW BUSINESSES

Dooley’s Petroleum, Inc., a supplier of refined fuels, propane, lubricants and natural gas to residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural customers across the Midwest, 1106 Lincoln Ave., Sauk Rapids. Pictured: Luke Cesnik, Frank Schwagel, Dan Selander, Randy Dooley, Rich Schwagel, Inese Mehr.

Asteria Inn & Suites-Waite Park, a multi-room hotel with suites that was recently remodeled. 815 1st Street S, Waite Park. Pictured Chris Panek, Dec Bhakta, Luke Cesnik.

INNOVATIVE LEADER

in TECHNOLOGY and in CARING for YOU!

Reichert Wenner, P.A., a full-service law firm practicing in the areas of real estate, employment law, social security disability, personal injury, business law, estate planning, and more, 616 Roosevelt Road, suite 100, St. Cloud. Pictured: Chris Panek, LeAnne Miller, Robert Wenner, Luke Cesnik.

Fountain of Juice, serving quality fresh pressed juice, smoothies and food via food truck and serving inside St. Cloud Good Earth Food Co-op, St. Cloud. Pictured: Chris Panek, Laura Akre, Caryn Stadther.

EXPERIENCE MATTERS

The Outpatient Surgery Specialists “Including Overnight Recovery Care”

Accredited by

Celebrating 45

Years of Excellence In Caring For You!

1526 Northway Drive, St. Cloud 251-8385 | 800-349-7272 | www.stcsurgicalcenter.com

CORY RITTER, Partner, CPA

MOLLY THOMPSON, Partner, CPA

Over 15 years of public accounting experience. Specializing in Business Tax, QuickBooks, Personal Tax, Financial Statement & Business Consulting.

Over 21 years of public accounting experience. Specializing in Audit & Accounting Services, Technology Consulting, Quality Control, Internal Control Reviews.

Voted BEST ACCOUNTING FIRM in Central MN by readers of the St. Cloud Times

Working with people, not just numb3rs.

Albany 320.845.2940

Little Falls 320.632.6311

Monticello 763.295.5070

St. Cloud 320.251.0286

An Independently Owned Member, RSM US Alliance

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

Maple Lake 320.963.5414

www.swcocpas.com

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

21


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

UpFront

NetworkCentral GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

E V E N T S A R O U N D T H E S T. C LO U D A R E A

GROW

The Chamber’s High School Internship Program, Unite For Success, helps students and employers connect.

Nimo Mohamed, a 12th grader at Apollo High School, interned with Independent Lifestyles and helped prepare programs like the organization’s Friendship Connection Group.

Zamzam Mohamed, a 10th grader at Apollo High School, interned at Independent Lifestyles and helped prepare a database of St. Cloud School District 742 teachers.

Jeremiah Simmons, a 9th grader at Sauk Rapids-Rice High School, interned in the Rainbow Room at the St. Cloud Area Family Y.

NETWORK

Sauk Rapids Chamber meetings include a presentation from the host and a business speaker. Julie Fisk, Quinlivan & Hughes, talks about common human resource mistakes.

Sauk Rapids mayor Kurt Hunstiger

Matthew Crouse, Candidate for District 13B House of Representatives

22

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

Dr. Eric Green, St. Cloud Surgical Center, shares the latest in knee replacement technology.

Minnesota District 13 Senator Michelle Fischbach


GROW

Lunchtime Learning covers a wide variety of business topics.

Even networkers enjoy a networking refresher course.

Learning is fun! Tanya Goering, ProStaff (L) and Jeri Clement, Tri-CAP

Tiffany Clements, College of Saint Benedict/Saint John’s University, explains social media strategy.

Betsey Lund Ross, Lund Ross Attorneys at Law, explains the new overtime and wage laws affecting businesses.

Tonie Dickmann, Times Media, educates the audience about geo-fencing.

DOING GOOD

Unite For Success You can help support the Chamber’s Unite For Success High School Internship Program by hosting a student or making a tax deductible donation to the Chamber’s Foundation. Learn more at UniteForSuccess.com Jeff Gau, Marco

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

23


InSIDE THIS ISSUE: Management Toolkit • Entreprenuerism

BUSINESS TOOLS GROW | NETWORK | PROFIT

u

Doing Good • Economy Central by Falcon Bank uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

RESOURCES THAT HELP YOUR BUSINESS GROW

ENTREPRENEURISM

Big Mistakes

Business owners who develop tunnel vision will miss seeing both the dangers and opportunities that lie ahead. By John Pepper

D

ivorced couples locked together by shared business interests. Partnerships without contracts. Promises broken. Fans of “The Profit,” CNBC’s reality show about business interventions, have seen all of these. On a happy day it’s a show about rescuing companies. Struggling entrepreneurs ask the show’s white hat investor Marcus Lemonis to bring his cash and experience to the table in the hope he can turn their failing businesses around. In return, he takes a part of the action and assumes complete control during the turnaround phase.

contributor John Pepper is a freelance writer in St. Cloud.

24

But often, when Lemonis is doing his digging, he discovers things ain’t what they seem. Sometimes hidden business partners hold guarantees on a piece of the pie. Sometimes the accounts don’t add up. Sometimes owners are their own worst enemies. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the failure rate for business startups is about 50 percent over five years. Independent restaurants and retail stores are the small businesses most tried and that most commonly fail. If you’ve observed the local business scene, that’s no surprise. These are businesses that appeal to common interests and appear to present opportunity without a lot of barriers. But basic business needs apply: a location that

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

works, a realistic business plan, a product people want, smart marketing, and expertise from owners and managers. Barry Kirchoff has seen the trap. He directs the Central Minnesota Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at St. Cloud State University. “I’ve counseled people who want to open a coffee shop,” he said. They’re attracted to the ambience, the sensual pleasure of relaxing amid the aromas of freshly brewed coffee, soft lighting and mellow music. “What people miss, is that turning the tables is where you make money. They’re fixated on the dream.” What sometimes happens is that somebody develops an expertise, is told they should open a business, and invests a life’s savings without really knowing what they’re doing. “Being a great cook isn’t enough,” Kirchoff said. “You can hire a great cook! There are so many other aspects to business.” Almost every list of common business mistakes includes a failure to budget accurately. A Business Startup Cost Calculator at businessknowhow.com lists 36 lines for one-time and ongoing costs, including deposits with public utilities, equipment lease payments, general business insurance, and legal fees.

Failing to understand business finance is at the top of Kirchoff’s mistake list. The SBDC offers a course on profit mastery that helps business owners see their own business plans and balance sheets the way a banker does. New and even experienced business owners are unlikely to have the expertise required to execute in all areas. Experienced business owners will obtain help where necessary. Startup owners may not feel they can afford to. They may also have the kind of tunnel vision which prevents them from seeing dangers and opportunities. One of St. Cloud’s most successful companies of the last 30 years has been Marco. After beginning as a typewriter business, it sold office furniture and copiers on its way to becoming today’s diverse business services company with a strong suit in IT. Marco CEO Jeff Gau, who blogs about business matters, says one of the biggest mistakes he sees in business is leadership that isn’t good at recognizing their strengths and weaknesses. “It happens far too often they keep leadership in place that lacks the skills to execute. Execution is king. Talking about it doesn't get it done.” Kirchoff draws a distinction between working in the business and working on the business. Ultimately, he said, an entrepreneur may want to


cash in on the business and sell it. To do that, he said, you have to be able to look at your own business the way a potential buyer would. Do you have a good management team, have you been doing annual vendor reviews, pricing reviews, and the other things that add value to a business? “Having an exit strategy or succession plan, is something business owners often overlook.” Barry Kirchoff’s recommendation to individuals considering starting a business is to speak with successful business owners. A book he suggests is “The Art of the Start” by Guy Kawasaki.

TriniTy logisTics | sarTell, mn

DOING GOOD

Giving HEROes

After hosting the Waite Park Chamber After Hours in October, Shingobee Builders used the event as a springboard for giving. The company pledged to make a donation to the Nicholas P. Koenig HERO Foundation for each person who attended the After Hours function,

resulting in a donation of $1,000. The HERO Foundation raises money for families affected by pediatric cancer and for pediatric cancer care and research at the St. Cloud Hospital and University of Minnesota. J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

25


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT

You’re Fired! Terminating an employee may be necessary, but the steps taken prior to termination can significantly reduce your exposure to a lawsuit. By Betsey Lund Ross on the manual as a resource for not only how to terminate the employee, but also the basis for termination. Have all employees acknowledge receipt of the manual with a signed form when they are hired.

“You’re fired!” Words no employee wants to hear and words many employers say with a cringing inner fear of liability or litigation. In fact, some employers will go so far as to avoid terminating an employee out of fear of future legal consequences. But as many of us have experienced, a trouble employee can create disastrous havoc in the workplace. Here are some tips to remember to minimize your risk of litigation

Be Consistent When handling employee termination, be consistent with your practices. The employee may not agree with the reason for termination, but the likelihood of litigation increases when employees believe they are treated differently than other employees. This is especially if employees believe they were treated unfairly or differently due to their age, race, nationality, gender, disability status, etc. The employee’s perception – correct or incorrect – plays a large role in whether the employee decides to file a legal claim to challenge the termination. when terminating an employee: Rely on the Employment Manual A well-drafted employment manual should detail your organization’s disciplinary process, set employee and employer expectations, and establish procedures to assist you in applying the organization’s policies consistently and equally to all employees. If termination of an employee is necessary, rely

Keep Accurate Records Whether it’s work performance issues or a bad attitude, most terminations result after there have already been several issues with the employee. Those previous issues should be documented and addressed at the time of occurrence. Avoid sending emails or text messages to the employee. Written documentation should be drafted and signed by the

employee. In litigation, those records become evidence of the issues that led up to termination. Prepare for the Termination Termination should never occur during a heated argument or when emotions are running high. Schedule a time to meet with the employee in a private room to inform the employee of the termination. Prepare notes prior to the meeting to prevent saying things that will later be regretted. Have another supervisor or manager present during the termination as a witness to what was said during the termination. Be Concise Even the most egregious employees may be shocked by their termination and challenge the basis for the termination. But wavering or sugar-coating the reason for the termination will only increase the employee’s confusion and frustration. Be concise and on point with the reason for the termination no matter how much the employee disagrees with the reasons. Following these five steps will not necessarily make the termination process easier, but will certainly reduce the likelihood your organization will face legal action in the future.

contributor Betsey Lund Ross is an attorney and shareholder with Lund Ross, P.A. Attorney at Law in St. Cloud, Minn., working in the areas of business law, employment law, and estate planning. You can find her online at lundrosslaw.com

26

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7


DOING GOOD

Photo Credit: Sheri Wegner, St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

Holiday Cheer I n November, the St. Cloud Area Chamber’s NEXT – Chamber Emerging Leaders group met at Anna Marie’s Alliance Shelter to learn more about the organization and tour the facility. To prepare for the meeting, group participants were encouraged to collect and bring donated holiday gifts for the women and children in the shelter. NEXT members engaged on a major level, collecting over 100 gifts for residents! Some group members also collected donations at their businesses prior to the meeting, allowing them

NEXT – Chamber’s Emerging Leaders visits Anna Marie’s Alliance during the holidays.

to bring boxes full of donated items. “Inviting community members to Anna Marie’s Shelter is important. It makes a difference when we can tell the story of Anna Marie’s Alliance and show people the facility to help them understand the importance of our services,” according to Mackenzie Fitting, Anna Marie’s Alliance and NEXT-Chamber’s Emerging Leaders member. “We are so grateful for the NEXT group’s visit and wonderful holiday donations.” NEXT – Chamber’s Emerging Leaders fosters

professional development and networking opportunities for emerging leaders in Central Minnesota. The group meets monthly on the second Tuesday at various locations throughout the St. Cloud Area.

Visit Business CentralMagazine.com to learn more.

WE FIX IT!

ST CLOUD 2710 2nd St South 320.240.2332 SAUK RAPIDS 27 N Benton Drive 320.230.2332 ONLINE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

BATTERIESPLUS.COM

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

27


uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

BusinessTools

Economy Central presented by

ECONOMY CENTRAL

The Heart of the Economy Free-market ideas, not capital, made us rich.

S

ince the days of Adam Smith, economists have grappled with the nature and causes of the wealth of nations. How is it that some countries prosper while others remain stagnant or even suffer under seemingly devastating conditions? Is it an abundance of resources? Capital investment? Though economists debate the relative importance of things like resources, institutions, and investments, there has never been a definitive answer as to what makes us rich…until now. Deirdre McCloskey has solved the central question in economics. In her recent book, Bourgeois Equality: How Ideas, Not Capital or Institutions, Enriched the World, McCloskey

By Lynn MacDonald

argues that ideas are at the heart of economic progress. You may be thinking that not all ideas are good. McCloskey freely admits this is true. More than specific ideas, she emphasizes the necessity of a framework that relies upon what “Adam Smith called ‘the liberal plan of equality, liberty and justice.’ In a word, it was liberalism, in the free-market European sense. Give masses of ordinary people equality before the law and equality of social dignity, and leave them alone, and it turns out that they become extraordinarily creative and energetic.” In short, creative ideas fuel productivity gains. Abundant capital investment and abundant

resources will not create wealth unless there are creative ideas and innovation accompanying them. The freedom and opportunity for people to “have a go” facilitates economic progress and wealth creation. “We need to inspirit masses of people, not the elite, who are plenty inspirited already,” according to McCloskey. “Equality before the law and equality of social dignity are still the root of economic, as well as spiritual, flourishing — whatever tyrants may think to the contrary.” But, wait…don’t we all know that income inequality is worsening? The rich are getting richer while the poor are getting poorer. This pervasive and oft-repeated sentiment seems to lack historical context. McCloskey argues the focus on income inequality misses the mark; she says wealth is better measured by our ability to meet basic comfort in essentials. McCloskey points out that, “by the standard of basic comfort in essentials, the poorest people on the planet have gained the most. In places like Ireland, Singapore, Finland and Italy, even people who are relatively poor have adequate food, education, lodging and medical care — none of which their ancestors had. Not remotely.” Even if we look at financial wealth, frequently reported

statistics seem to skew what is really going on. Though income inequality (financial wealth) fluctuates, in the long run it has been reduced. “Financial inequality was greater in 1800 and 1900 than it is now, as even the French economist Thomas Piketty has acknowledged,” according to McCloskey. “By the more important standard of basic comfort in consumption, inequality within and between countries has fallen nearly continuously.” This is a message of hope. Maybe things aren’t quite as bad as we all think. In McCloskey’s words: “The world is rich and will become still richer. Quit worrying.” Source: McCloskey, Deirdre. “The Formula for a Richer World? Equality, Liberty, Justice.” The New York Times, Upshot, September 2, 2016.

BY THE NUMBERS

How Sweet It Is

#1: Minnesota’s ranking in the country for production of sweet corn ___________ 1/3: Minnesota’s production of the entire U.S. crop of sweet corn ___________ 100,000: The number

of acres of farmland across the state dedicated to growing sweet corn ___________

700 million: contributor Lynn MacDonald is an associate professor of economics and co-director of the Winter Institute, St. Cloud State University. You can reach her at lcmacdonald@stcloudstate.edu

The estimated number of cans of corn that could be produced in Minnesota in 2016 Sources: DEED, MPR News

28

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7


743.05 *

$50M

$60M

$70M

$80M

December

$40M

November

September BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY

Home Sales C

2015 October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

$30M

October April March

TOTAL:$78,652,743.05 * $20M

February

January

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

TOTAL: $62,358,547

TOTAL:$64,832,866

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Residential 2014 2015 2016* 2014 August #/$ #/$ #/$ February

St. Cloud

1209

1,151

986

July $26,145,498 $21,854,833 $32,774,443 2016 January 0

500

Sauk Rapids 447 321 313 June $19,206,069 $15,843,450 $19,917,387.40

$40M

St. Joseph 176 142 178 February $1,353,832 $2,293,565 $3,850,915.21

$50M

$60M

$70M

$80M

January December Total as of 12/1/16. *2016 total is cumulative up-to-date.

Commercial Building Permits

$600k

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

BUILDING PERMITS BY COMMUNITY September

1000

$900k

TOTAL: 1525*

TOTAL: 1655

St. Joseph

2014

82 151 62 August Feb $3,783,078 $8,057,329 $32,432,562.09

July Total as of 12/1/16. *2016 Jan total is cumulative up-to-date.

2000

$200M

TOTAL: 1429

St. Augusta 7 5 66 September $202,027 $871,000 $0 Mar

TOTAL: $230,811,280.12* $150M

Food and Bev

ST. CLOUD 84 140 95 October $7,151,019 $18,735,131 $39,374,159.02 Apr

Waite Park

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

$100M

ST. CLOUD

Sartell 30 35 30 November $3,600,047 $11,485,611 $12,704,233 May 2015

1500

TOTAL: $1,126,765.07*

$1.5M

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

$50M

Food and Be

Sauk Rapids 409 567 549 December $7,465,381 $16,890,519 $7,577,477 June

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$0M

500

St. Cloud 397 444 464 2016 $57,715,070 $94,320,804 $138,751,046 July

Commercial Building Permits

2014

0

Commercial 2014 2015 2016* August #/$ #/$ #/$

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19

2015

November October

TOTAL: $230,811,280.12*

2016

2014

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

$30M

100 79 86 $4,437,367 $4,720,246 $8,062,179.85

March

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$20M

2016

$10M

St. Augusta

500

$300k

$0M

2015

Waite Park 116 113 72 April $1,803,560 $1,552,641 $1,754,612.66

0

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

ST. CLOUD

2014

2015

2016

2015

2014

$0

TOTAL: $62,358,547

2014

Sartell 291 329 239 May $8,129,708 $18,168,133 $12,293,194.93

2015

2016

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

$10M

2016

July December June

November May

Residential Building Permits

$0M

832,866

COLOR KEY:

Compiled by Kellie Libert, data current as of 12/1/16.

2014 2016

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. C ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSE

Economy Central presented by August

TOTAL:$64,832,866 2015

Home Sales C

September

TOTAL:$78,652,743.05 *

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS 2016

October

$80M

$250M

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

358,547

0M

280.12*

,393.19

,621.69

Residential Building Permits

$250M

2016

$0

$300k

June

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19 Sources: Building departments for the following cities: St. Cloud, Sauk Rapids, Sartell, Waite Park, St. Augusta, and St. Joseph. 2015

May

2015

Unemployment Rates 2015-2016

2014

Apr

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

Non FarmMarJobs

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com

September

October

M

J

J

1.0%

December

August

A

Jan

November

July

June

May

$250M

Feb

April

$200M

March

December

5%

$150M

November

$100M

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

$50M

1.5%

February

2.0%

January

6%

$0M

Source: www.positivelyminnesota.com 2014

2015-2016 % CHANGE

$300k

A

S

O

$0

0.5% 0.0%

4%

-0.5% -1.0%

3%

-1.5% -2.0%

2% O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

-2.5% O

N

D

J

F

M

St. Cloud Minneapolis/St. Paul Minnesota United States

St. Cloud, MN MetroSA Minnesota United States

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

29


43.05 *

BusinessTools

32,866

$80M

58,547

M

80.12*

93.19

21.69

$250M

uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu uuuuuuu

COLOR KEY: December

ECONOMIC INDICATORS & TRENDS

November

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec

December

October

December

November

October

August

September

August

July

June

May

TOTAL: 1525*

April

September

ST. CLOUD

October

March

February

January

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

December

November

October

D, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK,

September

August

July

June

Apr

Mar

Feb

Jan

lding Permits

May

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, November ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

September

2016

TOTAL: $1,126,765.07*

July

TOTAL: $230,811,280.12*

August July

TOTAL: 1655

June

2016

May

2015

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

June

TOTAL: $150,360,393.19

April May

500

$600k

November

1000

$900k

2015

July

May Not Capital, Made Us Rich.” McCloskey is Ideas,

Residential 2014 2015 2016* TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

Total as of 12/1/16. *2016 total is cumulative up-to-date.

speaking at 2 p.m. on Friday. April 2000

$1.5M

Stearns Co. 168 181 133 2014 Benton Co. 53 54 33

Benton County Sheriff’s Civil Process; Stearn’s County Sheriff’s Office $0 $300k $600k $900k $1.2M

andJune rhetorician, she will discuss “Free Market TOTAL: 1525*

250

TOTAL: 1655

200

TOTAL: 1429

2015 SHERIFF’S FORECLOSURE AUCTIONS

August

economics and features keynote speaker Deirdre McCloskey. A well-known economist, historian

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

150

Feb. 23-24. This year’s focus is on innovative 1500

100

TOTAL: $1,126,765.07*

TOTAL: $1,333,423.25

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

$1.2M

50

$1.5M

TheSeptember 2017 Winter Institute is Thursday and Friday,

TOTAL: 221

0

$1.2M

INNOVATIVE ECONOMICS October

TOTAL: $1,126,765.07*

2016 2014

$900k

December MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Food and Beverage Tax Collection TOTAL: 235 ST. CLOUD

$600k

Total as of 12/1/16. *2016 total is cumulative up-to-date.

TOTAL: 166

2016

$300k

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud

Sheriff’s Foreclosure Auctions STEARNS AND BENTON COUNTIES

January

$0

Housing/Real Estate St. Cloud Area AssociationJan of Realtors, $150M $200Msources:$250M http://stcloudrealtors.com/pages/statistics. Total as of 12/1/16. *2016 total is cumulative up-to-date.

2014

Home Sales Closed in St.Cloud

2000

Feb

6 COMMUNITIES - ST. CLOUD, SAUK RAPIDS, SARTELL, WAITE PARK, ST. AUGUSTA, ST. JOSEPH

1500

TOTAL: $1,326,730.36

0

$300k

Food and Beverage Tax Collection

1000

2016

February

ST. CLOUD

500

2015

2014

2016

March

TOTAL: $79,916,621.69

0

2015

Apr Mar

$0

$100M

2015

2014

2014

TOTAL: 1429

At noon on Friday, learn about innovation in March

action when a group of St. Cloud area business February

owners share their stories. From child care to

$1.5M

January

farming you'll hear how following your passion and creatively serving your customers ends up in a better product and increased opportunities.

Lodging Tax Dollars

The session will include a combination of live

of economic education organized by St. Cloud State University and sponsored by the St. Cloud

2015

Area Chamber of Commerce and other local TOTAL: $1,454,373.86

2014

businesses and organizations. You can learn more at

$0

$500k

$1M

$1.5M

$2M

BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Sources: Tax Collections – City of St. Cloud Total as of 12/1/16. *2016 total is cumulative up-to-date.

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

Economy Central presented by

December

The Winter Institute is an annual celebration

TOTAL: $1,508,301.02

30

November

St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce.

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

presentations and video. It is sponsored by the February

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2016

TOTAL: $1,263,831.14*

January

ST. CLOUD


x

Paula Capes

Business Development Manager

x

John Herges CEO

x

Dennis Miller

Commercial and SBA Lender

a local bank unmatched business banking That’s Reality. Every business is different. That’s why Falcon National Bank has a variety of financial solutions for businesses both big and small that are designed to fit a wide variety of needs from SBA Preferred lending and capital loans to merchant credit card services and remote deposit. Our products allow your business the flexibility to grow and thrive while our expert staff handles all the rest.

Member FDIC

www.Falconnational.com


POWERING

Story by Jeanine Nistler Photos by Joel Butkowski, BDI

After a lifelong career in the beer industry, Bernie Perryman is flipping the switch to try batteries and bulbs.

Y

ou’ve done your homework. Your team is trained to provide exceptional customer service. And they deliver. You follow up interactions with customer satisfaction surveys and the results are music to your entrepreneurial ears: “Satisfied.” What do beverages, batteries, bulbs and boats have in common, besides beginning with “b”? All have played significant roles in Bernie Perryman’s life. Let’s start with beverages, or more specifically, beer. Perryman joined Anheuser-Busch brewing company in 1982. The job took her to all 50 states and every major sporting event in the country, from the Bud Light Triathlon in Hawaii to the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in Louisville. And she worked five spring breaks in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. – until college students started calling her “ma’am” and she concluded

“I’m too old for that.” More about Perryman’s beer-related endeavors later. Let’s fast forward to batteries and bulbs, specifically Batteries + Bulbs, the franchise with one store in St. Cloud and one in Sauk Rapids that she bought this past August. Perryman has held high-level management positions for years, but this business is a big departure from beverages. In fact, several people asked her, “Are you sure you’re going to be able to make this move?” Her answer? “Yes! … You just adapt. You reinvent. You work it.” Perryman said she is, quite simply, the same person in a different role. “My character doesn’t change. I trust people. I want to build strong teams. I want them to always have trust in me,” she said. Perryman believes that no matter the industry, it’s imperative for a leader to trust, respect

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ 32

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7


+-+-+-+-+-+-+-++-+-+-+-+-+-+-+J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

33


+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ + + + + + + + + + Lance Barthel, commercial sales, Batteries Plus Bulbs, with owner Bernie Perryman

BUSINESS PROFILE Batteries + Bulbs

2710 Second St. South, St. Cloud _____

27 North Benton Dr. Sauk Rapids. These are two of 688 B + B stores in the United States.

Phone: St. Cloud, (320) 240-2332 _____ Sauk Rapids, (320) 230-2332 Fax: (320) 257-8271 Email: info@mnbattery.com Website: batteriesplus.com Ownership: Bernie Perryman, CEO and Keith Ulrick, CFO Business Description: Specialty retail sales of batteries and bulbs, plus repair of cell phones and tablets Employees: 11 - St. Cloud-based 4 - Sauk Rapids-based Total number of employees: 15 Current year projected sales: $2.6 million

34

and develop employees, and provide outstanding customer service. “Beer … batteries. They’re both ‘b.’ It’s still customers, sales, marketing, team building,” Perryman said. “I’m not a risk taker, but I looked at Batteries Plus Bulbs as a way to meet more people, to learn things.” In these early months with Batteries + Bulbs, Perryman is learning from the company’s leaders and her own employees. “I’ve got to know the game before I can say I’m the coach,” she said. Perryman completed three weeks of intensive corporate training in Pewaukee, Wis. Company trainers taught her and other franchisees about batteries and bulbs, of course, but also lighting effects, watch and key fobs, cell phones and tablets. They even covered how to rebuild battery packs. Since then, she has spent some time performing nearly every duty in her stores, from working the register to handling payroll, in order to expand her knowledge of the operation.

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

“I’ve got to learn a whole new trade. It’s keeping me fresh. I’m hitting this hard and we’re getting it done,” she said. “It’s important that they employees see me as engaged as they are every day.” And she already is planning to increase the commercial side of the business, where she said she sees “a lot of potential and opportunity.” Perryman is thrilled with what she has found at her two Batteries + Bulbs stores. “There’s nothing broken here,” said Perryman, who intends to build on the successes of the previous owners, Dolora and Brian Musech. “I’m honored for them to say, ‘We want you to take what we put our blood, sweat and tears into for 22 years.’ ” Passing the battery baton he Museches had been talking about selling Batteries + Bulbs “five or so years down the road,” Dolora said. Then, Perryman told Dolora that “she missed being self-employed and to let her

T

know if Brian knew of anything she might be interested in. I mentioned to Brian that our business was a perfect fit for her.” The couple also owns commercial real estate and their focus was turning more towards personal real estate investments. “So, when Bernie inquired, we thought we would approach her with our business. We met in May and I turned over a LOT of information. We met weekly after that until the closing on Aug. 1.” Dolora said she and Brian feel good about B+B’s new owner. “Bernie has great interpersonal skills,” said Dolora. “She is also very smart. She remembers details and people, is highly organized and is never afraid to ask for anything that will make her better at her job. She is not afraid to make hard decisions, but does so with as much information as she can gather. She deeply cares about her community and everyone in her organizations.” Even so, selling sparked strong emotions for Dolora. “It was like handing over a child,” she said. “I cried a lot during the process, mourning the loss. It wasn’t only the loss of daily duties, but the loss of employees who were like family, the loss of customers that were friends, the loss of identity and the loss of community responsibilities. Bernie was fabulous in respecting the terms of the sale, in which we did everything we could to make sure the transaction happened as smoothly as possible for our team and our customers.” That included keeping the sale secret until it was finalized. Perryman, Dolora and Brian stay in touch. “Since the sale, she has kept us updated on things so the loss wasn’t as


+-+-+-+-+-+-+-++-+-+-+-+-+-+-++ + + + + + + + harsh as it could have been,” Dolora said. “I knew, because we were friends, and Brian learned about her during the course of the sale, that she will take care of her team and her customers in the best possible way. We built our business on customer service and we feel that is how she will continue to grow it.” Perryman credits the Museches for opening their books and their hearts to her. And she credits John Herges, CEO of Falcon National Bank, for giving her confidence – and a loan. And she can’t say enough about husband Keith Ulrick’s support, not just with Batteries + Bulbs, but throughout her career. He never questioned her long hours or her friendships with business associates in a male-dominated industry. Perryman’s beginnings erryman grew up in Belleville, Ill., a community that calls itself the Capital of Southern Illinois. She earned a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Quincy College, about 2.5 hours north of her home. She worked at a variety of jobs throughout college, then landed her first Anheuser-Busch job.

P

Fun fact

In addition to batteries and bulbs, and phone/tablet repair, Batteries + Bulbs serves the commercial market, supporting several Central Minnesota companies. ++ When a customer says, “I need a new battery,” the sales associate will ask, “What makes you say that?” to troubleshoot. “We won’t sell you anything that won’t get the results that you expect,” said CEO Bernie Perryman. In that sales and marketing role, Perryman often would spend two months at a given location, working long hours, living in a hotel room and making friends with the locals. In fact, she became such close friends with Jean DeSelle, who worked at a high-end roof top bar in Fort Lauderdale, that Jean was maid of honor when Perryman married Keith Ulrick in 1992. “That job was fun,” Perryman recalled. “I learned a lot. I saw a lot. I met a lot of people.” And she gained the respect of the VP of Marketing and the Busch family, who attended many of the events that Perryman orchestrated. From 1982 to 1999, Perryman held eight different positions with Anheuser Busch. “Every position I’ve taken, every role I’ve taken, I’ve had to reinvent myself,” she said, because each job was different from the one before it.

Her early days with Anheuser Busch involved outfitting beachfront bars with Anheuser Busch marketing materials, buying beer for college students and giving away T-shirts. “Spring breakers would do anything for a T-shirt,” she said. Fifteen-plus years later it was a completely different experience when she became a sales executive for the company. Perryman grabbed another rung on the executive ladder in 1999 when she joined C&L Distributing, the AnheuserBusch distributor in Sauk Rapids. Founder/owner Arland “Brownie” Carlson mentored Perryman. In fact, many people said Brownie and Perryman were more like father and daughter than business associates. Perryman owned 25 percent of C&L and was its managing CEO. Perryman continued to pour her mind, body and soul into her work, much as she had during her

special events days. But she also nurtured a leisure-time passion: boating. Perryman and Keith adored their Leech Lake weekend getaways, where they enjoyed sharing sunshine, adult beverages, meals and laughter with the friends they made there. There was no need for a hotel room or cabin; they slept on the boat. Perryman also fondly recalls the Fort Lauderdale days of “shorts and T-shirts and drinking,” a time when she made friends with the owner of a 40-foot sailboat. The folks who partied on that boat never talked about their careers. “I met people who didn’t identify you as your job,” Perryman said. “I enjoyed not being branded by what I was doing.” Change came quickly fter Brownie Carlson died in 2007, the tenor at C&L changed. The way Perryman and

A

Timeline + May 1981

Bernie Perryman graduates from college

+ 1982

Perryman starts working at AnheuserBusch. Over 17 years she holds a variety of positions throughout the company and country.

+ 1994

Dolora and Brian Musech open Batteries Plus in St. Cloud

+ 1999

Perryman purchases a 25-percent share and becomes the managing CEO of C&L Distributing, Sauk Rapids, Minn., an Anheuser-Busch distributor

+ July 2011

Perryman first consults, then becomes the owner and managing CEO at Big North Distributing, the Anheuser-Busch distributor in Bemidji, Minn.

+ 2012

The Museches open Batteries Plus Bulbs in Sauk Rapids

+ November 2014

Perryman sells Big North Distributing and becomes the regional manager at Viking Coca-Cola, St. Cloud, Minn., a Coors and Coca-Cola distributor

+ August 2016

Perryman purchases the Batteries + Bulbs franchises in St. Cloud and Sauk Rapids J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

35


+-+-+-+-+-+-+-++-+-+-+-+-+-+-++ + + + + + + +

Best advice received The most valuable asset you have, and it does not cost money, is your character. From character, you can drive may things internally and externally, with your own employees, family and customers. This will leverage respect and will define you. You take this with you wherever you go and whatever you do. A strong character doesn’t just happen. You develop it and make it your own. This was a consistent message with the Busch family and management team.

36

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

Brownie had run the company didn’t sit well with some of Brownie’s family members. Tensions came to a head in 2011 and Perryman was asked to leave the company – abruptly. “The departure from C&L was tough,” Perryman said, “but things happen for a reason. … I had a wonderful run there.” And Perryman believes that “sometimes when things are falling apart, they are really falling into place.” Within days of Perryman leaving C&L, AnheuserBusch’s Minnesota manager called her with an idea that would take Keith and her to Bemidji for a few years. A beer distributor there, Big North, was struggling after owner Max Baker died. Perryman consulted with the surviving partner, Max’s wife, Shelly, from September 2011 until December of that year, when Perryman agreed to buy the business. In January 2012, Perryman and Keith moved into a Bemidji lakeshore rental and Perryman rolled up her sleeves even higher, working on Big North

tactical issues, policies, sales and marketing until she sold the distributorship in November 2014. Shortly before the sale was final, Perryman contacted her friend Michael Faber, CEO of Viking Coca-Cola in St. Cloud, to inquire about opportunities there. She became Viking’s regional manager for the Coke/ Coors distributor in November 2014 and stayed in that role until she and Keith bought Batteries + Bulbs this year.

What’s retirement? hen selling the Big North distributorship, Perryman briefly considered retiring. Emphasis on briefly. “I just wasn’t ready and I knew my husband wasn’t ready,” Perryman recalled. When she took the regional manager job with Viking Coke, she thought she’d stay until at least age 62. But an entrepreneurial spirt was stirring inside her. That’s when she shared her interest in business ownership with Dolora Musech – and within wa few months left Viking for B+B.

W

Perryman figures she has a lot of good working years left. But she also has a vision of one day moving with Keith to Florida. In her mind’s eye, Perryman can see herself working part-time in a tiki bar on the beach and spending her off hours on the water. “I can’t see myself never working, but I could see myself working fewer hours or fewer days.” For the foreseeable future, Perryman will lead the local Batteries + Bulbs stores and spend countless hours volunteering with Rotary, the Chamber of Commerce, the St. Cloud Economic Development Authority and more. She loves giving back to the community and helping other business people succeed. Slowing down is not one of her short-term goals. “That’s me. That’s my DNA. That’s my character to put a lot of hours in, to not quit,” Perryman said. “My hard work has made me a better person. … I’ve had great opportunities and this is one more.” Jeanine Nistler is a freelance writer in St. Cloud.

PERSONAL PROFILE Bernadette “Bernie” Perryman Age: 58 Title/role: CEO/Franchise Owner Hometown: Belleville, IL Education: Bachelor’s degree in marketing from Quincy College, Quincy, Ill. Graduated in May 1981. Family: Husband Keith Ulrick, charter pilot Hobbies: Boating and working. Active in many local community organizations, including Chamber of Commerce, United Way, Habitat for Humanity, Economic Development Authority for the City of St. Cloud Advice to a would-be entrepreneur: Take chances and don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do it. Drive an honest culture with your employees, building strong teams.


-

50 YEARS

CULTIVATING FRIENDSHIPS 1967-2017 // CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW


WELCOME to the Farm Show

WELCOME TO THE 2017 CENTRAL MINNESOTA FARM SHOW!

T

JOHN BIERINGER

he Central Minn Farm Show, brought to you by the St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, is the largest indoor show if its kind in the region. Why does such a show exist in this growing metropolitan area? Because agriculture is still one of the area’s leading industries! Since opening its doors 50 years ago, the Farm Show has been a popular community event for Central Minnesota. The show offers something for everyone with an interest in agriculture. When you turn to the center of this brochure you’ll find a complete map of the show and a list of vendors to help you make the most of your visit. The St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce is committed to helping area farmers through organization and sponsorship of the Central Minnesota Farm Show. And there’s something

Dairyland Supply Volunteer Chair, Central Minn. Farm Show

ANDY NOBLE

Advantage 1 Insurance Agency Volunteer Vice Chair, Central Minn. Farm Show

SHERI WEGNER

2017 Farm Show Coordinator St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce

else we’d like you to know. As part of our commitment to agriculture and education, each year the Chamber dedicates a portion of the proceeds from the Farm Show to scholarships. In the past we have provided scholarships only to high school seniors. This year we’re trying something new. You can read more about it on the next page. Volunteers have worked hard to put together a show that you will find both valuable and fun. Enjoy your visit with us and if you have questions or suggestions, please stop by the information booth. We’d like to hear from you. Sincerely, John Bieringer, Andy Noble and Sheri Wegner

JOBS

GROWING EMPLOYEES

Ag-related companies are wondering where their next employees will come from – and the Chamber is trying to help.

B

usinesses throughout the country are struggling to find employees. In Central Minnesota almost everyone will tell you that they would hire if they could just find the right person. The shortage is becoming particularly acute in ag-related businesses. There is such a shortage of students in the agriculture

38

colleges that the ag-related companies are recruiting students with degrees in other disciplines such as business and marketing. In fact, the opportunities are almost unlimited for students who are willing to relocate in the United States, as well as overseas. With a competitive demand for students and teachers specializing in agriculture,

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

Eric Welsh, of the American Society of Agronomy, says there is a shortage of at least 2,000 to 3,000 graduates specializing in agriculture every year. The St. Cloud Area Chamber is committed to doing our small part to help address the shortage. Each year we dedicate some of the proceeds from the Central Minn. Farm Show to student scholarships. In the past those scholarships have been targeted at high school seniors. Since the program started in 1982, the Chamber has awarded over 200 scholarships for a total of almost $75,000. This year we’re trying something new. The scholarship program is being expanded to include trade school, and college students, as well as high school students. And

we’ve enlarged our service area to include 71 Central Minnesota high schools and 10 colleges and trade schools. The students are required to apply for the scholarships, which are awarded based on merit and a stated intent to continue their education by studying some area of agriculture.

MORE TO KNOW

There will be 10 scholarships worth $500 each awarded this year, and we’ll announce the recipients at the Farm Show on Wednesday, March 1. For more information, or to apply for a scholarship, visit CentralMNFarmShow.com Application deadline is February 3, 2017.


TERS

FARM BROADCASTERS

FARM BROADCASTERS

FARM BROADCASTERS LIVE BROADCAST

FMinnesota’s Most Respected Farm Team ARM BROADCASTERS

Team

Minnesota’s Most Respected Farm Team

Linder Farm Network’s Lynn Ketelsen is scheduled Minnesota’s Most Respected Farm Team to attend the 50th Central Minn. Farm Show. Minnesota’s Most Respected Farm Team

Ketelsen was named the Listening to the Linder Farm 2005 National Broadcaster Network has become a of the Year by the National Minnesota tradition with Association of Farm farmers across Broadcasting, Ag the state. For 30 Communicator of years, the Linder the Year by several Farm Network has national farm and been the Voice of commodity groups, Agriculture in the and has been state, providing recognized for his information that Lynn Ketelsen Linda Brekke Jeff Stewart From left: Jeff Stewart, Agri Marketing Specialist; Linda Brekke, Farm Reporter; t, Agri Marketingfarmers Specialist; Linda Brekke, From left: farm Jeff Stewart, Agri Marketing Specialist; broadcasting by Linda Brekke, Farm Reporter; need toFarm Reporter; Lynn Ketelsen, Farm Director Lynn Ketelsen, Farm Director Lynn Ketelsen, Farm Director many national organizations know to run their businesses The 2005 Nationa Linda Brekke grew up on a farm near Jeff 2005 Stewart grewBroadcaster up on a farm in Year west The 2005 National of the Year da Brekke grew up on a farm near Linda Brekke grew up on a farm near The National of the Jeff Stewart grew Broadcaster up on a farm in west by the Nationa by theMinnesota. National He Association of Farm by the Minnesota. National Association Farm Hartland, where she learned about farming central He worked in of feed and tland, where shesuccessfully. learned about farming central worked in feed and the Hartland, where she learned about farming including American Broadcasting, Ly Broadcasting, Lynn prior Ketelsen has also Broadcasting, Lynn prior Ketelsen has Farm also first hand. She has worked at radio agronomy marketing to entering hand. She has worked at radio agronomy marketing to From entering first Agri hand. She has worked at radio left:Farm Jeff Stewart, Marketing Specialist; Linda Brekke, Farm Reporter; been named Ag C been named Ag Communicator the Year Ag Communicator of the Year From left:ofJeff Stewart, AgriLynn Marketing Specialist; Linda City, Brekke,been Farmnamed Reporter; stations in Redwood Falls, Mason City, Broadcasting. A broadcasting and ions in Redwood Falls, Mason City, Broadcasting. A broadcasting and stations in Ketelsen, Redwood Falls,Director Mason Farm Soybean Association, the We are pleased to by several nation by severalveteran, nationalStewart farm and commodity by severalveteran, nationalStewart farm and commodity Iowa and Albert Lea. Her radio duties marketing spent 11 years a and Albert Lea. Her radio duties marketing spent 11 years Iowa andKetelsen, Albert Lea. HerDirector radio duties Lynn Farm groups. Lynn has groups. Lynn has been recognized for his groups. Lynn has been recognized for his The 2005 National Broadcaster of returning the Year Linda Brekke grew up onand a farm farm news near Jeff Stewart grew up on before a farmreturning in west include delivering markets and farm news in New broadcasting before ude delivering markets and farm that news Lynn in New include delivering markets efforts in farm bro Growers, announce Ketelsen efforts inYork farmbroadcasting broadcastingNational by such groupsCorn efforts inYork farm broadcasting by such by the National Association of groups Farm Hartland, where she learned about farming central Minnesota. He worked in feed and on the air, covering agricultural meetings, to his Minnesota roots and the Linder Farm he air, covering agricultural meetings, to his Minnesota roots and the Linder Farm on the air, covering agricultural meetings, The 2005 National Broadcaster of the Year Linda Brekke grew up on a farm near Jeff Stewart grew up on a farm in west as the National Ag as the National Agri Marketing Association, as the National Lynn Agri Marketing Association, Broadcasting, Ketelsen has also first hand. has worked atfarming radio agronomy marketing prior in to entering Farm and producing farm stories for the Linder Network. regularly does reports producing farmof stories forLinder the Linder Network. Stewart regularly doesthe reports andBureau. producing farm stories for the Linder byAmerican the Stewart National Association of Farm the American So the Network American Association, the the Soybean Association, the Hartland, where She she learned about central Minnesota. HeSoybean worked feed and and Farm His the Farm been named Agthe Communicator of the Year in She Redwood Mason City, Broadcasting. Astate and Farm Network. Linda has experience in from around statethe and country in also m Network. Linda has experience in from around the andFarm country in firststations Farm Network. Linda has experience in National Corn Gro Broadcasting, Lynn Ketelsen has National Cornprior Growers, the Bureau, National Corn Growers, Farm Bureau, hand. has Falls, worked at radio agronomy marketing to broadcasting entering Farm by several national farm and commodity Iowa and Albert Lea. Her radio duties marketing veteran, Stewart spent 11 years hosting talk programs, and brings added and many oth addition to hisAg duties of coordinating ting talk programs, and brings added addition to Ahis duties of coordinating hostingintalk programs,Falls, and brings added and many other major agricultural and many major agricultural been named Communicator of his the Year groups. Lynn other has been recognized for stations Redwood Mason City, Broadcasting. broadcasting and appearance at the show is will be broadcasting live organizations. organizations. Lynn is before also the only organizations. Lynn is also the only include delivering markets and farmtonews in New York broadcasting returning expertise in gardening knowledge to the regional advertising sales. ertise in gardening knowledge to the regional advertising sales. expertise in gardening knowledge the by several national farm and commodity in farm broadcasting by such groups and Albert Lea.agricultural Her radio duties efforts marketing veteran, Stewart 11 yearsaFarm Minnesota ag com Minnesota ag communicator toLinder have day Iowa Minnesota ag communicator have a day for his on the Farm air, covering meetings, to his Minnesota rootsspent and the Linder Farm Network. der Farm Network. Linder Network. groups. Lynn has been to recognized as the National Agri Marketing Association, sponsored by the Steffes from the 50th Annual proclaimed in his deliveringfarm markets news the in New York broadcasting before returning proclaimed in his honor by the Governor of include proclaimed in his honor byAssociation, the Governor ofgroups and producing storiesand for farm the Linder Network. Stewart regularly does reports efforts in farm broadcasting by such American Soybean the the state. Lynn ha the state. Lynn has served as President of the state. Lynnthe hasstate served as President of on Farm the air, covering agricultural meetings, to his Minnesota roots and the Linder Farm in Network. Linda has experience in from around and country National Corn Growers, the Farm Bureau, as the National Agri Marketing the National theStewart National of Farm andhosting the National Association of Association, Farm Group. Central Minn. Farm Show. producing farm stories the added Linder and Network. reports talk programs, and for brings other major agricultural addition to regularly his Association dutiesdoes of coordinating the many American Soybean Association, the

Broadcasters and Broadcasters andLynn has traveled virtually all organizations. is also the only Corn Growers, the Farm Bureau, 50 states and ma 50National states and many countries around the Minnesota ag communicator to have a day and many other major agricultural world as a farm br world as a farm broadcaster. proclaimed in his honor by the Governor of organizations. Lynn asisPresident also the the state. Lynn has served of only Farmers Trust Our Team Minnesota communicatorofto Farm have a day the Nationalag Association proclaimedand in his by virtually the Governor of Broadcasters hashonor traveled all state. served as President of 50the states andLynn manyhas countries around the Ag Media Research Farm Broadcaster Comparison Ag Media Research Farm Broadcaster Comparison world a farm broadcaster. the as National Association of Farm

Broadcasters and has traveled virtually all

expertise in gardening knowledge to thein regional advertising Network. Linda has experience from around the state and country in the Farm 50 states and manysales. countries around Lindertalk Farm Network. and brings added hosting programs, addition world to his of coordinating as a duties farm broadcaster. expertise in gardening knowledge to the regional advertising sales. Farmers Trust Our Team Linder Farm Network.

earch Farm Broadcaster Comparison

n Ketelsen ?

Farmers Trust Our Team What farm broadcaster do you depend on Are you familiar with the name Lynn Ketelsen for farm information? of the Linder Farm Network?

Broadcasters and has traveled virtually all

Are you familiar with the name Lynn Ketelsen What farm broadcaster do you depend on 50 states and many countries around the world as aof the Linder Farm Network? farm broadcaster. for farm information?

Ag Media Research Farm Broadcaster Comparison Farmers Trust Our Team Yes: 96.3% Yes: 96.3% No: 3.2%

What farm broadcaster d for farm inform

No: 3.2% Are you familiar with the name Lynn Ketelsen What farm broadcaster do you depend on Ag Media Research Farm Broadcaster Comparison of the Linder Farm Network? for farm information?

Survey 2012 - Linder PMA

Survey 2012 - Linder PMA

Survey 2012 - Linder PMA

Lynn Ketelsen, Linder Farm Network 71.7% Are you familiar with the name Lynn Ketelsen What farm broadcaster do you depend on Yes: 93.7% No: Yes: 96.3% No:6.3% 3.2% Linda Brekke, Linder Farm Network 15.5% LINDER FARM NE LINDER FARM NETWORK LINDER FARM NETWORK of the Linder Farm Network? for farm information? Emery Kleven 255 farm@lindernetwork.com Cedardale Drive S.E. • Owatonna,3.3% Minnesota 55060 • Phone: 507-444-9224 • Fax: 444-9080 • E-mail: farm@linderne 60 • Phone: 507-444-9224 • Fax: 444-9080 • E-mail: 255 Cedardale farm@lindernetwork.com Drive S.E. • Owatonna, Minnesota 55060 • Phone: 507-444-9224 • Fax: 444-9080 • E-mail:

Yes: 96.3%

No: 3.2%

Survey 20142012 - Linder PMA Survey - Linder PMA

LINDER FARM NETWORK

255 Cedardale Drive S.E. • Owatonna, Minnesota 55060 • Phone: 507-444-9224 • Fax: 444-9080 • E-mail: farm@lindernetwork.com Survey 2012 - Linder PMA

LINDER FARM NETWORK

255 Cedardale Drive S.E. • Owatonna, Minnesota 55060 • Phone: 507-444-9224 • Fax: 444-9080 • E-mail: farm@lindernetwork.com

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

39


BOOTH Floor Plan

BOOTH FLOOR PLAN

2017 FARM SHOW SEMINAR SCHEDULE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH Session 1: 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. Session 2: 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Topic: Carrying the Load: Is your equipment fit for the road? Description: Steve Krueger, commercial motor vehicle officer with the Minnesota State Patrol will provide the latest rules and regulations on roadside inspections, load securement, transporting hazardous materials, road safety with farm equipment, federal farm exemptions and state statutes, and common paperwork and equipment violations. ----------------------Topic: Market Outlook Seminar Description: Van Ahn and Company, Inc. will share an outlook for commodity markets, crop inputs, and discuss marketing tools and marketing plan strategies. Presenters and topics are subject to change. For the most current information, visit CentralMNFarmShow.com

40

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7


2017 FARM SHOW SEMINAR SCHEDULE WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1 Session 1: 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. Session 2: 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Topic: Turning Precision Data into Profits Description: Panelists Brad Carlson, University of Minnesota Extension educator for crops; Jess Wold, ISG specialist, Midwest Machinery Co.; and Nathan Kosbau, precision ag specialist, CHS Inc., will provide insight into turning precision data into profitable management decisions. Learn how to apply variable rate nitrogen technology on your farm; how you can be sure the data is dependable; where the data goes once it’s “up in the cloud” and who has access to it; how to protect your data; and the best apps for analyzing and comparing data. ----------------------Topic: Market Outlook Seminar Description: Joe Spader, president and risk management consultant at DairyVisor, will share an outlook for dairy, beef, feed, and grain markets, and discuss marketing tools and marketing plan strategies.

THURSDAY, MARCH 2

Estate Planning Part 1: 10:30 a.m. - noon Estate Planning Part 2: 1:30 - 3 p.m. Topic: Planning Your Legacy Description: Panelists Cathy Olson, senior business counseling specialist, AgStar Financial Services; Gary Hachfeld, University of Minnesota Extension educator; and Brian J. Schoenborn, attorney at Stinson Leonard Street, present key steps, tax strategies, and insights on developing and implementing a successful farm transition plan.

Visit Craig & Chad at the Central Minnesota Farm Show for Customized Equipment Financing Options.

1-800-247-1922

Stop b booth fo y our r a chan c to win a grain e bin full of c ash!

Presenters and topics are subject to change. For the most current information visit CentralMNFarmShow.com

follow us

stearnsleasing.com J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

41


EXHIBITORS by name Company Name ..................Booth #

A

Ag Solutions............................. A103 Agri-King, Inc............................ B913 Agri-Systems.......................... B1009 AgStar Financial Services......... B821 Albers Dairy Equipment, Inc............ .................................................. A218 Aldteich Tractor................................. ...................C4007-4010 5000-5003 Alltech Inc..................................... A5 American Doorworks............... B836 American Pressure Inc............. A317 AMPI.......................................C7022 AMPS, Inc................................. B810 API Garage Door Store............ B830 Arnold’s of St. Cloud......................... ........................B922-925 1000-1003 Arnzen Construction/ St. Rosa Lumber............................ ................C3011-3013 4004-4006

D

Dairyland Pest Control...........C2010 Dairyland Seed, Inc.................. A602 Dairyland Supply............................... ............................A612-622 700-710 Dairymaster USA, Inc............... A502 Dan’s Custom Welding Tables, LLC .......................................B1006-1007 Dick Meyer............................... B906

E

Edward Jones......................... B1023

F

Factory Home Center.............. A106 Farm Bureau Financial Services........ .................................................. B902 Farm Rite Equipment........A416-417 Feed Stuff Bagging, Inc........... B828 Finken Water Treatment, Plumbing, Heating, and Cooling..... ................................................C7024 Forward Farm Lines..........A426-431 Freeport State Bank................. B824

G

320.836.2284 888.276.1751

arnzenconstructioninc.com BOOTH# C3011-3013 4004-4006

Arvig........................................C7011 Automotive Parts HeadquartersAuto Value.................... C7000-7001 Avon Lime.................................... A2

B

Bazooka.............................A717-718 Belgrade Co-Op Assn............. A508 Big Grain, Inc............................ A118 Bongards Creameries............ B1010 Boss Supply Inc............ C7003-7004 Bremer Bank............................. B814 Bryron Seeds............................ A603

C

Carlson Whole Inc............................. ...................C2011-2012 3004-3005 Catholic United Financial......... A101 Centra Sota Coop............................. ...................C5009-5013 6002-6006 Central Minnesota Credit Union...... .................................................. A117 Central Minnesota Renewables....... .................................................. B825 Central MN Corn Growers...... B812 Champion Miling Supply, LLC......... ...........................................A512-513 CHS Prairie Lakes..................... A202 Complete Grain Systems, Inc........... ............................................B802-804 CowKuhlerz...................B1033-1034

42

G3 Power Systems, LLC.......... A515 Genex Farm System, Inc................... .......................................B1026-1029 Gilman Co-op Creamery.................. ...........................................B928-931 Granite Electronics................... A200 Grassland Solutions................... A11 Green Energy Products........... A519 Growers Chemical Corporation....... ................................................ B1025

H

Hanson Silo Company...................... ...................C3007-3009 4000-4002 Hodgman Drainage Co, Inc.... A608 Hotsy......................................... A713 Hubbard Feeds........................ A714 Husky Spring Company........... A105 Huton Inc................................C7004 Hydro Engineering................... B834

I

Innovative Basement Systems.......... ...........................................A103-104

K

K&S Millwrights Inc................C2002 KASM............................................ A1 Kuhn North America.........A300-304

L

Land O’Lakes Coop Trucks.............. ...........................................A405-407 Legend Seeds............................ A34 Lemken USA............................. B835 LG Seeds.................................. B806 Lifestyle Lumber, Inc................ A719 Linder Farm Network................. A12 Lumber One........................... B1020

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

M

Mark J. Traut Wells, Inc........... B809 McKay’s Dodge................................. ...................C4011-4013 5004-5006 MEDA, Inc.........................A500-501 Messer Repair and Fabricating........ ...........................................A320-322 Midsota Manufacturing, Inc............. ...........................................A418-422 Midstate Genetics.................. B1011 Midwest Machinery Co..................... ............................A521-522 609-610 Midwest Sales and Construction..... ...........................................A318-319 Mies Outland............................ A112 Mimbach Fleet..................A110-111 Minnesota Farm Guide............ A201 Minnesota Tarps and Liners.... B905 Minnwest Bank..................... B808 Modern Farm Equipment................. .B817-820 839-429 918-921 940-947 Morton Buildings Inc................ A607 Munson Hybrids, Inc..............C7008

N

NAPA........................................ B816 Nelson Agri Structures............. B903 Nexttire, Inc...................... C500-501 Northern Tool and Equipment........ ...........................................A505-506 Northland Buildings................. B907 Northland Farm Supply, Inc.... B829

O

O’Reilly Auto Parts.................C7010

P

PAI Insurance Group............ B807 Paul Mueller Company..................... ...................................... C7018-7020 Paul’s Welding and Repair...... A102 Peterson Farms Seed............... A507 Pluto Legal, PLLC..................... A313 Powerhouse Outdoor Equipment Inc ........................B927-928 1004-1005 Powerlift Doors.......................C7009 Prairie Brand Seed................... A109 Producers Hybrids.................... A712

S

Schlenner Wenner and Company........................... B909 Show-Me Shortline............................ ............................A432-433 509-510 St Cloud VA.............................. B908 St. Cloud State University........ A203 Star Publication............................ A7 Stearns Bank-Equipment Financing Division................ B971 Stearns County Farm Bureau........... .................................................. B901 Stearns Electric Association.............. ...........................................A423-424 Steffes Group Inc..............A600-601 Stine Seed Company............... A204 Structural Buildings.................. A514 Sunrise Ag................................ A715

T

The Boot Shack........................ A503 Thomas Tool and Supplies...... A107 Thunder Seed.........................C7021 Titan Pro................................... A425 Tracy Seeds, LLC.................... B1019 TransAgra..................................... A9 Tri-County Foam Insulation, LLC........................ B1024

W

Waytashek Seed Sales............. B815 Weatherstar Company............ B916 Wieser Concrete................... A212 WW Osakis Silo Repair..........C6000

Y

Yetter Manufacturing............... B836 Your Home Improvement....... A520

Z

Ziegler CAT.................. C2003-2006 Zip’s Diesel Injection Service, Inc..............................C7007

ADVERTISE NEXT YEAR

Q

QC Supply, LLC....................... A108 Quality Forklift Sales and Service..... ...........................................B826-827 Quality Sales and Service, Inc.......... .................................................. B915

R

R&S Tire Service................A605-606 RDO....................A219-922 307-310 Redfield LLC............................. A217 River Power and Equipment, Inc...... .................................................. A504 Roes Whitewashing and Steam Cleaning................ B904 Royalton Lumber Inc................ B914

For more information, please contact Wendy Hendricks at (320) 656-3808 or at whendricks@ BusinessCentral Magazine.com


The Business of Family. or the Hackett family, successful farming has always been about strong connections— to the land, each other, and their network of trusted partners. Now, as ownership passes from father to son, those relationships are more important than ever. The Hackett’s thriving 900-acre operation is a result of long-term commitment, vision, and trust— qualities they sought in a lender as well. And as a lender with roots in farming, they discovered an advocate who saw their potential and treats them, well, like family. If you’re ready to start or grow your business, we’re eager to listen.

Business & Agriculture Banking Personal Banking | Online Services

Because friendly still counts. Sauk Rapids

320.252.5121

1301 2nd St N

44

|

Eden Valley

320.453.2000 359 State St N

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

|

Pierz

320.468.6422

80 Main St

FMpierz.com


uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Feature

The Secret Sauce To engage your employees, create an engaging workplace.

D

o your employees think like an owner? If so, most likely they are engaged in their work. Simply put, engagement is a measure of how frequently employees think and consciously reflect on their actions and performance and how those actions affect the organization. Employees who think like owners are more engaged, more likely to do what is good for the company, and are more accountable. The best leaders do not need to be great motivators, they need to design engaging workplaces. In fact, the concept of a leader who can motivate others to

high levels of performance is a long-standing myth. The research regarding motivational leaders is less compelling than that regarding an engaging workplace. Leaders who focus on the workplace will discover that their efforts provide the most immediate benefits. The Gallup organization measures employee engagement annually and always discovers that the majority of workplaces do not really engage employees. The survey results (available at BusinessCentralMagazine.com) can help leaders design a workplace where employees are engaged and self-motivated.

By Bruce Miles

HOW TO MEASURE IT here are many commercial tools available to help measure employee engagement. A simple version is to ask your employees the following three questions: 1 What two or three things are going well? 2 What two or three things need to be improved? 3 Would you recommend this as a place to work to your friends and family? Why or why not? These open-ended questions typically elicit sentences and short paragraphs, providing more useful information than a ranking score of 1-to-5.

T

THE SECRET SAUCE ccountability is emerging as an amazingly potent predictor of employee engagement. Employees who believe they are accountable to the organization and to others, report feeling more competent, committed, creative, and innovative. They have higher morale and job satisfaction, and focus on improving their performance. What leader would not want those dividends? Leaders need to deliver tough messages when people are not performing as individuals. That has been a leadership responsibility forever. But when employees view accountability

A

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

45


uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Feature as helpful, and as a progressive way to measure and complete work, it increases engagement and yields tremendous results. To get started, identify two to three goals, then measure your progress. A simple example of measurement is the United Way thermometer in a bank lobby that is colored in red to indicate the number of dollars raised over the course of a campaign. This shows the ultimate goal, as well as providing regular updates. ACCOUNTABILITY FOR TEAMS here are a number of tools and strategies that leaders can use to increase employee engagement through

T

accountability. The first is having employees participate in identifying successes and issues. A local manufacturer is currently developing organizational beliefs and mission. To accomplish this, every technician and office employee is participating in focus groups where they identify what is working well, and what needs to be improved in the following areas: 1 Their work for customers 2 Their workplace 3 Customer service 4 Communication and interpersonal skills In these sessions, employees identify their beliefs on small Post-it notes and stick them on a whiteboard to identify

strengths in each of the four areas, as well as improvements needed. Each employee also completes a session evaluation after the focus group. The employees have reported feeling honored that they have been asked to participate, and pleased to learn that their input is valued by the owner and leadership. Data displays are another tool that leaders can use to increase engagement and accountability. A local manufacturer has five production stations in the plant. Each of the production stations measures four facets of performance each week: 1 Products produced 2 Products shipped on time

Innovative Economics The Winter Institute is a two-day conference celebrating economic education featuring invaluable networking opportunities, concurrent sessions featuring practical issues of interest and nationally recognized speakers.

Thanks to our generous sponsors: Visionary: John Templeton Foundation through a grant from the IHS Foundation for Teaching Economics Pioneer: Microbiologics St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce Times Media

Innovator: Anonymous Donor Granite Equity Partners Entrepreneur: Executive Express GSDC MFP, Inc. Mike Helgeson MCEE SBDC

Innovative

Advocate: American Heritage National Bank Arctic Cat Central MN Community Foundation Falcon National Bank Great River Federal Credit Union Minnwest Bank Economics Sandler Training

St. Cloud State University is committed to legal affirmative action, equal opportunity, access and diversity of its campus community. (http://scsu.mn/scsuoea)

www.stcloudstate.edu/winterinstitute/ 46

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

3 Inventory turns 4 Defective products The data in those four areas is charted and posted at each station. As employees move around the plant, they see what is going on in each of the other stations. Compliments are handed out for great production, and hard questions get asked when the data do not look good. ACCOUNTABILITY FOR INDIVIDUALS mployees who have more frequent conversations regarding performance perform better than those receiving an annual evaluation. An overwhelming percentage of employees in the United

E

Ideas and Innovation Feb. 23 & 24, 2017 St. Cloud State University and 912 Regency Plaza, St. Cloud, MN

Keynote:

Deirdre McCloskey Distinguished Professor Emerita of Economics, History, English and Communication Keynote Topic:

Free Market Ideas, Not Capital, Made Us Rich

10% DISCOUNT

promo code: Chamber


States believe that the annual performance review is not effective. An even higher percentage of supervisors and managers agree. However, individual employees do benefit from accountability. They are looking for direction and conversations on the important elements of their jobs. A leader in a local business wanted to hold her managers accountable for progress on the organization's goals, as well as their personal goals. She wanted a much more focused performance discussion, rather than what she labeled the "one hour annual love fest." She developed a feedback form that you can find on BusinessCentralMagazine.com.

This leader uses the tool with each of her managers three times per year for 15 to 20 minutes each time. She then uses an additional five minutes to hold the compensation portion of the annual review at a later time. SO‌ WHAT IS A LEADER TO DO? 1 Stop thinking of yourself as the “Chief Motivatorâ€? Your employees have more to gain with you thinking as a strategist and not a motivator. Look through those Gallup results, Google some other engagement ideas, or go to bigrivergroup.com, then click on "Links for Leaders," then "Leadership Tools," and then

"Employee Engagement" to find some survey resources. 2 Measure it Use a survey software, such as Constant Contact, to develop and deliver an employee engagement survey. Keep it short, simple, and use openended questions. You can hold focus groups after the results are in if you want to dig deeper on a topic and not deliver a second survey. 3 Set goals Remember, self-motivation occurs differently for different people. Some of us are more motivated by talking about the goal itself, and some are more motivated by measuring

the steps along the way. Some employees have a balance of each, so make sure that in your daily five-minute standup operational meeting that you talk about the two-three goals, and the most recent data regarding progress. Bruce Miles, Ed.D., is the owner and CEO of Big River Group. He can be reached at bruce@ bigrivergroup.com.

Some of the resources cited in this story can be found at BusinessCentral Magazine.com

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

47


uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Special Focus

Beyond Wellness Implementing a well-being program can positively impact your bottom line. By Kelli Radi

A

s business owners, healthcare and wellness take on a whole new perspective, especially in relation to the bottom line. Small businesses grapple with rising healthcare costs and the complexities of the Affordable Care Act. Some are seeking relief through worksite wellness programs, which historically have been the domain of larger companies.

ROI Wellness programs often combine education, health screenings, and incentives for employees to exercise, eat, and live healthier. The payoff is a healthier workforce, decreased

absenteeism, lower healthcare costs, and reduced insurance premiums. Dani Berg, certified health and wellness coach and worksite wellness specialist for HealthPartners Central Minnesota Clinics, cites recent studies of the effectiveness of corporate health programs. These studies demonstrate significant cost reductions such as 28 percent reduction of sick days, 26 percent drop in health care costs, and 30 percent reduction in workers compensation and disability management claims. “Looking at companies who’ve implemented wellness

3 spine specialists for 3 times the back support. From non-operative care to surgery. Spine care is no small feat. So when it’s time to evaluate a patient’s back condition, we have a team of three highly trained specialists at their service. Each one specializes in the most proven methods of non-surgical therapy and minimally-invasive operating techniques in order to get backs on track as quickly as possible, in the best way possible. Our team is dedicated to providing Central Minnesota with the strongest spine care, delivered with precision. Faster treatments, better outcomes. Right here at home.

StCloudOrthopedics.com 320.259.4100

1901 Connecticut Ave S, Sartell

Knee & Shoulder • Joint Replacement • Sports Medicine • Hand Center • Trauma • Spine Center • Foot & Ankle • Physical & Occupational Therapy

48

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7


insight

About Ben

programs, we see a savings cost ratio of $5.93 to $1,” Berg explains. “The key to success is employee engagement. You want at least 50-60 percent participation to best meet the needs of the employer.” ROI, however, is not limited to health savings. “Too many businesses view wellness through a narrow scope,” says Jodi Gertken, director of wellness at CentraCare Health. “If you’re only looking at wellness as a means of reducing insurance costs, you’re ignoring other benefits, such as increased employee engagement, lower absentee rates, improved retention, stronger recruitment incentives, and employees with better attitudes and improved productivity.”

“I have an identical twin brother… now that’s double vision!”

Wow have times changed since I was growing up, and as a parent of three children I worry about many things, but the blue light exposure is more prevalent then ever imagined. The cell phones, computer use and screen time is a constant part of our lives. I know the risks for eye damage is real. That’s just one more reason why a yearly eye health examination is so important. Finally, I know you are wondering, YES my mother dressed us the same when we were little! Love you mom!

The Broader Context of Well-being At the October Waite Park Chamber meeting, Bob Mahowald, Sr., partner at Mahowald Insurance, explained the value of taking the overall health and wellness of employees seriously. Instead of focusing solely on wellness initiatives that are restricted to physical programs, such as smoking cessation or diet modification, Mahowald believes wellness is better addressed in a broader context of well-being. Authors Tom Rath and Jim Harter agree. In their book Well Being: The Five Essential Elements, they reveal how well-being initiatives which include the areas of social, financial, career, physical, and community well-being are able to address the total wellness of employees. They call these five interconnected elements “the currency of a life that matters.” Whether you are looking for the ROI, or simply wish to have a healthy workforce, taking steps to encourage and create a healthy atmosphere will ensure well-being for your business and employees. Kelly Radi is a freelance writer, public speaker

uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Schedule your appointment with

Bennett W. Nelson, O.D.

Stay connected.

and owner of Radi To Write, a public relations writing firm. radi.to.write@gmail.com.

Waite Park 320-253-0365

Becker

763-261-5444

Paynesville 320-243-3566

insighteyecare.us

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

49


uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuu

Special Focus WORKING WELL

The Healthcare Tax Credit

T

he small business health care tax credit benefits employers who: –––––––––––– Offer coverage through the small business health options program, also known as the SHOP marketplace –––––––––––– Have fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees –––––––––––– Pay an average wage of less than $51,800 a year in 2016 and $52,400 beginning in 2017 –––––––––––– Pay at least half of the employee’s health insurance premiums

Here are five facts you should know about this credit:

If you are a small employer, there is a tax credit that can put money in your pocket.

3 The credit is available to

50 percent of premiums paid for small business employers and 35 percent of premiums paid for small tax-exempt employers.

eligible employers for two consecutive taxable years beginning in 2014 or later. You may be able to amend prior year tax returns to claim the credit for tax years 2010 through 2013, in addition to claiming this credit for those two consecutive years.

2 To be eligible for the credit,

4 You may get both a credit

you must pay premiums on behalf of employees enrolled in a qualified health plan offered through a Small Business Health Options Program Marketplace, or qualify for an exception to this requirement.

and a deduction for employee premium payments. Since the amount of your health insurance premium payments will be more than the total credit, if you are eligible, you can still claim a business expense

1 The maximum credit is

deduction for the premiums in excess of the credit.

5 You can carry the credit backward or forward to other tax years if you do not owe tax during the year. Source: IRS.gov

For more information, visit BusinessCentral Magazine.com

Profile: OB/GYN When you think of women’s healthcare, do you think of prevention? We do. At St. Cloud Medical Group, we keep longevity in mind. Routine visits to our OB/GYN providers keep you moving in the right direction for a healthy lifestyle. Whether you’re planning a family or keeping family history in check, we’re here to guide you. That’s what personalized healthcare is all about. It’s the genuine care and respect we have for our patients that makes all the difference.

South Campus

Northwest Campus

320-251-8181

320-202-8949

Clearwater Clinic

Cold Spring Clinic

320-558-2293

320-685-8641

Family Medicine + OB/GYN + Pediatrics + Express Care + Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation + Occupational Medicine + Surgery

StCloudMedical.com 50

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7


WORKING WELL

5 “Beginner” Wellness Strategies for Small Businesses Businesses don't have to invest a lot of money to implement an introductory wellness program. They need to identify goals, engage employees, and track what is working 1 Make wellness a sustainable part of your corporate culture. This requires leadership buy-in and followthrough. Understand that wellbeing is not a one-and-done program. It is ongoing.

Make this both practical and do-able. If possible, suggest walking meetings or allow extended lunches (i.e. Walking Wednesdays or Fit Fridays) for employees to workout or get some fresh air.

3 Get employee feedback. Ask them how the organization can improve the culture in relation to overall well-being. Set up a team of employees to organize programs and educational components.

burnout, and ultimately poor health. Encourage productivity while at the office, and enable employees to disconnect from work during off-hours.

5 Celebrate success! Encourage employees to share health-related activity. Use rewards, incentives, or recognition to honor their efforts.

Our Vision is to Help Yours

Dr. April Austing and the Midwest Vision Centers team are focused on your visual needs and overall eye health. Yearly comprehensive eye examinations keep you seeing clearly with a careful determination of your prescription and early detection of eye diseases. Dr. April Austing

“We’re looking forward to seeing you!”

4 Model the ability to 2 Encourage staff to incorporate physical movement into the workday.

disconnect. The “always on” atmosphere at many small businesses can lead to stress,

Full Service Eyeglass Lab Most Insurance Plans Accepted 2824 W Division Street (Next to TJ Maxx) St. Cloud, MN // (320) 253-2020

COMING IN MARCH 2017

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION Featuring: Commercial Construction, Manufacturing,Real Estate & Leasing

SENIOR CARE | OUR BEST FOR YOU KNOW THE DIFFERENCE WHEN PLANNING YOUR POST-HOSPITAL STAY. Providing transitional care that covers your emotional, intellectual, social, spiritual & physical wellness. A tradition to trust! Visit centracare.com, click on locations, senior living.

For more information call Wendy Hendricks at 320.656.3808 or whendricks@BusinessCentralMagazine.com

Deadline: JANUARY 27 BusinessCentralMagazine.com

320-654-2355 J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

51


SMART BUSINESS: CENTER FOR DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING (CDI)

SPECIALIZING IN ANSWERS Trust The Experts, Choose CDI

W

CDI’s Ryan P. Wippler, M.D., breast radiologist and Real Men Wear Pink ambassador shows off our new 3D mammogramphy that helps find cancer earlier

hen your health is in question, you need answers – and you need them now. At Center for Diagnostic Imaging (CDI), we understand your need to know. That’s why we specialize in providing the right answers right away to give you the comfort you need to get the care you deserve. For more than 20 years, CDI has delivered patients and doctors in central Minnesota the highest quality images and interpretations from the best local, subspecialized radiologists. CDI specialists live and work in our community, and they are the specialists your doctor knows and trusts

The complexity of techniques and examinations coupled with the importance of imaging as a diagnostic tool, make the radiologist’s skills more valuable than ever.

52

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

to deliver accurate, timely and affordable results that are critical to your diagnosis and care plan. A recent National Institutes of Health study highlighted specialized radiology as key to patient care, diagnosis, and treatment. The complexity of techniques and examinations coupled with the importance of imaging as a diagnostic tool, make the radiologist’s skills more valuable than ever. And when that radiologist is subspecialized, they bring an even greater depth of knowledge to your diagnosis. If you have cancer, you choose an oncologist who specializes in your type of cancer. The same is true in radiology, where musculoskeletal radiologists know more about your knee, while breast radiologists are expert at interpreting mammograms.

In Central Minnesota, our radiologists are subspecialized in body, breast, musculoskelatal and neuro, which includes the brain and spine. These radiologists spend the majority of their time interpreting diagnostic images within these areas. This focus means they offer a more specialized level of care and diagnosis than a general radiologist. And because they live and work right here is our community, they are never more than a click or call away to consult with your doctor on your diagnosis. When it comes to getting the right answers about your health, it matters who you see. Choose CDI for expert radiology, as well as a comprehensive pain care services to diagnose and treat your pain. Learn more at myCDI.com/ CentralMN.

INSIDE SCOOP

Center for Diagnostic Imaging (CDI) CDI offers convenient access to the highest quality medical imaging: MRI, CT, 3D mammography, pain care and more.

Visit myCDI.com/ CentralMN


properly dianose the individual causes for each DRY EYE patient and offers unique and customized treatment programs designed to treat each patients’ specific problems.

HEALTH & WELLNESS DIRECTORY

T.

CentraCare Diabetes Center

St. Benedict’s Senior Community

Benedict Village and Benedict Court

Insight Eye Care Doctors (l-r) Dr. Ben Nelson, Dr. Anna C. Malikowski, Dr Greg Friederichs, Dr. Burt Dubow 320-253-0365 insighteyecare.us

W

e provide comprehensive eye care for all ages via diagnosis, treatment and management of eye conditions.We are equipped to handle eye trauma and most eye injuries as well as treatment for more common aiiments such as red, itchy, allergen related symptoms or pink eye. We offer three convenient locations, St. Cloud, Paynesville and Becker. For over 30 years we have delivered top quality eye care to our patients. Thank you for trusting us.

St. Cloud Medical Group Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

P

ut down your shovel and pick up your social life with outings, happy hours, shopping trips and musical entertainment. Let the staff at Benedict Village and Benedict Court take care of the cooking, cleaning and shoveling! Personal care delivered to your individual apartment is among one of the many community highlights. We invite you and your loved ones to come in for a complimentary lunch, take a tour, meet our friendly staff and see what makes our campus a wonderful place to call home.

A tradition to trust!

1810 Minnesota Boulevard SE, St. Cloud, MN 56304 (320) 203-2747 • centracare.com email:SBSCInformation Registry@centracare.com

M

atthew J. Timp, D.O., joined St. Cloud Medical Group’s Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation team in 2016. He is passionate about helping patients decrease pain and improve physical function. Dr. Timp completed his residency at the University of Minnesota and his fellowship in pain and musculoskeletal medicine at the University of Wisconsin– Madison. Board-certified, he is a member of the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spine Intervention Society, and American Osteopathic Association.

C

320-202-7759 centracare.com

entraCare Health provides a full range of diabetes care for patients and families in our region through education, leadership, health promotion and preventive services. We help you manage your diabetes so you can maintain the best possible health and quality of life. Ask your provider for a referral. Our team of experts include: • Endocrinologists (specialist who care for patients with diabetes) • Certified Diabetes Educators (registered nurses, registered dietitians) • Pharmacists • Internal Medicine • Family Practice

St.Cloud Orthopedics Sports Medicine Specialist

Chad Griffith

Dr. Matthew J. Timp, D.O. 320-529-4726 www.stcloudmedical.com

1900 CentraCare Circle St. Cloud, MN 56303

(320) 259-4100 StCloudOrthopedics.com

S

t. Cloud Orthopedics welcomed Chad Griffith, MD, in 2015 as a general orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist. Dr. Griffith enjoys helping patients improve their overall quality of life. A native Minnesotan, he completed his medical degree at the University of Minnesota and fellowship training in sports medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Griffith is a candidate member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

MRI - CT - Pain Management Ultrasound - X-ray 3D Mammograms

W

320.251.0609 myCDI.com/CentralMN

hen your health is in question, you need answers – and you need them now. At Center for Diagnostic Imaging (CDI), we understand your need to know. That’s why we specialize in providing the right answers right away to give you the comfort you need to get the care you deserve. For more than 20 years, CDI has delivered patients and doctors in central Minnesota the highest quality images and interpretations from the best local, subspecialized radiologists. CDI specialists live and work in our community, and they are the specialists your doctor knows and trusts to deliver accurate, timely and affordable results that are critical to your diagnosis and care plan.

J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7 //

www.businesscentralmagazine.com

53


Business Spotlight

Dirt in the Blood

Eric Sannerud never thought of farming as a career. But things change. By Gail Ivers

At A Glance Mighty Axe Hops Gilmanton Township (952) 201-4227 eric@mightyaxehops.com mightyaxehops.com Facebook.com/ MightyAxeHops

Business Central: Have you always been interested in farming? Sannerud: No. Absolutely not. I never thought about the family farm. It was just Grandma and Grandpa’s place. I never even thought of it as a farm. It wasn’t until I was in college that I figured all this out. My grandma calls it ‘dirt in the blood.’ Like farming is in my blood. My great grandpa bought it and farmed it. No one else farmed it until me. There’s very little land left, only three tillable acres. BC: Why hops? Sannerud: Ben and I both like the idea of farming and beer. Hops is a pretty natural place where they meet. Barley would be the other choice, but it’s much harder to grow brewing quality barley and it’s harder to sell. Hops are the most expensive ingredient. People most strongly identify with it, they like and care about it, and they’ll pay more for it. 54

BC: How do you harvest it? Sannerud: We pick, dry and pellet it. We separate the flowers off one end and then they go into a drying machine to get to storage moisture. The dried product runs through a pelleting machine. We sell the pellets to brewers who use the pelletized hops to make beer. BC: Is it hard to find buyers? Sannerud: No. I’ve never had enough hops to go around. I sold out of this year’s harvest as soon as I sent out the email. I think the breweries like the quality and freshness of

Business Central Magazine // J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 7

Best advice to a new entrepreneur:

Know thyself. Work from your passion. Money isn't everything. Totally commit; no half measures.

the hops, but I also think they like supporting the farmer down the street, supporting the local economy. The craft brewing industry is similar, so they get it. They’re creating a local specialty product, people are happy to pay extra for a craft product, and brewers are happy to pay for high quality ingredients for that craft product. BC: What have you liked best so far? Sannerud: This is such a wonderful opportunity. I have the power to make it my own. I think a lot about what that means. As millennials we don’t want to be in a traditional office environment. We want to do something we’re passionate about. We do seasonal hiring so we often hire young people without any previous work experience. What a gift for me – to model what I think a good workplace should look like.

Business description: Mighty Axe Hops grows local hops for local beer. Number of employees: Two full time; about 15 additional seasonal employees Owners: Eric Sannerud, 25, CEO; and Ben Boo, 27, COO

Timeline 2009 Eric Sannerud graduates from Edina High School 2012 Sannerud and Ben Boo start Mighty Axe Hops on Sannerud’s family farm in Ham Lake 2013 Sannerud graduates from the University of Minnesota after studying sustainability, business, and social justice June 2016 Sannerud and Boo purchase 120 acres in Gilmanton Township to expand their hops production; they begin by immediately planting 40 acres with planned harvest in fall 2017

Photos courtesy of Mighty Axe Hops

Ben Boo (left) and Eric Sannerud, owners of Mighty Axe Hops

Eric Sannerud in front of the hops vines at Mighty Axe Hops farm.

Twitter.com/ MightyAxeHops


Ready for a healthier you?

START SMART With personalized service led by health coaches, dietitians and doctors who will help you achieve your weight loss and health goals. We offer an array of services: • Education • Wellness coaching • Medically supervised weight loss • Surgical weight loss

Call 320-240-2828 or visit centracare.com


A tradition of SERVING OUR COMMUNITY Now announcing Avon State Bank is joining the American Heritage Bank family to better serve and continue our commitment to the greater St. Cloud community area.

Call for a

FREE CONSULTATION LET US HELP YOUR FUTURE

S T C LOUD

2 9 1 5 S ECON D S T S | 320.654.9555

525 HWY 10 S | 320.257.5000


January/February 2017