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ISSUE 03

RORY KENNEDY // BENJAMIN COOPER // ROSAN MAGAR // HARRIET LOWTHER // ELENYA GRANT // PERRY ROWE //

ILLUSTRATION BY ROSAN MAGAR.


EDITOR’S LETTER WHAT IS BUMF?

As both this academic year, and my time at AUB both draw to an inevitable finale, I feel a strange, giddy mixture of pride and confidence. This past year has seen BUMF transformed; thanks to the concerted efforts of our Editors-in-Chief we welcomed BUMF:Gallery onto the scene in September, I found a delightful Editorial team in October who’ve since been developing BUMF into what it is now, we’ve seen more submissions, published more content and reached a wider audience than ever before, we’ve introduced a new bi-weekly Friday Feature - an interview and video dedicated to one impressive student, we’ve reviewed plays and performances and featured a more courses than ever before, and last but not least, my personal favourite, BUMF was shortlisted for two national awards – for Best Publication and Best Specialist Publication by the Student Publication Association. It’s been quite a year!

Mission Statement BUMF originally started off as a 32 page printed zine consisting of students’ work from the Arts University Bournemouth. BUMF:Media is a multi-platform brand offering students numerous opportunities to showcase their work. Our aim is to continuously develop current platforms for students, and to create more awareness for the creative abilities at AUB.

Submissions

This year BUMF has numerous different platforms to feature students’ work.

What should you expect from BUMF Issue 03 and the future? Well, this issue is rammed full of stuff; we’ve got interviews, reviews, events, and tonnes of creative goodness from across the full spectrum at AUB, everything from serious to silly! And that confidence I mentioned? I’m leaving BUMF in the very capable hands of the 2016-17 AUBSU Comms Officers, Alice Pomfret and Rory James, who have been Editors at BUMF this year, to be overseen by 2016-17 AUBSU President Lauren Housego and VicePresident Ismini Black. Enjoy reading!

/BUMFmedia

BUMF:Media - Our Online Website BUMF:Zine - Our Printed Zine BUMF:Gallery - Our In-house Gallery Please visit our website to submit: bumfmedia.co.uk/submit

PRINTED BY// NEWSPAPER CLUB

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PRINT RUN // 500 COPIES


CONTENTS 4 | EVENTS CALENDAR

EDITORS IN CHIEF

6 | RORY KENNEDY

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

WHAT’S HAPPENING?

OSCAR WOODRUFF MEGAN HOOD

F(ARTY) COMICS

WILL ABLETT

EDITORS

8 | BENJAMIN COOPER BIG PIT

RORY JAMES ALICE POMFRET

12 | LAUREN HOUSEGO

DESIGN

THE GRASP PROJECT

ALICE POMFRET

REVIEW EDITORS

14 | ROSAN MAGAR HOME FOR THE STARS

LAUREN HOUSEGO PAULINE KORP

18 | HARRIET LOWTHER

PHOTOGRAPHERS

COMPETITIVE WINTER

EWA FERDYNUS RORY JAMES

20 | ELENYA GRANT

SUBMISSION SCOUT

BRAILLE

ELVAR SIG

24 | ONE PIECE OF ADVICE

SOCIAL MEDIA

SIR PETER COOK

MARIANNE

26 | PERRY ROWE

BUMF:GALLERY TEAM

DEVELOPING ILLUSTRATIONS

YASEMIN TOPCAM (GALLERY COORDINATOR) JORDAN BOSHER (GALLERY TEAM) FELIX SPELLER (PHOTOGRAPHER)

30 | BUMF:GALLERY REVIEW

| VISUAL

| WORD 3

| GALLERY


WHATS HAPPENING? APRIL

22ND

23RD

23RD

28-29TH

3RD - 5TH

5TH/8TH

9TH

5TH - 7TH

6TH - 9TH

7TH - 11TH

21ST

THE TURN OF THE SCREW 19:30 PAVILLION DANCE

MAY

9th

CUSP (PHOTOGRAPHY) 17:00 PV THE FACTORY STUDIOS

JUNE

AUBSU SUMMER BALL 13:00 SOMERLEY TEA PARTY

G.DESIGN // VISCOM GS 5th 18:00 PV OLD TRUMAN BREWERY

AUB THANKYOU AWARDS 15:45-17:00 AUB

GRAD FASHION SHOW 14:30 // 16:30 // 19:30 PAVILLION

GRAD FASHION WEEK 6th - 11:00AM TRUMAN BREWERY LONDON

COMM.PHOTOGRAPHY GS 7th 18:00 - 22:00 PV CANDID ARTS LONDON

PV - PRIVATE VIEW GS - GRAD SHOW

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THE GRASP PROJECT 13:00 THE FACTORY STUDIOS

BOURNEMOUTH 7’S FESTIVAL

MODELMAKING 18:00 PV HOLBORN STUDIOS LDN

PHOTOGRAPHY GS 7th 18:00 - 22:00 PV OLD TRUMAN BREWERY


//BUMF.MEDIA

ILLUSTRATION - ZOE SLATTER

28TH

HOT AIR (FINE ART) 17:00 - 19:00 PV LOWER GARDENS

29TH

TEXTILES 18:00 PV BUSINESS DESIGN CENTRE

JULY

30TH

MAP - MUSIC ARCH POOLE UNTIL 24TH AUGUST AUB GALLERY

7TH - 11TH 8TH FINE ART GS 7th 18:00 PV OLD TRUMAN BREWERY

FILM & ANIMATION GS 10:00 // 17:00 SOUTHBANK BFI

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1ST

GRADUATION BALL 22:00 O2 ACADEMY

14TH - 18TH

INTERIOR ARCH&DESIGN GS 18:00 PV 14th OLD TRUMAN BREWERY


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RORY KENNEDY // 3RD YEAR ILLUSTRATION

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BEN COOPER / 2ND YEAR COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

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// BENJAMINCOOPERPHOTOS.TUMBLR.COM

“From memories of visiting this place as a boy scout many years ago, I remember being amazed at the fact that I could go underground like miners once did.”

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BEN COOPER // 2ND YEAR COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER

BIG PIT Ben: “Big pit was a project that stemmed from an initial idea I had about British industry going through major stages of deindustrialization. Deciding that it would be best if I explored one industry in more depth, I stumbled across Big Pit, a mining museum. However, I found myself actually becoming disheartened, to me this place was just now an ode to a time when Britain was an industrial powerhouse. I became intrigued by the pit’s workers, people that would once sweat day and night to just extract minerals from the ground are now clean and left to just direct tourists around this ghost of an industry. Another major point that caught my attention is the beautiful scenery that surrounded this place, it is placed in Blaenavon in the south of Wales, and these mines originally fractured the landscape for a beneficiary purpose, but what is now redundant. This could either be considered a tragedy, or a beautiful reminder of what the British industry once was.”

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// LAUREN HOUSEGO - REVIEW EDITOR

THE GRASP PROJECT I think most of us can agree that Bournemouth, being a retirement town and mostly coming to life in summer after the majority of students have left, doesn’t have much going on outside of the university. Things are improving, and Bournemouth has a lot of potential, with an upcoming and emerging arts scene supporting independent events, but at times it’s about as exciting as visiting your nan (given the population of OAPs here, chances are she lives in Bournemouth already). Which probably explains why most student activities consist either of being at uni, or being wasted in The Winchester. So, The Grasp Project is a refreshing little oasis of craft and creativity. Run by two third-year Arts and Events Managements students, it’s a celebration of traditional craft skills to combat the digital age. The project is running a series of innovative workshops throughout the day in Origami, Brushmaking, Lino-printing and Laser-etching Ceramics all for £6 a pop. Spaces are limited, so get in there quick if you want to pick up a new skill! The workshops are followed by an evening event (also £6 per ticket) with artist talks from ceramicist Benjamin Matthews and activist Sarah Corbett who runs the Craftivist Collective in London, live bands and poetry from award-winning feminist poet, Megan Beech. It is exciting to see an event that moves past the monotony of alcohol and is stimulating, rather than killing, your brain cells. The compelling evening talks offer us an insight into life as an activist artist, as Sarah Corbett is a kind of ex-activist who, after spending years marching and protesting, is trying a less-aggressive approach to encouraging

sustainable activism through craft and community. Benjamin Matthews uses laser cutting in his ceramics practice, and this blend of technology and traditional craft is right at the forefront of the creative industries facing us as graduating arts students. Lastly, Megan Beech has been included in a number of Feminist Icon lists in the Guardian and Evening Standard, performed at Glastonbury and recently made a film with the BBC for the iplayer series “Women Who Spit”. All interesting stuff! The movement to revive craft is an admirable one. Something that irks me about modern-living is how far removed we have become from practical skills and learning to do things ourselves. Our generation, at the mercy of technology and convenient capitalism, with the almost factory-farmed process of going to university and into a ready-made Graduate Scheme or job, is losing the skills of traditional trades and entrepreneurship. Life isn’t about sitting at a computer in an office job then going home and sitting on a computer on your sofa. It’s time for us all to learn how to do something useful, to remember what it feels like to work with materials, touch, sound and smells. So, instead of burning £60 on another predictable night out that you can’t remember and a hangover, grab yourself a bargain and learn a new skill, you never know where it might lead you!

*OPINIONS EXPRESSED ARE WRITERS OWN & NOT HELD BY THE SU.

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THE GRASP PROJECT

The Grasp Project is at Boscombe Factory Studios on Saturday 23rd April Workshops (ÂŁ6 per ticket): Origami with Esther Thorpe Brush making with Ellie Birkhead Lino-printing with Sarah Fennell Ceramics and Laser-etching with Benjamin Matthews

Evening event (ÂŁ6 per ticket): Talks by Sarah Corbett, activist and founder of Craftivist Collective, and ceramicist Benjamin Matthews Live music acts The Dubarrys and Hannah Robinson Poetry by feminist poet Megan Beech Tickets are available online from //thelittleboxoffice.com/TheGraspProject

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ROSAN MAGAR / 3RD YEAR ILLUSTRATION

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//BEHANCE.NET/ROSANMAGAR

HOME FOR THE STARS Rosan: “This is an personal illustration piece that I made for myself and then exhibited at “Asian Osmosis-Bournemouth Emerging Art Fringe”. It was inspired by the memory of my Grandmother’s home back in Nepal. The subjects of my memory are placed in my imaginative world. My grandmother’s place was like a playhouse for me with the wooden carved ladder, terraced fields to run around, giant trees to play hide and seek around, chasing the chickens, endless fruits to eat from the trees and the most consolatory view of the stars dancing in the night sky.

I have also featured my project ‘The Crystal Expedition’ inspired by J.G Ballard’s book The Crystal World. The text has inspired me to produce my own interpretation of the crystal forest. The visual description is absolutely beautiful and that’s exactly what I wanted my illustration to reflect, the bright and happy side of the Crystal forest.”

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ROSAN MAGAR // 3RD YEAR ILLUSTRATION

“The crystalline trees hanging like icons in those luminous caverns, the jewelled casements of leaves overhead, fused into a lattice of prisms, through which the sun shone in a thousand rainbows, the bird and crocodile frozen into grotesque postures like heraldic beasts carved from jade and quartz - what was really remarkable was the extent to which I accepted all these inward pattern of the universe.�

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//INSTAGRAM @HARRIETLOWTHERTEXTILES

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HARRIET LOWTHER // 3RD YEAR TEXTILES

COMPETITIVE WINTER Harriet: “Competitive Winter, has taken the stimulus of my vast passion for ‘ski’ and the desire to capture the dynamic atmosphere of a forever growing sport and trend. Inspiration has been taken from being immersed within the environment of snow, landscape, equipment, skills, racers and competitions, whilst taking particular influence from the pattern, shape and texture of the myriad equipment. This project focuses on my specialisms of stitch, surface manipulation and simple hand print, combined with my bold use of colour and shape, together with the use of a range of materials, to create an innovative collection of fabrics and wall covers for interior spaces. The final designs are a combination of my three specialism techniques, which in turn serve to highlight my bold designs. Materials used include; sportswear fabrics, plastics, in order to explore and create inventive surfaces with stimulating tactile qualities.”

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ELENYA GRANT / 3RD YEAR COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

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//ELENYAGRANT.WIX.COM/PHOTOGRAPHY

BRAILLE

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ELENYA GRANT // 3RD YEAR COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER

Elenya: “Braille, a conceptual fashion editorial. Working with braille and the female form to create images that depict naturalness and exposes the body through transparent fabrics. The idea is to create a tactile, personal relationship between the viewer and subject matter. The braille is raised by gems stuck onto the print. Inspired by the quote ‘He reads the goosebumps on my skin like a blind man reads braille’, I took the act of stroking fingertips across the braille to seem like you are caressing the subject matter, creating a kind of intimacy. It also acts as a stimulus to those who cannot see the image, the braille reads poetic descriptions that paint vague aspects of the image, leaving the rest open to imagination.”

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AN INTERVIEW WITH SIR PETER COOK TAKEN FROM ONE PIECE OF ADVICE // AUB ALUMNI PUBLICATION Your career is incredibly prolific, yet the AUB Drawing Studio is the first building of yours to be built in the UK, which seems to surprise people. Can you take us through your career and how it’s progressed, from the very beginning up until the Drawing Studio?

If we were to flatten Bournemouth right now, how would you rebuild it?

My career has been a fairly unusual one. I was at the Bournemouth College when it was just an art school with a tiny little architecture school. Then, I went to the AA [Architectural Association School of Architecture]. Then, I did a project when I was about 26 or 27 called Plug-in City. That became very famous very quickly, because it was picked up by the Sunday Times Colour Supplement and got published a lot abroad. By the time I was in my late 20s, I was quite famous to a lot of people who knew about architecture.

I have a project that I started about two or three years ago, which was to take the absurdity that Bournemouth and Poole are separate and to reestablish a Pine city centred on Westbourne and Upper Branksome. To take the old border and put the centre there.

Through getting to know a number of people around London, we formed this thing called Archigram. Really, we did the magazine first and then the group formed around it. I suppose I was the sort-of pushy member of that. It was a greatly talented group of people, so collectively we got to be very well known, and started to be invited abroad a lot for exhibitions. Meanwhile, after working in a few offices, I was brought back to teach at the Architectural Association and I have, until relatively recently, been — at least in some capacity — employed by an academic institute. Even now I’m retired, I’m still doing quite a lot of teaching and lecturing. Certainly a lot of lecturing — as much now as I’ve ever done.

So how did the commission for AUB’s Drawing Studio come about? Around five or six years ago, I had a call from Stuart Bartholomew [Principal and Vice-Chancellor, AUB] saying, ‘We’d like to make you fellow of the college.’ And then later came this letter out of the blue from him saying, ‘We’d like you to do a building for us.’ Most of the things we have done we have had to hustle for. We’ve had to get the work by doing competitions, by tendering, by competing, or working alongside some other bigger out ts that are more commercial. This came as a straight commission.

“I THINK THERE ARE CERTAIN TIMES WHEN YOU’RE WITH A CERTAIN GROUP OF PEOPLE AND YOU SAY, ‘THIS IS SPECIAL AND MAGIC’ — AND DIFFICULT TO SUSTAIN, USUALLY BECAUSE OF MONEY OR BECAUSE OF PEOPLE’S AMBITIONS. BUT YOU KNOW IT’S SPECIAL.”

I think being an old person and having lived in Bournemouth predominantly in the 50s and 60s, I think Bournemouth itself has become crummier. I don’t think it’s just a distorted memory. Old Christchurch Road was an interesting street. It’s less interesting now. It’s either clubs or crap. And that’s partly because of the socioeconomics of the situation. The people who would’ve spent money going to Bournemouth and buying a Harris Tweed suit and going to have to tea in a department store, they don’t go there anymore. The equivalent people would be on a plane going somewhere warmer. And that’s the reality of Bournemouth, really. I remember my Dad going into a pub where the whole Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, or certainly its brass department, including the conductor would go there after rehearsals. I think they’re probably younger and too hardworked to go and drink down the pub now. They certainly do more concerts. The world has changed, in the way that buildings are now designed on the computer. Orchestras don’t necessarily go and get pissed in the pub. The town doesn’t have little funny shops. There were lots of funny antique shops and bric-a-brac shops. It seems to have got much more at. There’s a sort of sadness to that. What kind of advice do you always find yourself telling students? I’ve come round to telling them more and more to look at things. Far too many students and people in general go to the formulaic approach, the tickbox approach. They say, ‘Okay I must analyse how many people walk along the street in half an hour’. Rather like my analogy of the Marks & Spencer story, it’s just bean counting the obvious. And Zara caught up with the young ones, even if the clothes fall to bits. And I’m not in the fashion business!

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PHOTOGRAPH BY JACK ORTON

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SPECIAL THANKS TO OPOA & SIR PETER COOK


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RORY KENNEDY // 3RD YEAR ILLUSTRATION

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//PERRYROWE.COM

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PERRY ROWE // 2ND YEAR GRAPHIC DESIGN

DEVELOPING ILLUSTRATION A small collection of personal illustrations that is undergoing development. Perry: “Whenever I begin a drawing, I always block in basic/ overall shapes of a subject, then continue refining and adding detail. These illustrations are based on the initial blocking stages which includes analysing angles of the shape to create the overall form. Every angle within each of these illustrations is matched. The experimentation of cutting out each part and painting them separately like a jigsaw gave a nice texture to the illustrations.�

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// PAULINE KORP - REVIEW EDITOR

‘LIGHTWRITERS’ REVIEW This BUMF exhibition could easily act as an awareness campaign for one of the most relevant problems in our everyday lives. We live in an antisocial, digital-heavy age, in which everything is simplified and made easy to use. It is often thought to be a generation of minimal creativity, effort and experimentation. For instance, in the age of Snapchat and Instagram, many of us with a camera could succeed at taking fascinating, beautiful photographs, even though they do not know anything about the specifics of photography. The artists displayed in "Lightwriters" almost take a stand against this mainstream fashion of everyone wanting to be a photographer. They show that photography is not only about taking a ‘nice’ photo, but it is also about the techniques and different ways of creating a photograph, capturing the essence of life and our existence in it. The exhibition itself was a collection of photographs that have been created using cameraless methods, using light as it's main tool. Although, for me, the main beauty of this exhibition was that the participants of this exhibition created not only photos, but also 'graphics', therefore, successfully fulfilling the definition of the word 'photographic'. Heather Connolly created a series of ‘lightwritings' by causing light to react with an object on light sensitive paper. The main intention of the artist was to create a conversation of the specifics of the manufacturing of these 'writings'. She wanted people to discuss, discover and think about her creations. However, these images cover a whole technique, work process and even a secret method. This creates a different conversation entirely (which could not be a result of a simple Instagram photo!) as the matter in question is about the diversity and mystery of the technique, as well as the effort put into the artwork. Samuel Day created a series of images through experimenting with different colours and the methodical logic of photographic printing. He worked in reverse order to get to the desired colours and, therefore, using his knowledge of the additive and subtractive colours, he created these amazing pieces of art. When placed next to each other they create an almost graphic-like pattern through the use of different space and shapes. The 'writings' draw you into the colour and, again, make you ask the important question – how?

Margaret Maguire explored the three-dimensional space with analogue, cameraless photography. She applied this to her work by experimenting with different perceptions of space, time, form and light. Her photographs use objects to leave a print through the implementation of light and from further away they seemed like pictures of space or something unnatural, it was built on a great geometrical sense of space and positioning. Christian Marot was the only artist who used a human form in his work. He explored the two ongoing opposites of presence with absence and life with death. Although these inspirational subjects have been explored throughout human history, he has managed to do something that is still fascinating through a complicated procedure of cameraless methods. He took infinite oppositions, problems and went back to the basics of photography to understand and explore them. Personally, Sarah Markbreiter must have been the most fascinating exhibitor for me, as her technique really drew me in and made me explore the different techniques she must have used. The artwork in question looked from one angle like it was acrylic, from one angle like it was digital and from another angle as if it were a watercolor. Instead, however, they were cyanotype prints, which were made using a combination of paper, chemicals and sunlight. The artists' intention was to highlight the fragility, preciousness and the imperfections of the prints. This then acts as a metaphor for the fleeting nature of human existence - a great metaphor to end the exhibition with. Altogether these 'lightwriters' created a professional exhibition of art, graphics, fascinating techniques of alternative photography and showcased their amazingly varied and advanced skill base. They prove that the key to professionalism, originality and one's own pleasure in the work process comes from the effort one puts in their work, the different techniques it explores, and the conversations it starts. Coming up is the BUMF:Gallery Screening Week ‘A-ROLL’ showcasing short films from MA Fine Art, Commercial Photography, BA Photography and Fine Art. Make sure you come down every night of the week during 18th-22nd April 4.30pm!

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BUMF:GALLERY REVIEW // LIGHTWRITERS

PHOTOGRAPH BY FELIX SPELLER

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ILLUSTRATION BY RAMAN ASO

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BUMF ISSUE 03.  

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