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Faculty Podcast Series

featuring

Professor James E. Fleming

Constitutional law expert Professor James E. Fleming will be the focus of the March edition of BU Law Podcast series, as hosted by media veteran Dan Rea (‘74) of WBZ-Radio 1030. Professor Fleming will talk about his latest book, Constitutional Interpretation: The Basic Questions (Oxford University Press), which he wrote with Professor Sotirios A. Barber. The book defends a philosophic approach to constitutional interpretation, arguing that judges cannot avoid making moral and philosophic choices in interpreting the Constitution, and criticizing all approaches that aim and claim to avoid doing so.

The BU Law Podcast series features six professors discussing a variety of topics. The podcast series began in December 2009 and will continue through May of 2010. To hear this podcast or subscribe to the series go to www.bu.edu/law/av. The podcasts will also be available on Legal Talk Network www.legaltalknetwork.com.


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765 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 02215 “Jim Fleming and Sot Barber have produced a book that is a carefully argued, thorough, and eloquent introduction to the most important foundational questions about constitutional meaning. Their book is both widely accessible and intellectually sophisticated—a place for newcomers to start their investigations and for scholars to return for new insights and perspectives.” —Professor Lawrence Solum, University of Illinois College of Law

BU Law Professor James E. Fleming, The Honorable Frank R. Kenison Distinguished Scholar in Law, joined BU Law in 2007, and teaches constitutional law, constitutional theory and torts. The author of several books on constitutional theory, his most recent book, with co-author Sotirios A. Barber of the University of Notre Dame, is Constitutional Interpretation: The Basic Questions (Oxford University Press). In Constitutional Interpretation, Professors Fleming and Barber argue for a philosophical approach to constitutional interpretation. In doing so, they systematically criticize competing approaches, such as textualism, originalism and pragmatism, that aim and claim to avoid a philosophic approach. They show that it is impossible for one to responsibly avoid philosophic reflection and choice in interpreting the Constitution. The book has been honored as a “Choice Outstanding Academic Title.” Professor Fleming is working on his next book, Rights, Responsibilities, and Virtues, with BU Law colleague and wife Linda C. McClain. He is author of Securing Constitutional Democracy: The Case of Autonomy (University of Chicago Press, 2006), and co-author of American Constitutional Interpretation (4th ed., Foundation Press, 2008) (with Walter F. Murphy and Stephen Macedo of Princeton University and Sotirios A. Barber). Before joining BU Law, Professor Fleming was the Leonard F. Manning Distinguished Professor of Law at Fordham University School of Law. His writings are in constitutional law and constitutional theory, and he has organized and published many symposia in constitutional theory. He is the faculty advisor to the Boston University Law Review and the editor of NOMOS, the annual book of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy.


James Fleming Postcard 2010