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5-Year OHK Sustainability Plan 2010 - 2015


Forward The 5-Year OHK Sustainability Plan 2010-2015 has been written and prepared under contract by BullMarket Consulting Ltd., and is the sole property of the Thompson Neighbourhood Renewal Corporation. Authorization must be granted before any reproduction or distribution of this report. If you have any questions or require additional information please visit www.tnrc.ca or contact the TNRC at: 101-55 Selkirk Avenue Thompson, MB R8N 0M5 Phone: Fax: Website:

204.677.0760 204.677.0765 www.tnrc.ca

BullMarket Consulting Limited Tammy Lee Marche, President Box 940 Thompson, MB R8N 1N7 Phone: Email: Website:

2

204.679.5436 tmarche@bullmarketconsulting.com www.bullmarketconsulting.com


Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................ 4 TNRC................................................................................................................................................................. 6 ABOUT OUR HOME KIKINAW ................................................................................................................................ 8 GOALS ............................................................................................................................................................ 12 GOAL #1

FUND-RAISING ................................................................................................................................. 12

GOAL #2

LEADERSHIP AND CAPACITY BUILDING .............................................................................................. 16

GOAL #3

SUCCESSFUL HOMEOWNERSHIP ....................................................................................................... 17

GOAL #4

AWARENESS ................................................................................................................................... 18

GOAL #5

HOME BUILD AND ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY .......................................................................... 19

BUDGETS – OHK SUSTAINABILITY PLAN 2010-2015............................................................................................... 21 APPENDIX 1

2009-2010 OHK SECURED FUNDING ............................................................................................... 24

APPENDIX 2

OHK FUNDRAISING PLAN 2009-2010 ............................................................................................... 27

Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6

3

OHK Organizational Structure............................................................................................................................. 9 Family Selection, Home Build and Move In Timeline......................................................................................... 11 2009-2010 Secured Funding Sources by %.......................................................................................................... 13 OHK Expenses and Revenue.............................................................................................................................. 22 OHK Operational and Administration Expenditures ........................................................................................... 23 2010 Home Build Expenses ................................................................................................................................ 23


Executive Summary Our
 Home
 Kíkinaw
 (OHK)
 became
 a
 project
 of
 the
 Thompson
 Neighbourhood
 Renewal
 Corporation
 (TNRC)
 in
 late
 2008,
 out
 of
 a
 need
 in
 the
 community
to
assist
low‐income
families
in
achieving
homeownership.

This
sustainability
plan
serves
as
a
blueprint
toward
accomplishing
our
 Ultimate
Goal:

Five
Homes
in
Five
Years.
 The
TNRC
took
the
lead
on
this
project
to
maximize
its
impact
in
achieving
one
of
its
goals;
supporting
affordable,
accessible
housing
by
serving
 low‐income
families
in
Thompson.

By
utilizing
the
resources
and
staff
of
the
TNRC,
OHK
is
prepared
to
effectively
respond
to
the
growing
needs
 in
the
community.

During
our
planning
process,
this
past
year
we
saw
a
number
of
hardworking
families
in
need
of
a
helping
hand
to
get
back
 on
their
feet,
and
we
have
experienced
the
generosity
of
local
individuals,
organizations,
business
and
governments.
It
is
in
response
to
this
need
 and
community
support
for
the
project
that
we
present
this
aggressive
roadmap
for
our
organizational
growth
and
sustainability
from
2010
to
 2015.

 We
are
proud
to
be
a
part
of
this
pioneering
homeownership
project
in
Thompson.

OHK
has
been
developed
on
the
successful
foundation
of
 Habitat
for
Humanity
and
it
is
on
this
foundation
that
we
prepare
to
take
a
new
step
forward
toward
our
future.
This
five‐year
plan
will
guide
our
 efforts
to
engage
the
community
in
our
mission
in
more
profound
ways,
to
connect
OHK
homebuyers
to
the
community
and
neighbourhood,
 and
to
form
partnerships
that
allow
us
to
raise
the
capital
required
to
sustain
the
project.

Additionally,
it
will
allow
us
to
broaden
and
deepen
 OHK’s
opportunities
for
volunteer
engagement.
 For
families,
this
plan
will
help
them
make
a
successful
transition
to
homeownership
by
expanding
services
and
by
guiding
them
through
the
 partnership
process.

 It
is
in
this
context
that
the
TNRC
board
and
staff
commit
to
the
vision/mission
and
goals
of
the
OHK
5‐Year
Sustainability
Plan
2010‐2015.



Ultimate
Goal


Five
Homes
in
Five
Years


Through
the
implementation
of
the
5‐Year
Sustainability
Plan,
OHK
will
acquire
the
necessary
capital
and
community
and
 government
support
to
complete
one
home
build
a
year
for
the
next
five
years.





Goal
#1


 Goal
#2

 Goal
#3

 Goal
#4

 Goal
#5


Fund‐Raising
 Leadership
and
Capacity
Building
 Successful
Homeownership
 Awareness
 Home
Build
and
Environmental
Sustainability


 It
is
often
said
that
the
best‐made
plans
will
accomplish
very
little
if
they
are
poorly
implemented
and/or
not
fully
supported
by
staff.

Hence,
 tactical
 and
 operational
 responsibility
 for
 the
 fulfillment
 of
 the
 goals
 and
 their
 actions
 have
 been
 assigned
 to
 the
 project
 coordinator.
 
 Key
 oversight
will,
however,
remain
the
focus
and
main
responsibility
of
the
TNRC
board
of
directors
as
is
consistent
with
its
governance
role.



5


TNRC Established
 in
 2001,
 the
 TNRC
 is
 a
 community
 development
 organization
 governed
 by
 a
 volunteer
 board
 of
 directors
 working
 to
 support
 neighbourhood
 renewal
 initiatives
 by
 providing
 assistance
 to
 the
 community
 through
 funding
 and
 education.
 The
 Manitoba
 governments
 Neighbourhoods
Alive!
program
provides
core
funding
to
the
TNRC
enabling
the
organization
to
act
as
a
catalyst
for
community
development
in
 Thompson.
 The
 TNRC
 has
 focused
 on
 recreation,
 housing,
 neighbourhood
 empowerment,
 cleanliness
 and
 beautification,
 safety
 and
 crime
 prevention,
and
economic
development.

 Vision
 Healthy
Homes
and
Healthy
Communities
 
 Mission
 Working
with
communities
to
promote
a
place
of
empowerment
to
influence
positive
changes.
 
 Goals
 1. Affordable Accessible Housing • TNRC
is
aware
and
informed
on
housing
related
issues
 • TNRC
will
promote
housing
programs
 • TNRC
will
be
a
strong
advocate
for
housing
 • Enhance
the
existing
housing
stock
for
low‐income
families
 • Provide
housing
to
middle
to
low‐income
families


2. Safe Communities Increase
individual
knowledge
on
personal
and
family
safety
 Increase
urban
safety
 Increase
social
cohesion
in
at
risk
populations
 Increase
knowledge
of
poverty
 
 3. Cultural Acceptance • Celebrate
cultural
diversity
 • • • •


 


6


Programs
 1. Our
Home
Kíkinaw
(OHK) Thompson’s
Model
Habitat
for
Humanity
Project
 2. Community
Safety
Charter Signatories
commit
to
an
action
that
will
help
reduce
crime,
save
lives
and
make
the
community
of
Thompson
safer.
 3. Front
and
Paint
Program Home
improvements
grants
through
exterior
painting
and
renovations.
 4. Small
Grants
Fund
 Small
grants
of
up
to
$5,000
to
support
community‐building
initiatives.
 5. RRAP
and
HASI
 Provincial
housing
assistance
programs
in
the
form
of
a
forgivable
loan.
 6. S.E.E.D
Asset
Building
Programs Low‐income
participant
saving
programs
for
productive
assets
or
household
necessities.
 7. Downtown
Ambassador
Program Enhance
the
local
downtown
district
and
Millennium
Trail
by
creating
a
safe
and
friendly
environment.

 8. Thompson
Housing
Authority Assist
in
the
provision
of
affordable
housing
and
other
related
services
in
Thompson.
 9. Neighbourhood
Renewal
Fund Make
recommendations
to
NA!
for
provincial
funding.

7


About Our Home Kikinaw OHK
is
a
project
of
the
TNRC
that
assists
low‐income
families
in
achieving
homeownership
by
providing
them
with
the
opportunity
to
purchase
a
 no‐profit
 home.
 The
 project
 is
 structured
 in
 accordance
 with
 Habitat
 for
 Humanity
 Winnipeg’s
 policies
 and
 procedures;
 however,
 it
 has
 been
 modified
to
be
successful
in
northern
communities.
 The
OHK
housing
project
is
an
opportunity
to:
Assist
low‐income
families
in
homeownership;
to
empower
people
and
build
community
pride;
 and,
to
build
partnerships
within
the
community,
the
province
and
the
federal
government.
 Mission
Statement
 To
collaborate
with
volunteers
and
community
partners
to
build
homes
that
provide
low‐income
working
families
with
affordable
housing
and
 promote
home
ownership
to
create
a
community
where
everyone
has
access
to
quality
housing.
 Objectives
 1. Work
in
partnership
with
low‐income
working
families,
sponsors
and
communities
to
build
safe,
decent
and
affordable
housing.
 2. Mobilize
volunteers
and
community
partners
in
building
affordable
housing
and
promoting
homeownership
as
a
means
to
breaking
the
cycle
 of
poverty.


8


Historical
Highlights
 Meetings
began
at
the
TNRC
office
to
determine
community
interest
in
a
Habitat
for
Humanity
Project
in
Thompson.
 Research
and
collaboration
with
Habitat
for
Humanity
Winnipeg
determined
that
the
population
of
Thompson
is
too
 small
to
become
a
Habitat
for
Humanity
Winnipeg
affiliate.

 A
decision
was
made
by
the
TNRC
to
develop
and
support
an
affordable
housing
project
by
modelling
it
after
Habitat
 for
Humanity.
 Volunteers
 were
 identified
 and
 engaged
 to
 become
 members
 of
 the
 Community
 Team
 who
 was
 charged
 with
 overseeing
the
business
of
the
project.
 Foundational
documents
and
organizational
structure
developed.
 Staff/Community Team training took place in Winnipeg.
 First
home
build
site
located
and
secured
through
a
partnership
with
the
City
of
Thompson.
 Committees
established
and
trained.
 Construction
preparation
complete.
 First
Family
Partnership
Agreement
signed.
 Family
began
sweat
equity.
 Capital
required
for
build
secured.
 R2000
Building
Plan
finalized.
 Ground
breaking.



 
 OHK
Organizational
Structure
and
Committees
 As
set
out
in
Figure
1,
OHK
consists
of
four
volunteer
driven
committees
and
 a
 community
 team
 who
 report
 to
 the
 TNRC
 project
 coordinator.
 
 The
 community
team
and
each
committee
meet
on
a
regular
monthly
basis
and
 as
required.

The
project
coordinator
reports
to
the
TNRC
executive
director
 who
 then
 relays
 information
 and
 project
 updates
 to
 the
 TNRC
 board
 of
 directors.
 
 TNRC
Board
of
Directors
 The
board
of
directors
hold
ultimate
governance
responsibility
and
decision
 making
ability
for
the
OHK
project.
 
 TNRC
Executive
Director
 Acting
as
a
link
between
the
board
of
directors
and
the
project
coordinator,
 the
executive
director
provides
guidance
and
direction
to
the
project
and
the
 community
team.


9

Figure 1

February
2008
 April
2008
 September
2008
 October
2008
 January
2009
 February
2009
 March
2009
 April
to
July
2009
 November
2009
 December
2009
 December
2009
 February
2010
 March
2010
 June
2010


OHK Organizational Structure


TNRC
Project
Coordinator
 The
project
coordinator
is
responsible
for
managing
and
implementing
the
5‐Year
OHK
Sustainability
Plan
2010‐2015,
and
for
coordinating
all
of
 the
activities
required
to
achieve
the
plans
‘ultimate
goal’;
build
Five
Homes
in
Five
Years.

The
coordinator
oversees,
implements,
supports
and
 mobilizes
all
committees.
 
 Community
Team
 The
community
team
is
both
a
governing
and
working
body.

It
manages
the
business
affairs
of
the
project,
and
members
of
the
team
are
 required
to
represent
and
be
active
participants
in
at
least
one
of
the
four
committees.
 Building
Committee
 The
building
committee,
led
by
the
construction
manager,
oversees
the
design
and
construction
of
homes
to
ensure
they
are
built
on
schedule,
 and
that
they
are
affordable,
functional
and
safe.




 Family
Selection
Committee
 The
family
selection
committee
meets
twice
a
year
to
plan,
organize
and
conduct
family
submission
meetings.

This
committee
also
ensures
that
 each
applicant
understands
the
process
and
commitment
involved
in
buying
a
home
through
the
OHK
program;
i.e.
completing
sweat
equity
 hours
and
acquiring
financial
training.
 Committee
members
review
each
application
to
determine
the
qualifications
of
each
applicant
on
the
basis
of
need,
partnership,
and
ability
to
 pay.
Those
who
qualify
to
this
point
receive
home
visits
by
teams
of
two
from
the
committee.

The
committee
then
makes
their
 recommendation
to
the
board
of
directors
on
which
families
are
the
best
fit
for
the
OHK
program.
 Fundraising
Committee
 The
fundraising
committee
is
responsible
for
assisting
the
coordinator
with
completing
the
fundraising
plan
contained
within
Goal
#
1
of
the
 sustainability
plan.

This
committee
is
also
responsible
for
assisting
the
project
coordinator
with
achieving
the
projects
‘ultimate
goal’;
Five
 Homes
in
Five
Years,
through
fundraising
campaigns,
grant
proposal
writing,
special
fundraising
events
and
the
cultivation
of
major
donors.


 Volunteer
Committee
 The
project
coordinator
is
responsible
for
keeping
a
database
of
volunteers
and
identifying,
recruiting,
orienting,
utilizing,
retaining
and
 recognizing
volunteers
in
order
to
attain
the
goals
of
the
plan.

The
coordinator
is
also
responsible
for
ensuring
that
the
program
is
volunteer‐ friendly
and
a
rewarding
experience
so
as
to
maintain
the
highest
possible
level
of
participation.


10


Home
Build
Timeline
 Figure
2
outlines
the
16‐month
process
between
the
times
family
selection
applications
are
accepted
in
June
to
the
November
move
in
date.

 This
process
will
be
repeated
every
year.


Figure 2

11

Family Selection, Home Build and Move In Timeline


Goals To
ensure
that
each
of
the
goals
and
their
assigned
actions
are
accomplished
within
the
appointed
timeframes,
the
project
coordinator
has
been
 charged
with
the
responsibility
of
implementing
the
plan
to
its
successful
completion.

There
is
an
assumption
that
the
project
lead
is
the
project
 coordinator
 with
 direction
 and
 final
 decisions
 coming
 from
 the
 TNRC
 executive
 director
 and
 board
 of
 directors.
 
 Each
 of
 the
 goals,
 with
 the
 exception
of
the
‘ultimate
goal’,
which
is
what
all
other
goals
are
striving
to
achieve,
will
be
presented
to
the
community
team
and
they
will
be
 asked
 to
 actively
 participate
 in
 completing
 the
 action
 steps.
 
 In
 this
 manner,
 the
 volunteer
 capacity
 of
 the
 project
 will
 be
 strengthened
 as
 volunteers
will
be
engaged
and
assigned
specific
actions.


Ultimate
Goal:
 


Goal
#1
 Goal
#2

 Goal
#3

 Goal
#4

 Goal
#5


Five
Homes
in
Five
Years Through
the
implementation
of
the
5‐Year
OHK
Sustainability
Plan
2010‐2015,
OHK
will
acquire
the
necessary
capital
 and
community
and
government
support
to
complete
one
home
build
a
year
for
the
next
five
years.


 
 Fund‐Raising
 Leadership
and
Capacity
Building
 Successful
Homeownership
 Awareness
 Home
Build
and
Environmental
Sustainability

Goal #1 Fund-Raising Organizational
sustainability
is
pertinent
to
the
success
of
OHK,
and
although
the
project
has
received
a
substantial
flow
of
monetary
support,
 both
at
the
governmental
and
the
non‐governmental
levels,
it
is
essential
for
the
project
to
implement
a
milestone
based
fundraising
plan.

The
 80‐20
Rule,
which
has
been
called
the
‘secret
of
achieving
more
with
less’,
and
states
that
‘80%
of
effects
come
from
20%
of
the
causes’,
the
 OHK
sustainability
plan
focuses
on
generating
80%
of
its
monetary
and
in‐kind
support
from
20%
of
its
source
contributors.


 In
2009,
the
project
began
with
the
operational
support
of
the
TNRC,
and
various
funding
proposals
were
sent
to
a
variety
of
organizations
with
 successful
outcomes.

In
this
first
year
of
operations,
OHK
secured
most
of
it
operating
and
building
capital
requirements
and
in
February
2010
it
 had
secured
a
total
of
$349,274.00
in
cash
and
in‐kind
contributions
(Refer
to
Appendix
1:

2009‐2010
OHK
Secured
Funding),
enough
to
cover
 the
estimated
project
costs;
$345.530.00.

This
first
year
has
been
an
implementation
and
foundation
building
year,
and
local
fundraising
 activities
started
with
a
Christmas
Raffle,
50/50
Draw,
and
in
February
2010,
the
OHK
Gala
event.




12


Figure 3

2009-2010 Secured Funding Sources by %

Funding
Source
 TNRC
Operations

 Federal
Government
 Provincial
Government
 Municipal
Government
 Private/Other
Sectors
 (Including
foundations)
 Events/Fundraisers
 Total


Action
 28.46%
 10.31%
 9.10%
 15.46%
 35.12%
 0.83%
 100%


Figure
3
sets
out
the
percentage
of
funding
each
source
attained
according
to
Appendix
1.

Less
 than
1%
of
funding
in
2009‐2010
came
from
local
events
and
fundraisers,
15.46%
from
the
 municipal
government
(City
of
Thompson),
and
35.12%
from
private
and
other
sectors.
 By
utilizing
the
80‐20
Rule,
the
OHK
fund‐raising
plan
prioritizes
the
20%
of
funding
sources
 that
have
raised
the
most
support.

The
funding
sources
have
been
separated
into
three
major
 sources
of
funding:
primary,
secondary
and
tertiary.

Priority
is
given
to
each
source
in
the
 following
descending
and
successive
order:



1) Primary
Sources
‐
Private
and
Other
Sectors
(including
foundations);
local
 corporations
and
businesses,
faith
institutions,
and
individuals.


 2) Secondary
Sources
–
all
levels
of
government
and
government
grant
programs.


 3) Tertiary
–
Events/Fundraisers.


 Although
the
fundraising
efforts
of
2009‐2010
were
highly
successful,
aside
from
the
TNRC’s
operational
support,
these
funding
sources
have
 not
secured
multi‐year
commitments.

Therefore,
the
project
will
need
to
focus
on
the
implementation
of
the
Fund‐Raising
Plan
by
continuing
to
 cultivate
current
funding
partnerships,
identifying
new
partnerships
and
by
identifying
new
stakeholders.

Further,
as
the
project
is
in
its
 infantry,
and
from
the
experience
of
2010,
it
has
been
realized
that
local
fundraising
events
require
a
lot
of
time
and
effort,
and
available
and
 active
volunteers.

As
OHK
is
beginning
to
build
awareness
within
the
community,
there
is
a
need
to
acquire
more
volunteers
that
will
play
a
key
 role
in
organizing
future
local
events
and
fundraisers.

Therefore,
at
this
point
in
time,
local
events
and
fundraising
will
be
utilized
as
a
tool
for
 generating
awareness
about
the
project
and
soliciting
active
volunteers,
rather
than
moneymaking
fundraisers.

The
fund‐raising
plan
is
broken
 down
into
yearly
and
monthly
milestones
as
follows:

13


Fund‐Raising
Plan

 2010‐2015
 Objective

 1.

Continue
to
 identify
funding
 sources
and
 build
 partnerships
 with
 stakeholders.


2.

Review
and
 build
on
 progress.


14

Method
 Action
 Research
and
identify
new
 1. Cultivate
current
partnerships
and
request
continued
support
by
focusing
on
 stakeholders
and
partnerships
 primary
and
secondary
sources
of
funding.
 based
on
the
successful
 • Create
and
present
a
year
in
review
document
to
show
how
cash
and
in‐ fundraising
efforts
of
the
 kind
support
has
been
utilized
and
to
celebrate
the
projects
successes.
 previous
year
and
by
 • Offer
opportunities
for
continued
involvement
in
shaping
the
program
 following
the
80‐20
Rule:
 through
regular
meetings
and
dialogue.

 • Share
the
credit.

 1. Primary
Source

 • State
how
the
project
is
beneficial
to
all
partners
and
individuals.

 • Private
and
Other
 
 Sectors
(including
 2. Build
fund‐raising
capacity
by
recruiting
key
people
to
the
fundraising
 foundations);
local
 committee
who
may
have
a
vested
interest
in
the
project.
 corporations
and
 
 businesses,
faith
 3. Keep
the
energy
of
the
fundraising
committee
focused
by
organizing
one
main
 institutions,
and
 fundraising
event
in
2011
and
2012,
and
as
project
awareness
increases
and
 individuals.


 volunteer
support
strengthens
incorporate
more
events
annually.
 2. Secondary
Source
 
 • All
levels
of
 4. Develop
an
active
funder
database
to
monitor
cash
and
in‐kind
support;
track
 government;
 funding
sources
and
donations,
create
a
full
listing
of
existing
and
potential
 municipal,
federal
 funding
sources
and
contact
listings,
keep
proposals,
agreements
and
source
 and
provincial.


 communications,
and
an
updated
financial
statement,
calendar
of
submission
 3. Tertiary
Source
 deadlines
and
other
key
dates.
 • Local
 
 Events/Fundraisers
 5. Continue
to
collaborate
and
solicit
fundraising
expertise
from
Habitat
for
 Humanity
Winnipeg
and
local
community
groups.
 Review
outcomes
and
 1. Review
progress
toward
financial
goals;
who
will
benefit,
who
else
needs
to
 progress
of
the
previous
years
 be
involved.

 fundraising
efforts,
and
focus
 
 on
the
lessons
learned
and
 2. Develop
annual
report
to
summarize
progress
and
attract
new
supporters.
 successful
outcomes
of
the
 
 previous
year.
 3. Review
and
update
fundraising
materials.
 
 4. Review
project
needs
and
revise
the
sustainability
plan
as
necessary.


Timeframe
 Annually
(Jan
to
Mar)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Annually,
On‐going
 
 
 2011
and
2012
 
 
 
 2010
to
2011
 
 
 
 
 
 On‐going
 Annually
(Jan
to
Mar)
 
 
 Annually
(Mar)
 
 Annually

 (Jan
to
Mar)
 Annually

 (Jan
to
Mar)



Potential
Funding
Sources
 Potential
funding
can
be
sought
in
several
areas
including
affordable
housing,
employment
support
programs,
environmental
sustainability,
and
 others.

Also,
ReStore’s
sell
used
building
supplies
and
materials,
and
have
been
traditionally
used
by
Habitat
for
Humanity
as
a
way
to
generate
 local
community
support.

However,
a
feasibility
study
was
conducted
in
2009
into
the
possibility
of
implementing
a
ReStore
type
store
in
 Thompson,
and
at
that
time
it
was
not
feasible.

It
is
suggested
that
OHK
revisit
the
ReStore
model
and
consider
holding
a
fundraising
event
once
 a
year
where
business
and
individuals
could
donate
used
building
supplies
for
sale.

Further,
the
TNRC
has
a
membership
to
Imagine
Canada,
a
 database
of
Canadian
foundations
and
corporations,
and
it
is
highly
recommended
that
this
membership
be
utilized.

Charity
Village
is
another
 resource
that
contains
a
listing
of
funding
sources
to
help
assist
non‐profits
in
their
sustainability
efforts.

Both
Imagine
Canada
and
Charity
 Village
are
great
sources
for
OHK
to
use
when
expanding
their
potential
funding
options.
 
 Imagine
Canada
–
Canadian
Directory
to
Foundations
and
Corporations
(TNRC
has
current
membership)
 www.imaginecanada.ca
 Charity
Village
–
Listing
of
funding
resources;
i.e.
foundations
and
gov’t.


15

www.charityvillage.com



Goal #2 Objective
 Ensure
OHK
has
 the
organizational
 leadership
and
 capacity
to
 implement
the
 Project
Plan.
 


Leadership and Capacity Building Method
 Develop
financial
structures
that
support
long‐term
sustainability
 and
growth
of
organization
by
implementing
Goal
#1.
 Clarify
and/or
adjust
roles
and
responsibilities
of
the
Community
 Team
and
Committees,
and
create
a
policies
and
procedures
 manual
that
will
guide
operations.



2010


2012


2013


2014


2015


Support
professional
staff
to
lead
the
program.


ED


Implement
an
administrative
support
position.


ED


Ensure
that
OHK
has
the
systems
and
infrastructure
to
fully
 support
the
work
of
the
organization
by
implementing
data
 management
software
and
training
for
the
project
coordinator.
 


ED
and
 Community
 Team


Recruit
leaders
to
serve
on
the
Community
Team.
 


Community
 Team
and
all
 committees
 ED,
Community
 Team
and
all
 committees


2011


√


Reduce
Community
Team
meetings
from
monthly
to
quarterly
 unless
there
is
a
need.
 


Conduct
a
yearly
review
of
the
project
and
project
plan;
 including,
financial
and
committee
reviews,
and
homeowner
 feedback/surveys.


16

Collaborators
 ED
and
 Community
 Team
 ED
and
 Community
 Team


√
 July


√
 Sept


√


√


√


√
 Aug


√



 √
 



Goal #3

Successful Homeownership

Objective
1
 Ensure
OHK
 families
make
a
 successful
 transition
to
 homeownership,
 equipped
to
 succeed
financially
 and
become
 contributing
 members
of
their
 community.
 


Method
 Ensure
homeowners
have
a
variety
of
opportunities
to
complete
 their
sweat
equity
requirements
prior
to
moving
into
their
home.

 
 Ensure
that
homeowners
complete
the
Money
Management
 Training
(MMT)
program.


Collaborators
 2010
 Community
 Team
and
all
 committees
 Community
 Team
and
 Family
Selection
 Committee
 Community
 
 Team
and
 Building
 Committee
 Community
 
 Team
and
 Building
 Committee
 Family
Selection
 Committee


2011


Method
 Sign
partnership
purchase
agreement
and
sweat
equity
 agreements
with
the
selected
family
 


Collaborators
 Ed
and
 Community
 Team



2011


Once
mortgage
agreements
are
developed
have
family
sign
 agreements.
 


ED


Review
household
incomes
and
adjust
mortgage
accordingly.
 


Community
 Team


Develop
home
maintenance
handbook
to
help
guide
the
family
 with
home
repairs
and
upkeep.
 
 Implement
an
annual
reward
program
for
homeowners
to
assist
 in
building
pride
by
giving
rewards
for
care
and
upkeep
of
home.
 
 During
the
family
selection
process
determine
the
level
of
 transitional
support
a
family
requires,
discuss
with
family
and
 refer
to
appropriate
resources.
 


Objective
2
 Ensure
that
OHK
 and
the
families
 are
both
 benefiting
from
 the
financial
 agreements
for
 homeownership.
 


17

2010


2012


2013


2014


2015


√


√
 
 √
 
 √


√
 Annually
in
November


2012


2013


2014


√
 Annually
in
January
 √
 Annually
in
June
 √
 Annually
in
November


2015



Review
mortgage
conditions
and
partnership
agreements
to
 determine
the
effectiveness
of
these
agreements
and
adjust
as
 required.
 


ED,
Community
 Team,
Family
 Selection
 Committee


Method
 Promote
OHK
through
electronic,
print
and
other
media
(i.e.
 quarterly
newsletter,
website
and
FaceBook
pages),
and
work
in
 association
with
the
Fund‐Raising
Plan
to
develop
the
message
 and
project
updates.


Collaborators
 Community
 Team
and
all
 committees


2010


Increase
awareness,
understanding
and
actions
in
support
of
 affordable
housing
by
forming
key
partnership
with
local
 organizations;
i.e.
the
University
College
of
the
North
Social
 Studies
students
to
assist
in
fundraising
efforts
and
event
 planning.
 
 Build
strong
presence
within
the
affordable
housing
community
 by
actively
participating
and
assisting
with
the
implementation
of
 the
Thompson
Housing
Authority.
 


Community
 Team,
 Fundraising
and
 Volunteer
 Committees
 
 ED
 


2013


2014


2015


√


Goal #4

Awareness

Objective

 Increase
 awareness
about
 OHK
homes
and
its
 function
in
the
 community,
and
 decrease
stigma
 surrounding
 affordable
housing
 and
low‐income
 families.

 
 


18

2011


2012


√


√


√


√


√



Goal #5 Objective

 Ensure
the
 effective
 progression
of
 home
builds.

 


Home Build and Environmental Sustainability Method
 Make
certain
that
home
builds
are
on
time
and
not
delayed
by
 adhering
to
these
annually
significant
timelines:
 


Collaborators
 Community
 Team
and
ED
 


19

May
 June


2012


2013
 √


2014


2015

Prefabrication



Groundbreaking,
foundation,
 basement
and
floors.
 • Framing
and
roof.
 July
and
August
 • Trades
people;
plumbing,
electrical,
 carpentry,
etc.
 • Dry
walling.
 September
and
October
 • Finishing
work Hire
a
construction
manager
to
implement
the
annual
home
 builds.
 


ED
and
Building
 Committee
 


Identify
and
secure
four
lots
for
future
home
builds.


ED,
Building
 Committee


Provide
and
coordinate
volunteers
for
the
construction
manager
 to
assist
with
the
home
build,
and
ensure
that
they
have
been
 safety
trained
 
 Ensure
that
volunteers
are
available
and
ready
to
work
weekly
 Thursday
to
Saturday
from
June
to
October,
8am
to
5pm.


2011



 
 


2010


Volunteer
 Committee
 
 Volunteer
 Committee


√
 Annually
in
November
 


√


√


√


√



Objective
2
 Encourage
and
 implement
 environmentally
 sustainable
 homes.

 



 
 
 
 
 


20

Method
 Incorporate
existing
environmental
sustainable
programs;
i.e.
 LEED
standards
and
Hydro
Power
Smart.
 


Collaborators
 Building
 Committee


Continue
to
research
and
incorporate
new
and
existing
eco
 friendly
options
into
home
builds.
 


Building
 Committee
 


Acquire
LEED
certification.
 


Building
 Committee
 


Seek
funding
that
supports
environmental
building
projects.


Fundraising
and
 Building
 Committees


2010


2011


2012


2013


2014


2015


√


√
 



 √


√



Budgets – OHK Sustainability Plan 2010-2015 To
maintain
consistency
in
the
cost
forecast
for
the
OHK
project
over
the
projection
period
a
number
of
assumptions
have
been
made.

These
 assumptions
are:

 1)
 2)
 3)
 4)
 5)
 6)
 7)
 8)
 9)


1
 $266,122.00
 5%
 10%
 5%
 $349,274.00
 15%
 5%
 25%


10)
 11)
 12)
 13)
 14)
 15)
 16)
 17)
 
 
 
 
 


$44,323.75
 2
 2%
 5%
 25%
 10%
 5%
 5%


21

Single
family
dwelling
built
each
year
for
five
years.
 Cost
per
single
family
dwelling
in
2010.
 Annual
growth
in
building
costs.
 Line
of
credit
10%
of
building
costs.
 Interest
rate
on
line
of
credit.
 Cash
and
in‐kind
contributions
in
2010.
 Increase
in
in‐kind
contribution
in
2011.
 Increase
in
in‐kind
contributions
after
2011.
 Mortgage
geared
to
gross
income
rate
(Land
taxes
not
included).
 Mortgage
Payments
cumulative
over
five
years
for
five
homes.
 OHK
LICO
‐
Average
Income
for
5
person
family.
 Months
occupancy
for
new
homeowners
in
new
build
year.
 Annual
growth
in
salaries.
 Growth
in
administration
costs.
 Increase
in
cash
fundraising
in
2011.
 Increase
in
cash
fundraising
after
2011.
 Increase
in
grants
and
other
sources
in
2011.
 Increase
in
volunteer
support
costs.



OHK
Expenses
and
Revenues
2010
–
2015
 
 Figure 4

OHK Expenses and Revenue

2010


2011


2012


2013


2014


2015


$0.00
 $0.00
 $266,122.00
 $79,408.00


$1,534.00
 $30,671.00
 $278,828.00
 $80,813.00


$1,687.00
 $33,738.00
 $292,158.00
 $82,261.00


$1,856.00
 $37,112.00
 $306,141.00
 $83,751.00


$2,041.00
 $40,823.00
 $320,812.00
 $85,287.00


$2,245.00
 $44,905.00
 $336,203.00
 $86,870.00


$345.530.00


$391,846.00


$409,844.00


$428,860.00


$448,963.00


$470,223.00



 $48,020.00
 $97,546.00
 $203,708.00



 $60,025.00
 $112,178.00
 $213,893.00



 $66,028.00
 $117,787.00
 $224,593.00



 $72,631.00
 $123,676.00
 $235,823.00



 $79,894.00
 $129,860.00
 $247,614.00



 $87,883.00
 $136,353.00
 $259,995.00


$1,846.00
 $351,120.00


$13,187.00
 $399,283.00


$24,978.00
 $433,386.00


$37,237.00
 $469,367.00


$49,975.00
 $507,343.00


$63,209.00
 $547,440.00


Annual
Expenses
 Interest
Cost
 
 Line
of
credit
 Building
Cost
 Operations:
 (Administration,
 1 Staff,
Fundraising )
 Total
Annual
 Expenses
 
 Annual
Revenues
 Fundraising
 Cash
 In‐kind
 Grants
&
Other
 Funding
Sources
 Mortgage
Payments
 Total
Annual
 Revenues


1

Construction Manager salary is a construction cost and is located in the Home Build Expenses.

22


OHK
Operational
and
Administration
Expenses
 
 Figure 5

OHK Operational and Administration Expenditures


 F/T
Project
 Coordinator



2010
 $41,000.00


2011
 $41,820.00


2012
 $42,656.00


2013
 $43,509.00


2014
 $44,379.00


2015
 $45,266.00


Supplies/Equipment
 Promotion/Advertising
 Volunteer
Support
 Subtotal
 15%
Administration
 Fee
 Total
 
 


$3,000.00
 $20,000.00
 $5,050.00
 $69,050.00
 $10,358.00


$3,150.00
 $20,000.00
 $5,302.00
 $70,272.00
 $10,541.00


$3,308.00
 $20,000.00
 $5,567.00
 $71,531.00
 $10,730.00


$3,473.00
 $20,000.00
 $5,845.00
 $72,827.00
 $10,924.00


$3,647.00
 $20,000.00
 $6,137.00
 $74,163.00
 $11,124.00


$3,829.00
 $20,000.00
 $6,444.00
 $75,539.00
 $11,331.00


$79,408.00


$80,813.00
 


$82,261.00
 


$83,751.00
 


$85,287.00
 


$86,870.00
 


2010
Home
Build
Expenses
 
 Figure 6

2010 Home Build Expenses


 Construction
Manager
 Construction

 Landscaping
 Permits
 Insurance
 Total
 


23

2010
 $20,000.00
 $223,345.00
 $18,616.00
 $3,254.00
 $9,07.00
 $266,122.00
 


2011
 $20,400.00
 $234,512.00
 $19,547.00
 $3,417.00
 $952.00
 $278,828.00


2012
 $20,808.00
 $246,238.00
 $20,524.00
 $3,588.00
 $1,000.00
 $292,158.00


2013
 $21,224.00
 $258,550.00
 $21,550.00
 $3,767.00
 $1,050.00
 $306,141.00


2014
 $21,649.00
 $271,478.00
 $22,628.00
 $3,955.00
 $1,102.00
 $320,812.00


2015
 $22,082.00
 $285,052.00
 $23,759.00
 $4,153.00
 $1,157.00
 $336,203.00



Appendix 1

24

2009-2010 OHK Secured Funding


2009-2010 OHK Secured Funding 


Financial
Contribution


Non‐Financial
Contribution


Total
Contribution


Percentage
of
Total
 Contribution


Total
Project
Costs:

$345,530.00
 Operations
 TNRC
 Federal
Government
 Thompson
Urban
Aboriginal
 Strategy
(TUAS)
 Provincial
Government
 Neighbourhood
Renewal
 Fund
(NRF)
 TNRC
Small
Grants
Fund
 Municipal
Government
 The
City
of
Thompson
 Private
Sector
 Vale
 Assiniboine
Credit
Union
 Local
business
donations
for
 xmas
raffle
 Sunlife
Financial
 BullMarket
Consulting
Ltd.
 Weir
Designs
 Smook
Brothers
 
 CHTM

 
 Eecole
Eclectic

 
 TreeSuns
‐
Pending
 
 Gardewine
North
‐
Pending
 


25

$79,408.00


$20,000.00


$99,408.00


28.46%


$36,000.00


0


$36,000.00


10.31%


$31,800.00


0


$31,800.00


9.10%


$2,500.00


0


$2,500.00


0.72%


$54,000.00


0


$54,000.00


15.46%


$25,000.00
 $5,000.00
 0


0
 0
 $500.00


$25,000.00
 $5,000.00
 $500.00


7.16%
 1.43%
 0.14%


0
 $120.00
 0
 0


$900.00
 $750.00
 $500.00
 $5,596.00


$900.00
 $870.00
 $500.00
 $5,596.00


0.26%
 0.25%
 0.14%
 1.60%


0


$600.00


$600.00


0.17%


0


$6,500.00


$6,500.00


1.86%


0


$1,000.00


$1,000.00


0.29%


0


$200.00


$200.00


0.06%



Trades
people
‐
Pending
 
 Décor
Cabinets
‐
Pending
 
 Other
Sectors
(Including
foundations)
 Christian
Fellowship
Centre
 Construction
Manager
 Events
 Christmas
Raffle
and
50/50
 Gala
 Total


26

0


$40,000.00


$40,000.00


11.45%


0


$1,000.00


$1,000.00


0.29%


$15,000.00
 0


0
 $20,000.00


$15,000.00
 $20,000.00


4.29%
 5.73%


$400.00
 $2,500.00
 $251,728.00


0
 0
 $97,546.00


$400.00
 $2,500.00
 $349,274.00


0.11%
 0.72%
 100%



Appendix 2

27

OHK Fundraising Plan 2009-2010


OHK
Fundraising
Plan
2009­2010
 Our Home Kikinaw (OHK) is a project of the Thompson Neighbourhood Renewal Corporation (TNRC) that will assist low income families in achieving homeownership by providing them with the opportunity to purchase a no-profit home. The project is structured in accordance with many of Habitat for Humanity Winnipeg’s policies and procedures. It is the goal of OHK to complete one home build during the summer of 2010. It will take a blend of government funding, corporate sponsorship, individual and organizational support to achieve our goal of $281,996.73. Below is a breakdown of what has been secured to date, what is still pending and future plans. Various grants and proposals: • Manitoba Housing and Renewal Corporation - Pending • Thompson Community Foundation - Pending • Assiniboine Credit Union - $5,000.00 • Thompson Urban Aboriginal Strategy – $36,000.00 • Neighbourhood Renewal Fund - $31,800.00 • TNRC Small Grants Fund - $2,500.00 • Inco - Pending • City of Thompson – $54,000.00 to purchase the land and services to the property line Working with local charitable organizations and businesses will diversify OHK’s access to donations. Donations Received to date: • Christian Fellowship Centre - $15,000.00 • Local businesses – merchandise for christmas raffle • Sunlife – Human Resources • Bullmarket Consulting – Marketing Resources • Weir Designs – $300 value donation for Webpage development/updates Donations of materials and resources are being requested from various companies throughout the province, with the focus being in Thompson. To date we have managed to secure donations from: • Smooks – excavation, weeping tile, backfill and driveway topping

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CHTM – media sponsor Décor Cabinets – cabinetry for the home Eecole Eclectic – electrical package TreeSuns – waste disposal bins McMunn and Yates - Pending Home Hardware - Pending Gardwine - Pending Trades people(carpenters, electricians, plumbers, painters, etc) - Pending Meetah Building Supplies – Pending

There have been a few smaller fundraising/marketing events. These include: • Personal cash donations • Raffles and 50/50 draws • Crafts shows Two signature events are also being developed to launch in 2010 to further market OHK and provide a steady stream of revenue, adding to the stability and longevity of the project. 1. Home Makeover Gala 2. Ladies Night Out 3. Poker Tournament Partnerships We have established partnerships with Thompson Boys and Girls Club Youth Build Program and RD Parker Construction and Carpentry Program. These partnerships are providing access to a semi-skilled labour pool, facilities to prefabricate parts of the home, some storage space, use of tools, etc. Furthermore, we are applying for dollars to provide youth with summer employment, giving them a chance to further hone their skills and supporting the development of skilled trades’ people in the North. Future Fundraising Plans As part of the ongoing efforts to raise the necessary funds for the current build and create a solid foundation for the project to grow on our fundraising plan spans the course of the year and is designed to be annual events. Some of the plans that are slated to happen include: • Apply to Royal Bank of Canada for donations • Continue to request donations for building materials and supplies • Partner with the Thompson Humane Society for a community wide monthly 50/50 draw

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• • • •

Buy a brick campaign Revenue from mortgages of the homes we sell Request support from local businesses Assiniboine Credit Union to provide a line of credit

By accessing funds from all levels of government (Municipal, Provincial and Federal)and engaging the private and public sector, Our Home Kikinaw is poised to grow into the Affordable Homeownership Program that is absent in the North. The demographics of Thompson include 36% of our population being Aboriginal. Couple this with the average rate of homeownership among Aboriginal people being %20 compared to 70% of Non- Aboriginals and with our policy that acknowledges this disparity, OHK will provide a population that is systematically marginalized an opportunity to acquire assets, move out of poverty and further enhance their quality of life and the greater community overall.

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5-Year OHK Sustainability Plan 2010-2015  

Ultimate Goal - Five Homes in Five Years

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