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the alumni magazine of boston university school of law

THE

RECORD fall 2012

graduate tax program now online supreme court cites students’ amicus brief annual report of giving: 2011-2012

a pivotal moment for the law school sumner redstone gives $18 million to bu law

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inside the record, fall 2012 The Alumni Magazine of Boston University School of Law

Maureen A. O’Rourke

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Dean, Professor of Law, Michaels Faculty Research Scholar

Office of Development & Alumni Relations Cornell L. Stinson J.D., Assistant Dean Cristine More, CFRE, Director of Advancement

Office of Communications & Marketing Ann Comer-Woods, Director Caitlin McCartan, Associate Director

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Elizabeth Hines, Web Content & Publications Manager Johanna Odwara, Design Specialist

Contributors Ben Carlisle

cover story

Michelle Chandler

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A Pivotal Moment in the History of the Law School: Sumner M. Redstone Gives $18 Million For New Building

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After the Dust Settled at Ground Zero William Groner (’80)

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Halting Foreclosures Triggerd by “Robo-Signers” Thomas Cox (’69)

18 Talking About a Revolution (in Entertainment) Jonathan Zepp (’01) 22 Pandora’s Keeper Delida Costin (’95)

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Aiming for a Mark You Can Protect Jason Zedeck (’98)

26-35 News and Updates from BU Law 26. Online Graduate Tax Program 27. Supreme Court Cites Students’ Brief 28. New Faculty 29. Seidmans Retire 30. Incoming Class Silver Shingle Awards

4-36 Events 3 34. 2012 Reunion Gala and Silver Shingle Awards 36. Commencement 2012 8-40 3 Public Interest News 38. Spring Break Pro Bono Trips 39. Public Service Fellowships 40. In-House Fellowship Program

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BU Photography Mark Ostow Photography Len Rubenstein

Architectural Renderings Bruner/Cott

Cambridge Editors

Prompting the Music Industry to Sing a New Tune John Rosenberg (’79)

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Casey Atkins

Proofreading

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Chelsea Sheasley

Photography

16 Representing Massachusetts’ Most Controversial Clients Janice Bassil (’78)

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Meghan Laska Alia Wong

Patrick Collins

Annual Report of Giving

on the cover: sumner redstone

Printing FGS, Inc.


letter from the dean For Boston University School of Law, 2012 has been an exciting year. The major highlight was the naming of our anticipated new building to honor Sumner M. Redstone (Hon. ’94), for his $18 million gift to the law school. As I noted in the Fall 2011 edition of The Record, our new building is being made possible through the support of the University and the generosity of our alumni and friends. It was inspiring for us to hear Mr. Redstone talk about his decision to make this generous gift to the law school at a gathering of faculty, students and university officials on September 13. We followed up that milestone event on September 21-22 with a gathering of our alumni to celebrate Alumni & Reunion Weekend and officially kick off The Campaign for Boston University. Mr. Redstone, executive chairman of the board of both CBS Corporation and Viacom Inc., has a relationship with BU that long predates his current gift. In 1982, he joined the BU Law faculty, creating one of the nation’s first courses in entertainment law and helping to pioneer our School’s intellectual property curriculum. In 1994, he received an honorary Doctor of Laws from Boston University. His daughter, Shari Redstone (J.D.’78, LL.M.’80), serves as president of National Amusements and vice-chairman of CBS and Viacom. Preparation work for the foundation of the Redstone Building began last summer. Construction is scheduled to begin in May 2013 and be completed in time for the opening of the fall semester in 2014. We will then turn our attention to completely refurbishing the Law Tower so that it meets the needs of a modern-day law school. While the new building is the most visible symbol of the law school campaign, we are also asking for financial support for the people and programs that are the heart of BU Law. The law school seeks to raise $80 million for the building, financial aid, faculty support, academic programs and the Annual Fund. We are grateful for our alumni’s past support and look forward to their continued generosity.

The law school campaign and the construction of the building truly represent a new era for our world-class law school. BU Law, which is now 140 years old, has produced many graduates who have achieved tremendous success in their profession. For several alumni who have found themselves at the epicenter of major national events, their BU Law education prepared them to tackle enormous challenges, whether it was the debilitating health problems that afflicted the 9/11 first responders, the practice of “robo-signing” that escalated the nation’s foreclosure crisis, or a high-profile federal case in which an American citizen was tried for terrorism. Then there are the alumni who have assumed the role of legal pioneers through their work at the nation’s most innovative technology companies. They wade into unprecedented legal issues that inevitably arise when companies like Google and Pandora introduce technologically novel products and services that soon become part of our everyday existence. When 20th century (or earlier!) law is applied to 21st century technology, companies turn to our alumni to help them navigate new legal issues in every area, particularly intellectual property law. BU Law continues to produce outstanding alumni, but our recent graduates face a very difficult job market. I ask for your assistance in helping these talented BU Law students find opportunities to launch their legal careers. Our alumni have always been critical to the success of our law school. Thanks to everyone who has contributed to the law school in ways both large and small — whether by making a gift to the Law School Fund, helping a recent graduate find a job, mentoring current students, serving as a placement partner for students’ pro bono trips, or something else. All of these activities and commitments reflect the heart of the law school. Its students, faculty and alumni are what make BU Law great. I look forward to seeing you in my travels around the country this year and to your continued support for the law school’s campaign.

maureen a. o’rourke, dean

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A PIVOTAL MOMENT IN THE HISTORY OF THE LAW SCHOOL: Sumner M. Redstone (Hon. ’94) Makes Gift of $18 Million for New Building

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More than a year before the launch of Boston University’s comprehensive campaign to raise $1 billion, the School of Law initiated its Campus Campaign to raise $20 million to break ground on a new building and completely renovate the law tower. By July 2012, a small but generous group of alumni, faculty and friends had pledged a total of $32.6 million. The lead gift that propelled the law school well beyond the $20 million goal was an extraordinary gift of $18 million from Sumner M. Redstone (Hon. ’94), a former BU Law faculty member who currently serves as executive chairman of the board of both CBS Corporation and Viacom, Inc. On September 13, BU President Robert A. Brown announced that the new building would be named the Sumner M. Redstone Building. the record

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“Boston University School of Law is one of the finest institutions of legal scholarship in the world and deserves a home that will enable it to continue to innovate and build on that legacy,” Redstone says. “As a former faculty member, native Bostonian, and the proud parent of a BU Law graduate, I could not be more pleased to provide this gift that will benefit generations of future students.” In 1982, Redstone joined the faculty of BU Law, where he created one of the nation’s first courses in entertainment law and helped pioneer the School’s intellectual property curriculum. Intellectual property law continues to be recognized nationally as one of the School’s strengths. In 1994, Redstone received an honorary Doctor of Laws from Boston University. His daughter, Shari Redstone (’78, ’80), who earned her J.D. and LL.M. degrees from BU Law, serves as president of National Amusements, based in Dedham, MA, and vice-chairman of CBS and Viacom.

“This gift comes at a pivotal moment in the history of our School of Law,” says President Brown, “and it will have a tremendous impact in two ways. First, it will permanently link the School with the Redstone name, which will forever set a high standard for our work in legal education and scholarship. And second, it means that our long-deferred dream of transforming the School of Law campus can now begin with the ground-breaking for this new building.” The initial success of the Campus Campaign has generated early momentum for the law school as it launches an overall $80 million effort as part of the university’s multiyear Campaign for Boston University: Choose to be Great. The law school is more than halfway toward its $80 million campaign goal to fund five important priorities: construction of the Redstone Building and a total renovation of the 18-story law tower, student scholarships and financial aid, professorships and faculty support,

academic programming, and unrestricted support for the Law Annual Fund. The University’s comprehensive campaign is an outgrowth of President Brown’s strategic vision of the University as a globally recognized research institution, and his belief that the Law School is one of the University’s “crown jewels.” To demonstrate the University’s commitment, Brown and the Board of Trustees voted to approve funding for the building construction and tower renovation, the total cost of which is about $170 million, while asking the Law School to raise just $20 million from its alumni and friends to break ground. The Redstone Building will welcome its first class in fall 2014, and the renovated tower will reopen the following year. The new building has been designed by architectural firm Bruner/Cott. While the law tower’s distinctive architectural qualities will be preserved, the renovation and addition will provide the classroom, study and communal spaces that the school’s students have long desired, create a more user-friendly library, and introduce the functionality, comfort and convenience of a modern educational facility. More importantly, the campaign will dramatically elevate the ability of faculty, students, staff and alumni to interact with each other, the larger BU community, and the world beyond BU, according to school leaders and campaign supporters.

The Redstone Building will welcome its first class in fall 2014, and the renovated tower will reopen the following year. While the law tower’s distinctive architectural qualities will be preserved, the renovation and addition will provide the classroom, study and communal spaces that the School’s students have long desired, create a more user-friendly library, and introduce the functionality, comfort and convenience of a modern educational facility. 6


While the new building will be the most visible symbol of the campaign, its impact on the law school goes beyond bricks and mortar. The campaign will:  increase financial support for

students, helping to make BU Law more affordable and accessible to those who might otherwise be unable to pursue a legal education;  enable the law school to continue to

attract and retain a faculty regarded as among the best in the country, both in research and in teaching;  enhance and expand the law

school’s academic programming, particularly internships, externships and clinical programs that provide the real-world training that the legal profession increasingly demands of new graduates; and  bolster the Law Fund, a critical re-

source of unrestricted support that provides the School with flexibility to address its most pressing needs. “There is an opportunity here for the Boston University Law School alumni community to do something it hasn’t done before, not because it tried and failed, but because it hasn’t been asked to do it,” says J. Michael Schell (’76), a founding benefactor of the Campus Campaign who has made a substantial financial commitment. “That’s a challenge that I have no doubt the community will respond to.”

Right-Sizing Law School’s Facilities

Built in the Brutalist architectural style that was popular on many campuses in the second half of the 20th century, the law tower is immediately recognizable on the Boston skyline. Although appreciated for its architectural significance, the building falls short in terms of practicality and user-friendliness. The 50-year-old tower has been overtaken by evolving trends in legal education and the growing diversity and dynamism of the BU Law program. Although the law school’s student body is intentionally smaller than it was a quarter of a century ago, it now has 15 percent more classes, a greater number of journals and student organizations, and an expanded graduate program. Space is at such a premium in the law tower that some student organizations must meet offcampus. Shoehorning more programming into already limited space risks compromising the student experience. “Legal education is taught in dramatically different ways than it was even 25 years ago,” says BU Law Dean Maureen A. O’Rourke. “Lecture halls with hundreds of students are fewer,” replaced by courses taught in smaller sections, seminars and clinics. “We need classrooms and spaces that are right-sized for those needs.” The expanded facility will address some of the structure’s persistent challenges, including poor acoustics and sight lines in some classrooms, inconsistent heating and cooling systems, and a lack of space for large

student groups to gather. In addition to upgrades to the Pappas Law Library, a new library in the Redstone Building will significantly increase study space and provide students with individual and group study options. Co-curricular and extra-curricular programs will have their own dedicated spaces. “To compete for the best and brightest students requires a facility that equals the quality of the School’s teaching and enhances the student experience,” says Campaign Chair Richard C. Godfrey (’79), senior litigation partner for Kirkland & Ellis LLP and a university trustee. “I think the School has always attracted the type of student that has a can-do attitude, a willingness to learn, and a willingness to challenge the conventional, which is something that I hope the School will continue to do.” Complementing Core Strengths

In addition to enhancing facilities, support for the campaign will complement the core strengths of the law school. Of the overall $80 million goal, the law school hopes to raise $15 million for scholarships and financial aid to enable BU Law in its efforts to compete for the best students and to attract a diverse student body. “It’s becoming increasingly challenging for our students to finance their education, particularly since changes in the legal market have made the prospect of a high-paying job upon graduation considerably less likely,” says O’Rourke, who has made a substantial financial commitment to the campaign herself. the record

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“BU Law is interested in attracting the best students in the country. We do that today, and we ought to be able to do that tomorrow. And as long as we’re in business, we’re not going to be able to do that if we can’t provide our students the type of financial support that will enable them to come to the law school without having to worry about the debt burden when they graduate.” Expanding the School’s ability to support students financially is one of the reasons Stephen M. Zide (’86) made a very generous lead gift to the campaign. “Boston University as a whole, and the law school in particular, have always been very focused on providing opportunities for students irrespective of their socio-economic status,” says Zide, managing director of Bain Capital in New York, a University trustee and a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board. “The environment for learning is better, richer and more robust with a diverse community of students and experiences. This is a great opportunity for alumni to continue to provide a similarly unique and rewarding experience for future students that they had when they attended the School.” Recruiting and Retaining Top Faculty

The law school aims to raise another $10 million for endowed professorships and other faculty support, which will enable the School to recruit and retain top teaching talent, particularly 8

in key areas such as health law, intellectual property law and corporate law. “The fundamental advantage that BU has is its excellent faculty,” Godfrey says. “The School provides a rigorous training program for law students. The faculty has always been top rated. It’s a diverse faculty, and it’s a faculty that engages with its students on a daily basis both in and outside the classroom.” Schell adds, “The faculty is, in some sense, the whole story. To the extent that the campaign will improve our ability to compete for top-grade faculty, it will improve our ability to keep top-grade faculty, and then give them the tools while they’re here to be the most effective and the most successful they can be. Those are all tremendous plusses for the school.” Offering a Wide Range of Programs

The School will seek $8 million for academic programming, including internships, externships, fellowships, foreign study and other opportunities that enable students to develop real-world skills, broaden their experiences and perspectives, and enhance their post-graduation marketability. Among the opportunities the School foresees are endowing its successful transactional law program, providing more business education, introducing more analytical training and problem solving, and adopting more collaborative methods of training.

BU Law’s reputation both at home and abroad depends on these types of programs, according to John N. Riccardi (’91), assistant dean for graduate and international programs. “What really distinguishes our school is not only the quality of the teaching inside the classroom, but the range of programs students have available to them outside the classroom,” he says. “The range of programs that we offer, including clinical opportunities, externships, internships — and study abroad programs, is phenomenal right now — much more than when I was a student. We are on an exciting trajectory right now, and with alumni support, it will continue.” Sustaining the Annual Fund

Even during a campaign with specific priorities, unrestricted support for the Law Annual Fund is critical. The goal for this “undesignated” priority is $7 million over the life of the campaign. Achieving this generous amount from alumni and friends will give the School the financial flexibility to respond to unexpected needs. In recent years, the School has tapped the Law Fund to provide additional financial aid to students with unmet needs after the School’s scholarship funds were exhausted. And it has funded 10 post-graduation fellowships in public interest jobs that have been extremely valuable to students navigating a very difficult job market. Adam Peltz (’11) credits a BU Law fellowship for his successful transition from law school to public interest law as an attorney in the Environmental Defense Fund’s energy program. “My experience at BU was absolutely essential to me getting this position, most directly by way of the public interest fellowship, without which there is no way I could have gotten a job here, and possibly not have been able to find the sort of public interest work I wanted to do at all,” he says. “BU Law is now, without a doubt, a great place to be a law student,” says Professor Mark Pettit, Jr., who has taught thousands of students over the


course of his 35 years at the law school. “The thing that we need to work on more than anything is to make sure that we have the resources to continue this kind of support of students, to protect our faculty from other schools, and to allow us to continue to improve in this highly competitive law school world.” Godfrey acknowledges that BU Law did not always have a student-centric reputation, which is all the more reason that he hopes alumni will contribute to the campaign. “I found the experience [of attending law school] to be challenging; I found it at times frustrating; I found at times that I was not as happy as perhaps I would have hoped to have been. But when I walked away from it and looked back, I thought it was exactly what I needed at that time of my life, which was an experience by which my ability to think and analyze was challenged and improved, and I walked out a better person,” he says. “I would like to make it so that, in the future, other students have the same intellectual experience that I had, and that they have a better experience overall than I had.” Motivated to Support the School

Like Godfrey, other graduates recall the impact of BU Law on their education, their careers and their lives, and now they want to give back. BU Overseer Gerard H. Cohen (’62), for example, felt an obligation to repay BU Law for the scholarship he was awarded as a student 50 years ago and to help build the university that three generations of his family have attended. He has generously donated leadership, time and financial support to the School and university for decades. Ryan Roth Gallo (’99), also a University overseer, cites the leadership of Brown and O’Rourke in her decision to contribute to the campaign. “I felt very confident that the money we’re going to donate to the School is going to be well managed and well used,” she says. “I believe in the value of the education I received here, and I’m grateful for what it has done for me and my life. I want-

ed to be able to express my gratitude for that in a way that would make a difference for not only the law school overall but for students now and in the future.” For Schell, contributing to the campaign is a way to express gratitude for his good fortune. “A lot of people in my educational experience made tremendous contributions to opportunities that I was lucky enough to be able to take advantage of. So you say, ‘Well, how do I give back? How do I pay back? How do I do something that recognizes and also really does reinvest in the institution that has helped create that good fortune for me?’ “I felt very fortunate to be admitted to BU,” he adds. “I thought they took a little bit of a chance on me and I’m glad they seemed to have been right. I’d like to repay that.” Whatever the unique motivation, Zide hopes it leads more alumni to support the campaign and to encourage each other to contribute to its success. “When I was in law school a quarter of a century ago,” he says, “I did not feel a very strong connection to the School. I think that can create a growing divide, if you will, between the alumni and the School as the years pass. But if you sit back as an alum and think about what the School provided

“Boston University as a whole, and the law school in particular, have always been very focused on providing opportunities for students irrespective of their socio-economic status.” to you and what your obligations are and how you feel about fulfilling those obligations as you start getting on in years, I do think that people really will realize just how important and rewarding and rich the experience was. “I hope that my classmates as well as people that came before me and after me through the law school will reflect on what they gained from that and provide that same opportunity to young people in the future.” n visit the school of law campus campaign web site at: www.bu.edu/law/alumni/ campus_campaign watch the video of the redstone building naming ceremony: www.bu.edu/law/alumni/ campus_campaign/news/naming-ceremony.shtml

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After the Dust Settled at Ground Zero: William Groner (’80) negotiates landmark settlement for 9/11 first responders

After the Twin Towers collapsed on 9/11, a plume of smoke and dust chased bystanders down city streets and billowed above Ground Zero for days, eventually settling on the buildings’ charred and twisted ruins. In the cloud was a toxic mist of chemicals and building materials, including pulverized glass, cement, insulation and asbestos, that tens of thousands of firefighters, police and other first responders inhaled while conducting rescue, recovery and cleanup operations. And in the cloud, too, was the greatest challenge of William H. Groner’s career: a David and Goliath legal battle that would come to involve more than 10,000 plaintiffs, hundreds of lawyers, thousands of news stories, nine years of Groner’s life, and – ultimately – a landmark $800 million settlement for which Groner was the principal plaintiff damages negotiator. “For the District of New York,” the World Trade Center first responders’ litigation in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York “is historically one of the most complicated mass torts ever,” says James A. Henderson, Jr., a Cornell University Law School professor and an expert in tort law, who was one of two special masters appointed to the case by the court. “Bill was one of the lynchpin people, one of the go-to people in all of this.” the record

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You Did What You Had to Do

In the hours and days that followed 9/11, thousands of firefighters, police officers and others descended on the debris. Breathing in the stillsettling and continuously upturned dust, they searched for survivors and evidence, and then began the long cleanup. With every breath they took, they inhaled the contaminated dust that would come back to haunt them. “We weren’t prepared for it at all,” says Glenn Radalinsky, a disabled former Nassau County police officer who has been diagnosed with several respiratory illnesses, including a precancerous esophagus, scarring in his larynx, and difficulty breathing. He spent more than 200 hours at the site, including one stretch of 40 continuous hours immediately after the buildings fell. “We went out without any respiratory equipment. At the time, we didn’t even have paper filters. But you did what you had to do.” By 2003, the cost of that heroism was increasingly evident in the mounting health problems of the first responders. One of them, a police detective, approached Worby Groner Edelman LLP, a Westchester County personal injury firm known for winning large settlements. The detective suspected that something at Ground Zero had caused him to develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a relatively rare disease. And he blamed the city and its contractors for failing to provide him with protective gear and adequate supervision. Groner, the firm’s managing partner, was intrigued. An Internet search told him that benzene, a chemical in the jet fuel that was found on “the pile,” was linked to AML. “It was probably the seminal moment of the whole case,” says Groner. That’s because, buoyed by the knowledge of a possible link but ignorant of the legal complexities and long odds facing them, he took the case. “If I had been aware of how incredibly difficult it is to prove both liability and damages causation, how I would have to sue nearly a hundred entities, how the defense would pay over $200 million in attorneys fees to attempt to get the case dismissed – if I was aware of all that, just on a practi12

cal level I wonder if I would have taken the case,” Groner, 57, says. “Because David can’t beat Goliath, right?” A second case soon followed. As word spread, personal injury lawyers began referring clients by the hundreds, and first responders began seeking out Groner on their own. “You could just tell he knew what he was talking about – a real sharp guy,” says Radalinsky, who saw Groner make a presentation at a seminar on 9/11-related health issues and asked Groner to take his case. “That’s what impressed me. He took science and broke it down into layman’s terms.” Please Help Me

On one hand, the growing number of plaintiffs was good news. “We had to have big numbers to have leverage,” says Groner, an animated storyteller who becomes passionate when discussing his clients’ cause. “I knew that if we had a large number of cases, [the defendants] had to deal with us.” But on a personal level, every new phone call was “a kick in the stomach. It was police officer after firefighter after volunteer after construction worker saying ‘I just got diagnosed with cancer, with respiratory illness. I have a family. Please help me.’ It was so much beyond being a lawyer or a businessman.” He paused while recounting the memories, his eyes watering. “I’ve cried many times over the years with my clients.” As the numbers grew, Groner and his partner, David E. Worby, realized that they were treading in unknown waters. As personal injury lawyers, they were unused to class action-like numbers, so they joined forces with Napoli Bern Ripka Shkolnik, LLP, a firm experienced with mass torts. As the litigation ensued and grew, Groner assumed responsibility for making sense of the science and medical issues. “Bill was the brainiac in terms of the complexities of the case,” says Worby. It was a daunting task requiring an analyst’s attention to detail, a trial lawyer’s acumen, and a teacher’s knack for translating complex concepts into understandable information, but Groner was better equipped for the job than most.

His talents for organization and leadership were evident early in his career. At BU Law, he was student government president, student commencement speaker, and recipient of the Sylvia Beinecke Robinson Award for making a significant contribution to school life. Following graduation, he spent a year absorbing the intricacies of trial law as an assistant to a leading New York personal injury lawyer. Recruited to another firm, he handled dozens of trials in just three years. He quickly learned how to take complex information and make it easily understood by jurors and others. He soon hung his own shingle in New York, eventually moving his practice to Westchester County in the early 1990s and merging with Worby. “Bill is very analytical. He can focus on something for 10 times longer than the average person,” says Worby. “You can give him a 10,000-piece puzzle, and he’ll put the whole thing together in one sitting. You and me, we’d try to find the four corner pieces, give up, and watch TV.” A Significant Challenge

By becoming the case’s damages and science expert, Groner was trying to solve his own 10,000-piece puzzle, albeit a multidimensional one. Henderson, the case’s special master who — coincidentally — was Groner’s torts professor when he taught at BU Law, notes that a multitude of interconnected variables made the case unusually complex. Usually, mass tort cases have a single identifiable cause and similar patterns of injury. By contrast, the first responder case had numerous causes involving an untold number of toxins and dust components inhaled in various combinations and doses. Those contaminants interacted differently with each other and with each responder’s unique personal chemistry, resulting in thousands of distinct injury combinations and severities, including lower and upper respiratory illnesses, gastrointestinal illnesses, cancers, and more. Additionally, the amount of time each first responder spent on “the pile” varied greatly, from as little as a few hours to as much as a few months.


“The idea that order could be brought to the factual chaos of all these people with all these injuries, and that there could be some way of getting all these individual cases settled, that was a significant challenge,” says Henderson. Rather than shrink from the challenge, Groner embraced it. He created a system in which nurses reviewed each plaintiff’s medical records, coded each and every symptom, diagnosis, medication and test result, and entered the details into a specially created software program that enabled him to analyze and assess the millions of data fields. He met with experts and specialists and eventually became so fluent in his understanding of the medical issues that several people involved in the case likened his expertise to that of a doctor. Using the data, he painstakingly devised and negotiated a compensation system by which plaintiffs were assigned points based on criteria such as the type and severity of their injuries as judged by specific medical tests. The points dictated the size of the plaintiffs’ settlements, ranging from a few thousand dollars to more than $1 million. The entire process, which took nine years, was both exhaustive and exhausting. The behind-the-scenes involvement of two sitting presidents, two mayors, a governor, various members of Congress and the press served to further complicate matters. “He was extremely disciplined and extremely committed,” says Groner’s wife, Sue. “The stresses of each individual phase of the project got worse as the project moved along. It really became a 24/7 situation. It definitely took its toll,” she says, particularly in his personal interactions with clients. “Instead of just looking at this as a job, he took it really personally. Every individual mattered,” she adds. “The ability to literally say, ‘I am going to devote all of my waking hours,’ for that many years — there are not a lot of guys who are able to do that,” adds Mark Manus, a New York personal injury lawyer with Lipsig, Shapey, Manus & Moverman who referred hundreds of cases to Groner. “He was tireless and devoted to it.” For Groner, the long hours and high stress levels were unavoidable.

“I had 10,000 people depending upon me, and due to the ever-present national and international press coverage and it being 9/11, it often felt like the whole world was watching,” he says. History Will Say It Was Fairly Done

Fortified with the best experts in the fields of medicine and environmental science, tens of thousands of evidentiary documents, dozens of round-the-clock staffers, and indisputable medical proof from millions of pages of medical records, Groner’s team won a series of courtroom battles over the years that prompted the defendants to seek a settlement. When the two parties finally arrived at a $657 million deal in the spring of 2010, Groner allowed himself a momentary sense of relief. But it was short-lived. The judge, criticizing the settlement as insufficient and the plaintiffs’ legal fees as too high, sent the parties back to the negotiating table. Three more months of talks ensued, resulting in a larger settlement and lower legal fees that, together, increased the money available to plaintiffs by more than $100 million. “They ended up with 99 percent participation, which is unheard of,” says Henderson. “All but a handful (of plaintiffs) opted to go into the settlement. I like to think that history will look back and say it was fairly done.” But Groner’s work was not over. The agreement called for plaintiffs to submit their claims to an independent administrator to decide settlements using the final negotiated injury classification system. Groner’s team submitted 10,000 claims, and argued more than 1,000 first appeals and hundreds of final appeals. Using his extensive medical data and familiarity with the evaluation criteria, Groner won virtually every appeal he initiated. Although proud of the case’s outcome, Groner remains indignant that the process was so long and arduous. “I’m still outraged that the city did not make it more of a priority to pay the thousands of people who risked their lives, and that it did everything it could to defeat us,” he says. “[The first responders] risked their lives and their

health, got injured and then had to fight for almost a decade to get recompensed. That’s impossible to accept.” Humbled by the Opportunity

Today, even as Groner is winding up the case’s final details, he is working on a separate but similar 1,000-plaintiff case involving office cleaners who were exposed to the toxic dust that settled in buildings around Ground Zero. Additionally, he and his firm are representing workers applying for care and compensation through the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act, a federal law that provides health care, medical monitoring and additional financial compensation for anyone in downtown Manhattan sickened by the dust. As Worby puts it, “Bill is one hard-working dude.” However, with the bulk of the first responders case behind him, the pace of life for Groner has slowed, allowing him to enjoy down time that was unimaginable at the height of the case. He’s raising 50,000 honeybees and tending to six transplanted cherry trees at his pastoral home in Westchester County. He is enjoying spending more time with his wife and children, Victoria, 15, and Hudson, 13. And he is mulling plans for the future, which include continued involvement with BU Law, where he is his class’ permanent class officer, and is investigating the creation and funding of a humanitarian law school clinic or program. Other prospects include teaching, philanthropic work, and – perhaps – a book about the first responders’ case. For a person who has spent virtually every waking minute of the last nine years being reminded of the fragility of life and health, his good health and luck are not lost on him. “I am humbled by the opportunity that fate has given me. I feel very fortunate,” he says. “And I don’t take any of it for granted.” n

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halting foreclosures triggered by “robo-signers” Thomas Cox (’69) filed a lawsuit in Maine that led to a national foreclosure freeze When the housing bubble burst more than five years ago, its fallout contributed to a worldwide financial crisis. Millions of people were left unemployed and could no longer afford their homes. In many cases, homes became worth less than their mortgages, making it difficult to sell or refinance. As a result, approximately 4 million Americans lost their homes to foreclosure between 2007 and early 2012, according to the New York Times. Making matters worse, it appears that the foreclosure process used by some of the largest banks was improper and possibly even fraudulent. “Robo-signers,” a term used to describe bank employees who robotically signed foreclosure documents without checking their accuracy, have been the focus of many lawsuits as well as investigations by 50 state attorneys general. One of the first lawyers to take on a “robo-signing” lawsuit against a large bank was Thomas Cox (’69) in Portland, Maine. His work put a temporary halt to foreclosures by the defendant bank, in his case GMAC Mortgage, and sparked a series of other lawsuits against large banks over foreclosure procedures. All of this led to the recent so-called “50 state attorney general settlement” where the five largest mortgage servicers agreed to a $25-billion settlement for their misconduct. “I’m doing what I can do in Maine, but it will be lawyers around the country that will bring some honesty back into the system,” says Cox. “We’ve made some very significant gains in the last four years, but we still have a long way to go.” 14

A Questionable Pattern

After retiring from his law practice in which, ironically, he represented banks in Maine, Cox spent several years building homes before he decided to get back into law by volunteering at Pine Tree Legal Services. Thinking he would work a few hours each month for that group’s Maine Attorneys Saving Homes program, he happened to pull the file for Nicolle Bradbury’s foreclosure case – and everything changed. “I was reviewing files mostly to educate myself about how foreclosures work today because I hadn’t worked in this area since the 90s, but I started to see a substantial number of foreclosures by GMAC Mortgage. I also saw that every single one of the summary judgment affidavits in those cases was signed by the same individual; that was highly questionable,” he recalls. They were suspicious, Cox maintains, because the law firm had left a blank to be filled in for the name of the signer, meaning that the lawyer didn’t necessarily know who would sign the affidavit much less whether that person knew the facts stated in the affidavit. Also, when the affidavit was sent to GMAC’s office in Pennsylvania, the same individual stamped his name onto the signature line, stating his title as “limited signing officer.” Cox says, “That brought me right out of my chair. It’s bad enough they had a signing officer, but it’s worse that he was a ‘limited signing officer.’ To me, that meant that he was just a paper signer and didn’t know what he was signing. I felt I was seeing a pattern of fraudulent affidavits that GMAC was submitting to the Maine courts. When I got to Nicolle Bradbury’s file, I decided I wasn’t going to let that one go.”


The Limited Signing Officer

After filing a response to GMAC’s summary judgment motion, the judge ruled against Cox except on one narrow issue pertaining to how much Bradbury owed the bank. Believing that the judge made a mistake, Cox focused on that one issue and used it as the basis to take the deposition of the limited signing officer. “I told my colleague at Pine Tree Legal, ‘I’m going to get this guy. We’re not going to let this keep going on.’” True to his word, Cox was able to get the limited signing officer to admit many things during the deposition: “that he doesn’t read the affidavits or know whether what they say is true, that when he says he’s attaching true copies of the loan to the loan documents in the file, he doesn’t even look at them or know whether they’re there, and that he doesn’t know if they are true or correct copies. Then, astonishingly, he even admitted that when he’s all done, he signs it and somebody else picks them up and takes them down the hall to the notary who then signs a certification that [the signer] personally appeared and was sworn before her, which was fundamentally untrue.” Cox recalls that when he received the expedited transcript a few days later, he really got the “wheels rolling” to stop GMAC. He began filing sanctions motions in several cases, including the Bradbury case. Cox says he also went to the Maine attorney general who issued a civil subpoena for the bank to hand over information pertaining to its foreclosure practices. In addition, he joined forces with lawyers from the Center for Responsible Lending and the National Consumer Law Center to initiate a class action suit against GMAC. Within a few months, GMAC publicly announced that it was stopping all foreclosures around the country. “We worked case by case with sanctions motions and attorney general involvement until somebody high enough up in GMAC realized they were in trouble and brought a halt to the whole operation,” he explains.

“Robo-signers,” a term used to describe bank employees who robotically sign foreclosure documents without checking their accuracy, have been the focus of many lawsuits as well as investigations by 50 state attorneys general.

watch video: bu.edu/law/news/cox-robo-sign.shtml

“My goal was to take care of Maine and get GMAC’s misconduct stopped here, but it went national, which was fine by me,” says Cox. “GMAC’s [foreclosure freeze] was followed by JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America and a bunch of others in the fall of 2010. And then that caught the attention of some folks down in Washington, D.C., and I was invited to testify before the House Judiciary Committee on a panel called ‘Foreclosed Justice.’” Even more satisfying to Cox was that this exposure of the so-called robo-signers led to the recent $25-billion settlement between the attorneys general of all 50 states and five national mortgage servicers, including GMAC Mortgage. In honor of his work, Cox was awarded the 2012 BU Law Alumni Pro Bono Award at a ceremony at the law school in April. In December 2012, Cox was honored with a $100,000 Purpose Award, which recognizes individuals 60 and over who create fresh solutions to old problems, from Encore.org, a nonprofit organization devoted to encouraging retired and older workers to pursue second careers in community service. Staying in the Fight

While the Bradbury case helped halt foreclosures, it also put Cox on a new career trajectory. Now, he is a frequent speaker at bar association meetings and legal seminars around the country. He has also returned to Washington, D.C. to participate in the ongoing work of the Uniform Law Commission’s session to draft a proposed model foreclosure statute. “I was very upset at the recent Uniform Law Commission meeting because all that they were talking about were numbers and how to make foreclosures easier and faster. So I spent time telling them real stories of the emotional distress that real homeowners go through every day with the foreclosure process. It’s frustrating because the industry is all about the numbers. The players are so large and everything is systemized so there is no room for human judgment anymore,” he says. Another ongoing problem, observes Cox, is that the majority of loans are originated with lenders who will not keep those loans on their books. Instead, those loans will be sold, diminishing any care or concern the original lenders might have had for their customers. While many people would opt for retirement at this point, Cox says he’s staying in the fight. “There is no doubt in my mind that I’m on the right side and I believe in what I’m doing and my ability to make a difference,” he explains, noting that he’s working on a business plan to organize other retired attorneys in Maine interested in this type of volunteer work. As for Nicolle Bradbury, her fight isn’t over either. She’ll likely face foreclosure at some point down the road. But for now, she’s still in her home. n the record

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Representing Massachusetts’ Most Controversial Defendants A desire for fairness drives Janice Bassil (’78) to take on the toughest criminal cases

“Maybe it’s still the adolescent in me [who thinks] you can say, things are fair or unfair, they’re black or they’re white. But I think lawyers spend a lot of time talking with each other and saying, that was fair, that was a fair result, or unfair,” says trial attorney Janice Bassil (’78), who has represented defendants in criminal cases for more than three decades. She has defended clients from all walks of life — the exalted and the luckless, the notorious and the anonymous — from criminal charges such as murder, rape and assault. Despite the long hours, crushing disappointment that can come with defeat, and the difficulty of building a balanced life outside of work, Bassil continues to bring an unusual amount of passion—and compassion — to her job, even as she nears the age when most attorneys begin to think of slowing down. “I joke sometimes that this is my version of extreme sports,” she says. “Some people do extreme snowboarding or skiing. I do jury trials on murder cases.” Bassil has had more than her share of emotionally charged cases over the years. In 1996, she was the court-appointed attorney for John Salvi, who was convicted of murder after a shooting rampage at two abortion clinics. In 2009, she won an acquittal for Angela Vasquez, a single mother accused of killing her two children in their Roslindale, Massachusetts home. She has also defended numerous juveniles, including a 14-year-old boy from Plymouth County who in 2009 was accused of statutory rape after engaging in consensual sex with three pre-teen girls. 16


Ever since the Salvi case, Bassil’s firm, Carney & Bassil, has developed a reputation for representing unpopular and controversial clients. When Mark Kerrigan, the brother of figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, was indicted for the 2010 death of his father, it was Bassil who cleared him of manslaughter charges. Last year, Bassil’s partner, J. W. Carney, Jr., became the court-appointed attorney for reputed mob boss James “Whitey’’ Bulger. After initially petitioning the court to have Bassil named co-counsel, Carney and Bassil decided that she would not take on this particular case. In fact, she could use some time to recover from her most recent gut-wrenching case: the defense of Tarek Mehanna, a 29-year-old pharmacy college graduate from Sudbury, Massachusetts, who was charged with conspiring to support Al Qaeda and kill American soldiers overseas. Mehanna’s nine-week trial, which ended in December 2011, drew national attention. Dangerous Radical or Opinionated Intellectual

Prosecutors portrayed Mehanna as a dangerous radical who traveled to Yemen in 2004 to seek terrorist training, hoping to fight U.S. soldiers in Iraq. When he was unable to find a training camp, prosecutors alleged Mehanna returned to the U.S. where he undertook to aid Al Qaeda by translating the group’s propaganda and distributing it on the Internet. Bassil and Carney painted a very different picture. They described Mehanna as an opinionated Muslim intellectual who disagreed with U.S. foreign policy and believed fervently in the need for Muslims to defend themselves against foreign forces in Afghanistan and Iraq, but who had no desire to engage in acts of terrorism. They argued that Mehanna went to Yemen to research religious schools, and that his actions and opinions were protected by the First Amendment. Bassil spent two years preparing for the trial — reading about Islam and the Middle East, talking to experts, spending hours upon hours with Mehanna — and she felt that they had a strong case. “We believed passionately in our defense,” says Bassil, who was deeply shaken when the jury came back after only 10 hours of deliberation with guilty verdicts on all counts. “I was just devastated,” Bassil says. “I had never felt that devastated in a courtroom. I just... when they read the verdicts, I literally... my body started shaking, and I literally felt like it was body blows every time they said ‘guilty.’” In April, Mehanna was sentenced to 17½ years in federal prison. Always an Interest in Justice

Looking back, Bassil says that her interest in the law has always been an interest in justice. She remembers reading three books over the course of one summer when she was a teenager: To Kill a Mockingbird, The Grapes of Wrath and Native Son. “Those three books convinced me that there was great unfairness in the world, tremendous unfairness, and that there were people who couldn’t speak up for themselves, and

that there were people who could speak for those people. And that seemed just fine with me and something that attracted me.” Around the same time, she remembers being fascinated by the daily coverage of the Chicago Eight trial, in which radical lawyer William Kunstler defended Abbie Hoffman and seven other defendants from charges of conspiring to start riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. “This seemed like something I could do,” she recalls thinking. At first, she kept to herself any ambitions of becoming a lawyer. Before Bassil and her sister, no one in her family had ever attended college, much less law school. But during her last year as an undergraduate at Brandeis University, she applied to BU Law and was accepted. Bassil arrived at BU as a 21 year old, and soon found herself struggling. The law, on first exposure, seemed inscrutable to her, and she experienced an element of disillusionment with law school. Justice — the calling that had drawn her to the law — was a word she almost never heard uttered in her courses. “When I went to BU,” she explains, “it was very geared towards commercial law and business law, and very geared towards placing people in traditional law firms. And I knew that was not what I wanted to do.” During her third year, Bassil found her calling in the School’s clinical program, arguing cases at the Boston Municipal Court. That formative experience left her thinking, “This is the best place I have ever been in my life,” she says. After graduation, Bassil worked for six years at the Massachusetts Defenders Committee, and then spent four years at White, Inker and Aronson, where she practiced criminal law and launched a parallel career in family law that she continues to this day. In 1989, she partnered with Carney to form their own firm. This is Who We Are

These days, criminal law cases comprise only about onequarter of Bassil’s caseload, but those are the cases that spark her intellectually and consume most of her time. She has accomplished most of her professional goals: arguing a large federal case, winning a rare “not guilty by reason of insanity” verdict, and taking on the types of cases she wanted to argue when she first became a lawyer. Her only remaining goal, she says, is “to just keep going.” Last year, Carney was asked why their firm had agreed to take on the daunting task of defending Bulger on 19 counts of murder. “Janice Bassil and I started as state court public defenders here in Boston in 1978,” Carney explained. “This is why we became criminal defense lawyers — to represent people who are in trouble.” “This is who we are,” Bassil likes to say. She’s been at it for 34 years, and she has given no thought to changing course now. n

watch video: bu.edu/law/communications/bassil_seeking_justice.shtml

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Talking About a Revolution (in Entertainment) Jonathan Zepp (’01) is at the center of Google’s efforts to become the world’s ‘entertainment marketplace.’ Cutting-edge technology, mind-blowing innovations, global industry trailblazers and cinematic entertainment are the nuts and bolts of Jonathan Zepp’s day-to-day responsibilities. As the driver of strategic content partnerships for Google’s transactional Movie & TV offering (i.e., rentals and purchase), Zepp is at the heart of an endeavor that intends to dramatically expand the parameters of cyberspace and its entertainment-providing capacities. Following in the strategic vision of Robert Kyncl, the company’s vice president of TV and entertainment and global head of content, Zepp and team are tasked with prodding film and television distributors in unique directions.

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“We are involved in various business models related to entertainment content creation and distribution. Currently, my personal focus is on leading our worldwide partnership efforts relating to rental and purchase of movie/TV content via Google Play & YouTube,” says Zepp. Google Play (https:// play.google.com/store) is an online entertainment emporium where users can build collections of premium entertainment content, including music, books, movies, TV episodes, apps and games. Zepp foresees Google Play and YouTube continuing to be the anchors of Google’s content ecosystem evolution across platforms and all types of content. YouTube was the focus of Kyncl’s keynote address at the 2012 Consumer Electronics Show: “YouTube isn’t big in just online video — it’s big in video. Period,” he told the audience. “We’ve built an open platform that reaches an enormous global audience, and we’ve built an economic engine on top of it.” Kyncl also spoke of how channel and content diversification could affect the Internet’s appeal as a primary medium for entertainment consumption. With the proliferation of niche channels, the future of entertainment could entail a marked shift from cable television — one that is notably similar to the conversion to cable from broadcast that the American public experienced a few decades ago. “We believe the industry will continue to trend toward personalized viewing experiences, and our platforms are particularly well positioned to deliver on that concept,” Zepp says. Part of Zepp’s job is finding innovative and lasting ways through which Google Play & YouTube can transcend what he calls “infrastructure handicaps” that may hinder more traditional distributors in order to arrive at “an environment that is limitless in terms of shelf space and reach.” The enormity and vigor of his tasks make Zepp’s approach to innovation all the more consequential. A significant part of his responsibilities is being able to sift through and discern initiatives that best comply with Google’s evolving philosophy for entertainment content distribution. “Part of the challenge of my role is filtering noise from innovation to allow us to make smart decisions regarding opportunities to pursue,” he says.

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This skill is integral to Zepp’s position, particularly in a realm that is entrenched in competition. Though it is a widely coveted field, the Internet industry’s dynamism and unpredictability increase the likelihood of employment opportunities. “One door might close, but others will open up. This industry tends to create interesting, unique opportunities more quickly [than others],” says Zepp. “I think that in any competitive space there will be personal wins and losses, and you have to look at your career development process as more of a marathon than a sprint.” And Zepp makes sure that half of that marathon is run at home with his wife, Lucy. “As you gain more career responsibility, work-life balance becomes more of a challenge,” he says. “You have to make it a priority.”

“It’s exceedingly rare that you’ll have a chance to be around the depth and breadth of knowledge and experiences that BU Law offers on a daily basis. Do what you can to take advantage [of those resources] while you’re there, but also look to create meaningful relationships in order to leverage those resources throughout your career.”

In fact, Zepp and Lucy met at BU Law. Like her husband, Lucy (Ferreira) Zepp (’01) spent a few years as a practicing lawyer before transitioning into a different area. She now serves as a senior vice president at a Los Angeles public relations firm. Zepp is also an amateur screenwriter, a hobby that he attributes to his BU Law days. He decided to experiment with screenwriting when his classmates bet him that he would be unable to do it. “I did one just for fun, loved the experience and kept it as a hobby ever since,” he said. “Anyone who gets into the [entertainment] space is probably somewhat attracted to the creative aspects of the business.”


Reminiscing about these times, Zepp notes that some of the best years of his life were at BU Law, where he spent much of his time overseeing the Boston University Law Review. It was through his editor-in-chief position that he fortified his continuing relationship with Professor Tamar Frankel. Under Zepp’s direction, the journal had published a series of papers that were presented at a consortium on the Internet, trust and the law that Frankel was then leading. “Jon possessed then, as he must possess now, the ability to lead, and even to criticize, in the right and effective way,” says Frankel. “He created a team and a team spirit, which he seems to continue creating to this day. A unique talent is crucial to be able to restrict other people’s behavior and yet receive their acceptance. This is what Jonathan Zepp is doing. His service is unique because it is becoming increasingly crucial.” But it is clear that such admiration is mutual, and Zepp credits Frankel with having increased his awareness of how the Internet’s influence would continue to grow. According to Zepp, Frankel fully anticipated how an array of legal issues — from basic contract law to trust and piracy — would evolve with the technology and Internet boom. “She put into perspective where the industry might be heading in terms of reach.” Emphasizing that professors like Frankel have contributed to the knowledge that he continues to apply to his job, Zepp encourages students to build sustainable relationships with professors and other mentors. “It’s exceedingly rare that you’ll have a chance to be around the depth and breadth of knowledge and experiences that BU Law offers on a daily basis,” he says. “Do what you can to take advantage [of those resources] while you’re there, but also look to create meaningful relationships in order to leverage those resources throughout your career.”

To connect with BU Law alumni and others who shared his interests, Zepp pursued informational interviews and additional opportunities — all to “understand the landscape a little bit.” And “I’m still in touch with a lot of the folks that I met in the early days,” he says. Zepp sees law school as a steppingstone upon which students can cultivate lasting tools to enhance their careers. Although he is no longer a practicing lawyer, law school, he says, taught him invaluable life lessons, and the underlying skill set he developed has been critical in advancing his career at all stages. After getting his J.D. from BU Law, Zepp spent a few years at big firms in both Los Angeles and New York before moving into the entertainment and technology industries. After a stint at Napster, he worked at Paramount Pictures and then Sony Network Entertainment. Last year, he appeared as one of “Hollywood’s Fastest Rising Stars” in The Hollywood Reporter’s “Next Gen Class of 2011” issue. And while he says his path up until now has not necessarily been part of a preconceived scheme, he acknowledges it has not been entirely arbitrary either. “My path wasn’t planned out in terms of detailed steps,” he says. “But the general progression has been fairly close to what I had hoped it might be.”n

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pandora’s keeper Delida Costin (’95) heads streaming radio service’s legal team

Delida Costin (’95) always thought she would pursue public interest law. That explains why, in her first job as a young attorney at the Boston law firm, Goodwin Procter LLP, she took on pro bono cases in addition to her general corporate law duties. “I just had a passion for helping people,” she explains. Now, the New York native is involved in a new set of challenges in Silicon Valley, where she is a major player in a fast-evolving specialty — technology law. Costin is general counsel at Pandora Media, a service providing personalized Internet radio. Pandora is based on the Music Genome Project, “the most sophisticated taxonomy of musical information ever collected,” according to the company Web site. Through the Project, teams of musicologists analyze and classify songs using over 450 musical characteristics. Tunes are then categorized by their individual attributes, allowing for greater listener-customization and a “more personalized radio experience.” The Oakland, California-based company provides streaming radio through computers and mobile phones, as well as through hundreds of connected devices and cars, including a few unexpected ones like a Wi-Fi equipped refrigerator. When she joined the company two years ago, Costin was the firm’s sole in-house attorney, but she quickly built a 13-person legal team. Costin directs her staff through various matters, from meeting federal financial reporting requirements to examining business expansion strategies. 22

She was among the executives who clapped and whooped from atop a tiny balcony overlooking the New York Stock Exchange in June 2011, when Pandora went public and company CEO Joseph Kennedy rang the opening bell on the firm’s first day of trading. “What I love the most is that every day I come in and there’s something new to deal with,” says Costin. “That is the most fun thing about being at a company like Pandora. It’s like playing a game every day and just trying to figure out how to win.” Since her student and early professional days, Costin has blended her passion for the law with her many other wideranging interests. Fresh out of law school, she learned the ropes at Goodwin Procter as a junior associate focused on drafting documents, incorporating companies and handling debt financings. But she was also energized by the chance to voluntarily take on a pro bono assignment involving a client seeking political asylum in the U.S. The case was far beyond the parameters of conventional corporate law, but it fit with Costin’s motivation to provide free legal care, which she started doing as a student in BU Law’s Asylum & Human Rights Clinic.


While few other Goodwin Procter attorneys were “going outside of their practice area to do what I was doing,” Costin considered taking on the pro bono asylum case to be “a great opportunity to really help somebody who I thought needed help.” Later on, she handled an IPO for a Boston company that did not quite go as expected, an experience that sparked her interest in switching gears and coming to the West Coast. “Something happened in China, the market tanked and everybody’s deal fell apart, including my own IPO,” she explains. Watching the television news later, Costin noticed very different responses from business experts interviewed about the shakeup. In New York City, Wall Street folks called it the worst crisis ever. In Chicago, people commented that while things were down now, they would eventually recover. “And then somebody in San Francisco said, ‘What—there was a crash? What happened?’” Costin recalls. “And I thought, ‘How cool that there is a place in the world with an economy that is growing at such a clip that they’re unaffected by the things that are affecting me. I would love to go see what that was all about.’” So she packed up and moved cross-country for a job at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP in Palo Alto, California in 1998, when online companies including Amazon, eBay, Yahoo, Google and others had soared onto the business scene. Silicon Valley was “like Rome at the height of the Roman Empire. I mean, there was so much innovation,” she says. “People were doing some amazing things. There was a feeling that you could achieve anything.” By comparison, back in Boston the corporate mainstays were mature firms from banking, real estate and other big industries. But California exuded a serious startup vibe, and Costin was intrigued by the region’s “new, cool and hip” business scene dominated by young and creative corporate founders. She particularly appreciated the West Coast’s less hierarchical workplace culture that benefitted less experienced attorneys. Silicon Valley’s law firms typically assigned deals to one law partner and one associate, while firms back East staffed similar projects with three or four people. That made it possible for her to get more responsibility and broad experience early on, as she helped emerging technology businesses with their private rounds of financing and other needs. After Pillsbury Winthrop, Costin went on to join CNET Networks in San Francisco as assistant general counsel in 2000. Then she watched the dot-com bubble burst. Some tech companies failed spectacularly as share prices fell and firms ran out of cash. But for Costin, it was not a frightening period. “The lesson was that times get bad and sometimes there is a place and time to sit down, re-examine priorities and figure out how to weather a storm,” she says. She took it as an opportunity to assess her company’s strengths and launch gamechanging projects, even with fewer resources. watch video: www.bu.edu/buniverse/view/?v=vxgT615d

It was, she says, “a really great lesson in introspection, research, project planning and setting goals. It was a very good time.” Costin rose to become vice president of CNET Network’s legal department in 2006, the same year her mother, Ida, suffered a heart attack and lapsed into a coma. That crisis spurred Costin to reorder her own professional goals. She had yearned to take on a new challenge — running a private law practice — and realized she wanted her mother to see her achieve that milestone. “My mom was always about doing what you love to do, finding your niche and continuing to grow,” Costin says. “I wanted her to see me take a risk. Watching what she went through — and her courage — gave me a lot of courage as well.” Ida lived to see her daughter start her solo practice in 2007. Costin’s practice focused on small businesses in technology and beyond, a role which gave her an up-close view of “how the changes and choices made as companies really impacted individuals immediately.” She also launched a blog for her clients, posting stories about Silicon Valley entrepreneurs on how they had faced business challenges and the advice they had for others seeking startup success. An avid user of Pandora, Costin wrote a profile of the company’s CEO, Joseph Kennedy. One thing led to another, and she was asked to join the company’s top leadership team as general counsel in 2010. These days, the most difficult yet rewarding part of Costin’s job at Pandora is continually wading into unexplored legal and business territory. About 150 million users are tuning in to the service, more than 75 percent of them using mobile devices, while the company’s employee count has doubled in two years to 589 nationwide. With so much change and opportunity, “I need to be able to help myself, my legal team and the executive team make judgment calls in places where there isn’t a lot of precedent,” she explains. From her perch at Pandora, Costin has watched major technological shifts occur, such as Encyclopaedia Britannica’s decision to exit the published book business as consumers seeking information increasingly flock to the Internet instead. “That’s a change we’ve been able to witness and live through, and it’s fascinating to me. I just love watching those transformations occur,” she said. “I think it will be really interesting to see what people say about this time 50 years from now.” n

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prompting the music industry to sing a new tune john rosenberg (’79) tackles the challenges of old copyright laws in the new media era

After Napster created an uproar more than a decade ago, multiple Internet service providers and social media sites emerged with various business models for sharing music. Yet no one has really determined how these groups can peacefully coexist without infringing on each other’s rights, and the law is still in catch-up mode. Litigator John Rosenberg (’79), co-founder of Rosenberg & Giger PC, a New York City law firm that represents some of the biggest names in the music industry, says that new media copyright cases are becoming increasingly prevalent for entertainment litigators. Artists need to ensure they will be paid their rightful royalties, and record companies seek to protect their business, but “copyright protection now must exist in the realm of new technologies that are making the copying and sharing of music easier and easier,” he explains. Many copyright laws were developed decades ago, but the legal issues involved in today’s copyright cases are “very cutting-edge,” he says, often involving unforeseen technological developments. “The law needs to evolve quickly so that all of the players have some ground rules.” Rosenberg, an accomplished musician himself, has seen a recent uptick in these cases in his entertainment law practice, especially involving the negotiation of licenses between artists/ record labels and Internet service providers who want to stream their work. “Those groups need each other because artists typically want a way to reach as wide a listener base as possible, record labels want their recordings exploited for a fee, and Internet service providers require content so that people visit their sites. Even where the law may not require it, I attempt to negotiate licenses so the service providers can stream a vast catalogue of recordings and the record labels — and hence the artists — are paid royalties for that streaming,” he explains. While that may sound fairly straightforward , legal issues nonetheless frequently arise, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) — the federal law enacted in 1998 to address issues created by the digital age — leaves gray areas for the courts to sort out. “The DMCA was a positive step and good starting point, but there is a great deal of litigation over it as well,” says Rosenberg. The law, he explains, essentially provides a “safe harbor” for Internet service providers who stream content uploaded by third parties. If a copyright holder feels that his work has been posted without permission, he can send a “takedown notice” to the Internet service provider requesting that the work be removed from the site. But what if the person who posted the work insists he has the legal right to do so? Are there loopholes in the law that expose the Internet service provider to liability? Does the safe harbor apply to all recordings or only recordings created after 1972 (a date referenced in the section of the Copyright Act that provided federal copyright protection to sound recordings created after that date)? 24

“The DMCA safe harbor makes sense because as a practical matter you can’t impose on an Internet service provider the obligation to monitor all content posted on its site for copyright compliance, as many ISPs receive tens of thousands of uploads every day. If monitoring was required, there would be few, if any, providers because no one could possibly monitor all of that material,” says Rosenberg. “But at the same time, there are a number of significant issues of first impression arising from the DMCA that are now making their way through the courts both at the trial and appellate levels.”

“When I was in college, the worst offense was making a mix tape and lending it to your roommate. That is, of course, a far cry from the level and degree of music sharing on the Web today.” One of Rosenberg’s clients is a popular Internet streaming service that has been involved in litigation raising these issues. Grooveshark provides a platform for users to upload recordings that other users of the site can stream. While the site’s policy requires users to confirm that they own or control the copyright in any uploaded materials, there is no way — other than the DMCA take-down procedure — for Grooveshark to realistically verify the copyright of every single upload to the site, according to Rosenberg. In its July 10, 2012 decision, the New York Supreme Court ruled that the DMCA’s safe harbor protections apply to pre-1972 recordings, a significant victory for Grooveshark that has been appealed by Universal Music Group, the plaintiff in that litigation. Despite ongoing hearings before Congress, proceedings before the Copyright Royalty Board and other agencies, and a number of important court decisions in various jurisdictions, Rosenberg observes that it is impossible to know where the law ultimately will land until more appellate decisions address these issues. “I find it challenging to be involved in this sort of litigation because it’s a new realm outside of the traditional copyright model in which I grew up, where you had to buy music at a record store and large-scale copying wasn’t an option. When I was in college, the worst offense was making a mix tape and lending it to your roommate. That is, of course, a far cry from the level and degree of music sharing on the Web today,” he says, noting that this new environment is leading to a host of “fascinating” and as of yet unresolved legal issues. n


aiming for a mark you can protect

trademark pro jason zedeck (’98) advises clients on what’s in a name

When you search the Internet for a word or phrase, do you just “google it,” or do you use the search engine owned by Google? Why shouldn’t a manufacturer of brown chairs call itself The Brown Chair Company? These are the kinds of issues trademark law expert Jason Zedeck (’98) navigates every day at his eponymous Los Angeles-based firm. “The name’s the thing,” as he says. The former IP counsel for Fox Entertainment Group, Zedeck opened his own practice three-and-a-half years ago as an established authority on selecting, protecting and expanding trademarks and domain names. “I love almost every minute of it,” he says. His interest in the field began shortly after law school while working at an entertainment law firm as a litigator. He began volunteering for extra trademark cases on top of his regular workload because “it helped me distinguish myself and was something I enjoyed doing.” After hours of extra work and learning on the fly, Zedeck had established himself as the “go-to” trademark lawyer in his office. During his third year at the firm, he emailed Fox Entertainment Group in response to a job posting to ask if they might be interested in someone with his experience. They immediately invited him for an interview and, shortly thereafter, hired Zedeck into trademark enforcement and opposition. During his eight years at Fox, he oversaw various IP issues across the studio, including film, television, merchandising and social networking channels. “I loved working at Fox,” Zedeck says. “You’re working with creative people, and you’re also working with marketing and corporate, and trying to combine all the interests.” Zedeck’s trademark savvy proved essential throughout his time at Fox. “Someone would have a vision, and the challenge was trying to facilitate that vision, especially with a trademark,” he says. Marketing teams often proposed literal show titles to describe a new program, suggesting generic names like “Doctors,” that a target audience could grasp effortlessly. “But from a trademark standpoint… you can’t register and protect that,” Zedeck explains. “You can’t stop another series from talking about doctors, or using “Doctors” as part of the title any more than you could register that generic name with the Patent and Trademark Office. Descriptive marks don’t usually stand,” he says. “You want to make sure that you have a mark you can protect.” By the time Zedeck had risen to senior IP counsel, he was well versed in this argument. As the resident expert, Zedeck was frequently asked throughout his time at Fox if he knew any lawyers that could help with trademark-related issues. Recognizing a need for such counsel outside big firms and specialized boutiques, he opened his own shop in 2009.

He now crafts customized, comprehensive trademark strategies for not only entertainment organizations, but also restaurants, clothing companies, ski resorts and more. The first order of business? Selecting a good name. “I think the nature of the law is that a keyword may not constitute trademark infringement, but I think there’s more pressure on trademark owners to select a good name.” He advises clients to choose a distinctive word that does not mean anything, like Google or Xerox, over a descriptive name (think The Brown Chair Company). Invariably, most clients want to start with a name that simply describes what they are selling. It’s interesting work in a day and age when consumers are constantly bombarded with branding and messaging — and when competitors, cyber-squatters and third-party entities can buy keywords and domain names to keep from, or sell to, a company that is not vigilant.

“I think the nature of the law is that a keyword may not constitute trademark infringement, but I think there’s more pressure on trademark owners to select a good name.” Zedeck helps his clients navigate these pitfalls with the old adage, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” He says it is crucial to be proactive and register a trademark and domain name — even a Twitter and Facebook handle — prior to announcing a company name. After all, “it’s much cheaper to get them from the outset rather than trying to buy it from somebody else.” In addition to providing outside counsel, Zedeck also serves as “in-house” trademark counsel for several of his largest clients. “It combines the best of what I loved about my prior positions at a law firm and in-house at Fox,” he says. “And I control my own hours.” That means he is able to keep his booming business running and still be home to have dinner with the kids and his wife, whom he met during his first year at BU Law. “Every step I took to get here was the right step,” he says. “I don’t think I would be where I am doing what I love doing without taking each of those steps.” n

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news and updates

graduate tax program offered online As of Fall 2012, BU Law now offers its LL.M. in Taxation online. This innovative option provides the same challenging course of study as the residential program, but it allows students to complete the 24-credit course requirements in as few as four sessions of part-time study or over the course of three years. The curriculum offers a balance between tax law theory and practical application, meeting the needs of lawyers who wish to excel as tax practitioners. LL.M. Tax students can select from a wide spectrum of elective courses and gain exposure to all areas of taxation, or they may choose to concentrate on courses that will prepare them for specialization in a particular area such as business organizations and transactions, estate planning and wealth management, or international tax. The online option is ideal for domestic and internationally trained tax lawyers whose jobs preclude them from attending classes held on the Boston campus. Students can begin the program in any of the three online sessions — fall, spring or summer — and enroll in an attractive variety of courses, all

taught by the same highly experienced BU Law faculty who teach the residential courses. “At BU Law, providing LL.M. students with a vast array of student services is a top priority,” says John Riccardi (’91), assistant dean of Graduate and International Programs. “We are committed to providing our online students with the same outstanding support as our on-campus students.” BU Law’s Graduate Tax Program, established in 1959 as one of the first in the nation, continues to be one of the best: BU Law ranks 6th among American law schools in Taxation, according to U.S. News and World Report. n

more information is available at www.bu.edu/law/prospective/llm/taxation

bu law offers two new dual degree programs Starting in Fall 2012, BU Law began offering two new dual degree programs with the College of Arts & Sciences: a joint J.D./M.A. in English and a J.D./M.A. in History. These dual degree programs enable students to earn two advanced degrees in less time than it would take to pursue them separately. 26

J.D./M.A. in English

J.D./M.A. in History

This new degree offers qualified students a unique opportunity to combine the study of law with coursework in English and American literature. “Law and literature” is an established scholarly field, and the dual degree program facilitates inquiry into the common terrain of these two disciplines. Students who intend to practice law will benefit from the careful, critical approach to textual analysis that is taught in graduate literature courses and the enhancement of writing skills, which are essential to law practice. A student who decides to pursue a career outside law, such as teaching literature, will benefit from the rigorous specialized training in the analysis of legal texts and issues that a J.D. degree provides.

Offering students the opportunity to combine the study of law with coursework in history, this dual degree program facilitates inquiry at the two fields’ intersection in legal history. For students who intend to practice law, the program provides a broader array of coursework that enhances analytical and writing skills, which are essential to legal practice. Similarly, the program can benefit students who pursue academic careers in law and/or history, particularly legal history. Possession of both degrees can improve students’ chances of securing academic appointments in law schools and, for those who pursue the Ph.D. in history, in history departments.


bu law students’ amicus brief cited by supreme court in ‘obamacare’ ruling: As part of the Supreme Court’s 5-4 decision in June to uphold President Obama’s health care law, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg cited an amicus brief that was crafted with the help of BU Law students Braden Miller (‘13), Paul Payer (‘13) and Katie O’Neill (‘13). The students worked on the “Health Care for All” brief in the seminar Constitutional Health Care Litigation, which was taught by Associate Professors of Law Abigail Moncrieff and Kevin Outterson. The lead client for the brief was Health Care for All, based in Boston.

abigail moncrieff

Associate Professor of Law

kevin outterson

Associate Professor of Law Since 2006, Massachusetts has required residents to maintain affordable and comprehensive health insurance. Justice Ginsburg cites the brief ’s section on the economic disadvantage faced by individual states, such as Massachusetts, that undertake health care reform on their own: “Out-of-state residents continue to seek and receive millions of dollars in uncompensated care in Massachusetts hospitals, limiting the State’s efforts to improve its health care system through the elimination of uncompensated care.” Ginsburg continues in her opinion: “Facing that risk, individual States are unlikely to take the initiative in addressing the problem of the uninsured, even though solving that problem is in all States’ best interests. Congress’ intervention was needed to overcome this collective-action impasse.” Fourteen students submitted four Supreme Court amicus briefs as part of the class. “We are incredibly proud of the great work that our students did on all of the briefs,” Outterson says. “It was an opportunity for them to have an impact on one of the Court’s most critical opinions.” Another amicus brief, which was written by BU Law students Rachel Smit (’13), Zoe Sajor (’13) and Emily Westfall (’13) for the same class and filed on behalf of the Jewish Alliance for Law and Social Action, argues that the individual mandate is functionally indistinguishable from a tax. “That is the exact argument that saved the mandate,” Moncrieff says. “While there was no official citing of this brief in the Supreme Court’s opinion, it’s nice to have been on the right side of the ruling. Perhaps, it may have influenced Chief Justice Roberts, who provided the deciding vote.”

Smit, who worked for three years at a state health policy institute prior to enrolling at BU Law, says, “Because the ACA (Affordable Care Act) makes health insurance accessible to many people with low incomes, I was glad to have an opportunity to defend the law.” On the Medicaid expansion issue, seven justices found the law unconstitutional; five justices ruled that the remedy should be a state-by-state option to accept or refuse the additional funds, without risking existing Medicaid funding. This was the same argument made in the Health Law & Policy Scholars’ Brief, supported by BU Law students Valerie Moore (’12) and Amrit Gupta (’13), together with Boston College Law students Max Bauer and Frederick Thide. Other BU Law students who participated in the brief writing were Julia Mirabella (’12), DJ Arnold (’12), Kyle Thomson (’12) and Hao Wang (’12).

 “Over 120 amicus briefs were filed in this case,” Outterson says, “Only a very few were cited. The briefs we wrote were high impact and made a difference.” On September 27, Outterson joined with fellow BU health law faculty Leonard Glantz and Wendy Mariner for a panel discussion at the law school on “The Supreme Court’s Opinions on Obamacare.” n

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news and updates

bu law welcomes new faculty BU Law has long enjoyed a reputation as having one of the most outstanding and engaging teaching faculties in the country. The Princeton Review ranks BU Law #3 in “Best Professors.” This year, we welcome two new faculty members who will uphold our reputation for excellence.

Kent Coit joins the BU Law faculty as director of the Transactional Law Program. Professor Coit comes to BU as a recently retired partner in the Boston office of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP, where he practiced in the firm’s mergers and acquisitions department for almost 30 years. Coit directed Skadden’s Boston Summer Associate M&A Training Program, in which law students learn the basics kent coit of contract drafting and negotiation Professor of the Practice of Law through participation in a simulated Director, Transactional Law Program auction of a company. He also served as A.B., magna cum laude, Harvard College Skadden Boston’s attorney development M.A., Harvard University partner, responsible for developing and Ph.D., Harvard University Graduate implementing an associate mentoring School of Arts and Sciences program, and he was an instructor in a J.D., Harvard Law School number of associate training programs.

william p. marshall

Visiting Professor of Law B.A., University of Pennsylvania J.D., University of Chicago

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William Marshall joins the BU Law faculty as a visiting professor of law. He is the Kenan Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina School of Law, where he has taught media law, civil procedure, constitutional law, First Amendment, federal courts, church-state, and the law of the presidency. He has published extensively on First Amendment, federal courts and presidential powers issues. He is a leading expert on federal judicial selection matters and on the interrelationship between media, law and politics. He is the author of Cases and Materials on Federal Courts (American Casebook Series, 2011). Professor Marshall has served as deputy

During his career at Skadden, Coit advised both public and privately held clients in connection with negotiated and hostile acquisitions, public and private financings, spin-offs, leveraged buyouts, recapitalizations, restructurings, joint ventures, licensing agreements, and transactions involving companies in Chapter 11 bankruptcy. His practice focused on biotechnology companies and other health care industry participants, as well as companies in the communications and technology industries.

White House counsel and deputy assistant to the president of the United States during the Clinton administration, and as the solicitor general of the State of Ohio.

For more information about the BU Law faculty, please visit www.bu.edu/law/faculty


ann and bob seidman retire from bu law faculty The process they have developed, Bob Seidman says, is to “start out with a detailed examination of what’s going on in the society right now, and then you try and see in what way a change in the law can change the behaviors which constitute the social problem.”

ann and bob seidman Longtime BU Law professors Ann and Bob Seidman retired this spring after teaching at the School for a combined 49 years. Together, their influence has spread globally — working in 30 different countries, co-authoring over 35 books and articles, and serving as United Nations consultants, all during 65 years of marriage. Throughout their careers, the Seidmans have focused on using the law to bring about democratic social change. They have helped draft the constitutions of Namibia and Somalia and served as advisors for legislative drafting processes in China, Bhutan, Kazakhstan, Indonesia, Afghanistan, South Africa and Sri Lanka. “One of the reasons why we’ve been invited everywhere, whether it’s China or Africa,” Ann Seidman says, is that “people have been very interested in this — how do you use law to facilitate development and democratic social change?” As a testament to the demand for their research and experience, their co-authored manual Legislative Drafting for Democratic Social Change: A Manual for Drafters (with Naline Abeysekere, Kluwer Law International 2001) has been translated into Arabic, Bahasa Indonesian, Chinese, Farsi, Macedonian, Russian, Sinhalese and Vietnamese.

Throughout their careers, the Seidmans have focused on using the law to bring about democratic social change. They have helped draft the constitutions of Namibia and Somalia and served as advisors for legislative drafting processes in China, Bhutan, Kazakhstan, Indonesia, Afghanistan, South Africa and Sri Lanka. Before BU Law, the Seidmans taught at the University of Ghana, University of Laos, University of Zambia, University College of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania and the University of Wisconsin. They were both Fulbright Professors at Peking University in Beijing from 1988-1989. At BU Law, the Seidmans taught courses in legislative drafting and law and development and were co-directors of the Boston University Program on Legislative Drafting for Democratic Social Change. Both praise their students. “By the time they get to be law students at BU Law School, they’re very bright and alert,” Bob Seidman says. “The ones who take the subjects we teach are really interested in the subject.” “You learn every time you work with students,” says Ann Seidman. “You get new insights.” n

watch video: “using the law as a tool for social change” www.bu.edu/law/events/audio-video

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news and updates

getting to know the incoming class A serviceman decorated with the Bronze Star joins four other veterans, nine Teach for America Teachers, a CIA analyst, electrical engineer, accountant, campaign finance manager, police officer, as well as paralegals, firefighters, and EMTs in this fall’s first-year class of 210 students. This eclectic group also includes the two-time Ivy League champion in triple jump, Division I athletes in football and rowing, Fulbright Scholars, artists, writers, musicians, dancers and members of service organizations including AmeriCorps and Jesuit Volunteer Corps. Boston University School of Law received almost 6,000 applications for this year’s entering class. The Class of 2015 comes from 33 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. Students of color make up 23 percent of the group, and 52 percent are women. The class includes members who were born in 14 countries including Canada, China, Cuba, the Czech Republic, Israel, Lebanon, Panama, Peru, Romania, South Korea, Sweden, Taiwan and Tajikistan. The students are graduates of 114 undergraduate institutions with majors in every field from aerospace engineering (2) to economics (8) to English (23) to history (15) to political science (61). Nineteen students hold advanced degrees, including PhDs in the sciences, and master’s degrees in education, fine arts, political science, philosophy, accounting and religion, among others.

profile of the class of 2015 • • • • • • • • • • •

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Number of Applicants: 5,971 Number of Matriculants: 210 Median LSAT: 166 (range 151-177) Median GPA: 3.75 (range 2.90-4.13) Women: 52% Students of Color: 23% Average Age: 24 Age Range: 20–35 Undergraduate Schools Represented: 114 U.S. States Represented: 33 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia Countries Represented: 14

The number of foreign languages spoken is a testament to the wide range of experience and backgrounds of the Class of 2015. The class has fluency in at least 29 languages, including American Sign Language, Arabic, Bengali, Cantonese, Czech, Farsi, French, German, Hebrew, Hindi, Italian, Korean, Malayalam, Mandarin, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Ukrainian and Vietnamese. The median LSAT score of the class is a 166, and the median GPA a 3.75, but the talents of the Class of 2015 go well beyond these numbers, resting on diverse life experiences and perspectives. The average age of entering students is 24, with 64 percent having at least one year of post-graduate work experience. In fact, 25 percent of the class brings three or more years of post-graduate experience to BU Law. The LL.M. in American Law Program’s Class of 2013 includes 83 lawyers from 35 countries, while the Graduate Program in Banking and Finance Law’s entering class of 56 new students hails from 28 countries. This fall, 19 students enrolled in the new Online Graduate Tax Program, joining 35 students in the residential program. After graduating its first class in May, the Executive LL.M. in International Business Law program currently has 26 students.


awards

bu law honors 2012 silver shingle award winners As part of the festivities of Alumni & Reunion Weekend 2012, BU Law held its annual Silver Shingle Awards at the Four Seasons Hotel on September 21. Awards, which recognized outstanding alumni and friends of the law school, were given in the categories of Distinguished Service to the Profession, Distinguished Service to the Community and the Young Lawyer’s Chair. A separate honor, the Gerard H. Cohen Award for Distinguished Service to the School, is presented to an outstanding BU Law administrative staff member.

service to the profession

justice joseph p. nadeau (’62)

Justice Joseph P. Nadeau (’62) was appointed to the New Hampshire Supreme Court in 2000, and he retired as senior associate justice in 2005, after authoring significant opinions in the area of torts, individual rights, separation of powers and judicial procedure. His judicial career began in 1968, when he was appointed to a part-time judgeship in the Durham District Court. He was named to New Hampshire’s Superior Court in 1981, and became its chief justice in 1992. As an active member of the ABA Conference of State Trial Judges’ international relations committees, Justice Nadeau has traveled extensively as a volunteer judicial educator, presenting programs on the rule of law, judicial ethics and the independence of the judiciary. He has participated in national and regional training programs in the United States and in countries throughout Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

In 2005, exactly a century after his own grandparents emigrated from the Middle East to the United States, Justice Nadeau traveled to Slovakia to work with the federal chief justice of Iraq, Medhat al Mahmoud, and senior Iraqi justices to craft judicial provisions for the new Iraqi constitution. In 2006, he spent time in Jordan to offer training for Iraqi trial judges and attend the first conference of the Arab Council for Judicial and Legal Studies. Since retirement, Justice Nadeau has also made trips to Indonesia to consult on USAID Rule of Law projects designed to combat judicial corruption, and has held training sessions for more than 2,000 Indonesian judges. In a letter to the governor announcing his retirement from the Supreme Court, Justice Nadeau wrote; “I have felt privileged to serve in the judicial branch of the government. Not only have I been given the honor and privilege of working for the people of New Hampshire, but I have also been given the opportunity to serve the law, that I revere, and the profession that I love.”

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service to the school

christopher a. kenney (’90)

As a BU Law student, Christopher A. Kenney (’90) was named a Paul J. Liacos Scholar and later elected president of his graduating class. After graduation, he became a highly successful and respected attorney in Massachusetts, but he never really left BU Law. Kenney has served as an adjunct faculty member and mentor for many students. He has sat on panels, offered advice when asked, and hired a number of BU Law graduates. Kenney has taken on numerous leadership roles in the alumni association, and in 2010 served as its president. As a founding member and the managing shareholder of Kenney & Sam, a boutique law firm in Boston that represents individuals, businesses and public authorities at trial and on appeal in a broad array of civil disputes, he has successfully tried cases before every level of the state and federal trial court system in Massachusetts. Kenney has also served as an appellate advocate before the Massachusetts Appellate Division, Massachusetts

Appeals Court, Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, and the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. He served the Commonwealth as a special assistant attorney general from 1999 to 2005, and currently serves as the New England regional trial counsel for several major corporations. Kenney was named the 2012 Massachusetts Defense Lawyer of the Year by the Massachusetts Defense Lawyers Association. Boston Magazine has ranked him as one of the Top 100 Lawyers in Massachusetts. In a peer-reviewed survey, Kenney was named a “Superlawyer” in the areas of business litigation and civil litigation defense, a designation limited to the top five percent of attorneys in New England. He has been selected for inclusion in every edition of The Best Lawyers in America since 2009, and the Martindale Hubbell National Law Directory has given him its highest rating for his legal abilities and professional ethics.

The Honorable Boyce F. Martin, Jr. is the most senior active judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Appointed in 1979, he rose to become chief judge of the circuit in 1996, and is now chief judge emeritus. Judge Martin has written more than 1,100 opinions during his tenure and has taken on more graduates of BU Law as clerks than any other judge. His style, both on the bench and in written opinions, is characterized by clear and concise writing and a focus on common sense. His intention in handing down an opinion is to provide justice to the parties and explain the law to the lawyers and the public. He quickly publishes opinions so that the disputing parties need not wait longer than necessary. His writings on the death penalty and affirmative action are particularly noteworthy, and a recent decision upholding the trademark rights of Maker’s Mark Kentucky Bourbon has been referred to as a “history lesson,” and not just a judicial finding.

In 1964 and 1965, Judge Martin served first as an assistant U.S. attorney, and then as the U.S. attorney for the Western District of Kentucky. He left for private practice in Louisville for a short time, but in early 1974, he was appointed by the governor to fill a vacancy on the Jefferson Circuit Court, a position to which he was re-elected by a landslide later that year. During the 1970s, Judge Martin worked behind the scenes to spur reform in the Kentucky judiciary. These efforts resulted in an amendment to the state constitution in 1975 that cleared the way to create a unified court system with a new intermediate Court of Appeals with the Kentucky Supreme Court replacing the old highest court. As the first chief judge of the newly created Court of Appeals, Judge Martin quickly got the new court off the ground and cleared the backlog of cases that had developed under the old system.

Myron Dean Quon (’93) serves as the executive director of the National Asian Pacific American Families Against Substance Abuse, based in Los Angeles, a national nonprofit organization focused on substance use disorder and other addictions in Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities. Previously, Quon served as an executive director of the Asian Pacific American Legal Resource Center in Washington, where he oversaw a one-third increase in its operational budget, a doubling of its staff, and an expansion of its impact from two to four offices. This organization assisted low-income and limited-English proficient Asians and Pacific Islanders through legal services, advocacy, and community organizing in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Northern Virginia. Before that, he was the legal director of the Asian American Institute in Chicago, where he successfully

led advocacy efforts to repair the presumptive exclusion of Asian American-owned business enterprises from the City of Chicago’s public contracting affirmative action program. Quon has also served as the deputy regional director for the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund. Over nearly two decades since earning his J.D., he has provided unparalleled public advocacy work. His service in particular to the LGBT and Asian Pacific American communities has been especially significant. He is a tireless advocate for civil rights and his community service efforts have helped make a true difference. Through his work, Quon has become a nationally respected expert on diversity issues. He has been featured in or quoted by national media, including The Washington Post, National Public Radio, The O’Reilly Factor, The San Francisco Examiner and The Los Angeles Times.

service to the school

the honorable boyce f. martin, jr.

service to the community

myron dean quon (’93)

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young lawyer’s chair

mika mayer (’02)

Mika Mayer (’02) studied chemical engineering as an undergraduate, but through an internship at Motorola, she found an interest in patent law. Now a partner at Morrison & Foerster in Palo Alto, CA, she draws on her scientific and legal training to work at the highest levels of intellectual property and patent law, and she has earned a reputation seldom achieved so early in one’s career. At Morrison & Foerster, Mayer co-founded her own practice group — the Venture Intellectual Property Group, became partner, and now leads two practice groups — the VIP group and the Medical Device Patent Group. As patent counsel, she prepares and prosecutes patent applications, provides strategic patent portfolio analysis for her clients, and oversees potential investments that range in size from small seed money to multi-billion dollar acquisitions in the medical device, drug delivery and pharmaceutical fields. She was first named a “Rising Star” by Super Lawyers in 2009. In 2010, The Daily Journal honored her as one of “Top 20 Under 40” attorneys in

California, and she earned a place on the Law360 list of “Top 10 IP attorneys under 40 in the U.S.” In 2011, The American Lawyer listed Mayer as one of its “45 Under 45.” She was recognized as a “Life Sciences Star” in the inaugural edition of LMG Life Sciences 2012. Marie Clare magazine named her “Top Lawyer” in its 2012 Women on Top Awards honoring women under 40 who are leaders in their fields. Mayer is a board member of the Center for WorkLife Law, a non-profit advocacy group focusing on preventing discrimination in the work-place, and a committee member of the American Heart Association’s Science and Technology Accelerator Program, an American Heart Association initiative created to bring innovators and investors together to help get new technology to the market quickly. She also teaches patent strategy at Stanford University for its Biodesign Program, and she helped write a chapter on patent strategy for the Biodesign course book.

gerard h. cohen award

kassie tucker

Since joining the law school in 2009, Kassie Tucker has risen through the ranks quickly and distinguished herself as the go-to administrator for one of the School’s most innovative initiatives. As program manager for the Executive LL.M. in International Business Law, a blended learning program that combines short-term residencies with online instruction, she demonstrates unrivaled resourcefulness, creative problemsolving skills, a can-do attitude and business savvy to support the success of the program. Tucker received her B.S. in Business Administration from the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia, and she worked for a time in the financial services industry. She then attended Babson College’s Olin School of Business, where she focused on international business. Before becoming the program manager for

the Executive LL.M. Program, Tucker worked in the BU Law Development & Alumni Relations Office. She is one of those rare people who never seem to have a bad day. Her mantra is, “No worries!” Tucker is relentlessly upbeat and always willing — indeed eager — to help. She handles every task from the most mundane to the most daunting with an equal level of enthusiasm. Tucker has always shown a keen entrepreneurial spirit, coupled with flexibility, creativity and consummate customer service skills. She is a natural and tireless bridgebuilder and navigates the sometimes Byzantine pathways of a large university with grace, aplomb and a high degree of professionalism. Tucker takes a great deal of pride in the Executive LL.M. students, and her background in alumni relations has also proven invaluable as the program builds a small but growing and fiercely committed alumni network.

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events

2012 alumni reunion gala and silver shingle awards Alumni & Reunion Weekend moved to a new format for 2012 to coincide with the kick-off of The Campaign for Boston University. The festivities began on Friday, September 21 at the Four Seasons Hotel with the presentation of the Silver Shingle Awards to six deserving recipients. On Saturday, September 22 at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel, alumni gathered for their class reunion cocktail receptions and annual luncheon. Dean Maureen A. O’Rourke addressed the crowd, then introduced the law school campaign video. Afterward, a reception was held at the law tower, where alumni could see a 3-D model of the Redstone Building and talk with representatives from the architectural firm Bruner/Cott. The evening concluded with a huge “Celebration of BU” at the Agganis Arena.

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events

bu law commencement 2012 On Sunday, May 20, the Boston University School of Law community convened at the Agganis Arena for the 139th Commencement ceremony. Roderick L. Ireland, chief justice of the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, delivered the Commencement speech, after which LL.M. candidate Michelle Phillips (’12) and J.D. candidate Jarrod Schaeffer (’12) reflected on the BU Law experience in their student addresses. Following the awards presentation and conferral of degrees, 477 graduates celebrated with family and friends at a reception.

Springfield, Massachusetts-native Roderick L. Ireland began his legal career in 1969 as a Neighborhood Legal Services attorney, followed by dedicated service at the Roxbury Defenders Committee, Massachusetts Executive Office of Administration and Finance, and Massachusetts Board of Appeal on Motor Vehicle Liability Policies and Bonds. He has served as a jurist for more than 34 years, first at the Juvenile Court and Massachusetts Appeals Court before being the first African-American appointed to the Supreme Judicial Court in 1997. In 2010, Governor Deval Patrick swore Ireland in as the 36th chief justice.

chief justice roderick l. ireland B.A., Lincoln University J.D., Columbia Law School LL.M., Harvard Law School Ph.D. in Law, Policy and Society, Northeastern University

“BU Law students have prosecuted criminals, represented juveniles, promoted new markets in the Middle East, drafted legislation for African countries, developed policy in the White House, and fought to overturn wrongful convictions. We’ve done a lot and learned even more.” –Jarrod L. Schaeffer (J.D.)

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Chief Justice Ireland has been an adjunct faculty member at Northeastern University since 1978, and on the faculty of the Appellate Judges Seminar at New York University Law School since 2001. He is the author of the Juvenile Law volume of Thomson/West Publishing’s Massachusetts Practice Series, as well as several Law Review articles.

“With small class sizes, a genuine shared interest in our subjects of study, and — most importantly — an atmosphere that has promoted easy and meaningful interactions, we have substantively gained from each other. ” – Michelle Renee Phillips (LL.M. in Taxation)


hire talent at a reasonable cost: the bu law in-house fellowship program Is your corporation or not-for-profit organization looking for high-caliber legal talent at a reasonable cost? BU Law’s In- House Fellowship Program brings together companies seeking talented, eager attorneys and new BU Law grads hoping to gain a year of valuable hands-on experience in a legal department.

the bu law career development & public service office (cdo) provides  A talented pool of applicants that have taken business and law courses in preparation for corporate and commercial practice  The option to send your new hire(s) to BU’s Pocket MBA Program for Lawyers, a four-day, intensive business-training program designed for in-house counsel and lawyers who represent businesses

how it works The Program streamlines the hiring process by setting the following guidelines: participating partners offer  One year of employment* in your organization’s legal department to a young alumnus or recent BU Law graduate  An annual salary comparable to that of a judicial law clerk (approximately $50k; $40k for not-for- profit organizations)

how to participate If you are interested in becoming a participating partner, please contact Sara Dana in the CDO at sdana@bu.edu or 617.358.5099. We look forward to helping your organization hire top talent.

* The hiring decision, both for the fellowship and beyond, is left to the sole discretion of the participating partner. There is no expectation that the new attorney will continue beyond the one-year commitment. the record

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public interest news

sixty-five students travel to nine cities to participate in spring break pro bono trips Legal issues ranging from foreclosure prevention to immigrant detention were on the docket of 65 students participating in BU Law’s spring break pro bono trips this year.

BU Law Professor Stan Fisher with students who participated in the spring break pro bono trip to New Orleans in 2012

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Libby Hasse (’14) and Michelle McGrath (’13) at the AIJ (Americans for Immigrant Justice) office building.

p

2012 pro bono and public service award winners alumni pro bono award: thomas cox (’69) Awarded at the Year-End Pro Bono celebration to an alumnus/a in recognition of their lifelong commitment to pro bono work student pro bono award: alexis chernow (’12) Awarded at the Year-End Pro Bono celebration to the 3L student with the highest number of pro bono hours completed faculty pro bono award: constance browne Awarded at the Year-End Pro Bono celebration to a faculty member in recognition of his/her lifelong commitment to pro bono work 38

Administered through the Office of Career Development and Public Service, students provided pro bono legal services to nonprofit organizations in nine cities across the United States. Each group was comprised of two to sixteen students and supervised by a professor, staff member or alumnus. BU Law covered the cost of students’ travel and accommodations. “Our goal is to show students how lawyers can get involved and what poverty and legal need look like in different geographic and topical areas,” says Maura Kelly, assistant dean for career development and public service. “We picked areas where there was a great need for attorneys to address the legal issues of the local population. We try to cover a wide variety of legal issues that disproportionately impact individuals with limited financial means.” Kelly’s office welcomed assistance from students in adding Oklahoma Indian Legal Services to the roster this year. “We had the idea of petitioning the School for a spring break trip related to Indian law,” says student Jenny Small (’13). “We proposed the idea to BU Law’s Career Development and Public Service Office thinking we would merely be planting the seed of the idea, but they were incredible and started to actually put a plan into action and met with us for our input to develop the idea.” As a result of this collaboration, Small and three other BU Law students provided the Oklahoma City nonprofit with services including land research and will drafting.

dc public service award: jason r. baron (’80) Awarded by the Career Development & Public Service Office to an alumnus/a in the Washington, DC area who has shown exemplary work in the area of public service victor j. garo public service award: honorable vieri volterra (’59) and namita mani (’03) Awarded at the Pro Bono Kickoff to alumni who have demonstrated a continuous commitment to public service public interest project (pip) distinguished alumni award: marion fremont-smith (’51) and neal e. minahan (’04) Presented at the annual PIP Auction to alumni in recognition of their service to PIP


And it’s not only the nonprofit that benefits from this work. Students are able to apply skills learned on service trips to their future legal careers. “Being able to draft a will on the spot translates into any kind of drafting or transactional work where attention to detail is essential,” Small explains. “Attending tribal courts provided the lesson that there is always another lens through which to see a matter and that an issue may be more complex than one would expect.” Students were able to choose from a wide variety of pro bono legal work that corresponded with their career aspirations or personal interests. “If you want to be a transactional attorney, there are many ways for you to contribute that knowledge. Some students are immersed in studying mortgage documents and others are helping to write wills,” Kelly says. “If you want to be a litigator, you can use those skills to help in a trial court or administrative proceedings.” “These experiences sparked my interest in immigration law,” says Maria Tartaglia (’14), who worked at the Pro Bono Asylum Representation Project in Texas. “This trip was an amazing opportunity to see if I might want to practice immigration law without the limitation of only being able to intern or volunteer for an organization for a few hours a week during the semester.” See below for a full listing of this year’s service trips. For slideshows and first-person accounts of students’ spring break pro bono work, visit: www.bu.edu/law/news/probonorecap2012  Boston, Massachusetts: AIDS Action Committee of MA; Alternatives for Community and Environment, Inc.; Center for Law and Education; Community Legal Services and Counseling Center; Kids in Need of Defense; National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild; Volunteer Lawyers Project; Women’s Bar Foundation of MA  Detroit, Michigan: Michigan Legal Services; Southwest Solutions  Harlingen, Texas: Pro Bono Asylum Representation Project  Kansas City, Missouri: Death Penalty Litigation Clinic  Miami, Florida: Americans for Immigrant Justice  New Orleans, Louisiana: AIDSLaw of Louisiana; Health Law Advocates; Innocence Project New Orleans; Orleans Public Defenders Office  Newark, New Jersey: New Jersey Institute for Social Justice; Refugee & Immigration Assistance Program with Catholic Charities  Oklahoma City, Oklahoma: Oklahoma Indian Legal Services  Portland, Maine: Pine Tree Legal Assistance If you are an alumnus interested in hosting a pro bono spring break trip, please contact Carolyn Goodwin in the CDO at cgoodwin@bu.edu. n

students earn public interest fellowships

Judith Kim (‘14) was selected for the prestigious Goodwin Procter Public Interest Fellowships for Law Students of Color. The fellowship supports first-year students from law schools across the country who spend the summer working in public interest legal positions. Recipients are selected based on academic excellence, leadership skills and commitment to community service. Amy Baral (’14), Caroline Holda (’14) and Michael Rugnetta (’13) have been named Rappaport Fellows in Law & Public Policy. The highly selective program considers rising 1L and 2L applicants enrolled at one of six Boston-area law schools who have demonstrated a strong academic record, commitment to public service (as shown by volunteer work and extracurricular activities), and demonstrated capacity for leadership. The 10-week summer program offers fellows the opportunity to gain civil service experience through weekly seminars, a mentorship program, and a legal internship with a state or local government office that focuses on policy issues in the Greater Boston region. David Matulewicz (‘13) was awarded a Peggy Browning Summer Fellowship to work at Mehri & Skalet PLLC in Washington, DC. Peggy Browning Fellows are distinguished students who have not only excelled in law school but who have also demonstrated their commitment to workers’ rights through their previous educational, work, volunteer and personal experiences. Nick Levenhagen (’12) has been awarded an Equal Justice Works Fellowship to begin his career with pro bono legal services organization Bet Tzedek in Los Angeles providing outreach to underserved Holocaust survivors. Levenhagen joins an esteemed group of law school graduates selected for two-year fellowship grants from Equal Justice Works, a nonprofit organization with the mission of cultivating legal careers in public service. Jessica Burniske (’12) and Sapna Patel (’12) have each been awarded positions in the federal government by the Presidential Management Fellowship, a prestigious two-year leadership program for recently graduated students interested in working in the public sector. For the duration of their fellowships, both graduates will work in a federal agency chosen based on their legal backgrounds, focusing on administrative projects and public policy development.

the record

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public interest news

bu law announces 2012 post-graduate fellowship recipients For the second year in a row, Boston University School of Law has awarded 10 full-time public service fellowships to its most recent graduates and, for the first time, named one N. Neal Pike Disability Rights Fellow for work on disability law issues. These competitive 10-month fellowships enable graduates to provide legal assistance in underfunded nonprofit organizations and government agencies nationally and abroad. For BU’s emerging lawyers, this fellowship program offers an important first step in a legal career. Dean Maureen O’Rourke selected a committee comprised of faculty, administrators and alumni to review the many excellent and inspiring applications and to provide her with recommendations. “While it was hard to choose just 11, I know the committee was excited to be part of the process of making these dream jobs a reality for the recipients,” says Carolyn Goodwin, associate director for public service programs. In addition to providing an opportunity for BU Law graduates to serve communities throughout the world, these fellowships are actively helping graduates launch careers in public service. Of the 10 fellows from the Class of 2011, eight are now employed as attorneys, five of them with the organizations where they completed their fellowships. “I hope to gain solid legal experience,” says 2012 recipient Adam Mayle. “It’s a tough legal marketplace, and gaining 10 months of real legal experience at a respected employer will give me the opportunity to acquire the skills and the professional connections that will hopefully give me a leg-up over some of the competition.”

2012 recipients n. neal pike disability rights fellowship alex freundlich, new york legal aid society, bronx, new york, ny Representing clients in disability-related legal matters public service fellowships andrea carrillo, greater boston legal services, boston, ma Working in the consumer law unit on foreclosure issues at a civil legal services organization

adam mayle, northwest justice project, kings county office, seattle, wa Working in the consumer law unit of a civil legal services organization on issues related to foreclosure, predatory lending, unlawful debt collection and unfair business practices

amanda catalano, legal aid foundation of chicago, chicago, il Working as a staff attorney in the children and families practice group of a civil legal services organization

david rod, asylum access ecuador, quito, ecuador Representing refugees from various countries seeking political asylum and other legal rights at an international nonprofit organization

jacqueline croteau, aids action committee of massachusetts, boston, ma Representing clients diagnosed with HIV/ AIDS in a variety of civil legal matters

gabriela ventura, california health benefit exchange, sacramento, ca Working with the state agency charged with implementing the Affordable Care Act in California

geoffrey derrick, center for appellate litigation, new york, ny Working in the “Justice First” program designed to detect wrongful convictions and aggressively pursue claims of actual innocence as well as litigate other post-conviction motions on behalf of non-citizens aquilah gantt, children’s law center of massachusetts, lynn, ma Representing children in immigration and family law matters at a nonprofit civil legal services organization

40

kyle gay, delaware department of justice, office of the attorney general, wilmington, de Serving as a prosecutor in criminal cases

joshua wolk, massachusetts civil liberties union, northampton, ma Protecting civil rights and liberties through litigation, legislative work and public education at an affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union, a national nonprofit organization


annual report of giving

july 1, 2011 - june 30, 2012

annual report of giving

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49


table of contents

annual report of giving fiscal year 2012 july 1, 2011 – june 30, 2012

51  School of Law Campus Campaign i) Update from the Campaign Chair, Richard C. Godfrey (’79) ii) Campus Campaign Leadership Intentions iii) Campaign Gift Pyramid 54 G  iving in Fiscal Year 2012 i) Overall Giving: Update from the Assistant Dean, Cornell L. Stinson, J.D. ii) Building Project Select Naming Opportunities iii) Law Fund & Annual Giving Programs (a) Update from Law Fund National Co-Chairs (b) President’s Society & Donors (c) Fund Programs: Year in Review iv) Donor Profile: James N. Esdaile, Jr. (’70) 64 D  onor Roll Fiscal Year 2012 i) Alumni Giving by Class ii) Friends, Corporations & Foundation Giving

56

61

82 Alumni Activities i) Letter from the 2011–2012 President of the Alumni Association, James C. Fox (’86) ii) Alumni Volunteers iii) Alumni Benefits iv) Alumni Events Calendar 88 Esdaile Alumni Center Staff – Contact Information 89 Get Involved

83 50


campus campaign

update from the campaign chair In last year’s edition of The Record, I shared with you the news that BU Law had launched a fundraising effort raising $13.3 million toward a goal of $20 million in support from alumni and friends for a transformative building project. What I didn’t share then was that this project is just the initial component of an even greater vision for the School of Law. As you may know now from our kick-off events this past September, or from reading the cover story of this edition of The Record, Boston University School of Law has embarked on an extraordinary comprehensive Campus Campaign to raise $80 million in support of five key priorities: the building project I mentioned, student scholarships & financial aid, professorships & faculty support, academic programming, and unrestricted support for the Law Fund. I am very pleased with our progress over this past year raising support for the building while also quietly securing the lead gifts and pledges needed to launch the School’s overall campaign this fall. As The Record went to print, the School of Law already has raised more than $44 million in gifts and pledges supporting the above five fundraising priorities, an impressive 55 percent of our comprehensive campaign’s $80 million multiyear goal. Within this remarkable achievement is the magnificent show of support the School has received toward our building goal; specifically, we easily exceeded our initial $20 million goal by raising more than $32.8 million to date in order to transform our physical campus. The wonderful $18 million gift from Sumner M. Redstone (Hon. ’94), executive chairman of CBS and Viacom, to name our new building guaranteed the project’s green light for construction. This gift is the largest in the law school’s history and second largest ever to the University overall. We are deeply indebted to Mr. Redstone, and we thank him for his support and unprecedented generosity.

richard c. godfrey (’79)

Chicago, Illinois Senior Litigation Partner Kirkland & Ellis LLP Trustee, Boston University Chair, BU Law Dean’s Advisory Board Chair, BU Law Campus Campaign

Yet, we are really just getting started! On the following page, you will see the names of the School’s most generous benefactors whose gift commitments to BU Law’s campaign make up the impressive $44 million total we have received thus far. Among these donors are the Dean’s Advisory Board members whose advice and generosity since the early planning stages of the building project and campaign played an important role in our success today. This loyal group of distinguished alumni will continue to advise Dean O’Rourke throughout the campaign and beyond. I encourage you to contribute generously to our Campus Campaign. Moreover, as you consider the most significant financial commitment you can make, I would ask that you please consider the impact BU Law has had in preparing you for your career and in enabling your success. Over the course of this important endeavor, President Brown, Dean O’Rourke and I hope to speak with many of you to seek your support for our great institution.

richard c. godfrey annual report of giving

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fall 2012

51


campus campaign

* Includes all gifts and pledges to the law school since July 1, 2010 and also includes all Founding Benefactor commitments prior to this date.

leadership intentions

 Dean’s Advisory Board  Founding Benefactor (contributed support for the building project during its quiet phase that ended December 31, 2011) + Deceased

total campaign gifts & pledges: $44,008,344* As part of The Campaign for Boston University: Choose to be Great, the School of Law has launched an $80 million comprehensive fundraising effort. The School’s Campus Campaign seeks support from generous alumni and friends for five key priorities: building construction & renovation, student scholarships & financial aid, professorships & faculty support, academic programming, and unrestricted support for the Law Fund.

$10,000,000 or more

$250,000 – $499,999

$50,000 – $99,999

Anonymous Lisa G. Beckerman (’89) 

Susan H. Alexander (’81) & Caroline G. Gammill (’12) 

Edward W. Brooke (’48) 

Anonymous

Barry M. Clayton Trust

The Estate of John R. Begley

Ellen J. Flannery (’78) 

Lansing E. Crane (’70) 

Robert F. Grondine (’80) +

Claudia O. (’80) & Leo T. Crowley (’80) 

The Estate Of Patricia M. Aronowitz

Hugh R. McCombs (’73) 

Esdaile Barrett & Esdaile LLP

Philip S. Beck (’76) 

Nathan B. Mandelbaum (’69) 

Anthony M. Feeherry (’74) 

Robert T. Butler (’55) 

John R. Robinson (’64) & Widgeon Point Charitable Fund 

Kay E. Glasser Trust

Ryan K. Roth Gallo (’99) 

Charles Lamar Family Foundation

Sumner M. Redstone (Hon. ’94)

$5,000,000 – $9,999,999 Richard Cartier Godfrey (’79) 

$1,000,000 – $4,999,999

Patricia & William Kleh (’71)  Peter McCausland (’74)  J. Michael Schell (’76)  & Schell Family Foundation Stephen M. Zide (’86) 

$500,000 – $999,999 Anonymous Gerard H. Cohen (’62)  The Estate of Edith F. Helman Kenneth P. Morrison (’83) 

George Michaels (’48) +

$100,000 – $249,999 Howard S. Altarescu (’74) James N. Esdaile, Jr. (’70) + Michael D. Fricklas (’84)  Robert B. Goldfarb (’67)  The Estate of A. Vincent Harper William Landau (’59) + Maureen O’Rourke & James Molloy  The Estate of Rupert D. Morrill Linda S. Peterson (’76)  James C. Pizzagalli (’69)  Bettina B. Plevan (’70)  John K. Skrypak (’82) Paul Sugarman (’54) Jeffrey M. Verdon (’67)  Howard Xinhua Zhang (’93) 

52

The Estate of Joseph F. Holman 

Samuel S. Perlman (’68)  Kanwar M. Singh (’92)  John Larkin Thompson (’63) +


$80 million gift pyramid total raised to date: $44,008,344 total $50k+ gifts: 56 of 128

$15M (1/1)

$5M (1/3)

$2.5M (0/5)

$1M (7/11)

$500K (4/13)

$250K (10/25)

$100K (15/35)

$50K (18/35)

annual report of giving

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fall 2012

53


giving in fiscal year 2012

overall giving: fiscal year 2012 (july 1, 2011 - june 30, 2012)

dear alumni and friends,

cornell l. stinson, j.d.

Assistant Dean for Development and Alumni Relations

The 2012 fiscal year (July 1, 2011 – June 30, 2012) was a true watershed year for our fundraising activities at the School of Law. In FY12, 2,109 generous alumni and friends contributed a record-breaking $5,192,274 in total cash giving, the third consecutive record year for cash giving and the first increase in donors since the 2007 fiscal year. Yet, the School’s success raising 22.5% more in cash gifts and receiving support from 4.9% more donors this year versus last year was just the tip of our fundraising achievement. The School also secured an extraordinary record in the total dollar amount of new multiyear pledges, inspiring our most generous benefactors to pledge financial commitments totaling nearly $20.3 million, an amount that smashed the prior pledge record of $7.2 million set in 2009. As our campaign chair, Rick Godfrey (’79) noted in his update earlier in this annual report, the law school kicked-off its Campus Campaign in September, ending the quiet phase of a comprehensive fundraising effort that seeks support for five key priorities — a building construction and renovation project, student scholarships & financial aid, professorships & faculty support, academic programming, and unrestricted support for the Law Fund. The School launched this great fundraising enterprise only a year after celebrating the public unveiling last fall of efforts to secure financial commitments for the building project, the campaign’s principal component.

total cash giving: fiscal year 2005–fiscal year 2012 $5,500,000

$4,236,348

$3,673,217

$4,000,000

54

2005

2006

2007

$2,431,316 2008

$1,870,726

0

$2,232,554

$1,000,000

$2,055,515

$2,000,000

$1,196,102

$3,000,000

$5,192,274

$5,000,000

2009

2010

2011

2012


to the building fund and $103,917 as an unrestricted gift to the Law Fund. The remaining $275,000 established an endowed fund, the income of which will provide critical support for public interest internships for BU Law students—a particular passion of the donor.

It has been truly rewarding talking “quietly” with many of you about BU Law’s campaign vision and receiving your outstanding financial support for our students and faculty that has made our plans for a new campus the approaching reality. As you will see when you return to campus, preliminary construction to clear the site around the tower has begun, with major construction commencing within the next several months. With construction virtually underway, we have identified a host of naming opportunities throughout these plans that will allow us to thank and acknowledge the magnificent generosity of our building benefactors within the halls of our new campus. For a select list of these spaces and their associated gift amounts, see page 56. Although the campaign will stretch over several years to achieve the $80 million goal, we must achieve a fundraising milestone each year of its duration toward this important conclusion. All donors to the Law School’s Campus Campaign contribute to that great goal, funding key priorities that are components of the School’s broader strategic plan. I would like to acknowledge and thank again a few such donors whose most generous support during the 2012 fiscal year propelled us even closer to success: The School of Law deeply appreciates the wonderful bequest in FY12 of $574,478 from the Estate of Edith F. Helman. Dr. Edith Helman was a 1925 graduate of BU’s College of Arts & Sciences, while her husband, Benard, was a 1926 alumnus of the law school. Established as an endowed scholarship fund, the Bernard Helman Scholarship Fund will provide annual scholarship funds for BU Law students. This additional source of financial aid comes when there is a greatly increased need as many of the School’s graduating students have high amounts of educational loans and currently face a very difficult job market. An anonymous donor made a very generous gift of $478,917 and allowed Dean O’Rourke to divide this special gift among three important needs. To help the School on two major fundraising fronts for FY12, the donor was delighted to have $100,000 of the total designated

Hugh (Rick) McCombs (’73), a loyal alumnus and partner at Mayer Brown in Chicago, who answered the call from Dean O’Rourke last year to be a Founding Benefactor, supporting the building project before its public launch, agreed to increase his $50,000 gift to a $250,000 commitment and join the Dean’s Advisory Board when Board and Campaign Chair Rick Godfrey (’79) reiterated the Dean’s desire to have him play a more important role during the School’s campaign. BU Law is fortunate to have his sage advice and terrific generosity! Another wonderful gift supporting the law school’s campaign priority of unrestricted support was a bequest from The Estate of Rupert D. Morrill. An alumnus of the great class of 1948, Mr. Morrill included an unrestricted bequest totaling $169,772 to BU Law in his estate plans. His thoughtful contribution has been designated to an endowed fund the annual income of which will provide unrestricted support for the School in perpetuity. Finally, although the results of our efforts raising unrestricted gifts to the Law Fund in FY12 are presented later in this annual report, the law school would like to give special recognition to those donors who generously contribute such support annually at the President’s Associates ($10,000 to $24,999) and President’s Circle ($25,000 or more) levels. We are delighted to begin celebrating this wonderful society of unrestricted donors as part of our published report of the Fund’s activities.

cornell l. stinson, j.d.

endowed funds (as of 6/30/2012)

$20,000,000

$53,854, 569

$54,378, 584

$30,000,000

$44,435,551

$40,000,000

$41,544,095

$52,657,130

$50,000,000

$53,986,327

$60,000,000

faculty support academic programs unrestricted endowment library endowment

$10,000,000 0

scholarships/ student support

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

annual report of giving

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55


giving in fiscal year 2012

redstone building & law tower naming opportunities of $100,000 or more

56

naming opportunity floor

total quantity

total available

naming gift amount

New Library (Redstone Building 2nd & 3rd Floors)

2

1

1

$5,000,000

Winter Garden Atrium (Main Entrance Lobby)

1

1

1

$3,000,000

Large Reading Room (Pappas Library)

2

1

1

$3,000,000

Student Dining Lounge & CafĂŠ

2

1

1

$3,000,000

Charles River Reading Room (River View)

3

1

1

$3,000,000

135 Seat Classroom

1

1

1

$1,750,000

Terrace & Roof Garden

5

1

1

$1,750,000

115 Seat Classroom (1st & 2nd Floors)

1

2

2

$1,500,000

East Entrance Courtyard

1

1

1

$1,500,000

Executive Education Suite (River View)

5

1

1

$1,500,000

Moot Court

6

1

1

$1,500,000

Dean's Suite

11

1

1

$1,500,000

105 Seat Classroom

4

1

1

$1,375,000

95 Seat Classroom

2

1

1

$1,275,000

Clinical Offices Suite

13

1

1

$1,250,000

90 Seat Classroom

6

1

0

$1,200,000

Quiet Reading Room

3

1

0

$1,000,000

Student Organizations Suite

4

1

1

$1,000,000

Dean of Students Office Suite

5

1

1

$1,000,000

Career Development Office Suite

9

1

1

$1,000,000

Graduate Programs Office Suite

10

1

1

$1,000,000

Admissions Office Suite

12

1

1

$1,000,000

Faculty Lounge (River View)

15

1

1

$1,000,000

Student Journal Office (Law Review)

17

1

0

$1,000,000

60 Seat Classroom (1st & 4th Floors)

1

3

3

$750,000

Career Development Office Interview Suite

8

1

1

$750,000

Executive LL.M. Office Suite

9

1

1

$750,000

Banking & Financial Law Office Suite

10

1

1

$600,000

45 Seat Classroom 2

1

1

$550,000

40 Seat Classroom (2nd & 4th Floors) 2

3

3

$500,000

Function Room B 2

1

1

$500,000


naming opportunity floor

total quantity

total available

naming gift amount

Second Floor Upper Lobby

2

1

1

$500,000

40 Seat Training Room 3

1

1

$500,000

Mid-Level Hub Atrium Lounge

4

1

1

$500,000

Writing Program Suite 5

1

1

$500,000

Graduate Student Lounge 10

1

1

$500,000

Large Locker Lounge (2nd & 4th Floors) 2

2

2

$425,000

Main Entrance Courtyard 1

1

1

$400,000

Executive Education Classroom 5

2

2

$400,000

East Entrance Lobby 1

1

1

$375,000

30 Seat Classroom (2nd & 4th Floors) 2

2

2

$375,000

Tax Law Program Office Suite

1

1

$375,000

Locker Lounge (Basement) 0

1

1

$350,000

Practice Moot Court A 5

1

1

$350,000

Function Room A 2

1

1

$300,000

24 Seat Training Room 3

1

1

$300,000

25 Seat Classroom 4

2

2

$300,000

Practice Moot Court B 5

1

1

$300,000

Student Journal Office (Science & Technology Law)

4

1

1

$275,000

Student Journal Office (International Law) 4

1

1

$250,000

Small Practice Moot Court (6th & 7th Floors)

2

2

$250,000

Alumni Boardroom 12

1

1

$250,000

Student Journal Office (American Journal of Law & Medicine) 17

1

1

$200,000

Hearth Lounge 1

1

1

$175,000

Student Lounge 1.1

1

0

$150,000

Library Conference Room 3

1

1

$150,000

Small Locker Lounge (1st & 4th Floors) 4

2

2

$150,000

Student Journal Office (Public Interest Law) 4

1

1

$150,000

Student Journal Office (American Review of Banking Law) 9

1

1

$150,000

Student Government Association Office

1

1

$100,000

Small Reading Room (Pappas Library) 1.2

1

1

$100,000

Library Forecourt (Redstone Building) 2

1

1

$100,000

Lounge 5

1

1

$100,000

Large Transactional Law Seminar Room

5

1

0

$100,000

Staff Lounge 11

1

1

$100,000

10

6

1

*Floors 1.1 & 1.2 are stacks level in the Redstone Building and Pappas Library respectively. *Spaces noting more than one in quantity may be located on different floors in the Redstone Building and law tower, and may vary slightly in size.

For a list of gift opportunities below $100,000, please contact Cornell L. Stinson, J.D. at cstinson@bu.edu or 617-358-5351. All proposed gifts or pledges to name spaces at Boston University must be approved by the Board of Trustees before final acceptance is given to the donors. annual report of giving

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57


giving in fiscal year 2012

letter from the law fund co-chairs dear alumni and friends, To all of you who have made gifts to the Law Fund this year — thank you! Over the past two years it has been wonderful to see the level of support alumni have provided for our alma mater and the impact that has on the life of the School of Law. We are delighted to report that the BU Law Fund raised $955,639, from 1,788 donors in the fiscal year that concluded on June 30. This amount continues a two-year trend of increasing support for the Law Fund. We also increased the number of donors from last year, the first increase in donors in five years. Additional support from more alumni and friends is a positive trend we hope you will help the School continue next year. As you now know, the School of Law has entered the public phase of The Campaign for Boston University with our School of Law Campus Campaign goal set at $80 million. The Law Fund, which is comprised of unrestricted support to the School of Law, is one of the five priorities in this campaign, which also includes the building project, student scholarships and financial aid, academic programming and faculty research support. We will only succeed in reaching our Law Fund goal for the Campus Campaign through the generous support from even more alumni over the next several years. Your annual gifts to the Law Fund provide support for many important initiatives at the law school including public interest fellowships for graduating students, clinical programs, and student/faculty collaborations, just to mention a few. It has been a pleasure serving as National Law Fund co-Chairs these past two years. We are thrilled to welcome two new Law Fund co-Chairs, Linda Peterson (’76) and Mike Schell (’76) to their two-year terms and wish them great success. Even though we concluded our service on June 30, please plan to join us this new fiscal year in supporting our great institution with an unrestricted gift to the Law Fund. We thank you for all you do for BU Law and wish you all the best as we head into the holiday season.

gerard h. cohen (’62) Auburn, MA CEO Western Carriers

bettina b. plevan (’70) New York, NY Partner Proskauer Rose LLP

gerard h. cohen (’62) national law fund co-chair

58

bettina b. plevan (’70) national law fund co-chair


giving in fiscal year 2012

law fund and annual giving: year in review

(july 1, 2011 - june 30, 2012) law fund The Law Fund had an excellent year, finishing 1.4% higher than last year at $955,639. Also, 1,788 donors gave to the Fund for a 1% increase in participation over last year. Special recognition goes to the School’s 17 benefactors at the Presidential Society level whose giving totaled $352,888, or 36.9% of the total raised this year for the Fund.

total law fund dollars raised president’s society gifts

other fund gifts

$1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000

2012 3l class gift Each year, the graduating class has an opportunity to leave its mark on Boston University School of Law by participating in the 3L Class Gift. In supporting this effort, students not only show their school — and class — pride, but also have an impact on BU Law’s programs. The 2012 graduating class had a participation rate of 17.27% and donated $6,792 to the law school (both Law Fund and non-Law Fund gifts) — a new record for class giving at the School! The average gift of $113 was also the highest ever for 3L class giving. Thank you to the 71 class donors and especially to the 3L Class Gift committee for all their hard work. (For a list of the 3L Class Gift committee members, please see the Alumni Volunteers section within the Annual Report of Giving.)

0

FY05

FY06

FY07

FY08

$660,188 $1,003,982 $1,006,208 $1,021,910

FY09

FY10

FY11

FY12

$944,418

$884,008

$941,920

$955,639

alumni donors

participation rate

14.00% 12.00% 10.00% 8.00% 6.00% 4.00% 2.00% 0%

FY05

FY06

FY07

FY08

FY09

FY11

FY12

fall 2012

59

FY10

annual report of giving

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giving in fiscal year 2012

reunion giving In October 2011 the law school hosted its Annual Reunion Gala Dinner and Silver Shingle Awards Presentation at the Mandarin Oriental Boston in the Oriental Ballroom. This was the second year in a row the Reunion Gala Dinner was combined with the Silver Shingle Awards Presentation — the law school’s most prestigious awards that recognize outstanding alumni and friends of the law school. With over 240 attendees, Daniel J. Rea (’74) presided as the evening’s emcee while Dean O’Rourke presented the Silver Shingle Awards to the recipients. The classes ending in 1’s and 6’s celebrated their reunions throughout the weekend. A tremendous effort was made to encourage alumni from the class of 1986 to attend their 25th reunion, and with almost 50 people attending, the class broke the record for attendance at a 25th reunion in BU School of Law reunion history! Several other reunion classes held separate receptions prior to the gala dinner in and around the Mandarin Oriental as a way to mingle and connect with their fellow classmates outside of the main event. The School also hosted a Golden Circle Luncheon at the law tower for the 55th and 60th reunion classes where 17 alumni and guests gathered to celebrate and remember their 55+ years since their law school career. The reunion giving cycle spans a two-year period (the fiscal year prior and the fiscal year of the fall Reunion celebration), and this year the reunion classes raised a total of $3,186,405 (Law Fund and non-Law Fund gifts) with 13% participation from members of the reunion classes. This represents outstanding effort from 503 alumni donors. The class of 1976 raised the most money this year at an impressive $1,410,043 with 88 donors — what a great way to celebrate their 35th reunion. Well done to all participating classes! Thank you to all who attended and contributed and especially to the 47 reunion committee members. We look forward to seeing you all again in five years!

2011-2012 Reunion Committee Members William B. Tyler (’51) Jack B. Middleton (’56) Stephen V. Dubin (’61) Paul Buffum (’71) Edward J. Dailey (’71) Roger J. Geller (’71) Gladys J. George (’71) Paul E. George (’71) Jacqueline W. Hubbard (’71) Norman W. Huggins (’71) Morris N. Robinson (’71) Jason A. Rosenberg (’71) Peter H. Sutton (’71) Hugh H. Mo (’76) Linda S. Peterson (’76) Carolyn P. Jacoby Gabbay (’76) Mary E. Bowler (’81) Stacey Channing (’81) William A. Bogdan (’86) Christine N. Carey Lilore (’86) James W. Cohen (’86) Daniel R. Deutsch (’86) Jean Fallago (’86) Alan S. Fanger (’86) James C. Fox (’86) Jeffrey W. Goldman (’86) Daniel W. Halston (’86) Joe D. Jacobson (’86) Margaret (Peggy) C. Jenkins (’86) Susan W. Kenneally (’86) Valerie T. Rosenson (’86) Carolyn Spector-Landes (’86)

reunion giving by class

David Zimmerman (’86) Celina Gerbic (’91)

1951: $257,748

1981: $56,345

Victoria E. Green (’91)

1956: $4,590

1986: $1,044,102

Gregory T. Casamento (’96)

1961: $48,873

1991: $18,961

1966: $15,125

1996: $17,563

1971: $289,295

2001: $19,920

Douglas D. Hauer (’01)

1976: $1,410,043

2006: $3,840

Holly C. Lincoln (’06)

John N. Riccardi (’91) Bruce P. Matzkin (’96) Lisa Bebchick (’01) Leiha Macauley (’01) Lisa W. Martin Nagler (’01) Jeremy U. Blackowicz (’01) Layke Martin Stolberg (’06) Matthew D. McCloskey (’06) Denise R. Rosenhaft (’06)

60


2011 alumni reunion gala and silver shingle awards In October 2011, BU Law held its annual Alumni Reunion Gala Dinner and Silver Shingle Awards Reception at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel. Over 240 attendees came together to hear remarks from Dean Maureen A. O’Rourke, catch up with former classmates, and watch the presentation of the 2011 Silver Shingle Awards. The Class of 1986 broke the attendance record for the number of BU Law alumni participating in their 25th reunion. The School of Law also hosted a Golden Circle luncheon at the law tower for the 55th and 60th reunion classes. annual report of giving

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61


giving in fiscal year 2012

law firm challenge

Firms with 500+ Attorneys

The Law Firm Challenge (LFC) builds the BU Law community at firms with five or more BU Law graduates by having firms compete for the highest total dollars raised and the highest participation rate. It creates a sense of community among graduates, enhances firm pride, increases the firm’s reputation among BU Law students and educates alumni about current activities at the law school. There were 10 LFC captains for FY12, the most since the start of the Law Firm Challenge in FY06. (A full list of LFC Firm Captains is displayed in the Alumni Volunteers section within the Annual Report of Giving.) 135 firms participated in the LFC in fiscal year 2012 with a total of 1,709 alumni. Of this alumni group, there were 230 donors for a participation rate of 13.4%. LFC donors gave a total of $677,780 in both Law Fund and non-Law Fund gifts. Congratulations to all of our LFC winners! *Tie breakers in Percentage Giving are determined by dollars raised. If you are interested in representing your firm in the LFC, please contact the Esdaile Alumni Center at 617.353.3118 or lawalum@bu.edu.

dollars raised 1st Place Kirkland & Ellis LLP: $417,450 2nd Place Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP: $60,570

participation rate 1st Place Shearman & Sterling LLP: 40%* 2nd Place Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP: 40%*

Firms with 100-499 Attorneys dollars raised 1st Place Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C.: $9,150 2nd Place Brown Rudnick LLP: $4,550

participation rate 1st Place McCarter & English, LLP: 71% 2nd Place Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP: 43%

Firms with 25-99 Attorneys dollars raised 1st Place Riemer & Braunstein LLP: $3,600 2nd Place Rackermann Sawyer & Brewster: $3,000

participation rate

law firm challenge results total raised: $677,780

1st Place Bacon Wilson P.C.: 40%* 2nd Place Mirick, O’Connell, DeMallie & Lougee, LLP: 40%*

500+ Attorneys: $590,842 100-499 Attorneys: $23,737 25-99 Attorneys: $12,140 5-24 Attorneys: $51,061

Firms with 5-24 attorneys dollars raised 1st Place Sugarman and Sugarman, P.C.: $35,861 2nd Place Craig and Macauley, P.C.: $10,000

participation rate

62

1st Place Sugarman and Sugarman, P.C.: 42% 2nd Place Ruberto, Israel & Weiner, P.C.: 40%


donor profile

legacy of james n. esdaile, jr. (’70) passes to a new generation For a new student at BU Law, it can’t take long to realize that the name “Esdaile” occupies a central place in the life of the School. That name shows up in prominent places: on the wall of the Esdaile Alumni Center, which hundreds of students pass daily on their way to the registrar’s or the student affairs office; and on the entrance of Room 620, the sixth-floor classroom known as the J. Newton Esdaile Lecture Hall. BU Law students will soon have another reason to know the Esdaile name. The Esdaile, Barrett, Jacobs & Mone law firm is funding a distinguished lectureship to honor James N. Esdaile, Jr. (’70), a lifelong partner in the firm until his passing last year at the age of 66. The inaugural speaker will be Supreme Court Associate Justice Stephen Breyer, who will give a talk at BU Law on Thursday, January 24. The relationship between the Esdaile family and BU Law began more than 85 years ago, when James’ father, J. Newton Esdaile (’27, ’29) enrolled at BU Law. Newt Esdaile, as he was known, went on to become one of Boston’s legendary trial lawyers and one of the most generous and devoted supporters the law school has ever had. More recently, that relationship was carried on by the younger Esdaile, who followed in his father’s footsteps as a highly regarded trial lawyer and a friend and supporter of the School. Michael Mone, a partner at the firm, says of James N. Esdaile, Jr.: “He was the son of one of the great trial lawyers of his generation, and Jimmy was one of the best trial lawyers of his own generation. For over 80 years, we’ve had an Esdaile practicing at the highest level here in Massachusetts.”

James N. Esdaile, Jr. ('70) BU Law Dean Maureen O’Rourke adds: “Jim carried on in the footsteps of his father, Newt, both as a respected lawyer in Boston and as a wonderful and generous alum of the law school. He was a gentleman in the best sense of the word and we miss him.” A graduate of Harvard University, James Esdaile entered BU Law as a 21 year old. During his 3L year, he served as managing editor of the Boston University Law Review. After receiving his J.D. with honors, Esdaile clerked for Chief Justice G. Joseph Tauro in the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court and then served a tour of duty with the Judge Advocate General’s Corps of the U.S. Navy. After completing his service in 1974, Esdaile went into private practice in his father’s firm, which became known as Esdaile, Barrett & Esdaile. Over the next 35 years, he built a practice that concentrated on complex tort litigation, including medical malpractice and products liability, as well as business and financial disputes. He argued before all levels of the courts and succeeded in obtaining some of the largest verdicts and settlements in the Commonwealth. In 1984, Governor Michael Dukakis appointed him commissioner of a special commission on medical malpractice. In 1987, he was inducted as a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. In the 1970s, Esdaile returned briefly to BU Law as a lecturer on legal methods. He served as a University trustee from 1978 to 1982, acting as general counsel for part of that time. In 1990, he served a term as president of the Law School Alumni Association, after three years as vice president. His involvement with BU Law continued until the time of his death. Esdaile was a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board and was engaged in the planning for the upcoming expansion and renovation of BU’s law campus. He was one of the Founding Benefactors who made a major gift to the School to jumpstart the Campus Campaign. annual report of giving

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donor roll

alumni giving

(july 1, 2011 - june 30, 2012)

* The reunion giving cycle for classes ending in 1s and 6s includes gifts received in fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012. + Deceased

barrister

giving societies President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999 Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

friend George N. Hurd, Jr.

donor Christine E. Donna Leonard S. Michelman Glendora M. Putnam Stella H. Sims

Class of 1949

number of donors: 21 participation rate: 30%

Class of 1912

Class of 1943

fellow

donor

Dexter M. Kohn

Luke F. Kelley+

Thomas D. Burns Luba Y. Lepie

donor

number of donors: 1 participation rate: 100%

Class of 1934

number of donors: 1 participation rate: 33.3% donor George B. Barner

number of donors: 2 participation rate: 28.6%

Class of 1946

number of donors: 1 participation rate: 16.7% barrister Janice H. Wilkins

Class of 1941

number of donors: 1 participation rate: 10%

Class of 1947

donor

number of donors: 2 participation rate: 8.7%

Eunice P. Howe

barrister Bette S. Paris

Class of 1942

donor

number of donors: 1 participation rate: 14.3%

Jay M. Esterkes

donor

Class of 1948

Lester T. Jolovitz+

number of donors: 9 participation rate: 25% president’s circle Rupert D. Morrill+

president’s associates George Michaels+ 64

Reynold F. Paris Charlotte G. Ventola

friend

Jean N. Arlander Monte G. Basbas Jason S. Cohen Bayard T. Crane, Jr. Alan M. Edelstein Linwood M. Erskine, Jr. Barry F. Evans John H. Furfey Irwin P. Garfinkle Floyd L. Harding Robert B. Kent Harold Kropitzer Douglas A. Kydd, Jr. Burton E. Mabry William M. Macdonald Edward P. McDuffee Simon Scheff Mortimer D. Schwartz Murray L. Townsend, Jr. William T. Walsh

Class of 1950

number of donors: 10 participation rate: 15.9% barrister Nathan M. Silverstein

donor Jere R. Clifford+ George T. Costes Jean R. LaCroix Sumner A. Marcus Jerome D. Ogan Robert F. Preti Leonard S. Sawyer Benjamin T. Wright Albert J. Zahka

Class of 1951 60th Reunion*

total raised $257,748 number of donors: 29 participation rate: 31.5% president’s circle A. Vincent Harper+

president’s associates Irving E. Miller

fellow Louis A. D’Angio William B. Tyler

barrister Arthur E. Bean, Jr. Thaddeus Buczko Roger A. Putnam

friend Edward J. Bander Marion R. Fremont-Smith Norman M. Shack

donor Frederic W. Allen George N. Beauregard George W. Bunyan, Jr. Andrew T. Campoli


Sumner Darman Bernard A. Dwork Harry J. Elam+ Alfred F. Glavey Everett W. Gray Gerald H. Lepler Louis G. Matthews Dwight N. Vibbert Jack L. Wolfson

Class of 1952

number of donors: 15 participation rate: 15.2% barrister Paul D. Lipsitt Robert A. Shaines

donor Samuel S. Anter Rosalind P. Brooker Donald E. Eames Alan S. Flink Joseph T. Little Richard S. Milstein Thomas D. Pucci Richard T. Reed Haskell Shapiro David E. Stevens Joseph S. Tangusso Peter C. Valli Richard A. Wise

Class of 1953

number of donors: 14 participation rate: 17.1% barrister Donald T. Shire

friend Alice and Christopher A. Barreca

donor Albert J. Callahan Eliot K. Cohen Robert B. Gates George A. Kessler Vartkis Paghigian Henry S. Palau Eugene G. Panarese Anthony B. Sciarretta G. F. Smith James A. True Joseph S. Vera Donald F. Zezima

Class of 1954

number of donors: 12 participation rate: 15.2% president’s circle Paul R. Sugarman

fellow Alan Altman

friend John K. Dineen

donor F. Monroe Allen+ Charles E. Black George A. Bustamante Francis L. Crowley Kenneth J. Dilanian Edward R. Fink Charles M. Healey Ronald L. Kellam Richard W. Wennett

Class of 1955

number of donors: 11 participation rate: 18.3% president’s circle Robert T. Butler

fellow J. Robert Dyment

barrister Allen Rubin

friend Fernand J. St. Germain

donor Walter R. Budney Martin A. Dworken Jules L. Garel Morris J. Gordon Lawrence M. Liebman John D. McLellan, Jr. George N. Tobia

Class of 1956 55th Reunion*

total raised $4,590 number of donors: 10 participation rate: 14.3% barrister Jack B. Middleton

donor Nathaniel A. Boone Norman F. Burke Joseph G. Kinder Robert S. Linnell Richard S. Miller Bernard R. Silva, Jr. L. Barry Tinkoff

Emilio D. Iannuccillo Alfred Legelis Herbert Lemelman Charles N. Miller Alan C. Pease Robert A. Kaloosdian Nicholas Sarris John A. Wickstrom

Class of 1958

number of donors: 12 participation rate: 13.3% fellow Arnold I. Zaltas

donor Wallace F. Ashnault John F. Donahue+ Bernard R. Fielding Earle Groper Martin S. Malinou Frank D. Marden E. Donald Riddle Roy L. Smith Joseph R. Standell Stephen R. Weidman George F. Weir

Class of 1959

number of donors: 17 participation rate: 22.4% fellow Morton H. Aronson John J. Norton Oscar A. Wasserman

friend Lawrence S. Gates

donor

Class of 1957

number of donors: 13 participation rate: 13.4% barrister Edward M. Rockett

friend Herbert P. Phillips Joseph C. Sweeney

donor H. Alfred Casassa Frank H. Handy, Jr.

Henry N. Frenette, Jr. Issie L. Jenkins Clarence B. Jones James W. Killam Norman D. Kline Bertram S. Patkin Arnold I. Persky Raymond W. Philipps Emanuel N. Psarakis Ralph F. Scofield Michael A. Silverstein Philip S. Sternstein Lewis L. Whitman annual report of giving

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donor roll

Class of 1960

number of donors: 14 participation rate: 15.6% barrister

friend Salvatore V. Faulise Evandro R. Radoccia, Jr. Leonard I. Shapiro George H. Stephenson

Richard S. Hanki

donor

friend

George L. Bernstein Ralph Cianflone, Jr. Joel G. Cohen Richard A. Davis Douglas S. Hatfield Lewis A. Hurwitz Theodore P. Hurwitz Robert M. Schacht Barry R. Weiss Gerald Wolper Gerald H. Zackin

Mitchell Samuelson

donor Robert J. Bagdasarian Ronald H. Bean Myron R. Bernstein Elliot S. Cohen Samuel C. Fish Conrad W. Fisher Henry S. Levin R. Joseph O’Rourke Neill W. Schoonmaker, Jr. David A. Shrair David T. Smith Robert P. Weintraub

Class of 1962

number of donors: 15 participation rate: 18.3% president’s circle

Class of 1961 50th Reunion*

total raised $48,873 number of donors: 25 participation rate: 24% president’s associates Stephen V. Dubin

fellow Allan van Gestel

barrister E. Whitney Drake Eugene L. Rubin

Gerard H. Cohen

fellow Edward D. McCarthy

friend Robert J. Ferranty Levon Kasarjian, Jr.

donor Gilbert W. Cox, Jr. John J. DaPonte, Jr. John J. Dumphy Alan B. Fodeman Gordon C. Mulligan Robert D. Myers

Robert A. Scalise Edmund R. Sledzik Arthur L. Stevenson Dale G. Stoodley Irving J. Waldman

Charles A. Roover George R. Sprague

Class of 1963

president’s associates

number of donors: 16 participation rate: 17.4% barrister George Findell, Jr. William F. Michaud

friend M. Robert Queler

donor John F. Atwood Judith G. Belash Jerald D. Burwick Jerome H. Fletcher Frank S. Ganak Matthew S. Goldfarb Kenneth S. Green, Jr. Frederick A. Griffen Louis P. Massaro, Jr. Elwynn J. Miller Joseph J. Parrilla Robert Rosenthal Richard J. Snyder

Class of 1964

number of donors: 15 participation rate: 15.5% fellow Charles B. Swartwood

barrister Andrew E. Aloisi

friend Members of the Class of 1961

q

Ernest M. Haddad Frank J. Santangelo

donor James P. Carty Barry S. Gilvar Paul A. Lietar Donald H. Marden Alan S. Novick Charles E. Olney Burton Peltz David M. Prolman Peter B. Robinson 66

Class of 1965

number of donors: 36 participation rate: 25.9% Robert P. Smith

dean’s club Richard S. Mittleman Neil Sugarman

fellow Victor J. Garo Stephen A. Kolodny Edward S. Snyder

barrister Charles B. Curtis Peter B. Sang

friend Robert Belton+ Phillips S. Davis Frances H. Miller

donor Saul D. Behr Leslie E. Bloomenthal Peter M. Collins Paul R. Devin Sean M. Dunphy Fredric L. Feinstein Lloyd S. French John S. Goodnow Arthur W. Havey Melvin S. Katzman Philip R. Levine Matthew L. Lewiss Daniel S. Lynch, Jr. Ronald J. McDougald Maurice McWalter, Jr. Demitrios M. Moschos Michael C. Moschos Ronald A. Partnoy John J. Ryan Howard Scheinblum Edward A. Shapiro Henry H. Shultz J. Howard Solomon Robert S. Toyofuku Michael L. Widland


donor roll: alumni giving july 1, 2011 – june 30, 2012

Class of 1966 45th Reunion*

total raised $15,125 number of donors: 29 participation rate: 18.5% fellow Irving H. Picard

barrister Barry Y. Weiner

friend Lawrence T. Holden, Jr. Lawrence Levy

donor Gregory R. Baler Stanley A. Bleecker Richard I. Burstein John M. Downer Michael R. Garfield Lynne Hans Ronald Jacobs Martin Kantrovitz Arthur L. Lappen Mary E. McCabe Sylvia S. Paxton Willard R. Pope William E. Rabb Paul R. Salvage Steven J. Schwartz Jerome D. Sekula Sherwood R. Spelke Stephen C. Steinberg William W. Willard

giving societies

President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999

David M. Blumenthal Mark N. Busch Owen F. Clarke, Jr. Joseph D. Cronin Robert B. Dalton Stephen L. Dashoff Margaret H. DouglasHamilton Ernest E. Falbo, Jr. John E. Friberg Leon J. Glazerman Arthur G. Greene Karl L. Halperin Arthur W. Hughes William H. Hyatt, Jr. Patrick J. King James D. Latham James A. Moreland Michael Popowski Donald E. Quigley Catherine L. Salisbury William J. Salisbury Steven H. Silverman William W. Southworth Charles J. Speleotis John L. Vecchiolla Dudley H. Willis

Class of 1968

number of donors: 38 participation rate: 17.2% barrister

number of donors: 33 participation rate: 17.5% president’s circle

friend

Robert B. Goldfarb

barrister Stanley J. Krieger Richard J. Talbot

friend Harley M. Smith

donor Anthony J. Aftuck Joseph S. Alen Michaele S. Battles

Robert Droker Malvin B. Eisenberg Ellen Flatley Richard M. Gaberman Morton E. Grosz Richard S. Hackel John A. Karpinski William F. Malloy Ray A. Meyer Richard A. Millstein Charles S. Mitchell John T. Purves Andrew Radding William E. Ragolia, Jr. Paul A. Roberts A. Ned Rogin Lawrence Rosenbluth Stephen A. Safranko Sara A. Sanders Robert E. Sapir Wayne C. Vennard, Jr. Wade M. Welch

Class of 1969

number of donors: 46 participation rate: 22.9% president’s circle

Robert G. Anderson Mortimer B. Fuller Lawrence E. Kaplan Kernan F. King Samuel S. Perlman Peter W. Segal

Class of 1967

Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

Helen Gillmor John P. Gillmor Richard D. Mondre Judith H. Norris

donor S. Reid Alsop Carl O. Anderson Fredric H. Bender Evans J. Carter Jeffrey S. Cates Robert L. Cullinane

Sheree and Nathan B. Mandelbaum James C. Pizzagalli

president’s associates William Macauley

dean’s club

* The reunion giving cycle for classes ending in 1s and 6s includes gifts received in fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012. + Deceased

Michael E. Faden Richard M. Fentin Richard A. Glaser Marvin H. Glazier Norman Gross George R. Halsey Michael T. Healy Neil F. Hulbert Julie A. Koppenheffer Michael S. Krout Stephen H. Lewis Michael A. Meyers James L. Morse Martin S. Needelman Kenneth M. Nelson Donald P. Norris James M. Oathout John R. Pate, Jr. David E. Putnam Joseph S. Radovsky Stephen M. Randels Mitchell S. Riffkin Martin A. Rosenman Paul F. Ryan David W. Sanborn Elliot Savitz Richard E. Talmadge James W. Tello Michael A. Wheeler Henry W. Winkleman

Class of 1970

number of donors: 39 participation rate: 19.4% president’s circle

Barbara B. Creed Marvin M. Goldstein

Bettina B. Plevan

barrister

president’s associates

R. David DePuy Gerald C. Miller Bruce J. Wein

Lansing E. Crane

friend Arthur H. Bill Thomas E. Cimeno, Jr. Beth Ann F. Gentile Brainard L. Patton

donor David Allen Stephen B. Angel Robert B. Buckley, Jr. Anthony J. Catalano

dean’s club Anonymous

barrister Brian L. Bilzin Marsha D. Bilzin Alan M. Parness

friend Michael M. Davis Elizabeth H. Gemmill George E. Ross Richard A. Soden annual report of giving

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donor roll

donor Karen M. Allen Kenneth A. Behar Bruce W. Bergen Paul L. Black William R. Blane Susan M. Cooke Dennis M. Cronin R. Laurence Cullen Marshall I. Etra Robert B. Field, Jr. Lawrence T. Graham Peter J. Herrick Peter A. Janus Michele G. Kostin Mary S. Leahy Richard J. Litner Andrew F. Lucarelli Arshag A. Mazmanian Walter L. Mitchell Isabelle K. Pinzler Morris N. Robinson A. Joseph Ross Robert H. Segersten Thomas R. Smith David L. Taylor John A. Tierney Allen Whitestone Frank J. Williams Willard P. Yeats

Class of 1971 40th Reunion*

total raised $289,295 number of donors: 44 participation rate: 18.7% president’s circle William H. Kleh

fellow Sandra L. Lynch

barrister Gladys J. George Peter H. Sutton

friend Richard C. MacKenzie

donor Robert D. Abrams William S. Botwick Arthur L. Bowen William C. Decas Melvin Foster 68

Roger J. Geller Paul E. George Jeffrey B. Gray Richard S. Haines Julian T. Houston Douglas P. Jacobs Herbert M. Jacobs Thomas R. Lebach Kenneth D. Lipman Claude L. Lowen Russell I. Lynn Erica L. Powers Paul H. Rothschild Mary L. Sanderson Richard H. Saxe Ellen G. Walpert

Class of 1972

number of donors: 40 participation rate: 13.7%

Frederick M. Pryor Stephen J. Selden Charles D. Smith John R. Staffier Edward M. Stern Mary M. Sullivan Mark L. Sullivan Robert L. Weiss, Jr. Ellyn Weiss Richard B. Weitzen Kenneth I. Wirfel Myrth York

Class of 1973

number of donors: 59 participation rate: 15.9% president’s circle Hugh R. McCombs

barrister

Richard E. Mikels

Wayne B. Bardsley Barbara S. Fredericks Paul A. Schott Joseph J. Sweeney Marcus S. Weiss

barrister

friend

William A. Lewis, Jr. Roger A. Nelson

Jeffrey T. Demerath David H. Lee Jane Michaels Richard B. Osterberg L. Peter Temple

president’s associates Norbert A. Simmons

fellow

donor Robert G. Burdick, Jr. Gail V. Coleman Barbara B. Conover Kathleen K. David Michael C. Denny Douglas J. Dok, Jr. Andrew D. Epstein Eric M. Epstein Stanley N. Freedman Paul V. Freeman, Jr. Richard C. Goldman Judd A. Gregg David F. Grunebaum Christopher H. Hartenau A. Anthony Kilkuskie Dane R. Kostin Andrea S. Kremen Jeffrey W. Lemkin Helen I. Lom Winfield W. Major, Jr. Arkley L. Mastro, Jr. Sandra L. Moody Suzanne K. Nusbaum Kevin D. O’Connell

donor Judy F. Berkman David W. Brown Joan W. Cavanagh Hilary J. Dalin David J. DeMoss Lawrence S. Elswit Howard L. Felsenfeld

Members of the Class of 1971

q

Norman J. Fine Warner S. Fletcher Laurence M. Friedman Franklin Fruchtman Peter V. Funk, Jr. W. John Funk R. Scott Gardner Michael H. Glazer Dennis I. Greene Joel P. Greene Leora Harpaz Anne Hoffman Stephen L. Hopkins Pamela S. Horowitz Katherine W. Keane Craig M. Keats David C. King Ann-Louise Kleper John H. Kohring Phillip C. Koutsogiane Brian W. LeClair Caroline L. Meuly Kathleen G. Miller Anthony F. Muri Kristen C. Nelson Howard P. Newton Theodore S. Novak Lyle F. Nyberg Clifford B. Olson Paul W. Onkka, Jr. Jonathan T. Parkhurst David G. Reid Catherine S. Shavell Charles F. Shaw Henry P. Sorett Roger C. Stanford Daniel J. Steininger Kenneth H. Tatarian Albert W. Wallis Margaret A. Weekes Anna C. Wolfe


donor roll: alumni giving july 1, 2011 – june 30, 2012

Class of 1974

number of donors: 42 participation rate: 13.2% president’s associates Howard S. Altarescu Anthony M. Feeherry Peter McCausland

dean’s club Daniel J. Rea, Jr.

fellow Jeffrey D. Woolf

barrister Catherine S. Bardsley William S. Eggeling Richard A. Karelitz Stephen D. Tom

friend Ernest A. Goetz, Jr. Benjamin L. Jung

donor Steven H. Bowen John J. Carroll, Jr. Leslie R. Cohen Elsa Cole David C. Elliott David W. Faunce Robert J. Gordon Arnold P. Hanson, Jr. Peter H. Jacoby Richard P. Jaffe Stanley D. Katz Warren R. Leiden Stephen T. Lindo Bradford S. Lovette

Members of the Class of 1976

q

giving societies

President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999

Stephen M. Mason Edward A. McIntyre Robert S. Moog Ke-Ching Ning Kathryn M. Noonan Garland F. Pinkston, Jr. Harold M. Pressberg Robert H. Ratcliffe Anita W. Robboy James E. Rooks, Jr. Rhoda E. Schneider Melinda S. Sherer Arthur J. Spector Susan E. Stein Ellen Y. Suni Walker F. Todd Lucinda E. White

Class of 1975

number of donors: 49 participation rate: 13.8% president’s associates Anonymous

dean’s club Alan E. Reider Linda D. Reider Roger M. Ritt

fellow David W. Carpenter

barrister Richard M. Belanger B. Andrew Dutcher Andrew J. Ley James M. Sack Paul S. Samson Mary L. Wolff

Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

* The reunion giving cycle for classes ending in 1s and 6s includes gifts received in fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012. + Deceased

friend

president’s associates

Richard Driansky Amy L. Goodman Rikki J. Klieman Richard J. Levin Steven J. Weinstein

Joel G. Chefitz

donor Jerry D. Bailey Felix V. Baxter Kenneth J. Berk F. Walter Bistline, Jr. Jeffrey S. Chavkin Michael E. Chubrich Madeline E. Dudley Richard D. Eisenberg Barry A. Friedman Marc B. Friedman Steven J. Goldstein Jules S. Goodman Laurence E. Hardoon Michael C. Harvell Richard C. Heidlage Steven H. Klinghoffer Linda K. Lager Howard C. Lem Leslie W. Lewkow Carol B. Liebman Kathryn R. Lunney Lawrence B. Morse James I. Murray David M. Neubauer John L. Norton Charles A. Pillsbury Robert M. Pu Joel E. Richman Richard C. Sammis Nancy A. Sutherland Geoffrey A. Wilson Jeffrey M. Winik Lawrence R. Young

Class of 1976 35th Reunion*

total raised $1,410,043 number of donors: 88 participation rate: 19.3% president’s circle Philip S. Beck Steven R. Becker Linda S. Peterson J. Michael Schell

fellow Robert J. Glovsky Denzil D. McKenzie

barrister Carolyn J. Gabbay Gary H. Glaser Walter E. Hanley, Jr. Jack A. Rovner

friend Charles L. Babcock

donor Michael S. Albert David I. Altman Anne M. Atherton Marc P. Ayotte Frank W. Barrie Neal S. Baseman Virginia D. Benjamin Richard P. Bourgeois Jan A. Brody Joann M. Buckland Brian J. Coyne John C. Cuddy Margaret L. Dale Elaine K. Denniston David A. DiMuzio Linda J. Dreeben John E. Edison Richard J. Eisenberg Thomas J. Engellenner George J. Felos John W. Fieldsteel William E. Fitzharris, Jr. Gregory L. Foster Greg S. Friedman Myra M. Gordon Leonard E. Gross Richard D. Hawke Katherine A. Hesse Nancy M. Highbarger David R. Hodas Sandra J. Holman Gregory E. Hudson Laurence J. Hyman Dale R. Johnson Mary L. Kennedy Robert W. Kneisley Francis D. Landrey Richard M. Lipsman annual report of giving

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donor roll

Ronald G. Marshall Anne H. McAndrews Samuel P. Moulthrop Marsha J. Pechman Marjorie R. Perlman Eugene A. Reilly Donald B. Rotfort Ellen K. Schwartz Lewis J. Schweller Michael O. Sheehan James E. Sheldon Edward M. Spiro L. Seth Stadfeld Oliver W. Stalter Joel A. Stein John C. Sullivan O. Rogeriee Thompson Jerome F. Weihs Alexander Whiteside Byron E. Woodman, Jr. Robert P. Yeaton Marianne G. Zurn

Class of 1977

number of donors: 49 participation rate: 13.5% dean’s club Robert Y. Lider

barrister John Barylick James F. Crowley, Jr. Barbara G. Kemp Thomas G. Robinson

Ross C. Owens James A. Peterson Suzanne R. Phillips Kirk C. Rascoe Toby K. Rodman Michael T. Shutterly Marvin S. Silver Michael S. Sophocles Russell J. Speidel Richard W. Stern Joyce L. Wixson Judith S. Yogman

friend Frank Campbell, Jr. Robin B. Matlin Joseph F. Ryan

donor Richard H. Askenase Robert C. Barber Gaylen K. Baxter William C. Black Stephen R. Bosworth Mario Brossi James B. Daniels Allen N. David John F. DeBartolo Edmonde P. DeGregorio Guy R. Eigenbrode David J. Fischer Marshall A. Gallop Carmine A. Greco Stanley Greenberg Norman S. Heller Marc S. Intriligator David L. Kay Thomas H. Kelley Edmund H. Kendrick, Jr. Kenneth A. Krems Kenneth V. Kurnos Jeffrey A. Lester Sybil L. Levisohn W. David D. Marcello James C. May John B. Miller Amy L. Mower Joanne M. Neale

friend Pamela Jarvis Joseph A. Levitt Dean Richlin

donor Stephen H. Alpert Lawrence N. Altman Jeffrey Baxter William M. Berenson Wendy M. Bittner James Blakey Sam I. Blumenstyk Anthony M. Cacavio Robert W. Cunningham James R. Erwin Martha S. Faigen Stanley L. Ferguson Louise E. Halevy Joe L. Hegel Katharine Heidlage Shepard A. Hoffman Philip F. Holahan George C. Jones Bruce A. Langer Wendy D. Levine Allan L. Lockspieser Kenneth R. Luttinger Randolph J. Mayer David M. Mindlin David G. Nation Joseph A. Pellegrino Gail Pennington Michael S. Popkin F. Joseph Reichmann

Class of 1978

number of donors: 55 participation rate: 13.3% president’s circle Ellen J. Flannery

dean’s club Daniel C. Walden

fellow William A. Kamer Burr Tweedy, Jr.

barrister Joan B. Chamberlain Paul H. Friedman David R. Gellman Russel T. Hamilton Gary E. Hicks Michael J. Kliegman Alan R. Skupp

top 10 states by number of donors

massachusetts new york california new jersey connecticut florida maryland virginia illinois rhode island 70

law annual fund dollars by month fy10-12 $300,000 fy10

fy11

fy12

$250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 0

july

aug

sept

oct

nov

dec

jan

feb

march april

may

june


donor roll: alumni giving july 1, 2011 – june 30, 2012

John S. Rodman David E. Schaffer Richard A. Schnoll Richard W. Schumacher David E. Shellenberger Pamela R. Stirrat John R. Stopa Robert Volk Debra A. Weiner Judith M. White Suzan E. Willcox Nancy E. Yanofsky

giving societies

President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999

Michael N. Vaporis T. Kirk Ware Jeffrey M. Werthan Susan M. Werthan

friend Mark E. Cohen Randall A. Constantine Paul E. Nemser Robert G. Rowe

donor

Class of 1979

number of donors: 46 participation rate: 11.8% president’s circle Richard Cartier Godfrey

dean’s club David L. Feld

fellow Mary A. Akerson Michael D. Gayda Mark Schonberger Nadine R. Shaoul Sue S. Tebor

barrister Caroline D. Davis Richards H. Ford Eliza W. Fraser Dean S. Travalino

Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

Class of 1980

Samuel Abloeser Robert A. Axelrod Susan T. Bailey James M. Beslity Bruce T. Block James H. Broderick, Jr. Christopher J. Brogan David S. Brown Charles T. Brumback, Jr. Edward G. Coss Virginia M. Fettig Scott A. Fisher Kathleen Ford Margaret M. Gilligan Elin H. Graydon Mark J. Gundersen Kenneth Ingber Susan F. Kelley H. Frances Kleiner Eric M. Kraus Barry C. Laboda Craig D. Mills Donald V. Romanik Roger M. Ross Daniel M. Shields Stephen E. Socha Jacqueline F. Stein

number of donors: 64 participation rate: 15.5% president’s associates Claudia O. Crowley Leo T. Crowley

fellow H. Peter Haveles, Jr.

barrister Scott E. Cooper John J. Finn James A. Normand Donald S. Prusock Dawn C. Ryan Barry J. Swidler

friend Jason R. Baron Kathryn L. Roseen

donor Anonymous Christopher N. Ames Ann B. Andreas Marcy A. Bass Diane G. Berliner Peter C. Berry

law annual fund donors by month fy10-12

500 fy11

fy12

400 300 200 100 0

aug

sept

oct

nov

dec

jan

feb

march april

may

Nancy V. Brown Bernard H. Campbell Roy T. Chikamoto Judith A. Clark Jonathan S. Cole Emily J. Cooke Jeffrey M. Cooper Richard A. Dennett David Dinerman Margaret S. Fearey Marshall D. Feiring George E. Foote Arthur H. Forman Susan G. Glovsky Steven M. Glovsky Michael K. Golub Amy B. Greenblatt Richard R. Greenblatt David A. Gunter Laurie A. Kamaiko Christopher W. Kanaga Barbara R. Kapnick Stefanie K. Larson P. Ann F. Lomeli Emily A. Maitin Michaela O. Matthews Rosemary C. Meyers Carol Miller Henry I. Morgenbesser Robert F. Moriarty Molly S. Mugler David N. Neusner Timothy A. Ngau

over the past five fiscal years, the school has averaged 2,185 in total donors, with an alumni donor average for those years of 1,849. this alumni donor average represents an alumni gift participation rate of roughly 10.12%.

600

fy10

* The reunion giving cycle for classes ending in 1s and 6s includes gifts received in fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012. + Deceased

june

annual report of giving

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donor roll

Class of 1982

number of donors: 42 participation rate: 9.7%

president’s circle

Michael B. Berman

Kenneth P. Morrison

dean’s club

barrister

John K. Skrypak Kevin T. Van Wart

Paul V. Crawford John C. Englander

fellow

friend

Ira L. Herman

John A. Mase Bruce E. Rogoff Seth I. Truwit

Eileen M. Herlihy Susan E. Hislop Lawrence J. Reilly Glenn E. Siegel

Members of the Class of 1981

Nancy J. Nitikman Robert O. O’Bannon Richard H. Otto Dominic A. Petito David B. Picker James Ramlow Peter S. Rice Dana J. Roszkiewicz Scott D. Rubin Elizabeth D. Schrero Peggy K. Shiffrin Harvey C. Silverstein Nancy E. Spence Joel D. Teibloom

Class of 1981 30th Reunion*

total raised $56,345 number of donors: 65 participation rate: 14.4% president’s associates Susan H. Alexander

barrister Lance D. Cassak Ilisa Hurowitz Michael A. Tanenbaum Linda V. Tiano

friend Ronald M. Davids Richard R. Downey Virginia L. Ferko Gary L. Greenstein Ina P. Kupferberg Jeffrey M. Lesser 72

Donald F. Simone Steven G. Sonet Robert P. Suglia Diana L. Wainrib David C. Wright

friend

donor

Steven C. Altschuler Joe Boynton Gerri S. Bridgman Kristy A. Bulleit Paul Cherecwich, Jr. Jeffrey J. Coniaris Trudy W. Craig Jeffrey W. Curcio Susan M. Ferzoco John G. Fioretta Joan B. Gross Janet I. Hawley Robert G. Holdway Timothy J. Hufman Michael H. Hurwitz Mitchell A. Karman Janet D. Karman Milburn D. Kight Scott A. Kobler Debra A. Lewis Elaine M. Lucas Eleanor R. Miller Philip D. Murphy Joseph Raheb Carmin C. Reiss Joseph A. Rotella Alysa G. Sasson Rebecca J. Scheier James H. Shenwick Salvadore V. Spalitta Alexander Spaulding

Carol Boorstein Susan L. Carroll Stacey Channing Jordan B. Cherrick Lorraine M. Cherrick Richard K. Colman Lynne M. Durbin Martin A. Edelstein Christopher R. Gannon Mark G. Hanson Elizabeth P. Higgins Kathy J. Lamb-Flynn Karen Mathiasen Alexander G. Nossiff Barry M. Okun Carmine K. Perri James H. Rotondo Daniel M. Schwartz Donald B. Shanin Amy L. Shapiro Patricia A. Sheehan Wendy H. Smith Hugh T. Verano Beverly J. Verano Johnny J. Williams Melanie S. Williams Andrew L. Winder Randolph L. Worth Margaret D. Xifaras

number of donors: 52 participation rate: 11.1%

president’s associates

barrister

p

Class of 1983

Jeffrey L. Hirsch Harvey Shapiro Neil S. Witkes

donor

donor Glen P. Barrentine Marc J. Becker Carl B. Bindman Catherine L. Campbell Anthony Cefalogli Alison M. Clark John D. Craven Timothy S. Egan Cynthia E. Ellis Jack M. Farris Jonathan D. Fink Aida A. Gennis Howard S. Goldman James C. Hasenfus Richard M. Kallman David S. Katz Elisa S. Koenderman Timothy J. Langella Stanley D. Levitt Nancy E. Little John H. McCann Brian W. Mellor David T. Metcalfe Ruth A. Moore Mark L. Morris Barbara S. Nicholas Dena E. Palermo Matthew H. Piaker John A. Piccione Peter A. Pizzani, Jr. Steven K. Platt Michael B. Pollack Robin R. Pruitt James J. Shapiro Kenneth Simon Wayne E. Southward Philip Tabas Sandra L. Tanen


donor roll: alumni giving july 1, 2011 – june 30, 2012

Martha A. Toll Susan B. Tuchman Lisa A. Turowsky Matthew E. Van Tine John V. Veech Roger W. Wade Myrna L. Wigod David E. Wilson

Class of 1984

number of donors: 47 participation rate: 8.9% president’s circle Anonymous Michael D. Fricklas

giving societies

President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999

Richard K. Lichtman Terry Marvin Jeanne M. Mathews Stacey W. McConnell Robert S. Molloy Daniel W. Nye Robert C. Pasciuto Lawrence J. Profeta Harold W. Pskowski Allison Rock Adrian N. Roe Bonnie G. Ross Melissa E. Stimell Robert B. Teitelman Edward Waldman Barbara M. Watson

president’s associates Patricia J. Smith

fellow Howard M. Cooper Peter J. MacDonald

barrister Charles C. Cornelio Jonathan N. Halpern Joseph K. Juster David S. Zimble

friend Susan M. Banks Jonathan W. Haddon Susan J. Katz Matthew H. Lynch Michael A. Schlesinger Susan P. Sprung

donor Robert S. Adler Charles A. Baker Sarah J. Berger Irene J. Bleiweiss Jeffrey C. Brown Marie P. Buckley William Contente Paul R. Cortes-Rexach Harvey D. Cotton Suzanne M. Glynn Lisa B. Goldstein Lawrence J. Goodman Sheryl Gross-Glaser Kathryn S. Gutowski Robyn B. Klinger Mark H. Leeds

Class of 1985

number of donors: 55 participation rate: 9.8% dean’s club Doron F. Ezickson

barrister A. William Caporizzo Nancy A. Daly Robert Evans Edward M. Fox David M. Henkoff Michael E. Katzenstein Lawrence Safran Paul Saltzman David J. Shladovsky Gail P. Sinai Jeffrey D. Varsa

donor Paul J. Alfano Karen C. Burke Thomas A. Cohn Steven M. Curwin Amanda D. Darwin Simon Dixon Raymond F. Dolen Stacey O. Gallant Jay S. Geller Bruce H. Goldman Allen I. Gorski Howard B. Haas Sheryl H. Haberman Ronald J. Katter Gerald K. Kelley

Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

Dennis L. Kern Gail S. Kerner Susan P. Kornetsky Michael K. Krebs Sallie S. Levi Aurelle S. Locke Michelle M. Marchant David P. Maslen Jeffrey A. McCurdy John J. Monaghan Judith F. Monaghan Laura Nash Paul V. Nelms Shannon P. O’Brien Joel E. Rappoport Charles S. Rich Craig A. Roeder Meryl L. Rosen Patricia A. Roy James A. Schragger Donna H. Smith Scott L. Steinberg Deborah M. Tate George W. Tetler Andrew C. Wels Gregory L. White Jennifer Yeo Joseph D. Zaks

* The reunion giving cycle for classes ending in 1s and 6s includes gifts received in fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012. + Deceased

barrister Timothy C. Blank James C. Fox Daniel W. Halston Henry M. Rosen

friend John E. Arbab Suzanne E. Palmer

donor Daniel G. Adamian William A. Bogdan Yale H. Bohn Timothy G. Caron Kevin G. Chapman Sharon L. Chapman Kelly K. Cline James H. Cohen Jane Corwin Barbara D. Davis Daniel R. Deutsch Gwenn S. Eckel Alan C. Ederer Alan S. Fanger Carolyn L. Federoff Brian G. Fox Halsey B. Frank Ann C. George Laura J. Ginett Howard J. Goldsmith Ramon R. Gonzalez Jennifer E. Goodnow Eric J. Gouvin Cynthia Greco F. Christian Haab, Jr. Melinda J. Harrison

Class of 1986 25th Reunion*

total raised $1,044,102 number of donors: 79 participation rate: 14.1% president’s associates Wayne E. Smith

Members of the Class of 1986

q

annual report of giving

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donor roll

Alexandra B. Harvey Joseph M. Herlihy Janine H. Idelson Daniel J. Jacobson Joe D. Jacobson Margaret C. Jenkins Michael J. Kaminsky Paul B. Kaplan Susan Kenneally Robert A. Lavenberg Mark H. Likoff Steven F. Lincoln Robert J. Mack Andrew C. MacLachlan Steven D. Masters Felicia Miller Richard C. Oh Rose C. Palermo Douglas N. Perlo Marina Rabinovich Valerie T. Rosenson Rosalind S. Rowen Rossi Richard P. Silverstein Tammy J. Smiley Jonathan S. Springer Eric A. Strulowitz Carolyn S. Tisdale Beth Tomasello Jeffrey L. Van Hoosear Clea T. Winneg Neal S. Winneg Jason M. Zorfas

Class of 1988

number of donors: 42 participation rate: 8.7%

Monika K. Griffis Beverly E. Hjorth Robert Iannucci Paul M. James Jamie K. Kapel Linda R. Kurtz Kevin J. Leichter Andre H. Madeira Peter N. Maduro Rosemarie Mullin David L. Paldy Bradd S. Robbins Fred A. Robustelli John Serafino Lisa A. Sheeler Kenneth N. Smolar Susan L. Smotrich Jean S. Thaiss Lynne T. Toyofuku Debra E. Werbel Lynn B. Whalen Stephen Ziobrowski

Class of 1989

number of donors: 40 participation rate: 7.3% president’s circle Lisa G. Beckerman

Ann M. Dietrich Jeffrey A. Dollinger Heidi M. Fallone Ken M. Gatter Mary-Laura Greely Katherine W. Hazard Richard D. Kahn Joshua Katz Glenn M. Kurtz Israel Y. Levin Joyce S. Lilly Gjon N. Nivica, Jr. John G. Nossiff Randy L. Shapiro Barbara L. Shycoff Michael B. Siller Michael E. Tucker John B. Wholey, Jr. Michael L. Wojcik Benjamin A. Zelermyer

Class of 1990

number of donors: 38 participation rate: 7.2% president’s associates Steven Sereboff

barrister

Anita M. Sarafa

Karyn S. Blad Leiv H. Blad, Jr. Christopher A. Kenney

barrister

friend

Gary Domoracki Kathryn A. Piffat Andrew C. Sucoff

Andrew M. Felner Edward J. Goddard Rachel Kaplan

friend

friend

donor

David H. Botter Richard A. Brown

Merrick L. Gross Timothy S. Sinnott

Karen L. Ling Robert P. Nault Jeffrey S. Raphaelson Judith V. Scherzer Howard M. Singer

friend

donor

Laurence R. Bronska Edward L. Corbosiero Diane M. Morgenthaler Thomas J. Phillips

Amy B. Abramowitz William J. Balkun Wendy N. Bazil Robert V. Chisholm Ethan D. Corey Peter J. Dill Steven M. Falk Edward A. Fallone Jonathan Forstot Linda F. Goldwyn

Lois L. Berman Constance E. Boukidis David Breen Allyson H. Cohen Christina A. Cotton Barbara L. Cullen Andrew M. Cummings Hilary C. Gabrieli Christopher D. Galiardo Michael G. Giarrusso Sarah A. Hartry Joseph S. Huttler Donnalyn L. Kahn Elizabeth S. Kardos Jacqueline G. Kelley Stephen P. Kelly

Class of 1987

number of donors: 36 participation rate: 6.5% fellow Anastasios Parafestas

barrister

donor Deborah E. Barnard Linda G. Bauer Deborah D. Carlson Oliver C. Colburn 74

H. Peter DelBianco, Jr. Richard R. Desharnais Anthony S. Fiotto Elizabeth L. Gibbs John L. Hackett Ruth A. Haring Tracey C. Kammerer Stephen H. Kay Carolyn R. Kopans Deborah N. Korman Steven M. Kornblau Lawrence Krieger Daniel S. Lubell Peter J. Martin Todd A. Mayman Margit Roos-Collins Joshua N. Schwartz Lisa A. Schwartz Richard P. Schwartz Ralph M. Sherman Perry M. Smith Dana J. St. James D. Craig Story Walter G. Van Dorn, Jr. Elahna S. Weinflash

barrister Sonya J. Brouner Elizabeth K. Cooper Todd L. Kahn Cynthia J. LaRose Kim M. Rubin

fellow

donor Ellen W. Anderton Sidney C. Archuleta Edwin P. Aro Susan J. Assad Irene H. Bagdoian Michael Bailes Russell Beck Aileen D. Bolton Anthony A. Bongiorno Todd L. Brown Stephen Cesso Geraldine E. Champion Mary A. Daly


donor roll: alumni giving july 1, 2011 – june 30, 2012

Patrice S. Kester Robert G. Kester Tess J. Kline Jessie M. Klyce Joan A. Lieberman Andrew D. Myers Patricia L. O’Beirne Rafael A. Ovalles Frank E. Pasquesi David E. Russell David L. Schrader Julie B. Siminoff Terry N. Steinberg Allen D. Webster Philip B. Ytterberg

Class of 1991 20th Reunion*

total raised $18,961 number of donors: 47 participation rate: 9.2%

giving societies

President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999

Stephen Fuchs Marian Baldwin Fuerst Colleen M. Granahan Debra M. Gunkel Moira D. Kelly Jeffrey N. Lavine Paul B. Linn Michael M. Malihi Bruce C. Nelson Eunhae Park David L. Rihtarchik Edward D. Shapiro Karen Shapiro Jared W. Stansfield Joan E. Swartz-Siff George H. Thompson, Jr. Roberto Velez-Colon John A. Yannis

Class of 1992

dean’s club

number of donors: 24 participation rate: 4.9%

Thomas C. Farrell

dean’s club

barrister

Susan F. DiCicco

Kimon Manolius John N. Riccardi

barrister

friend

friend

John A. Grossman John T. Hecht

donor Ross W. Baker Deborah Chizewer Bradley H. Cohen Lois E. Cornils Sally L. Davis Daniel S. Field

Members of the Class of 1991

q

David H. Pawlik Michael S. Isikow Cynthia J. Warren

donor Nikos D. Andreadis Michael J. Brown Jeffrey M. Frank

Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

Jill P. Furman Silvia P. Glick Kenneth B. Goldberg Elizabeth L. Greene Gail O. Kanef Michael B. Kanef Nina H. Kazazian Catherine Watson Koziol Audrey C. Mark Peter F. May Jeffrey A. Miller Michael S. Perlstein Michele S. Perlstein Salim Sheikh Pierre N. Simenon John S. Simonian Michael W. Weihrauch

Class of 1993

number of donors: 31 participation rate: 6.4% president’s circle

* The reunion giving cycle for classes ending in 1s and 6s includes gifts received in fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012. + Deceased

Edwin H. Raynor Sheri L. Rosen Kevin T. Russell Jane H. Seibert Alana B. Sharenow Seth R. Weissman Mark F. Williams David L. Yas

Class of 1994

number of donors: 35 participation rate: 7% fellow Andrew P. Strehle

barrister Alison T. Bomberg Patrick O. Bomberg Joseph Listengart Francis C. Morrissey

friend

Howard Xinhua Zhang

George A. Casey Dawn L. Goldstein

president’s associates

donor

Anonymous

fellow Jay D. Crutcher Peter K. Levitt

friend James B. Goldstein Catherine S. Stempien

donor Sarah C. Baskin Ann Marie C. Beaudoin Joan F. Beer James T. Bork Peter M. Dichiara Stephen M. Edwards Laurie L. Fichera Tim Futrell Debra W. Goldberg Lisa G. Heller Ron I. Honig Dwinette E. Johnson-Bailey Lisa P. Korologos Ellyn H. Lazar-Moore James A. MacLeod Terry D. Poling Marc J. Rachman

Benjamin L. Apt Wendy Benner-Leon Kathleen L. Bodmer Linda K. Carter Glenn A. Cort Rick J. Fucci Joseph R. Ganley Lynn D. Goldsmith William J. Graham B. David Hammarstrom Daniel C. Hirsch Melanie B. Jacobs Lance A. Kawesch Barbara J. Keefe Stacy M. Kelner D. Paul Koch, Jr. Robert A. Lawsky Kelly A. McEnaney Daniel J. Morean Lynn S. Muster Christine A. Palmieri Andrew J. Pitts Babak A. Pooya Linda Rekas Sloan Matthew A. Renert Laurie A. Tan Kenneth T. Willis Anne S. Yas annual report of giving

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donor roll

Class of 1995

number of donors: 29 participation rate: 6.5% fellow Carla Munroe Moynihan James J. Moynihan

barrister

total raised $17,563 number of donors: 33 participation rate: 7.6% dean’s club Christi J. Offutt

Eugene M. Holmes Ian C. Pilarczyk Daniel D. Rubinstein

friend

friend

Stephen G. Baron Nicole T. Berry Mia S. Blackler John M. Blumers Amelia E. Bormann Brahm J. Braunstein Maureen F. Connolly David A. Copland Lauren G. Dome Lisa A. Gomez Charles A. Hope John Kelliher Matthew T. Levy Robert A. Maynez Mark K. Molloy Jonathan D. Mutch Shirin Philipp Clare F. Saperstein Jon C. Schultze Trishka Waterbury Joshua J. Wells Jodi H. Yamamoto Mara K. Youdelman

Moyahoena N. Ogilvie

donor George P. Attisano Anna Bastian Christopher R. Bush Kathleen M. Conlon Jeffrey D. Duby Amber L. Eck Duby Sean F. Eagan David R. Feniger Daniel J. Harding Andrea P. Hellman David G. Koch Manjusha P. Kulkarni Chunlin Leonhard Steven D. Ling Murray R. Markowitz Dragica M. Mijailovic Mark Mower David L. Nersessian Erin B. Newman Chigusa Saotome Cynthia M. Selya Ralph N. Sianni Jeffrey Trey

Members of the Class of 1996

q

76

Class of 1996 15th Reunion*

Bruce P. Matzkin

donor

Class of 1997

number of donors: 18 participation rate: 4.4%

Class of 1999

number of donors: 16 participation rate: 3.6%

dean’s club

president’s circle

Zachary D. Beim

Ryan K. Roth Gallo

friend

barrister

Adam D. Janoff

Rebecca A. Galeota

donor

friend

Afshin Ahmadi Kimberly A. Altschul Annelise C. Bauer Michael S. Branley Richard C. Farley, Jr. Mayra L. Garcia Andrea L. Hillier Tara L. Johnson Ronald M. Leshnower Helen A. Muskus Ethlyn O’Garro Edwin C. Pease Kristin G. Pechinsky Elizabeth A. Perl John A. Salerno Catherine V. Tannen

Michele L. Booth Amiel Z. Weinstock

Class of 1998

number of donors: 19 participation rate: 4.3% barrister Tracy K. Evans-Moyer Richard M. Jones Kenneth E. Rubinstein

donor Lisa M. Alexander Randall P. Berdan Austin B. Clayton Sandra K. Davis Rachelle A. DuBow Brian J. Knipe Eric D. Levin Christopher T. Meier Kathleen M. Paralusz Eric Rogers Gregg A. Rubenstein John R. Samia David F. Schink Raisha Vaidya Edith S. Wun Jason P. Zedeck

donor Nathan T. Bouley Delmas A. Costin, Jr. Anthony G. Dimaria John P. Floom Kristen B. Floom Noah A. Hochstadt Timothy C. Hogan Edward P. Kelly Oluwafunmilola F. Odegbami Christine M. O’Malley Joshua N. Perlman Jon C. Trotter

Class of 2000

number of donors: 20 participation rate: 4.6% fellow Lee K. Michel Cindy Z. Michel

barrister Mark E. Bamford Erich S. Lee

friend Christopher M. Loveland

donor Andreas P. Andromalos Franya G. Barnett Tara B. Burdman Elizabeth K. Chen Christine M. Fitzgerald Shera G. Golder Timothy P. Heaton John R. Hession James H. Kaplan Ori Katz Joshua J. Lozner


donor roll: alumni giving july 1, 2011 – june 30, 2012

Christopher Miller Alexander Stampf Adam M. Weisberger Tae-Hoon C. Won

Class of 2001 10th Reunion*

total raised $19,920 number of donors: 23 participation rate: 5.3% dean’s club Lisa Bebchick Beim

fellow John K. Gross

donor Amy J. Berks Joseph L. Devaney Dalmau Garcia Joshua M. Greenblatt Cynthia L. Hardman Kanchan Ketkar Melissa T. Lozner Tony R. Maida Daniel P. Schafer Matthew K. Smith Kleindinst C. Vanel Tobias Wintermantel Robert G. Young

giving societies

President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999

Benjamin J. Berger Cherie M. Bosarge-Dutton Obert H. Chu Amber C. Coisman Mark R. Curiel Felix Dashevsky Edward F. Dombroski, Jr. Timur Feinstein Deena Hausner John G. Hofmann John C. Jennings Avi M. Lev Venu M. Manne Kristin N. Meier Catherine O. Neijstrom Lior J. Ohayon George B. Pauta Hillary A. Pelletier Samuel B. Pollack Patrick J. Reilley Jodie A. Sadowsky Danielle E. Simon Toshihiro Ueda Paula-Marie Uscilla Angela C. De Cespedes Wenke

number of donors: 26 participation rate: 5.7% barrister Adam D. Raucher Jeremy Turk

donor

Christine V. Colmey Gaston de los Reyes Peter N. Fish Marla S. Grant Berit H. Huseby Judith A. Joseph Jenkins David A. Kluft Namita E. Mani Luca C. Melchionna Kendrick D. Nguyen Sheila M. Pozon Andrew E. Saxon Deanna G. Sheridan Zachary H. Smith Catherine K. Sonis Kevin M. Sutehall Michael D. Tauer Sarah A. Tauer

* The reunion giving cycle for classes ending in 1s and 6s includes gifts received in fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012. + Deceased

Rebecca M. Ginzburg Ki-Young Kim Adam W. Kiracofe Melissa D. Kirkel Kaley E. Klanica Jing Ma William S. Norton John J. Okray Christian A. Pugaczewski Leanne E. Scott Jennifer Z. Sieczkiewicz Mark H. Sosnowsky Pasquale F. Stricagnolo Loly G. Tor Cathryn E. Vaughn Brian P. Villarreal

Class of 2005

number of donors: 20 participation rate: 4.9%

Class of 2004

number of donors: 26 participation rate: 6.4% president’s associates Russell J. Stein

fellow Brian D. Eng

barrister

Julia B. Andrus Matthew J. Andrus

Angela Gomes Andrew G. Heinz Christopher D. Strang Colin G. Van Dyke

friend

donor

Wendy L. Fritz

Dana Krueger Jun Qi

friend

donor

Stephanie L. Ives Kevin E. Warner

Farhad R. Alavi Jesse T. Anderson Hugh L. Brady Miller B. Brownstein Melissa S. Gainor

Susanne G. Arani Craig A. Buschmann Padma Choudry Adrienne S. Domey Alexandra M. Gorman Dylan Hale Jessica R. Hale Erica L. Han Daniel Kaufman

barrister

Class of 2003

number of donors: 23 participation rate: 4.7% barrister

Class of 2002

Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

donor Stacie L. Boomstra J. Andrew Cohen

Members of the Class of 2001

q

highest total dollars raised

$1,410,043 class of 1976

highest number of donors

highest participation rate

88 class of 1976

31.5%

class of 1951

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donor roll

Alessandro J. Sacerdoti Kimberly A. Sexton Alexandra L. Shandell David W. Skinner Amanda H. Stumm Ena S. Suh Kenneth N. Thayer Manique S. Wijewardena Bloom Erika L. Wilkinson Deitzah A. Woll Raby

Class of 2008

number of donors: 25 participation rate: 6% friend Susan A. Dunn

donor Jennifer A. Taylor McCloskey Paul S. Mistovich Orna O. Safer Miriam P. Silberstein Sarah M. Waelchli Latarsha S. Williams

Class of 2006 5th Reunion*

Class of 2007

number of donors: 32 participation rate: 7.5%

total raised $3,840 number of donors: 31 participation rate: 7.8%

friend

friend

donor

Sophia K. Yen

donor Candace C. Cavalier Sean Chao Christopher J. Desmond Amory W. Donelly Erika C. Farrell Kelly A. Gabos Nowles H. Heinrich Christopher J. Kiyan Debra M. Koker G. James Kossuth Christee G. Laster Holly C. Lincoln Jeffrey A. Loesel Matthew McCloskey Samuel M. Mirkin Ashkan Mojdehi Bradley C. Morin Kerry A. Moynihan 78

Carly J. Munson Brian D. Nysenbaum Joshua D. Roth Alexandra D. Thaler Irena Zolotova

Joseph E. White Joybell Chitbangonsyn Cheryl C. Edson Gabriella K. Eisner Timothy J. Famulare Jonathan H. Feiler Christopher R. Freeman Francesca L. Fulchignoni Peter B. Hadler Sarah P. Harris Erica G. Jeung Peter A. Kals James J. LaRocca Robert S. Levine Andrea L. Lin Craig G. Marinho Amy H. Martell Wolf P. Mueller-Hillebrand Keum Nang Park Katherine Polak Lauren E. Reznick Behrang Ronaghy

Jeffrey S. Arbeit Nadya C. Bosch David J. Brill Tracy S. Dowling Mark J. Esposito Jesse A. Fecker Ricardo Ganitsky Penelope E. Gronbeck Anthony R. Ten Haagen Rachel M. Irving Stephen M. Johnson Rebecca L. Kurowski Isaac Mamaysky Dena L. Milligan Sara K. Mills Geoffrey G. Moss Kathryn T. Ostman Stephen J. Queenan Carolina A. Rossini Anna M. Schleelein Michele N. Shepherd Joshua F. Tom Claudia F. Torres Karen I. Trattner Gold

Class of 2009

number of donors: 26 participation rate: 5.9% donor Jonathan A. Amar Christopher J. Archer Julie Babayan Jamie M. Charles Jennifer E. Charles

Stephany Collamore Jessica L. Costa Patrick M. Dalin Cristian Casanova Dominguez Carlos E. Duque Benjamin Franklin Jennifer K. Gellie Sara B. Hanson Andrew J. Karelitz Devra S. Lobel Jennifer Lunsford Anat Maytal Kaitlin R. O’Donnell Carissa Rodrigue Nicholas Rohrer Lev Rosenblum Carolyn M. Rucci Mildred A. Solis Adaline R. Strumolo Andrew P. Sutton Jeffrey L. Vigliotti

Class of 2010

number of donors: 22 participation rate: 5% donor Christopher A. Avery Marissa L. Caylor James Ernstmeyer Rebecca H. Gallup Darren M. Goldman Ariel E. Greenstein Mary Alice Hiatt Elizabeth Ho Matthew S. Hyner Daniel I. Jacob Sarah J. Kitchell Benjamin F. Leatherman Inna Loring Michelle L. Marion Benjamin I. Narodick Katerina M. Novak Isabelle Prado Joshua Segal Shane D. St Hill Luke T. Tashjian Jill L. Weiner Robin L. Wish


donor roll: alumni giving july 1, 2011 – june 30, 2012

Class of 2011

number of donors: 24 participation rate: 5.7%

giving societies

President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999

Class of 2012

number of donors: 77 participation rate: 15.9%

donor

dean’s club

Christina E. Asencio Brooke L. Blanchard Jeffrey R. Bozell Ryan C. Chapoteau Christopher A. Fanelli Thomas J. Favaloro Brian K. Hartley Taylor F. Jerri Jeremy D. Knee Pamela A. Leskar Jessica W. Lin Shannon Liu Caitlin J. Monjeau Silvano D. Orsi Kristie-Anne Padron Katerina S. Papacosma John B. Prior Michael J. Quirk Alistair F. Reader Joseph D. Rutkowski Franco Torres Kier B. Wachterhauser Jenny R. Weisenbeck Thomas C. Woodcock

Caroline G. Gammill

barrister John C. Godfrey

donor Agustin I. Andrade Reveron James E. Bobseine Renee E. Burgher Andrea Carrillo Patrick C. Cento Alexis L. Chernow Kyle A. Childers Nicholas S. DiLorenzo Mark S. Eisen Amanda M. Ekey Deborah Farber-Kaiser Johanna D. Ferguson Juliet M. Fiege Stephanie Frank Jack T. Gannon, Jr. Bailey A. Goldberg Cristhian M. Cruz Gonzalez Adam T. Goodstone Mark T. Goracke Miranda J. Ha Mary A. Herman Kelly M. Horein Lynn A. Horowitz Benedict E. Idemundia Regina S. Ingberman Caitlin A. Johnston

Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

Carolyn J. Kendzia Patrick C. Kilgore Kevin E. Kozlowski Matthew R. Kugizaki Jonathan M. Lee So-Yeon Lee Jia Leung Nicholas A. Levenhagen David Linhart Hsiao-Fan Lu Pei-Yi Liu Andriy Lytvyn Chloe Major Liam McMahon Marina A. Miasnikova Brandon J. Middleton-Pratt Valerie A. Moore Maryam Naghavi Melissa B. Nasson Jennifer E. Neubauer Mark E. Nickas Adamma C. Obele Sapna N. Patel Theresa A. Perkins Christina R. Phelan Joanna E. Ray Lauren E. Ripley Jonathon H. Roth Jarrod L. Schaeffer Katharine L. Schanz Jiexin Shi Peter R. Shults Ashley E. Siegel David T. Skinner Molly R. Soiffer Jung Kwang Song

* The reunion giving cycle for classes ending in 1s and 6s includes gifts received in fiscal year 2011 and fiscal year 2012. + Deceased

Maura J. Tansley Julia K. Tebor Jonathan Tigeri Christopher Tom Angelo R. Trivisonno Marissa R. Urban Kristen Verrastro Hao Wang Matthew E. Waters Meghan B. Welteroth Victor T. Xu Marissa R. Zator Veronica N. Zhang

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donor roll

friends, corporations and foundations giving (july 1, 2011 - june 30, 2012) giving societies President’s Circle: $25,000 or More President’s Associates: $10,000 – $24,999 Dean’s Club: $5,000 – $9,999 Fellow: $2,500 – $4,999 Barrister: $1,000 – $2,499 Friend: $500 – $999 Donor: $1 – $499

president’s circle

fellow

Anonymous Anonymous Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund The Estate of A. Vincent Harper ‘51 The Estate of Edith F. Helman Public Interest Student Auction The Schell Family Foundation Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program

BARBRI, Inc. Crutcher Law Firm P.C. Ernst & Young, LLP Tamar Frankel Law Offices of Victor J. Garo The Gayda Family Foundation The Trust of Luke F. Kelley ‘12 Joan Levitt Trust UAD 9/24/07 McKenzie & Associates, P.C. Michel Family Foundation New York Stock Exchange, Inc. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP The William E. Ryckman, Jr. 2009 Trust William E. Ryckman, Jr. Elias Schonberger Sidley Austin LLP Marjorie W. Sloper Charitable Foundation Sirpa G. Tsimal

president’s associates The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jones Day McCausland Foundation The Estate of Rupert D. Morrill ‘48 Occidental Petroleum Corp. Maureen A. O’Rourke and James. M. Molloy Peggy Meyerhoff Pearlstone Foundation S. L. M. Charitable Foundation The Simmons Family Foundation Donald A. Stern Turan Corporation Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP

dean’s club Anonymous Biogen Idec Foundation Deloitte Foundation The Feld Law Firm P.C. Goodwin Procter LLP Medco Health Solutions Charitable Match Fund Schwab Charitable Fund The Stein Family Foundation Inc.

80

barrister Anonymous 120 Wooster LLC David C. Abrams Marlene H. Alderman AMG Charitable Gift Foundation Bingham McCutchen LLP Kristin A. Collins Deutsche Bank Securities Corp. FJC Linda C. McClain and James E. Fleming Goldman Sachs Philanthropy Fund Wendy J. Gordon Hanki Family Trust Jewish Community Foundation Kirkland & Ellis LLP Pnina Lahav Lincoln Financial Group

McDermott Will & Emery Charitable Foundation Morrissey, Wilson & Zafiropoulos LLP New York Life Insurance The Reynold and Bette Paris Family Foundation Elaine J. Pettit and Mark Pettit Philips Electronics North America Ropes & Gray LLP Sea View Realty Trust David J. Seipp Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP & Affiliates Themis Bar Review LLC Thompson & Knight Foundation Lauren and David Walker

friend Advisors Charitable Gift Fund Amalfi JDM, LLC The Boeing Company Law Office of Frank Campbell Daniela Caruso Combined Jewish Philanthropies Fidelity Foundation Franklin Templeton Investments General Electric Company Roberta Goorno Kaplan Kindred Healthcare, Inc. Andrew Kull Law Offices of Bruce Matzkin, LLC Alissa and Gerald Leonard McGuire Woods MetLife, Inc. Pierce Atwood LLP Proskauer Rose LLP Public Interest Bake Sale Public Interest Candy Grams David B. Rossman Peter B. Sang Revocable Trust Norman M. Shack Charitable Foundation Trust Cornell L. Stinson Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Benjamin D. White Larry W. Yackle Zimble Family Charity Fund


donor A&E Television Networks Bruce A. Adams Aetna Inc. All Pro Painters Inc Karen McAndrew Allen Revocable Trust Judith A. Alpert American Biltrite Charitable Trust America’s Charities Michelle E. Arawwawela Emily V. Archibald Maria E. Asencio Associated Jewish Charities of Baltimore AXA Equitable Financial Services, LLC Irene H. Bagdoian Attorney at Law Anthony J. Barbuto Kelsey Barrows Anna Bastian Attorney at Law Jack M. Beermann Bender & Associates Law Offices of Wendy M. Bittner Bloomenthal & Associates, P.C. David M. Blumenthal, Esq., P.C. Robert G. Bone Bove & Langa P.C. Braverman and Lester Jerome C. Brennan Brockton Animal Hospital Michael J. Brown P.C. Constance A. Browne Law Offices of Richard I. Burstein Catherine Butler Isaque C. Cadime Capital One Services Inc. Evans J. Carter P.C. Jeremy T. Cohen Kenneth B. Cohen David R. Cole Mary C. Connaughton Cooper Sapir and Cohen P.C. Brittany A. Copper Maureen P. Corcoran Benedict J. Cosenzo Law Offices of Delmas A. Costin, Jr. Benjamin R. Cox Deutsche DHW & SSW Charitable Foundation Stacey Dogan Anne M. Donahue Charles F. Donahue Christopher M. Donahue David J. Donahue George V. Donahue John E. Donahue Mary E. Donahue Peter Donahue Richard M. Donahue William T. Donahue Duke Energy Corporation ElderCare Resource Services Erin C. Elwood The Barry F. Evans Family Trust

Farrell & Associates P.C. Felos & Felos, P.A. Richard M. Fentin Revocable Trust Maureen Festa Kenneth G. Fettig Stanley Z. Fisher Jerome H. Fletcher Revocable Trust Law Offices of Stanley N. Freedman Dan J. Freehling Gabrieli Family Foundation Gannett Foundation Law Office of Mayra L. Garcia Law Office of R. Scott Gardner Law Office of Richard A. Glaser, P.C. Glavey & Glavey Glynn Law Offices Goldman & Pease LLC Goldman, Sachs & Co. Lee D. Goldstein Thomas Goots Matthew V. Grieco Frederick A. Griffen The Grunebaum Family Fund Hardings Law Offices HD Luck Charitable Trust IBM Raymond James Financial, Inc. Johnson & Johnson JP Morgan Chase Foundation George J. Kacek Jeffrey N. Kahn Law Offices of Martin Kantrovitz Karl L. Halperin & Associates LTD Glen A. Kashgegian Law Offices of Ronald J. Katter Robert A. Killip Thomas R. Klein Phillip C. Koutsogiane, Esq. Michael Kurs Thomas Lauber Eric J. Lavin LAW Class of 2012 Gary S. Lawson Elizabeth Lawton Legal & General American Inc. Lester Lieberman Foundation Eleanor G. Levine Moises & Janina Levy Lexisnexis Bert Libon Lee Like Chiaoling D. Lin Dorothy Litt Priscilla M. Louie David B. Lyons Vicki Maetani Carolyn Malone Karen J. Marcus Thelma Margulies Stephen G. Marks Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. Christine A. Marx and Kenneth W. Simons Jefferson H. Megargel

Stephanie M. Meyer David Michel Monroe & Florence Nash Foundation, Inc. Nancy J. Moore Cristine C. More MotivAction Mandeep Narang Northrop Grumman Foundation Carole A. Oloughlin John P. Opitz Michael K. Outterson Joseph J. Parrilla Revocable Living Trust Maria Pasquale Chris Perkins Dwight E. Perkins The Plymouth Rock Foundation Premier, Inc. David Prolman Mediation Resolution Inc. Prudential Insurance Company of America Michael Radin Xinhua S. Ren Rose, Chinitz & Rose The Aaron & Sylvia Rothenberg Family Foundation, Inc. David T. Rubin Lauren Rubin Law Office of David W. Sanborn Edith B. Schpero Rita R. Schwartz Trust Scoozi Restaurant Whitney Seeburg Shenwick & Associates Lawrence A. & Joan E. Siff Foundation Robert D. Sloane Gay G. Smith Ilana H. Starfield Richard Stewart Anne G. Stiefel D. Craig Story Attorney at Law Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada Megan Sykes Law Offices of Kenneth H. Tatarian Jo E. Temple Aida E. Ten The Law Hut Kanji Tomita F. Norman Totten Towers Watson Steven M. Turbiner United Technologies United Way of Central & Northeastern CT United Way of Rhode Island Upton & Hatfield, LLP Samantha Waite Matthew J. Welch Arlene L. Weyler Mordechai Wiesler Christina A. Wolfe Yoree Trust Zurn, Sharp & Heyman LLP

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alumni volunteers, events & activities

letter from alumni association president dear fellow bu law alumni, Greetings from BU Law! It has been my privilege to serve as president of the Executive Committee of the BU Law Alumni Association for the 2011-2012 year. Every EC Standing Committee was active and its members involved in helping the law school’s priorities become a reality. Learning directly from Dean O’Rourke about BU Law’s current priorities as well as the Dean’s vision for BU Law, in addition to working with other dedicated alumni on the Executive Committee, was both inspiring and rewarding. What I came to understand was the incredible impact BU Law alumni can have on the School and the many ways that we can truly make a difference in this community. First, it is important to recognize how alumni support can impact the Law School. This year we celebrate our success in increasing our Annual Fund total, overall cash received for unrestricted and restricted funds, as well as overall number of donors to the law school. Our personal investment in this great institution will “pay it forward” to so many deserving BU Law students. We can feel proud to contribute to an institution with such a rich history that continues to educate students not only in the theory of law, but also its practice and application so they are fully prepared when they enter the job market.

james c. fox ('86)

Alumni Association President Secondly, there was an increased focus on broader alumni outreach and alumni events around the country. Whether it was a wine tasting in Los Angeles or the Alumni and Admitted Student Reception in Miami, we were there reconnecting with each other and with the School. Please be on the lookout for future events, as there will certainly be more opportunities to reconnect again this year. The EC also focused this year on expanding EC membership opportunities to BU Law alumni all across the country. Please reach out to the Alumni Office if you’re interested in becoming more involved with the EC and BU Law’s Alumni Association. Finally, we all can have an impact on the job placement of our students. Our degrees from BU Law have allowed us to pursue rewarding careers, and now we have the opportunity to place BU Law graduating students at the top of the list when considering new hires. BU Law graduates are among the most talented in the profession. I ask you to recognize this talent and be a resource for BU Law students for networking and job placement. I encourage you to register online at the BU Law Connection at www.bu.edu/law/alumni. I can go on about the many other ways BU Law alumni make a difference, but now I ask you to think about how you can give back and support the law school. I also hope you will come and visit the campus to see all the exciting changes taking place. Become a more engaged member of BU Law’s alumni community, and I promise that you will find it a rich and rewarding experience.

james c. fox 82


alumni volunteers, events & activities

alumni volunteers We would like to acknowledge the following School of Law alumni who volunteer for the University at the highest level and serve as University Trustees and University Overseers. Trustees Richard Cartier Godfrey (‘79) Stephen M. Zide (‘86)

Overseers Steven R. Becker (’76) Thomas M. Bowers (’89) Gerard H. Cohen (’62) Derek Davis (’89) David B. Ellis (’57) William H. Kleh (’71) Ryan K. Roth Gallo (’99)

2012-2013 Alumni Association Executive Committee Officers

2011-2012 Alumni Association Executive Committee Officers

2011-2012 Alumni Association Executive Committee Members

president

president

Joanne Acford (’80)+ Susan Alexander (’81) Matthew Andrus (’04) Morton Aronson (’59) Peter Bennett (’85) Timothy Charles Blank (’86) Leslie Bloomenthal (’65) David Breen (’90) Robert Brennan (’90) Douglas Brown (’88) Ryan Chapoteau (’11) Gerard Cohen (’62) Howard Cooper (’84) Derek Davis (’89) Martin Desmery (’87) Thomas Dolan (’92) Gary Domoracki (’89) James N. Esdaile, Jr. (’70)+

Carla Munroe Moynihan (‘95)

president-elect Andrew P. Strehle (’94)

vice presidents Kathryn A. Piffat (‘89) Christopher D. Strang (‘05)

James C. Fox (’86)

president-elect Carla Munroe Moynihan (’95)

vice presidents

treasurer

Kathryn A. Piffat (’89) Leiha Macauley (’01) Christopher D. Strang (’05)

Matthew Andrus (‘04)

treasurer

recording secretary

Denzil McKenzie (‘76)

Francis C. Morrissey (’94)

recording secretary

corresponding secretary

Andrew P. Strehle (’94)

Rebecca A. Galeota (‘99)

corresponding secretary

parliamentarian

Rebecca A. Galeota (’99)

Jamie M. Charles (’09)

parliamentarian Matthew Andrus (’04)

2011-2012 Executive Committee Officers, from left: James C. Fox (’86) – President; Andrew P. Strehle (’94) – Recording Secretary; Christopher D. Strang (’05) – Vice President; Leiha Macauley (’01) – Vice President; Kathryn A. Piffat (’89) – Vice President; Jamie M. Charles (’09) – Young Alumni Council President

2012-2013 Executive Committee Officers, from left: Francis C. Morrissey (’94) – Recording Secretary; Rebecca A. Galeota (’99) – Corresponding Secretary; Andrew P. Strehle (’94) – President-Elect; Carla Munroe Moynihan (’95) – President; Christopher D. Strang (’05) – Vice President; Kathryn A. Piffat (’89) – Vice President; Jamie M. Charles (’09) – Parliamentarian; Matthew J. Andrus (’04) – Treasurer

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A special note of recognition and appreciation goes out to alumni who have served as event hosts, members of host committees, and mentors to our 1L students. Additional thanks to the many alumni who informally contribute their valuable time, wisdom and energy in so many varied ways to help build and strengthen the BU Law community, both on and off campus. Joseph Faber (’91) Thomas C. Farrell (’91) John Finn (’80) Warren Fitzgerald (’79) Michael Fondo (’90) James C. Fox (’86) Ana Francisco (’93) Carolyn Jacoby Gabbay (’76) Rebecca A. Galeota (’99) Victor Garo (’65) Celina Gerbic (’91) Robert Glovsky (’76) Edward Goddard (’90) Eileen Herlihy (’82) George Herlihy (’47) Kay Hideko Hodge (’77) Adam Janoff (’97) Richard Karelitz (’74) Christopher A. Kenney (’90) Sarah Kitchell (’10) ex officio William Landau (’59)+ Andrew Ley (’75) Leiha Macauley (’01) Maureen MacFarlane (’89) Lisa Martin Nagler (’01) Karen Mathiasen (’81) Edward McCarthy (’62) Denzil McKenzie (’76) Richard Mikels (’72) Frances Miller (’65)

Francis C. Morrissey (’90) Carla Munroe Moynihan (’95) James Moynihan (’95) Christian Na (’97) James Normand (’80) Andrea Nuciforo (’89) Kathryn A. Piffat (’89) Roger Putnam (’51) Dan Rea (’74) Bruce Rogoff (‘83) Eugene Rubin (’61) Kim Rubin (’88) Kenneth Rubinstein (’98) Christopher D. Strang (’05) Andrew P. Strehle (’94) Andrew Sucoff (’89) Neil Sugarman (’65) Annabelle Terzian (’51) William Tyler (’51) Kier Wachterhauser (’11) ex officio Gina Walcott (’93) Oscar Wasserman (’59) Barry Weiner (’66) David Yas (’93)

+ Deceased

2010-2011 Alumni Association President Christopher A. Kenney (’90) receives a token of appreciation from Dean Maureen A. O’Rourke for his service as President of the Alumni Association. q

84

Young Alumni Council 2011-2012 boston president Jamie M. Charles (’09)

members Christopher D. Strang (’05) Dan Levin (’09) Christopher Valente (’09) Jennifer Taylor McCloskey (’05) Matthew McCloskey (’06) Jennifer Ihns Charles (’09)

2012 3L Class Gift Committee Kyle A. Childers Thomas Faiella John C. Godfrey Ryan P. Kelly Matthew R. Kugizaki Hao Wang

Law Firm Challenge Captains FY12 Kathryn A. Piffat (’89) Edwards Wildman Palmer LLP Colin G. Van Dyke (’05) Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C. Dan V. McCaughey (’04) Ropes & Gray LLP Jonathan L. Awner (’85) Akerman Senterfitt LLP D. M. Moschos (’65) Mirick, O’Connell, DeMallie & Lougee, LLP Matthew S. Hyner (’10) Brown Rudnick LLP Angela Gomes (’05) Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Katerina S. Papacosma (’11) Bingham McCutchen LLP Leiha Macauley (’01) Day Pitney LLP Christopher D. Strang (’05) Desmond, Strang & Scott, LLP

2011-2012 Alumni Association President James C. Fox (’86) gives his remarks at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the BU Law Alumni Association.q


alumni volunteers, events & activities

alumni benefits BU Law Connection

BU Law has created this site to help you connect more easily with your fellow alumni. You can search for friends and make new connections with the BU Law Connection. We hope you will register and take advantage of its benefits. www.bu.edu/law/alumni

Did you know that just by being a graduate of Boston University, you are eligible for many alumni benefits, such as exclusive discounts and special access to University resources? For a full listing of special offers for graduates, please visit www.bu.edu/alumni.

Alumni Course Audit Benefit

BU Alumni have the opportunity to audit classes for academic enrichment through the Metropolitan College.

Barnes & Noble for Alumni

BU Alumni receive a 10% discount on general trade books and on most merchandise from the Barnes & Noble @ Boston University.

BU Credit Card

BU Alumni Credit Card – Show your Terrier pride by applying for the Boston University Alumni Visa card available through U.S. Bank. This is the only card that supports Boston University’s alumni, student and athletic programming.

Insurance for BU Alumni

The BU Alumni Association is pleased to offer several types of medical, life, auto and home insurance available at special rates to BU Alumni.

Library Benefits for BU Alumni

BU Alumni have borrowing privileges for all circulating materials from any Boston University library. This excludes online resources.

Princeton Club in NYC

BU Alumni have the opportunity to apply for affiliate membership to this prestigious social and business club, which offers comfortable and elegant facilities as well as many amenities, benefits and services.

Zipcar for BU Alumni

BU Alumni receive a discounted Zipcar membership for only $25—a savings of up to $150! Zipcar offers selfservice access to cars by the hour or the day. They are located in easy-to-get-to parking spaces in neighborhoods throughout Boston, New York, San Francisco, Toronto and Washington, DC.

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alumni volunteers, events & activities

fy12 alumni events To see the list of upcoming BU Law events or to get more information, visit our Web site at www.bu.edu/law/alumni/events or contact the Esdaile Alumni Center at 617.353.3118 or lawalum@bu.edu.

2011 July 9 Young Alumni Council Community Service Event - Cradles to Crayons Rosie's Place, Boston, MA J uly 14 Young Alumni Council Trivia Night Elephant & Castle, Boston, MA AUG 1 BU Law Alumni Day At Fenway Park Fenway Park, Boston, MA 

AUG 4

Annual Alumni Reception in conjunction with the ABA Annual Meeting Fairmont Royal York, Toronto, Ontario

UG 18 New York City Career Fair Reception A Brasserie 8 1/2, New York, NY OCT 6 

1L Mentor Program Kick-Off Reception & Young Alumni Council Networking 101 Barristers Hall, Boston, MA

OCT 12 

Young Alumni Council 5th Annual Speed Networking Clarke's, Boston, MA

OCT 18  OCT 29 

Quarterly Alumni Association Executive Committee Meeting Barristers Hall, Boston, MA Dean's Advisory Board Meeting BU Law Tower, Boston, MA

OCT 29  BU Law Golden Circle Reunion Luncheon Barristers Hall, Boston, MA OCT 29 65th Annual Boston University Alumni Awards Metcalf Ballroom, GSU, Boston, MA OCT 29 

Reunion Gala Dinner & Silver Shingle Awards Presentation Mandarin Oriental, Boston, MA

DEC 1 

Young Alumni Council Holiday Social The Living Room, Boston, MA

86


2012 JAN 5 Alumni Reception in conjunction with the Association of American Law Schools Annual Meeting Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, DC JAN 19 Alumni Hosted Campaign Dinner Philadelphia, PA JAN 25

FEB 22



Quarterly Meeting of the Alumni Association’s Executive Committee Hillel House,­Boston, MA



Young Alumni Council “How to Survive & Thrive” Alumni Panel Brown Rudnick, Boston, MA

FEB 23 Alumni & Admitted Student Reception WilmerHale LLP, New York, NY FEB 29 

Alumni & Admitted Student Reception Jenner & Block LLP, Chicago, IL

MAR 3  Asian Pacific American Alumni Conference: Breaking Barriers and Overcoming Obstacles in the 21st Century BU Law Tower, Boston, MA MAR 5  Women of Color in the Law Panel BU Law Tower, Boston, MA MAR 5  Alumni Lunch with Students: Linda Lager (‘75) BU Law Tower, Boston, MA MAR 8 

Alumni & Admitted Student Reception Akerman Senterfitt LLP, Miami, FL

MAR 12 Alumni & Admitted Student Reception WilmerHale LLP, Los Angeles, CA MAR 13  Alumni & Admitted Student Reception Sedgwick LLP, San Francisco, CA MAR 22  Quarterly Meeting of the Alumni Association Executive Committee GSU, Boston, MA MAR 22  Public Interest Project Annual Auction Metcalf Ballroom, GSU, Boston, MA MAR 23  Black Law Alumni Association: The Pathways to Success Panel BU Law Tower, Boston, MA MAR 24 

MAR 24  Black Law Student’s Association: Annual Gala BU Photonics Center, Boston, MA MAR 28   Alumni Lunch with Students: Jonathan Halpern (‘84) BU Photonics Center, Boston, MA MAR 29   Alumni & Admitted Student Reception Ropes & Gray LLP, Boston, MA APR 5 Alumni & Admitted Student Reception Sidley Austin LLP, Washington, DC APR 19 Dean’s Advisory Board Meeting New York Yacht Club, New York, NY 

APR 25

Young Alumni Council Happy Hour The Times, Boston, MA

PR 26 Boston Small Firm Members Dinner A Eastern Standard, Boston, MA AY 12 Young Alumni Council Welcome M New Alumni BBQ Warren Alpert Mall, Boston, MA 

MAY 23

BU Law Alumni Cocktail Reception Novecento, Miami, FL

JUN 6  The Investment World in 2012 Bernstein Global Wealth Management, Boston, MA JUN 6  BU Law Alumni Wine Tasting Los Angeles Athletic Club, Los Angeles, CA JUN 10  BU Law Alumni Day At Fenway Park Fenway Park, Boston, MA JUN 12 

BU Alumni Luncheon The Coronado Club, Houston, TX

JUN 14 

BU Law Alumni Reception in conjunction with the Rhode Island Bar Association Annual Meeting The Westin Providence, Providence, RI

JUN 19  BU School of Law Alumni Cocktail Reception Bingham McCutchen LLP, New York, NY JUN 27 

Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association Executive Committee John Hancock Student Village, Boston, MA

Black Law Alumni Association: The General Counsel’s Perspective BU Law Tower, Boston, MA annual report of giving

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esdaile alumni center

esdaile alumni center staff contact information cornell l. stinson, j.d.

cristine c. more, c.f.r.e.

zach dubin

emily v. archibald

Associate Director for Annual Giving & Leadership Gifts 617.353.7039 zdubin@bu.edu

Assistant Director for Annual Giving 617.358.5459 evarch@bu.edu

sara dacey

samantha j. waite

Assistant Dean for Development and Alumni Relations 617.358.5351 cstinson@bu.edu

Director of Advancement 617.353.8012 ccmore@bu.edu

Development Coordinator 617.353.6647 swaite@bu.edu

Assistant Director for Alumni Relations 617.358.4873 sdacey@bu.edu

The Esdaile Alumni Center has made every effort possible to ensure the accuracy of this donor roll. In the event that we have inadvertently omitted your name or listed you incorrectly, please let us know so we may correct our records. Also, please feel welcome to contact us with any questions you may have. For information regarding a gift or the many ways in which you can make a gift to BU Law, please contact us at: 88

Esdaile Alumni Center 765 Commonwealth Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 02215 Phone: 617.353.3118 Fax: 617.353.7744 Email: lawalum@bu.edu

www.bu.edu/law/alumni


get involved! One of the most valuable ways for alumni to reconnect with BU Law is by volunteering. Wherever you live or whatever your time constraints, we have a volunteer opportunity to match your interest. mentor a first-year student

be a resource for new lawyers

join the young alumni council

For over a decade, the Mentor Program Students and graduates can benefit from The Young Alumni Council (YAC) is Boshas connected first-year students to your knowledge and connections you ton University School of Law’s direct line School of Law alumni. Students assigned are willing to share. Respond generto young alumni. It was created by young to alumni benefit from the guidance ously to outreach from our students alumni to help the Esdaile Alumni Center and advice offered by individuals who and graduates, and join the BU Law better serve the needs and wants of the understand, through firsthand experience, Alumni Mentor Directory on LinkedIn. School’s large young alumni (less than the issues and concerns students face. If you are interested, please contact 10 years out) population both locally and For more information and to volunlawcdo@bu.edu or (617) 353-3141. nationally. To get involved or help start a teer for the 1L Mentor Program, please chapter, contact the Esdaile Alumni Cen hire our students and contact the Esdaile Alumni Center at ter at lawalum@bu.edu or (617) 353-3118. recent graduates lawalum@bu.edu or (617) 353-3118. If you know of a job, tell the BU Law CDO. connect with alumni Encourage your employer to interview in your area be a guest speaker on campus or send job postings to the Regional chapters help engage our alumni There are numerous opportunities to CDO. Hire a recent graduate to work across the country by planning networkshare your area of expertise with students full or part-time, even if for a limited ing experiences, events and special at special Law School events. Alumni term. To help in any of these ways or to programming. Because School of Law guest speakers provide students with discuss what you can do to support the alumni live in all 50 states and around firsthand knowledge about acclimating newest BU lawyers, contact the CDO the world, there are many opportunito law school, how to prepare for their at lawcdo@bu.edu or (617) 353-3141. ties to reconnect with local graduates legal careers, and how to manage their for personal and professional purposes. time and competing obligations once support the public interest auction Please consider hosting an event in they have entered the workforce. If you Each year, the success of the Pubyour home or place of employment, or are interested in being a guest speaker, lic Interest Auction is dependent on joining or establishing a local alumni contact Christine Marx, Associate Dean alumni involvement — attendees, bidchapter in your area. If you are interested for Student Affairs, at cmarx@bu.edu, ders and contributors. Sponsored by in any of these opportunities, please (617) 358-1800 or Maura Kelly, Assistant the Public Interest Project, the annual contact the Esdaile Alumni Center at Dean for Career Development & Public auction raises funds for student sumlawalum@bu.edu or (617) 353-3118. Service, at kelly@bu.edu, (617) 353-3141. mer public interest fellowships. These funds underwrite the students inter judge moot court For more details and additional ways to get ested in summer public interest jobs. Alumni are invited to apply as judges for involved as well as upcoming events, please BU Law Moot Court Programs. Each year, alumni volunteers judge oral arguments for the First-Year Esdaile Moot Court Program and second-year upper-level competitions, as well as the Negotiation, Client Counseling and Arbitration Competitions. If you are interested in becoming a moot court judge, contact Jennifer Taylor McCloskey in the FirstYear and Advocacy Programs Office at jataylor@bu.edu or (617) 353-3107.

Any and all creative auction items and contributions are welcome. Past student favorites have included:

visit us online at www.bu.edu/law/alumni. For the latest updates and alumni events, look for us via social media:

• Sporting events tickets • Arts events tickets • Weekend getaway destination

certificates • Special passes to events or museums • Hot air balloon ride • Dinner packages

Alumni interested in supporting the auction should contact the Public Interest Project at 617-353-7255. annual report of giving

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fall 2012

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Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage Boston, MA Permit No. 1839

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BU Law - Record - 2012  

The Record, the School’s annual alumni magazine, was launched in May 2005. The Record is published annually in the summer and highlights the...

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