Page 1

spring-summer 2013

BULLIS magazine

Congratulations Class of 2013 Readers Rich With Purpose Innovations in the Arts


spring-summer 2013

BULLIS magazine

Congratulations Class of 2013 Readers Rich With Purpose Innovations in the Arts


spring-summer 2013

BULLIS magazine

features

2 Class of 2013 Commencement 16 Lower School: A Community of Readers Rich With Purpose 20 Innovations in the Arts

departments academics 15 Model UN Visits the Hague news 22 Gala Success: A Red Carpet Affair 22 Bullis Seniors Final at National History Day arts 23 Imagination athletics 26 Outstanding Athletes

alumni

34 Alumni Golf Tournament 36 Profile: Nicole Bernard Chaffin ’83 38 Class Notes 46 Alumnus Revamps Radio Club He Founded 48 Brain Teaser

On cover: Outstanding Scholar Justin Schuble ’13 accepts his diploma from Head of School Dr. Gerald Boarman. Graduation highlights begin on page 2.

head of school Gerald Boarman, Ed.D. Michael Reidy, Ed.D., Assistant Head of School Andrew Delinsky, Upper School Principal Jamie Dickie, Director of Technology Constance Giles, Ph.D., Dir. of Curriculum and Institutional Research Darlene Haught, Director of Extended Programs and Emerging Technologies Betsy Kelly, Lower School Principal Kathleen Lloyd, Director of Girls Athletics Todd McCreight, Business Officer Andres Parra, Director of Boys Athletics Marilyn Moreno, Middle School Principal Tim Simpson, Director of Admission and Financial Aid Joanne Szadkowski, Dir. of Institutional Advancement Sherri A. Watkins, Publications Manager Susie Zimmermann, Director of Communications Susan King, Communications Coordinator Bullis Magazine is published two times a year by the Office of Institutional Advancement and distributed to alumni, parents, grandparents and friends. Letters and suggestions for future articles are welcome. Located in Potomac, Maryland, Bullis School is a private, coeducational, nondenominational college preparatory day school for grades 3–12. Bullis admits students of any race, color, religion, and national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion or national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, financial aid programs and athletic and other schooladministered programs. Visit our website at www.bullis.org

board of trustees OFF I CERS Tom Sullivan, P’09, ’11, ’13, Chair Adam Greenberg, P’14, ’16, ’19, Vice Chair Lesley Lavalleye, P’06, ’08, ’10, Acting Secretary Andrew Blair ’86, P’11, ’12, ’20, Treasurer Me m b e r s Marian C. Bennett, P’06 Gerald Boarman, Ed.D., ex-officio, Head of School Patrick Caulfield, P’14, ’20 Michelle Cohen ’87, P’14, ’16, ex-officio, President, Bullis Parents Association David Fink, P’10, ’14,’19 Dr. Gary Friedlander ’79, P’11, ’14,’19 Holly Funger, P’09, ’10, ’13 Jonathan Halle ’88, P’15, ’17 Kathryn Hanley, P’03, ’05 George Mavrikes, P’14, ’17 Tammy McKnight, P’08, ’12 Chris Nordeen, P’12, ’13 Xiumin Overall, P’07, ’11 Milton C. Theo, P’14, ’17 Ken Thompson, P’08 Berry Trimble, P’10, ’13 David Trone, P’12, ’14 Cyndi Bullis Vasco ’83 Dell Warren, P’10, ’13 Mark Weinberger, P’14, ’16, ’18 Paula Widerlite, P’11, ’14 Natasha Nazareth, General Counsel


head’s perspective Heart and Soul My first three years at Bullis have gone by so quickly. We have experienced great growth and development, and our trajectory is exhilarating. From a greatly expanded student body to the establishment of new initiatives and the prospect of new building, we have much to celebrate and embrace. Creativity within our community is merging with the opportunities of a 21st century world. New classes, new buildings, new technologies and new approaches will enhance our school. Yet what will never change about Bullis is its heart and soul. When I first visited Bullis its sense of community impressed me most. The enthusiasm, warmth and dedication that I sensed in every encounter was palpable. Along with an openness and anticipation for whatever would come, there was a great feeling of appreciation for what is shared daily. Enjoying today while eagerly looking ahead to tomorrow remains the common feeling every day on campus. The stories in this issue illustrate this essential heart and soul of Bullis. Lower School initiatives are captivating students and readying them for great things to come. Student athlete profiles highlight some of the many leaders who play with all their heart while setting an example for their teammates. The Visual Art department challenges students to take their skills and passions in directions beyond their expectations. Our Model UN-ers are collaborating to solve some of our planet’s toughest challenges. Six Bullis students, of thousands who competed, earned spots at National History Day and two—rising seniors Brian Mitchell and Oriana Theo—were finalists. Parents and alumni continue to support our school in innumerable and immeasurable ways. From surpassing our Annual Fund goal to nearly doubling the Gala’s Raise the Paddle and volunteering every day, they remind us that the heart and the soul of Bullis extends far beyond our campus. Amid all of this activity, our Bullis community remains strongly connected. When we lost senior Cami Baruch tragically in February, the senior class led by example in honoring her memory, remembering her daily and establishing the Cami Baruch Patio. Already it has become a peaceful touchstone for a bustling campus, a place to quietly reflect on what’s most important: the ties that bind us and the strength we give each other.


Class o

J ake Brandon Abelman Oluwatobiloba Adejuwon Adewole Akingbolahan Michael Akinkoye Tyler Alexander Allen Peter Ondua Angeh Nicholas John Barpoulis Camille Marin Baruch Corbin Edgar Blumberg Lisette Gabrielle Booty Antonio Borckardt E. Max Bramson Huntington Andrew Brown Philandieus Bryant III Brandon Eric Burke Kaitlin Jan Bushkoff 2

organ Jenna Cafritz M Amma Calhoun Alessandra Maria Clark Daniel Alexander Copeland Joshua Bruce Czerwiec Dana Bao Daniels Brianna Davis Jonathan Chandler Dyer Nadia Maryam Fallahi Nicholas Lester Fields David Schreiber Fireman George Vedder Fleming Joshua Lawrence Foreman Kristina Elizabeth Frye

icholas Charles Funger N Gordon Ellsworth George Badri Glonti Mitchell C. Goldberg Zoe Rachel Goldberg Brooke Margaret Gutschick Kiernan Youngbin Hahn Dazia Brianna Hall David Eugene Harrison Alexander G. Herbets Adam Nehemiah Holland Brandon Curtis Izzo Brittany J. Jackson Kourosh Kalachi

Clas

201 of

BULLIS magazine


s of 2013

ass

013 of

arris Zachary Kaserman H Ga Yeong Kim Winton A. Lyle Keon Bahrami Manesh Roman Connor Matijkiw Andrew James Metz Kendall Marie Mitchell Connor James Mitton Yingxuan Mo Kyle Brett Nemeroff Daniel Jacob Bloch Nielsen Maxwell Andrew Nordeen Amy Rose Oechsler Allison Audra Osterman

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

ejas N. Patel T Jaikrishan Singh Paton Hanna Rae Pordy Nicole Alexandra Rabovsky Lauren Anne Raffensperger Colette Elizabeth Roa Jared Hal Rubens Nicolas E. Ruggieri Joseph Daniel Sageman Kia Alexia Saint-Louis Maris Del Schneeman Justin Michael Schuble Drake Anthony Scott Alexander Siegel

J ackson Alexander Stoner William J. Stroup Jordan Hannah Sullivan William Harris Tavel Anthony Isaia Thompson Jill Kathleen Trimble Alanna F. Walczak Idrienne Alesia Felicia LeShea Walker Dexter Daniel Warren Sean Joseph Watkinson Tiffani Katherine Wills CeMaia Fanicia Wise Yanbing Yang Zhengyang Zhao Youyang Zhou 3


Class of 2013 College Matriculations

Boston College Bowdoin College Bucknell University (2) Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University College of Charleston (2) Clemson University Colgate University (2) College of the Holy Cross (2) Columbia University Cornell University Drexel University (3) Emory University (2) Frostburg State University George Mason University George Washington University Georgetown University (3) Gettysburg College (2) Johns Hopkins University Maryland Institute College of Art Middlebury College (2) New York University North Carolina A&T State University (2) Occidental College Ohio University Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg Pennsylvania State University (2) Pitzer College

Stevens Institute of Technology St. John’s University Syracuse University Trinity College (2) Tulane University (4) University of Alabama University of California at Los Angeles University of Delaware (2) University of Kentucky University of Maryland (7) University of Maryland, Eastern Shore University of Massachusetts University of Miami (2) University of Michigan University of Mississippi University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Richmond (2) University of Southern California University of Vermont (2) University of Wisconsin Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Wagner College Wake Forest University (2) West Virginia University (2)

Class of 2013 Lifers Bullis Lifers, from left, Nick Funger, William Tavel, Zoe Goldberg, Justin Schuble, Jordan Sullivan, Alex Herbets, Alessandra Clark, Kyle Nemoroff, Nadia Fallahi, Max Nordeen and Jared Rubens

4

BULLIS magazine


Awards for Members of the Class of 2013 Award: Recipient: The Founders’ Award.......................................................... Brooke Gutschick The Outstanding Scholar Award..............................................Justin Schuble The William H. Price, Jr. Citizenship Award............................Justin Schuble The Manuel Jose Baca, Jr. Joy of Living Award................... Corbin Blumberg The Douglas London Award for Excellence in English.........................................................................Joseph Sageman The Barbara Marks Award for Excellence in Foreign Language........................................................... David Fireman The John H. Dillon Memorial Award for Excellence in Science...............................................................................Hanna Pordy The John W. Spencer Award for Excellence in Mathematics......................................................................William Tavel The Irene Ford Smith Memorial Award for Excellence in Social Studies................................................... Kristina Frye The Award for Excellence in Music...................................... Joshua Czerwiec The Award for Excellence in Theater........................................Dexter Warren The Award for Excellence in Art.................................................... Esther Kim The Michael Ivey Achievement Award................................... David Harrison The Community Service Award..................................................CeMaia Wise The Alumni Award for Outstanding Achievement in Athletics .................................................. Nicholas Fields Idrienne Walker The David T. Hellekjaer Award............................................. Daniel Copeland Dana Daniels *For a description of the awards, visit www.bullis.org/graduation.

At top, Outstanding Scholar Justin Schuble accepts the William Price citizenship award; above, Hanna Pordy receives the science award from Science Department Chair Tina Zazaris-Davis.

Graduates honored for excellence while at Bullis include, from left, Esther Kim, receiving the art award from art teacher Maire O'Neill ’05; Nicholas Fields, receiving the athletics award from Andres Parra ’99, director of boys athletics; and Brooke Gutschick, receiving the Founders’ award from Former Head of School Lawrence Bullis ’54. SPRING-SUMMER 2013

5


From left, Jai Paton, Dana Daniels, Kourosh Kalachi, Tejas Patel and Badri Glonti assemble to begin Commencement exercises.

CeMaia Wise and Brooke Gutschick

Alessandra Clark, Kaitlin Bushkoff and Amma Calhoun

Phil Bryant and Hunty Brown

Bullis Memories Favorite teachers: I loved the spirited conversations and debates Mr. Chellman was able to spark every day in his American Government class. Two other teachers who had a significant impact on me were Mr. Zimmer, who taught me how math can be applied in the real world and in almost every occupation, and Mr. Kinder, who showed how interesting English can be.

Corbin Blumberg Favorite memory: It was amazing to be part of the lacrosse team that defeated Landon in 2012 because it was the first time we had beat them in lacrosse. School spirit vastly improved during each of my four years at Bullis, so it was particularly rewarding to experience that game. 6

Future plans: I am attending the University of Kentucky where I will study equine science and management. Advice for future seniors: Take advantage of every single moment. It goes fast! It’s an awesome year. Work hard and have fun. Favorite lunch: Chicken patties

Amy Rose Oeschler Favorite memory: It’s a tie between the great times I had in art classes and making the Bullis Varsity lacrosse team. Favorite teachers: Ms. O’Neill for her infectious enthusiasm and love for art and teaching. BULLIS magazine


Adam Holland, Dr. Gerald Boarman and Michael Akinkoye

New graduates Kira Mo, Esther Kim and Amy Yang

Favorite teachers: Mr. Johnson helped me with understanding character development in the various productions we put on. Mr. Strunk incorporated lessons from other classes into choir, and Mrs. Lombardo always had time for banter before class, which I enjoyed.

Future plans: I am attending Virginia Commonwealth University School of Arts where I hope to study graphic or communication design. Advice for future seniors: Appreciate the time you have with your classmates; the year flies by after college applications are submitted!

Future plans: I am attending New York University where I will major in musical theater.

Favorite lunch: Curly fries Dexter Warren Favorite memory: The “Children of Eden” cast singing the finale as a memorial tribute to Cami Baruch. To me, that moment showed that Bullis students care about one another whether or not they are close, and I found that to be particularly meaningful. SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Advice for future seniors: Get your college applications done early so you don’t have to worry about it! Favorite lunch: Turkey melt

7


Class of 2013 Counted Down to Graduation 50 Days to Graduation Day On February 22, the Alumni Office hosted a “50 Days to Graduation” event for seniors. Set inside the Commons in North Hall, a barista served coffee, tea and treats to the seniors while the Alumni Office informed them of the important role they would play as future alumni of Bullis.

From left, Idrienne Walker ‘13, Tyler Allen ‘13 and Joseph Sageman ‘13 look ahead to graduation over a cup of coffee.

Senior Lunch On May 1, members of the senior class joined together for the annual Senior Lunch while learning about the importance of staying connected to Bullis after graduation. Alumna and Middle School Assistant Principal Kira Orr ’93 told the students how the Bullis community had always been there for her, even organizing a blood drive while she was fighting TTP, a rare blood disorder. Kira emphasized that the Bullis community is close-knit and will continue to be there for each other in the future. The Alumni Office also welcomed new class agents Brooke Gutschick and Danny

Assistant Director of Alumni Jennifer (Hayman) Okun ’99 presents newly elected class agents, Brooke Gutschick and Danny Copeland, with their Bullis alumni t-shirts.

Copeland, who will be the direct liaisons between the Alumni Office and the class of 2013.

8

BULLIS magazine


Camille “Cami” Marin Baruch Forever in Our Hearts Along with her family, the Bullis community mourned the loss of senior Camille Baruch, who passed away suddenly in February. “Cami was an exemplary student and a beautiful person, kind-hearted, generous and with a great sense of humor,” wrote Head of School Dr. Gerald Boarman. “Her absence will leave a large gap in our hearts and in our community and her memory will always be a part of our School.” Although illness caused her to miss many school days, she was a member of the National Honor Society and earned high honors posthumously upon graduation. From the left, Jessica and Nathan Baruch, with

“Cami had a quiet confidence about her,” recalled classmate Brooke Gutschick ’13. younger sister Cami. “She had a remarkable zest for life, which was reflected in her love of country music and infectious smile that lit up the room. She always had something insightful to say and was wickedly funny as well. Modest about her accomplishments and rather thoughtful, one of Cami’s strongest traits was her kind-hearted nature.” Cami played violin, trombone and piano, and recorded CDs for distribution to patients at local children’s hospitals. Deeply committed to community service, she also played piano for seniors at a local nursing home and her favorite activity was the Jensen-Schmidt summer tennis camp at Bullis. Before illness curtailed her participation in athletics, Cami was an exceptional athlete in soccer, a catcher in softball and played on an Amateur Athletic Union basketball team that twice competed at the national championships.

Her own health issues undoubtedly contributed to her career interest in medicine. Specifically, according to Ms. Baruch, Cami “had decided to become a colorectal surgeon—a male-dominated profession that could benefit from a female perspective.” Cami also loved animals and was fascinated with elephants for their sense of family, gentleness and the fact that they never forgot those who were kind to them. “People come and go through our lives,” said Brooke, “but Cami isn’t one of those people. Her strong will, determination and positive attitude will forever live in my heart.” Friends and family gathered outside The Marriott Family Library before the senior awards celebration for the dedication of the Camille Baruch Patio—constructed thanks to the generosity of the Class of 2013 and the Sullivan family. Cami’s friends Zoe Goldberg ’13 and Jordan Sullivan ’13 read the language they helped draft for the plaque, including the quote selected by Cami for her senior yearbook page: “It is our choices… that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” —Albus Dumbledore Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J.K. Rowling Memorial donations can be made to: Save the Elephant Program at the Wildlife Conservation Network, The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America or the Ronald McDonald House of Cleveland. The Cami Baruch Patio. Inset, Jordan Sullivan ’13 and Zoe Goldberg ’13 unveil the plaque.


Generation to Generation Legacy Family Portraits Each graduation we capture photos of families with multiple graduate connections, including siblings, parents, aunts, uncles or cousins who had previously graduated from Bullis.

Alexi ’12, Abi ’11, Andrew ’86 and Kerry Blair

Corbin Blumberg ’13 and Brooke Ludder ’09 10

Bailey ’10, Jill, Kaitlin ’13 and Michael Bushkoff BULLIS magazine


Jordan ’06, Morgan ’13 and Erica ’08 Cafritz

Jason ’10, Jordan ’15 and Josh ’13 Czerwiec

George ’13 and Robert ’10 Fleming SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Gabriella ’11 and Alessandra ’13 Clark

Dominique ’05 and Brianna ’13 Davis

Josh ’13, Katelyn ’18 and Sam ’11 Foreman 11


Teddy ’09, Nick ’13 and Sam ’10 Funger

Brian ’10, Alex ’13 and Megan ’07 Herbets

Davis ’12 and Max ’13 Nordeen 12

Liana ’07, Allison ’13 and Jennifer ’09 Osterman BULLIS magazine


Tejas Patel ’13 and Priya Mehta ’09

Christina ’08 and Colette ’13 Roa

Kamar ’11 and Kia ’13 Saint-Louis SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Hari ’10 and Jai ’13 Paton

Jared ’13 and Courtney ’10 Rubens

Jaymi, Justin ’13, Jordan ’11, JR and Jessica ’18 Schuble 13


Will ’13 and Michael ’10 Stroup

Dexter ’13 and David ’10 Warren

Jordan ’13, Tommy ’11 and Courtenay ’09 Sullivan

Julia ’09, Sean ’13 and Cory ’05 Watkinson

Dignitaries joining this year’s ceremonies included Trustee Dell Warren, P’10, ’13, Upper School Principal Andrew Delinsky, Trustee Marian Bennett, P’06, Rev. Anne Benefield, Head of School Dr. Gerald Boarman, Former Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley, Chair of the Board of Trustees Tom Sullivan, P’9, ’11, ’13, Trustee Andrew Blair ’86, P’11, ’12, ’20, Trustee Adam Greenberg, P’14, ’16, ’19, and Trustee David Trone, P’12, ’14. 14

BULLIS magazine


academics Model UN Visits The Hague The Model United Nations (MUN) is more than an extracurricular club—it’s an opportunity for Bullis students to travel and experience first-hand the world of international diplomacy. For the past two and a half years the club has traveled to three or four MUN conferences each year, including one international trip. One of the most prestigious conferences on the Model UN circuit was hosted in The Hague, Netherlands, last January. Seven Bullis students traveled there to represent the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP). Chaperoned by Faculty Sponsor and Social Studies Chair Lisa Vardi and Dr. Mary Frances Bryja, director of college counseling, the group experienced a fantastic trip. Our Bullis students participated in global MUN meetings and bonded with other students from around the world, all of them sharing a dedication to making the world a better place.

represented their school and ESCAP “in an effective and impressive manner. I was so proud!” Ms. Vardi remembers. While attending the conference at the World Forum Convention Center in The Hague, the students watched some of the criminal proceedings against Radovan Karadzic, the former president of Serbia now accused of genocide. Despite a busy schedule, they also found time to visit Amsterdam, touring the Rijksmuseum and the Anne Frank house, and toured the city of Delft, famous for its medieval architecture and centuries-old pottery industry. On the blog kept throughout the trip, Ashlyn Coleman ’15 said the MUN trip was “life-changing.”

"Young people... will be the problem solvers of the future." —Lisa Vardi

Environmental sustainability was this year’s MUN conference theme, “a relevant topic for young people to discuss, as they will be the problem solvers of the future,” Ms. Vardi explains. “It was inspiring to watch the seriousness with which the 3,000 attendees approached this complicated topic and proposed solutions in the form of resolutions.” Throughout the five-day conference, Bullis students

Posing at the iconic “I amsterdam’’ sign are Model UN participants, top row from left, Samantha Zimmerman ’16, Idrienne Walker ’13, Ashlyn Coleman ’15 and Tyler Allen ’13; bottom row, Keon Manesh ’13, Thomas Liu ’16 and Andrew Goldberg ’16.

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

15


Kate Powell and her 4th grade class start every day with a morning meeting.

Lower School

A Community of Readers Rich With Purpose

16

BULLIS magazine


s

Fifth grader Jake Goldberg climbed into the car one winter afternoon and said, “Today was the best day ever.” Mom Tammy Goldberg smiled; Jake had said the same thing the day before. Jake and his twin brother Jonnie started at Bullis this year. “They are so chatty about everything they’re doing in school and how much they love their teachers and everyone at Bullis,” Tammy explained. “Since coming to Bullis, their confidence in academics has skyrocketed. They read without prompting and ask to go to the bookstore to buy books, not toys!” The Lower School is bursting with innovation: Accelerated Reading, individualized instruction, Responsive Classroom and much more. This activity is setting the foundation for students to successfully take on greater academic challenges as they advance in school, while providing a supportive, enriching and fun environment for students today.

direct correlation between reading skills and long-term academic achievement, and the most important method of developing reading skills is pure reading volume.” Each week, students met in small groups to discuss their reading, share recommendations and learn comprehension strategies. In writer workshops, they studied texts as readers and practiced them as writers. “Reading is really at the heart of the students’ daily experience,” says teacher Margaret Andreadis. “They bound into the room each morning chatting about their books.”

“The most important method of developing reading skills is pure reading volume.” —Betsy Kelly, Lower School Principal

100 Million Words

The heart of the Lower School’s new initiatives is its reading program. In September, Principal Betsy Kelly set a goal for each student to read one million words during the year. Students chose their own books and along with in-school reading were expected to read independently for 45 minutes every evening. For each book, students took a short online quiz to test comprehension and help teachers monitor progress. “Most important is the actual word count,” explains Lower School Principal Betsy Kelly. “Studies prove a SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Demetri Engel ’20 enjoys Read-in Day from the cozy confines of his sleeping bag.

17


Ms. Meghan Rose's science class built flexible knee braces as part of their Bodyworks unit.

The Washington Post featured a story about the 100 million word achievement in its KidsPost Section on June 11, 2013. (tinyurl.com/ohe9b2j)

By Read-In Day in May—when students settle into classrooms with sleeping bags, pillows, and an occasional tent to simply read all day—the Lower School had collectively read a whopping 100 million words. To kick off the event, the Lower School celebrated this achievement and each of the 38 “millionaire” students who reached their individual goals. Many millionaires exceeded the goal, including top-reader Caesar Wain, 5th grade, who plowed through more than five million words, and 4th grader Sam Bromberg, who devoured more than three million words reading fantasies and mysteries. Sam’s mother, Julia Beck, believes the “secret sauce” behind the reading program’s success is how students are encouraged to take ownership of their reading. “Sam poured a great deal of effort and energy into choosing his books. We spent time deep in conversation about what he might read next and he took so much pride in making those decisions.

18

The process built great confidence and self-esteem in Sam. It struck a careful balance between encouragement and autonomy and recognized Sam for the individual he is.” Individualized Instruction and the Emergence of STEM

The Lower School has implemented individualized instruction in other subjects as well, through a unique hybrid of approaches that address content knowledge, skills and critical thinking. At the beginning of each math unit, teachers assess students’ proficiency and group them by ability for practice and skill development. “The groups are fluid, changing from unit to unit,” says Ms. Kelly. “Students may be in a more advanced group for one unit and in a different group for another. The focus is never on what group you’re in but on the individualized work each student is doing, and teachers can design their

BULLIS magazine


instruction around the specific needs of each student.” Livia Christensen recalls wondering at the start of the year how much her son Julian, who has just completed 3rd grade, would be challenged at Bullis, but was impressed early on with the individualized curriculum. “Teachers are constantly reevaluating and adjusting to make sure the challenge is just right for each student,” she said. “Julian is always challenged, never bored and never stressed.” Another reason students are so engaged is a burgeoning STEM program integrating engineering and math with science. Rather than simply studying the human body in 5th grade, students in Meghan Rose’s class designed knee braces. The project was inspired by “Engineering is Elemental,” an engineering curriculum designed at the Boston Museum of Science. Responsive Classroom

Each Lower School class begins every day with a morning meeting—a key component of the division’s use of the Responsive Classroom approach, which facilitates social, emotional and academic growth in a strong, safe school community. According to 4th grade teacher Kate Powell, Responsive Classroom enhances the sense of community. By following a predictable routine that includes classroom jobs and a contract that holds kids accountable for their behavior, students learn social interaction skills,

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

empathy and self-control, along with problem solving and organization. “They remind each other about behavior and help each other out more,” she observes. The combined effect of the Responsive Classroom and the Lower School’s individualized approach is evident when students and parents describe their experiences at Bullis. “Everyone at Bullis is connected. This is the essential structure of our school— complete support,” said 5th grader Joe Martin at the year-end recognition ceremony. “People call to other people across the halls, always smiling, always enjoying time together… this is treasured here. My best word to describe how everyone is acquainted and connected here is family. I have never experienced such a vibe of collegiality. I have been taught how crucial it is to be part of a wider family.” Angie Jones, whose son Brendon, just finished 5th grade, agrees: “Ms. Kelly and the teachers help students realize what they can do, establishing self-worth and learning to move forward positively.” Looking Ahead

The Lower School’s individualized focus led to the decision to add 2nd grade to the program next year. “Our focus is on kids, not teachers,” said Ms. Kelly. “We constantly evaluate where students are and how to move each one forward based on individual competency. This approach provides flexibility and resources to expand.”

“Julian is always challenged, never bored and never stressed.” – Livia Christensen, P’22

New families joining the Lower School this fall will find students eager to resume lessons, celebrate each other and work hard. Removing stress from the equation—and valuing each student’s educational trajectory—is achieving great results. Most importantly, the students will progress to Middle School and beyond with knowledge, skills and a sense of self that will propel them ahead confidently. As 5th grader Mark Williams wrote of his Lower School years: “We became artists, athletes and learners. We became friends. We became Bullis!” For Tammy Goldberg and her family, the effects have been life-changing. “We are a happier, stress-free family thanks in huge part to Bullis. There is nothing better than picking up your children after a long day and having them be so happy!”

19


Innovations in the Arts Bullis art students are discovering that the visual arts involve more than painting, drawing, sculpting and displaying artwork. This year, innovative programs are expanding student experience beyond technique to the responsibilities and opportunities of the art world. While art shows have been a staple of the Bullis program, students are learning more about the exhibition process. Cocaptains assigned to AP studio shows oversee each of four events, critiquing, curating and installing art pieces as well as advertising the show. “The students curate the most cohesive show they can,” says art teacher Maire O’Neill ’05, “and make sure that student work is well represented.” Organizing the art shows provides important learning opportunities. “The students want each show to be more professionally presented than the one before,” says Ms. O’Neill. “They hold critique meetings to continually improve what they’re doing.” Last fall, student artists designed tokens and comment boxes to invite visitor feedback on their art pieces. In Open Studio classes, older Bullis students acting as show captains worked with younger students to critique, curate and organize younger student exhibits. The “Postcard Show” and “Artwalk” in May provided opportunities for all Bullis students to showcase their art. Inspired by 20

Students from all divisions seized the opportunity to showcase their postcard art with the entire community.

“One Day,” Richard Blanco’s Inauguration poem, students in all divisions wrote poems, while other students illustrated the verses on postcards. Swapping creative efforts allowed students to both write and illustrate, resulting in nearly 300 postcards displayed in the Blair lobby. For the Artwalk, student guides escorted visitors through classroom displays. “They stamped the hands of guests,” says Lily Gillette, visual arts chair and Lower School art teacher, “making it fun to go from room to room to see all the great work the students have done this year.” New as well is Bullis involvement in the National Art Honor Society (NAHS); similar chapters for the performing arts are the Tri-M Music Honor Society and

International Thespians. Sponsored by the National Art Educators Association, NAHS inducts art students who meet national requirements. Many opportunities are available, including “some outstanding scholarships at top art schools,” explains art teacher Louisa Morris. Interested students meet to discuss new art projects, such as community service hours earned through painting scenery for Lower and Middle School plays, face painting at the Homecoming celebration and designing prom tickets. Grade point averages, meeting attendance and fundraising activities also help students satisfy NAHS requirements. “In previous years, art students always BULLIS magazine


pitched in to help with school events, but we had no real system in place to do so,” says art teacher Deb Donoghue. “NAHS provides guidelines and incentives while encouraging the same kind of art-related activities.”

or draw, says Esther Kim. “This year we are problem solving—learning to utilize space in a show or solve a problem in artwork. The teachers encourage us to find our own style and to reach out to the community, too.”

In the wider art community, six Bullis students were selected to exhibit in the “Best of Independent Schools” show held at Landon School this spring. The competition among local BaltimoreWashington private schools received over 200 submissions, with 83 artworks chosen for display—including pieces by Bullis students Nadia Fallahi ’13, Will Gansler ’15, Esther Kim ’13, Qiaoumei Li ’14, Robyn Mackenzie ’16 and and Jack Zhou ’14.

Collaboration among art classes in all divisions is a key aspect of the program, “inspiring younger students to think more seriously about their own art,” says Ms. O’Neill. “We see more interaction among students, and they see what goes on in later art classes.” The Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) offers summer scholarships to two Bullis students by juried decision, providing a two-week art intensive taught by college

art professors. “This immersion helps students understand what art school is really like,” says Ms. Donoghue. Dayna Clayton ’14 and Kali Engel ’14 participated this past summer. Darcy Argain ’14 and Yasmin Rucker ’14 both received CIA scholarships for this summer. “Our teachers are really supportive,” says Esther Kim of the Bullis program. She will be attending college at Maryland Institute College of Art.“I feel so ready to go to art school now.” To enable visitors to further appreciate the array of Bullis talent in visual arts, an online gallery is updated each trimester on the Bullis website. View it at www.bullis. org/arts/Gallery.

Art outreach and community spirit is also encouraged in the Lower School, such as the successful quilt project for this year’s Gala. A grant from the Parents Association made available plenty of materials for Lower School students to create unique squares for three quilts auctioned at the Gala. What do these initiatives bring to the arts at Bullis? “More serious art students,” says Ms. Donoghue. “They understand that being an art student means showing work, documenting pieces and giving back to the community through their talent.” Ms. Gillette agrees. “Our students are becoming more invested in their artwork at a younger age.” Art at Bullis is more than learning to paint SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Maire O’Neill ’05 inducts Esther Kim ’13 as the National Arts Honor Society chapter’s first president.

21


news Gala Success: A Red Carpet Affair On Friday, March 15, “A Red Carpet Affair” Gala raised $330,000 in support of financial aid and professional development programs, including a new record for Raise the Paddle of $139,000 to fund a new outdoor video display and scoreboard. With great appreciation, we thank Gala CoChairs Audrey Friedlander P’15 and Tammy McKnight P’15,’18 for their enthusiastic and dedicated leadership; Total Wine & More and David and June Trone, P’12, ’14 for their generous sponsorship; and the many parent volunteers who donated countless hours of their time to the Gala. Their efforts, combined with the energetic participation and generous bidding of the Gala’s attendees, produced a great event that displayed the positive impact and generous contributions of our community.

Gala Co-chairs Tammy McKnight and Audrey Friedlander pose with the red carpet backdrop.

Bullis Seniors Final at National History Day More than 600,000 students from all 50 states participate in National History Day events during the school year, including all Bullis juniors and those sophomores who take honors US History. After the school events, winning students compete at the county and state levels to qualify for the national event in College Park, Maryland each June. Six Bullis students made it all the way to this summer's NHD, and two from our delegation made it to the finals. Congratulations to Oriana Theo ’14, who

22

placed 13th for her solo performance, “When Hope Fell From The Sky: The Berlin Airlift” and to Brian Mitchell ’14 who placed 7th for his documentary “Baltimore Polytechnic Institute: A Model of Desegregation Before Brown” (tinyurl. com/p2ypadk). Brian also received the Star Spangled 200 special prize for incorporating unity in diversity in his entry.

Finalists Brian Mitchell ’14 and Oriana Theo ’14 at the national competition. BULLIS magazine


arts Imagination A sampling of artwork produced by students across the divisions.

Leah Mayo ’18 Demi Fragoyannis ’22

Adeline Hollars ’20 SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Sloan Bernstein ’21 23


arts

Monique Muse ’16

Bridget Conway ’18

24

Nadia Fallahi ’13

Alonso Flores-Noel ’18

BULLIS magazine


Nick Sussman ’14

Justin Schuble ’13

Minnie Wu ’15

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Drew Micholas ’14

25


athletics Outstanding Athletes Anthony Thompson Basketball

“Anytime we walked onto the floor,” says Bruce Kelley, varsity basketball coach, “we knew we had the best point guard in the game, and that good things were going to happen.” That point guard for the last three years was Anthony Thompson, who wrapped his senior year leading the Bulldogs to a 47-7 record over the last two years, along with two IAC banners and two IAC tournament championships. He was also named Montgomery County player of the year by The Gazette, and named to 2nd team All-Met by The Washington Post. Anthony heads to Holy Cross College next year, leaving behind other impressive statistics as well, including 15.4 points per game, 106 assists and 62 three-point

Nick Barpoulis Swimming

“I actually love playing hockey,” says Nick Barpoulis, “but I’m a better swimmer!” He joined the swim team as a freshman, but did not get serious about it until the end of sophomore year when his coaches saw him begin to truly understand and appreciate the sport.

26

shots made during his senior year. “Very few students make a team win the way Anthony does,” declares Kelley. Anthony came to Bullis in 9th grade, and has played basketball—always at point guard—since he was four years old. “I love the passion and the competition of the game,” he explains, “and it’s great to see all the hard work pay off.” He looks forward to playing at Holy Cross, and might consider playing professionally here or overseas, but “college is more for life after basketball,” he says. He particularly enjoyed his economics classes here at Bullis, and hopes to work in business once basketball is behind him.

“We were shocked at his transition,” remembers Coach Bryan Jones, “from a goofy, non-serious swimmer to realizing that his commitment to get better would not only help increase visibility for the program and showcase Bullis but also aid in his development as a leader.” Nick became team co-captain as a junior, and went on to set a school record for 500 freestyle and share records for 200 free relay and 200 medley relay.

Swimming offers a unique combination of individual challenge and team spirit which appeals to Nick, who recognizes that in swimming “you can be whatever you make yourself to be. You will get better if you put in the effort.” Nick, who will attend Bucknell University this fall, was recognized for his work ethic and leadership when he won this season’s Coach’s Award.

BULLIS magazine


Brittany Jackson Basketball

Incredible intensity and passion for the game gives varsity basketball co-captain Brittany Jackson the qualities that her coaches want to see in their players: hard work, respect and composure. “Brittany has a loving spirit and a positive word for her teammates all the time,” observes Head Coach Rod Hairston, “but her competitive nature and desire to succeed takes over once she steps between the lines. She becomes a warrior with the determination of a champion.” Brittany developed skill and leadership over seven years on Bullis basketball teams. Like her undefeated 8th grade season, winning this year’s Independent School League was momentous. “That victory was the whole goal,” says Brittany. “We were working up to it for years.” Younger players will now fill spots vacated

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

by graduating seniors, and Brittany anticipates returning to see “what we’ve created.” Off the court, Brittany sang alto with the Chamber Singers for two years. “I love the challenge of working with a group. Just like basketball, the effort requires chemistry to successfully blend together to accomplish our ultimate goal.” With a scholarship to play at George Mason University, Brittany will also pursue her other passion—English literature. College basketball is a big commitment, so she may not find time for many activities, but she is certainly among the many multi-dimensional students that Bullis helps prepare to meet the world.

27


athletics Outstanding Athletes Josh Foreman Baseball

Josh Foreman prefers to play baseball rather than watch it, forgoing major league fandom for his own games. “I like the culture of baseball and the combination of mental and physical it requires,” he explains. After four years starting on the Bullis varsity team, he plans to play for Emory University next year. As shortstop, Josh is the point guard of the field, facilitating the defense and “getting the most balls,” Josh wryly adds. He started in more than 100 games during his time at Bullis. Aside from being a “team-first guy who leads by example on and off the field,”

Coach Brian Lumpkin named Josh the team’s Most Valuable Player. “He’s the most reliable defensive player I’ve ever coached,” says Lumpkin, pointing to Josh’s career fielding percentage of 93%. A two-time all-IAC player who also excelled on offense, Josh finished this season with 14 RBIs, 12 singles, 3 triples and 7 stolen bases. “Thanks to Josh, the last two seasons have been the best for baseball in school history,” said Lumpkin. Aside from playing, Josh was an avid writer for The Bulldog, and hopes to continue in sports media, maybe trying radio when he gets to Emory.

Brandon Burke Ice Hockey and Lacrosse

Most Bullis students participate in a variety of activities, but few are MVPs in two sports—standout athlete Brandon Burke ’13 has achieved that. Brandon played varsity lacrosse and hockey since his freshman year. The youngest of three boys, he followed his brothers onto the field and rink, becoming a leader in his own right in both sports. For Brandon, this winter’s hockey season was the best one in which he has taken 28

BULLIS magazine


CeMaia Wise Softball

This summer will be the first in several years that CeMaia Wise will not be playing softball. “I’ve played since I was seven, including summer travel leagues,” she recalls.

for her performance on the field and off.” Before leaving to attend St. Johns University in the fall, CeMaia will help coach softball for Bullis Summer Programs, where her ever-present smile

will accompany her winning combination of skills and positive energy: “I try to encourage everyone—a smile can make any day better!”

CeMaia started as catcher for all four of her years on the Bullis varsity team. She earned all-ISL during her junior and senior seasons, with 18 put-outs and 20 assists. “Coaches from every school always commented on her impressive skills,” says Coach Heather Patterson. “She puts fear in her competitors with her strong arm and quick release, picking players off repeatedly from first and third.” Patterson also gave CeMaia the coach’s Leadership Award for the season, crediting her unmatched positive support for her teammates. “She definitely has left her legacy and will be missed tremendously

Nadia Fallahi Lacrosse and Field Hockey

part. Although Bullis ultimately lost the IAC championship game, the team fought valiantly: “I’m really proud of how we stuck together as a team and hope that for the younger players this will be a learning experience for next year.” Brandon received the team’s Most Valuable Player award. As goalie for the lacrosse team, Brandon was awarded All-IAC and All-Gazette, and the team’s Most Valuable Player. Coach Robert Pollicino says Brandon “was the

consummate leader who pushed himself and his teammates to improve every day.” Brandon will play lacrosse next year at Colgate University. “At the end of the day,” he says, “I just want everyone to know that I left it all out on the field or on the ice.”

“Nadia Fallahi handles the pressurepacked job of varsity lacrosse goalie wonderfully,” compliments Coach Kathleen Lloyd. Nadia is a team player who holds a positive attitude and keeps the team in mind. “After every goal our team would score, she would run from her goal to midfield to congratulate the players,” Coach Lloyd recalls. Nadia had a game-changing moment when she overheard opponents doubting Nadia Fallahi continues next page

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

29


athletics her ability to defend penalty shots. “That fired me up to ramp up my game!” Soon everyone regarded her as a solid goalie. The Bullis girls will move to the upper division next year after being undefeated in the ISL this year. “We went out on a high,” Nadia says, “and I feel confident that I contributed to that success.”

to help others whether or not they hold leadership positions. Next year Nadia plans to study public

relations at University of Southern California and perhaps continue athletics on intramural teams.

For two years Nadia has played forward on the varsity field hockey team as well. “I don’t know what I would have done without sports,” she reflected on the eve of Graduation. “Playing two varsity sports helped me mature and learn to balance.” She hopes to inspire younger players

Kasey Countee Tennis

After two years away from competitive tennis, it took rising senior Kasey Countee just one year to return to peak performance, wrapping up his season with an 11-1 record, the IAC individual championship and All-Met recognition. He seems well on his way to fulfilling Coach Steve Miguel’s prediction: “If he keeps at it diligently, tennis may be Kasey’s ticket to a college education.”

became team co-captain, calling for increased focus from a player known for his talent, energy and enthusiasm— and for not taking things too seriously.

“Instead of getting caught up in myself,” Kasey has learned, “I have to lead by example and make sure others stay on top of their games as well.”

Surprisingly, despite his domination as a singles player, Kasey prefers team sports, having played lacrosse, soccer and basketball, and running cross country since enrolling in Bullis as a 6th grader. Within a team, acknowledges Kasey, rallying together as a group is a powerful motivator. When alone on the court, he confides, “I sometimes struggle to rely solely on myself for internal motivation.” Adding to the challenge this year, Kasey 30

BULLIS magazine


Basketball Teams Clinch Victories

The Bulldogs won the ISL tournament with a big win over Georgetown Visitation. Players include, front row from left, Nicole Kittay ’16, Brianna Davis ’13, Brooke Gutschick ’13, Raven James ’16 and Dazia Hall ’13. Back row, Kyla Lewis ’15, Ashley DeLeonibus ’14, Lynee Belton ’14, Kirby Porter ’14, Lawrencia Moten ’16 and Brittany Jackson ’13.

The varsity boys team defeated St. Albans to win a second consecutive IAC title. Front row from left, Jamaal Greenwood ‘14, Jonathan Dyer ’13, Anthony Thompson ’13, Aaron Briggs ’14, Lamonte Armstrong ’14, Kyven Jones ’14 and Justin Herron ’14. Back row from left, Winton Lyle ’13, Joe Sageman ’13, Andre Walker ’14, AJ Metz ’13, Russell Sangster ’14, Brian Kelley ’14 and Chris Aust ’14. SPRING-SUMMER 2013

31


Building Support for Bullis One at a Time Engraved bricks are once again available! Purchase a personalized brick in honor or memory of a student, team, teacher, individual or family. Proceeds from brick purchases help to support the Annual Fund at Bullis. Thank you for supporting Bullis and showing your school spirit! Please print text as you wish it to be engraved on the brick. Limit: 15 letters per line – 3 lines maximum per brick.

One letter or character per block Please use a separate form for each brick ordered. Name: ____________________________________

Relationship to Bullis: _________________________

Address: ________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________

E-mail: __________________________________________

Preferred location: Front of The Marriott Family Library _____ or Kline Alumni Stadium _____

Brick orders are payable in full. Please complete this form and return with a check for $250 made payable to Bullis School. Mail to: Bullis School Advancement Office, 10601 Falls Road, Potomac, MD 20854 Questions? Please email bricks@bullis.org All contributions are tax deductible to a 501(c)(3) organization in accordance with IRS regulations.

32

BULLIS magazine


advancement perspectives “Generosity nurtures this School.” Schools and growth go hand in hand—and this year, Bullis has seen record growth in every area, much of it due to the remarkable generosity and support of this wonderful community. Early in the school year we asked parents and the entire giving community to “Step Up” for Bullis. You did so with such enthusiasm that together we stepped right past our Annual Fund goal of $950,000—to reach one million dollars! That’s a milestone for any giving campaign, and we are grateful to all of you. Your high regard for Bullis and all that it represents for its students and community made new growth possible in programs and in campus improvements such as the brick patios outside The Marriott Family Library, including the lovely waterfall and sunny patio dedicated to Cami Baruch. This summer an impressive video scoreboard will be installed at the Stadium thanks to the record-setting donations on Gala night for Raise the Paddle. Every year with your help, we see more facets of the great potential in Bullis. The secret to our community’s strong culture of giving is not simply an appreciation of the importance of philanthropy—it’s the realization that generosity nurtures this school, and by extension, helps to ensure the future of every student who walks across this campus. Bullis benefits from donations of time and talents as well as resources. We are so grateful for the many parent volunteers, experienced and new, who stepped forward this year to help with everything from the snack bar to the Gala and the successful Bullis Gives Back 5K race. We thank each of you for “stepping up” in countless ways to encourage Bullis’s evolution. Our future looks bright—and as we move ahead to next year, we know that the School remains a priority for all of us. Enjoy a wonderful summer, and I look forward to seeing you in September! Sincerely,

Joanne Szadkowski Director of Institutional Advancement and Alumni

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

33


alumni Jerry May Alumni Golf Tournament For the last three years, Bullis Head of School Dr. Gerald L. Boarman and his golf partners have dominated the annual golf tournament. This year, though, a new team (in top photo at right) comprised of George Mavrikes P’14, ’17, Tom Mavrikes, Ryan Tendall and James Bannister, squeaked by Dr. Boarman’s team to take the title. The event attracted more than 70 golfers, including nearly half who were alumni. The tournament retained the fun, friendly competition and happy reunions that each Jerry May Alumni Golf Tournament features year after year.

Top photo, from left, Tom Mavrikes, James Bannister, Ryan Tendall and George Mavrikes P ’14, ‘17. Middle photo, Dean Sclavounos ’63, Glenn Hunter, Bruce Kelley and Andy Marusak ’66. Above, front row, Hunter Gosnell ’06, Josh Basile ’03, Craig Aronoff ’04 and Woody King ’09. Back row, Scott Crow ’11, Alex Friedlander ’11, Keith Cohen ’06, Brian Will ’08, Andres Parra ’99, Adam Janowitz ’00, Drew Prescott ’00 and Neil King ’07. 34

BULLIS magazine


Alumni Turn Out for Annual Hockey Game

We had a great turnout at the Arc Ice Rink for the November 22 hockey game. Back row from left, Craig Aronoff ’04, Mike Band ’08, Ross Koenig ’02, Paul Davis ’04, Ben Donoghue ’02, Josh Weiner, Brandon Burke ’13, Cory Watkinson ’05, Andrew Prescott ’00, friend, Kyle Newton ’05, Assistant Coach Doug Raeder, Neil King ’07, Michael Fayad ’07, Steven Burke ’08 and Keith Cohen ’06. Front row, Jordan Burke ’05, Zach Weiner ’09, Mark Shesser, Justin Hoch ’14, Alex Jackson ’07 and Ryan Davenport ’07.

Alumni Lacrosse Games

A large crowd returned to campus for June 8’s boys lacrosse game. Back row from left, Mitch Goldberg ’13, Chris Mejia ’06, Ross Koenig ’02, Jordan Burke ’05, Andy Will ’09, Josh Ein ’06, Steven Burke ’08, Robert Fleming ’10, Paul Davis ’04 and Svet Tintchev ’06. Front row, Brooke Slowinski ’07, John Kelly ’11, Danny Dickstein ’10, Nick Avedisian ’09, Sebastian Astrada ’98 and Kylor Bellistri ’12 . At right, Cary Smith ’02 and Katherine Basile ’02 played in the girls game on May 4. SPRING-SUMMER 2013

35


alumni profile

Nicole Bernard Chaffin ’83 Alumna was one of the first women to graduate from Bullis. Nicole Bernard has always been comfortable being a pioneer. As a member of the first class of girls to enter the School in 1981 when she was in 11th grade, Nicole was a trailblazer then and has continued to be throughout her career, including in her current role as senior vice president for audience strategy at The Fox Group. The position was a new one at the organization, where Bernard has worked since 2005. While many organizations have departments that focus on diversity, Fox selected Bernard to take on a broader challenge “to ensure that each of our entertainment products, across every unit, incorporates and engages as diverse an audience as our country is made of,” she explains. Bernard’s department provides strategy and resources and establishes partnerships throughout the country to support all divisions of Fox, and the position allows her to play to her strengths

36

as well as her passions to follow her own path, travel and explore and appreciate different cultures. “People amaze me and I have always loved to see, feel and touch all the things that make a culture so unique,” she says. “Having a blank slate to create something unique fosters the visionary in me,” she recalls. “I was the only girl on the boys tennis team at Bullis, and the mere fact that I sought out Bullis knowing I would be a first in more ways than one was really the catalyst for my being confident enough to move myself in a direction I might innately know is right for me, even if it means being the first or only one there.” Bernard credits Bullis with establishing this spirit to see things as they could be and not just how they are. Bernard still thinks of her days at Bullis as some of the happiest in her life. She enthusiastically recalls the School’s dynamic environment and how it provided

exactly the challenges she sought even as a teenager. “When my friend Candice Mitchell ’83 mentioned Bullis and its academic rigor, prior military foundation and great tennis team—and the chance to make history as one of the first women to integrate the school—I knew it was for me.” She still remembers feeling both “terrified and amused” by General Price when she arrived first on campus, and loving the focus on college preparation and an expectation for excellence. “I even liked that you had to be ‘invited back’ every semester. The idea sparked the competitor in me and made me feel like I was joining an elite club that I would earn the right to be a part of.” She talks often about Bullis with her nieces and nephew, current Bullis students Gabby McIntosh ’14, Brynn McIntosh ’16 and Alec McIntosh ’18. Today’s dress code options are a far cry from the blazer and saddle shoes of Bernard’s era—“those

BULLIS magazine


Left page, Nicole Bernard's 1983 yearbook photos. Above from left, twin daughters Leah and Hayden share a hug; at right Nicole and her husband Lee vacation in Cabo San Lucas with their daughters.

saddle shoes were just wrong in so many ways!” she laughs. Among the many life skills she developed at Bullis, Bernard is particularly grateful for the strong work ethic, determination, appreciation for healthy competition and the value of being part of a community as important foundations for her career success. She also applauds the expanded opportunities in the arts at today’s Bullis, along with the dedication to academic success and engagement in sports that remain still at the high levels she remembers. As her own twin daughters—Hayden and Leah, now six years old—grow older, she hopes to find a similar educational program for them in Los Angeles that will provide an elite education that balances fun, friendships and academics. “Prioritizing and balance are great life lessons that we learned at Bullis.” Bernard regularly advises her nieces and nephews to take advantage of the “dynamic teachers and to raise questions about SPRING-SUMMER 2013

what they are taught and what they wish to see more.” She encourages them to recognize and “always remember the school’s historical belief that discipline, balance and effort can catapult you to greatness.” She encourages them to leverage and try every single opportunity that the school and the campus offer. “Experience something that takes you out of your comfort zone, she urges, “because you never know how that experience will serve you later in life.” Bernard still remembers a particular personal lesson, when “the fantastically eccentric Mr. Klinger” had his students recite the prelude to the Canterbury Tales in front of the class. This taught Bernard that “there is no mountain too high!” And yes, she can still recite it.

“Experience something that takes you out of your comfort zone, because you never know how that experience will serve you later in life.” —Nicole Bernard Chaffin

37


alumni class notes From left, Zoe Glasby, daughter of Rick Glasby ’85 and his wife Athena; Akilah (Owens) Harris ’97 with her husband Kelvin and children Ethan and Elle; James Thomas Hurst and Harrison Samuel Hurst, sons of Anna (Buffone) Hurst ’98 and her husband Mike Hurst.

1974

1991

Carl Taylor reports that he just finished coaching his 32nd year of youth lacrosse for the West Hartford Youth Lacrosse League and he is in his 12th year as a Superior Court Judge. For the past two years he has served as the presiding judge in the Manchester, Connecticut courthouse.

Congratulations to Seth Eaton who won the 2012 SCCA Regional Solo 2 Championship in his Porsche Boxster S. The battle for the championship was very close, with Seth carrying a three-point lead into the 12th final race in December. (See photo on page 41.)

1978

1993

Thomas Howe has worked for six years at Google as an enterprise vertical account manager in manufacturing. He and his wife Carrie recently relocated from Chicago to Key West, Florida.

Christy (Pratt) Lucia lives in McLean, Virginia with her husband Seth and their four children, daughters Caroline, Catherine and Elsie and son Nicholas. Christy also lives two doors down from former Bullis teacher and coach Bill Wieand, and says she enjoys seeing him often. Christy recently attended her 20 year reunion and says it was great to see everyone who attended! (See photo on page 42.)

1985 Rick Glasby and his wife Athena had a daughter, Zoe, on April 13, 2012, who joins Rick’s first daughter, Leah, 23. Rick and Athena both work at Bechtel Corporation and reside in Frederick, Maryland.

1989 Lisa Schatz resides in Baltimore and is the owner and operator of Cupcake, a contemporary women’s boutique in Fells Point. Cupcake is in its 7th year of business and recently launched its e-commerce website: www.cupcake-shop.com.

Kira Orr was recently acknowledged an ACC Women’s Basketball Legend at Duke University, where she was also the first Blue Devil to be drafted professionally. Kira is currently assistant principal of the Middle School at Bullis.

1997 Akilah (Owens) Harris and her husband

38

Kelvin had daughter Elle Riley, on January 21, who joins big brother Ethan, 1. Akilah works as a sales manager for Centex Homes and she and her family live in Arlington, Virginia.

1998 Best wishes to Anna (Buffone) Hurst and her husband Mike, who recently welcomed identical twin boys, Harrison Samuel Hurst and James Thomas Hurst, born on December 5. Anna works as a senior recruiter for Salesforce.com and Mike is the CEO of a start-up company called Exactuals. The Hurst family lives in Los Altos, California. After living in San Francisco and working at Comcast SportsNet Bay Area since February 2009, Adam Littlefield has accepted a job with NBC Sports to help launch their new English Premier League soccer coverage. Adam says this is his dream job, working for one of the most prestigious networks in sports television with the added bonus of solely focusing on the sport about which he is most passionate. Adam relocated to New York City in June and began his new position on July 1. BULLIS magazine


From left, Celeste Melanson ’99 and her fiancé Joe Sweeney enjoying some quality time together; Scott Levenson ’99 with his wife Tamara, daughter Sasha and son Blake; Jennifer (Hayman) Okun ’99 and her husband Jared with their daughter Olivia Sloane Okun.

1999 Congratulations to Celeste Melanson and Joe Sweeney who were engaged on November 24. The couple resides in West Chester, Pennsylvania, where Celeste teaches science and coaches the varsity girls’ soccer team at Episcopal Academy, and Joe works for his family’s business, Medical Equipment Contractors. Scott Levenson reports that since fall 2008 he has been executive director at Private Prep, a tutoring service offering individually customized lessons for a range of K-12 subjects and standardized test preparation (www.privateprep.com). Last summer, Scott co-founded a start-up called Present Value, a gift registry service that enables people to make lasting contributions toward a more secure financial future for engaged couples and expectant parents (www.presentvalue. com). Scott and his wife Tamara are the proud parents of son Blake, 3, and daughter Sasha, 1. The Levenson family lives in New York City. Jennifer (Hayman) Okun and her husband Jared are thrilled to welcome their first child, daughter Olivia Sloane SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Share Your News Newly married? Relocating? Expanding your family?

Celebrating a career transition?

Exotic travel in the works?

Please send in your Class Notes for the next Bullis Magazine to keep your classmates and other Bullis friends up to date. High-resolution photos (JPEG format) are always welcome. Be sure to "like" us on Facebook—search Bullis School Alumni Association—and follow us on Twitter: @BullisAlumni. Email your updates to Jennifer Hayman Okun ’99, assistant director of alumni and events, at jennifer_okun@bullis.org.

Okun, born on December 9. Jennifer is the assistant director of alumni and events at Bullis and Jared works in commercial real estate at Rock Creek Property Group. Elliott Datlow recently traveled to Panama City, Panama to coach ATP tennis pro Jesse Witten at the ATP Visit Panama Cup, a pro tennis tournament. While there, Elliott also led a tennis clinic for 30 of the top junior players in Panama. (See photo on page 41.)

Rachel (Garff) Kirkham and her husband Jay are proud to announce the arrival of their son, Gabriel Dennis Kirkham, born on February 6. Rachel and Jay, along with their daughters Chloe, 4, and Lucy, 2, and baby Gabriel, live in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

2000 Best wishes to Jessica (Rafferty) Marx and her husband Jeff, who welcomed their first child, son Nathan Kurt Marx, on October 29. The Marx family resides in Dallas, Texas. 39


alumni class notes From left, Gabriel Dennis Kirkham, son of Rachel (Garff) Kirkham ’99 and her husband Jay Kirkham; Nathan Kurt Marx, son of Jessica (Rafferty) Marx ’00 and her husband Jeff Marx; Josh Basile ‘03, on right, poses with his classmate John Millar at their law school graduation in May.

2002 Liz Dufresne created and produces a health TV show on Montgomery Municipal Cable TV channel 16 called “Living Healthy,” co-hosted by Sport and Spine Rehab’s CEO Dr. Jay Greenstein and CCO Dr. Barton Bishop. Each episode focuses on a different health topic and features a guest who specializes in that area. Liz is also the senior marketing account representative for Sport and Spine Rehab. For more information, please visit www.ssrehab.com.

Lindsay (Gerber) Harris and her husband Josh welcomed son Mason on October 23, 2012. Lindsay works at Host Hotels & Resorts and lives with her family in Gaithersburg.

2004 Thomas Rachlin graduated from the University of Colorado in 2008 with a degree in Mechanical Engineering and currently works as a technical development engineer in research and development at Covidien. Tom was featured in the November issue of GQ Magazine as a finalist in their entrepreneur contest, “A Gentleman’s Call,” which was in pursuit of an “idea that matters.” Tom’s idea was The Clean Water Reserve Project, and out of 3,000 entries nationwide, Tom was selected as one of five finalists. Tom currently lives in Boulder, Colorado. To view Tom’s video, visit www.youtube.com/

Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Fletcher graduated from Army Sniper School in February 2013 and went through Special Forces Selection and Assessment. He has been selected to begin training to become a Green Beret.

2008 Patrick Schoen graduated from Occidental College last year with a major in diplomacy and world affairs. This past year he worked as a research assistant for AIDS Project Los Angeles’ community-based research program. This fall, Patrick will relocate to London to start an MSc in reproductive and sexual health research at The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Ibrahim Diane and Josh Posnick ’03 have teamed up to create “Live from the Republic,” an annual concert tour held in Africa that features hip-hop, R&B and pop musicians. A portion of the proceeds from tour merchandise is donated to social causes that benefit children in the African community. For more information, please visit www.livefromtherepublic.com.

watch?v=1D8ClK1pLq

Zachary Weiner graduated from Muhlenberg College in May with a degree in accounting and international business. He will soon begin a new job at CohnReznick, an accounting firm.

2003

2005

2012

Josh Basile graduated Magna Cum Laude from UDC’s David A. Clarke School of Law in May 2013. Josh is taking the bar exam this summer and is looking forward to beginning his job as an associate at Jack H. Olender & Associates.

Jordan Burke was named to the all-decade lacrosse team at Brown University.

Madeline Dahut just completed her freshman year at Georgetown University where she is majoring in nursing. This summer, Madeline is working with a researcher on a lab project at Georgetown as well as writing a paper for publication in an oncology journal.

40

2006 Fletcher Schoen joined the United States Army in May 2012 and is stationed at

2009

BULLIS magazine


From left, Mori Diane (father of Ibrahim Diane ’02), singer/songwriter/rap artist Ryan Leslie, friend Yasmine Rahmaan, Ibrahim Diane ’02 and Josh Posnick ’03; Patrick Schoen ’08; Davis ’12 and Chris Nordeen represent Bullis at Mt. Kilimanjaro.

Davis Nordeen, along with his father, Bullis Trustee Chris Nordeen, and his cousin, climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in December. Though the climb took six days and the route crossed through five climate zones, Davis reports that the “top was gorgeous” and they had a great time. Davis just completed his freshman year at the University of Michigan and this summer, he is interning for a nonprofit organization in Hong Kong.

Past Faculty/Staff Former Bullis history teacher and cross country/track coach Nicholas Kent has been named high school principal of Concordia International School in Shanghai, China, to begin in the 2013-14 school year. Nicholas says that his love for China and school leadership was founded at Bullis from 2000-2002. Concordia International School Shanghai is a preK-12 school serving expat families.

Elliott Datlow ’99 with members of a tennis clinic in Panama.

In Memoriam We extend our deepest sympathies to the families of those in our close Bullis circle who have recently passed away: Camille Marin Baruch ’13 Anthony Carozza ’46 William Clyde Earl ’46 Ashley Ennis ’68 Scott Friedel ’87 Gregory Panawek ’40

Seth Eaton ’91 in the Porsche Boxster S with which he won the 2012 SCCA Regional Solo 2 Championship.

Robert C. Wood ’63

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

41


alumni class notes

Christy (Pratt) Lucia '93 and her husband Seth enjoy time with their four children Caroline, Catherine, Elsie and Nicholas.

Young Alumni Day

The fourth annual Young Alumni Lunch took place on January 10, bringing a good crowd of alumni back to Bullis. The students stopped by to enjoy lunch while reuniting with classmates, teachers and administrators, and sharing great stories of their time after Bullis. It was wonderful to see everyone! Back row from left, teachers Michael Chellman and Tim Hanson, KaQuan Little ’10, Aurian Darvishi ’12, Leigh Ulica ’12, Jay Barrera ’11, Alex Anderson ’11, Nick Mars ’12 and college counselor Lynn Kittel. Front row, teacher Heda O’Brien, Sam Thomas ’12, Steven Xue ’12, Morgan Williams ’12, Cami Uechi ’12, Tish Barton ’12, Dr. Mary Frances Bryja and Dr. Jerry Boarman.

42

BULLIS magazine


Alumni Return for Annual Turkey Bowl

Alumni enjoy a game of flag football at Kline Alumni Stadium over Thanksgiving weekend. Above, from left, Will Beck ’07, Travis Lay ’04, Brooke Slowinski ’07, Mike Bombard ’10, Tommy Sullivan ’11, Kevin Clayton ’10, Alex Mattera ’10, Alex Friedlander ’11 and Folabi Masha ’11. At right, Meredith King ’10, Crystal Wilson ’10, Emily Siegel ’10 and Kerry McGovern ’10.

Informal Reunion for Members of the Class of 2006

From left, Jeff Ruben ‘06, Alex Lavalleye ‘06, Tim Conrad ‘06, Sammy Moskowitz ‘06, Claire Olszewski ‘06, Kelly Anderson ‘06, Elyssa Emsellem ‘06, Samantha Havas ‘06, Lauren (Ellie) Prince ‘06 and Ben Judge ‘05 gather at the Prince residence over Thanksgiving.

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

43


class reunions Class of 1993 Celebrates 20 Years!

Members of the class of 1993 gathered at RiRa Irish Pub in Bethesda to celebrate their 20 year reunion in June. Classmates remarked about how wonderful it was to see everyone and that a great time was had by all! From left, Kim Forsht, Mike Corrigan, Bradley Raymond, Sally (Kogod) Biederman, Dan Zubari, Christy (Pratt) Lucia, Lauren Shrensky, Kyle Blackstone, Alison (Colen) Wade, Liz (Myers) Barnhart, Dana (Gildenhorn) Wancjer and Todd Levine.

Class of 2002 Marks 10 Years!

The class of 2002 feted their 10 year reunion at Napoleon Bistro & Lounge in November. A special thank you to Courtney Abrams and Candace (Foulger) Morriss for their help with planning the evening. At right, Candace (Foulger) Morriss and Ross Koenig.

44

BULLIS magazine


Five Year Celebration for Class of 2007

The class of 2007 celebrated their five year reunion over Thanksgiving weekend at Tommy Joe’s in Bethesda. A big thank you to Kimberly Segal for all of her hard work in planning such a successful night! Of the night Kimberly said, “it was like a family reunion… Everyone was so excited to all get together and reunite.” Above from left, Alex Dresner, Molly Goodman, Megan Herbets, Ali Nemeroff, Andrew Zutz, Shaun Crow, Sarah O’Neill, Brandon Allen and Jaime Bernstein-Ansaldi. Below, back row from left, Alex Jackson, Spencer Kelly, Brooke Slowinski, Will Beck and Ben Carroll. Middle row, Andrew Zutz, Doug Silverstein, Alissa Lichtenstein, Neil King, Joey Goldberg, Molly Goodman and Andrew Gordon. Front row, Shaun Crow, Kimberly Segal, Sarah O’Neill, Megan Herbets and Ali Nemeroff.

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

45


class reunions Alumnus Revamps Radio Club He Founded Richard Hayman ’63 created Bullis’ first HAM Radio Club over 50 years ago to combine two of his interests, engineering and communication. While the Radio Club eventually dissolved with the move of Bullis from Silver Spring to Potomac and the introduction of newer technologies, Richard stayed active in the HAM Radio world. This past fall, Richard and a group of 10 Upper School students started Bullis’ new RC² club (robotics, computers and communication). The aim is for “kids to have fun and be practical with things they are learning in the classroom,” says Richard. While Richard’s expertise with HAM Radio influenced RC²’s initial projects, the club

also includes building robots and other computer-focused technologies. Junior Scott Bettigole ’14 says, “It’s very hands on. We’re working with real things and can see the product of our work.” Richard hopes that the use of radio will be an extension of what is being learned in the classroom­—for example, foreign language classes being able to speak to students in other countries. “HAM Radio is the original social media. You’re talking

with Bullis to revive the Radio Club. “HAM Radio is a hobby that’s over 100 years old, and it’s today’s youth who are going to keep it thriving,” he says. “The only way to do that is to expose them to radio and its capabilities.”

to strangers and making relationships around the world, but without the use of the internet.”

Richard’s interest in HAM began when his grandfather gave him a short wave radio at the age of 10. “In fact, my parents bribed me and said if I got good grades at Bullis, I could get a newer radio.” It worked, and in 1960, Bullis’ first radio club was formed. Over 50 years later, radio is once again part of Bullis.

Energized after attending the Golden Years Reunion last fall, Richard reconnected

For more about the RC² club, watch the video at www.bullis.org/radio.

At left, Richard Hayman in the 1963 yearbook, developing photos. At right, Scott Bettigole ’14, Adam Cohen ’14, Brian Mitchell ’14 and Richard Hayman ’63 erecting their first radio antenna outside of North Hall.

46

BULLIS magazine


Mystery Alumni Photos

Can you identify the people in one of these photos? Please email your answers to Jennifer (Hayman) Okun ’99 at jennifer_okun@bullis.org by August 15. The first person to answer correctly will win a prize from the Alumni Office!

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

47


alumni notes Bullis Alumni Brain Teaser 1

2

3

4

5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12

13

14 16

15

17

18

19

EclipseCrossword.com

Across 1.

Name of the stuffed bulldog Dr. Jung brought with him when he read to Lower School students in the 1990s 3. Lyricist of the Bullis alma mater 7. The area in North Hall reserved just for seniors 9. What is the first word of the Bullis motto on the front entrance to the School? 10. How is lunch served in the dining hall? 11. Name of the Bullis yearbook 13. Who first graduated from Bullis in 1983? 15. The item that 3rd graders give to 48

16. 17. 18. 19.

seniors at the beginning of the year to plant on campus How many football IAC championships has Bullis won? Name of the Bullis student newspaper Who first introduced the bulldog as Bullis’ mascot? Name of the terrace between North Hall and the Dining Hall

Down 1. 2. 4.

The name of the annual holiday concert First location of Bullis School Name of the games that take place

during Homecoming week Name of the all-boys area sports league of which Bullis is part 6. Prior to The Marriott Family Library, the library was located in this building on campus 8. Name of the “pageant competition” for men that took place each year during the 90s 12. In 1995 this document was put in place by the School and signed by each member of the student body and faculty 14. How many alumni currently work at Bullis? 5.

For puzzle solution see www.bullis.org/ alumni/crossword BULLIS magazine


THANKS A MILLION! So many of you stepped up for Bullis in a big way this year— WE SURPASSED OUR ANNUAL FUND GOAL OF $950,000, totaling more than $1 MILLION! Because of YOU, this year was another outstanding success. The generosity and support that Bullis receives each year enriches the education experience of every Bullis student.

THANK YOU!


BULLIS

Bullis School 10601 Falls Road Potomac, MD 20854 301-299-8500 www.bullis.org

NON-PROFIT U.S. Postage PAID Rockville, MD Permit No. 2158

Address Service Requested

Caroline Martin ’19 Watercolor


spring-summer 2013

BULLIS magazine

features

2 Class of 2013 Commencement 16 Lower School: A Community of Readers Rich With Purpose 20 Innovations in the Arts

departments academics 15 Model UN Visits the Hague news 22 Gala Success: A Red Carpet Affair 22 Bullis Seniors Final at National History Day arts 23 Imagination athletics 26 Outstanding Athletes

alumni 34 36 38 46 48

Alumni Golf Tournament Profile: Nicole Bernard Chaffin ’83 Class Notes Alumnus Revamps Radio Club He Founded Brain Teaser

On cover: Outstanding Scholar Justin Schuble ’13 accepts his diploma from Head of School Dr. Gerald Boarman. Graduation highlights begin on page 2.

HEAD OF SCHOOL Gerald Boarman, Ed.D. Michael Reidy, Ed.D., Assistant Head of School Andrew Delinsky, Upper School Principal Jamie Dickie, Director of Technology Constance Giles, Ph.D., Dir. of Curriculum and Institutional Research Darlene Haught, Director of Extended Programs and Emerging Technologies Betsy Kelly, Lower School Principal Kathleen Lloyd, Director of Girls Athletics Todd McCreight, Business Officer Andres Parra, Director of Boys Athletics Marilyn Moreno, Middle School Principal Tim Simpson, Director of Admission and Financial Aid Joanne Szadkowski, Dir. of Institutional Advancement Sherri A. Watkins, Publications Manager Susie Zimmermann, Director of Communications Susan King, Communications Coordinator Bullis Magazine is published two times a year by the Office of Institutional Advancement and distributed to alumni, parents, grandparents and friends. Letters and suggestions for future articles are welcome. Located in Potomac, Maryland, Bullis School is a private, coeducational, nondenominational college preparatory day school for grades 3–12. Bullis admits students of any race, color, religion, and national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion or national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, financial aid programs and athletic and other schooladministered programs. Visit our website at www.bullis.org

BOARD OF TRUSTEES OFFICERS Tom Sullivan, P’09, ’11, ’13, Chair Adam Greenberg, P’14, ’16, ’19, Vice Chair Lesley Lavalleye, P’06, ’08, ’10, Acting Secretary Andrew Blair ’86, P’11, ’12, ’20, Treasurer ME M B E R S Marian C. Bennett, P’06 Gerald Boarman, Ed.D., ex-officio, Head of School Patrick Caulfield, P’14, ’20 Michelle Cohen ’87, P’14, ’16, ex-officio, President, Bullis Parents Association David Fink, P’10, ’14,’19 Dr. Gary Friedlander ’79, P’11, ’14,’19 Holly Funger, P’09, ’10, ’13 Jonathan Halle ’88, P’15, ’17 Kathryn Hanley, P’03, ’05 George Mavrikes, P’14, ’17 Tammy McKnight, P’08, ’12 Chris Nordeen, P’12, ’13 Xiumin Overall, P’07, ’11 Milton C. Theo, P’14, ’17 Ken Thompson, P’08 Berry Trimble, P’10, ’13 David Trone, P’12, ’14 Cyndi Bullis Vasco ’83 Dell Warren, P’10, ’13 Mark Weinberger, P’14, ’16, ’18 Paula Widerlite, P’11, ’14 Natasha Nazareth, General Counsel


head’s perspective Heart and Soul My first three years at Bullis have gone by so quickly. We have experienced great growth and development, and our trajectory is exhilarating. From a greatly expanded student body to the establishment of new initiatives and the prospect of new building, we have much to celebrate and embrace. Creativity within our community is merging with the opportunities of a 21st century world. New classes, new buildings, new technologies and new approaches will enhance our school. Yet what will never change about Bullis is its heart and soul. When I first visited Bullis its sense of community impressed me most. The enthusiasm, warmth and dedication that I sensed in every encounter was palpable. Along with an openness and anticipation for whatever would come, there was a great feeling of appreciation for what is shared daily. Enjoying today while eagerly looking ahead to tomorrow remains the common feeling every day on campus. The stories in this issue illustrate this essential heart and soul of Bullis. Lower School initiatives are captivating students and readying them for great things to come. Student athlete profiles highlight some of the many leaders who play with all their heart while setting an example for their teammates. The Visual Art department challenges students to take their skills and passions in directions beyond their expectations. Our Model UN-ers are collaborating to solve some of our planet’s toughest challenges. Six Bullis students, of thousands who competed, earned spots at National History Day and two—rising seniors Brian Mitchell and Oriana Theo—were finalists. Parents and alumni continue to support our school in innumerable and immeasurable ways. From surpassing our Annual Fund goal to nearly doubling the Gala’s Raise the Paddle and volunteering every day, they remind us that the heart and the soul of Bullis extends far beyond our campus. Amid all of this activity, our Bullis community remains strongly connected. When we lost senior Cami Baruch tragically in February, the senior class led by example in honoring her memory, remembering her daily and establishing the Cami Baruch Patio. Already it has become a peaceful touchstone for a bustling campus, a place to quietly reflect on what’s most important: the ties that bind us and the strength we give each other.


Class o

Jake Brandon Abelman Oluwatobiloba Adejuwon Adewole Akingbolahan Michael Akinkoye Tyler Alexander Allen Peter Ondua Angeh Nicholas John Barpoulis Camille Marin Baruch Corbin Edgar Blumberg Lisette Gabrielle Booty Antonio Borckardt E. Max Bramson Huntington Andrew Brown Philandieus Bryant III Brandon Eric Burke Kaitlin Jan Bushkoff 2

Morgan Jenna Cafritz Amma Calhoun Alessandra Maria Clark Daniel Alexander Copeland Joshua Bruce Czerwiec Dana Bao Daniels Brianna Davis Jonathan Chandler Dyer Nadia Maryam Fallahi Nicholas Lester Fields David Schreiber Fireman George Vedder Fleming Joshua Lawrence Foreman Kristina Elizabeth Frye

Nicholas Charles Funger Gordon Ellsworth George Badri Glonti Mitchell C. Goldberg Zoe Rachel Goldberg Brooke Margaret Gutschick Kiernan Youngbin Hahn Dazia Brianna Hall David Eugene Harrison Alexander G. Herbets Adam Nehemiah Holland Brandon Curtis Izzo Brittany J. Jackson Kourosh Kalachi

Clas

201 of

BULLIS magazine


of 2013

ass

013 of

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Harris Zachary Kaserman Ga Yeong Kim Winton A. Lyle Keon Bahrami Manesh Roman Connor Matijkiw Andrew James Metz Kendall Marie Mitchell Connor James Mitton Yingxuan Mo Kyle Brett Nemeroff Daniel Jacob Bloch Nielsen Maxwell Andrew Nordeen Amy Rose Oechsler Allison Audra Osterman

Tejas N. Patel Jaikrishan Singh Paton Hanna Rae Pordy Nicole Alexandra Rabovsky Lauren Anne Raffensperger Colette Elizabeth Roa Jared Hal Rubens Nicolas E. Ruggieri Joseph Daniel Sageman Kia Alexia Saint-Louis Maris Del Schneeman Justin Michael Schuble Drake Anthony Scott Alexander Siegel

Jackson Alexander Stoner William J. Stroup Jordan Hannah Sullivan William Harris Tavel Anthony Isaia Thompson Jill Kathleen Trimble Alanna F. Walczak Idrienne Alesia Felicia LeShea Walker Dexter Daniel Warren Sean Joseph Watkinson Tiffani Katherine Wills CeMaia Fanicia Wise Yanbing Yang Zhengyang Zhao Youyang Zhou 3


Class of 2013 College Matriculations

Boston College Bowdoin College Bucknell University (2) Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University College of Charleston (2) Clemson University Colgate University (2) College of the Holy Cross (2) Columbia University Cornell University Drexel University (3) Emory University (2) Frostburg State University George Mason University George Washington University Georgetown University (3) Gettysburg College (2) Johns Hopkins University Maryland Institute College of Art Middlebury College (2) New York University North Carolina A&T State University (2) Occidental College Ohio University Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg Pennsylvania State University (2) Pitzer College

Stevens Institute of Technology St. John’s University Syracuse University Trinity College (2) Tulane University (4) University of Alabama University of California at Los Angeles University of Delaware (2) University of Kentucky University of Maryland (7) University of Maryland, Eastern Shore University of Massachusetts University of Miami (2) University of Michigan University of Mississippi University of Pennsylvania University of Pittsburgh University of Richmond (2) University of Southern California University of Vermont (2) University of Wisconsin Virginia Commonwealth University Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Wagner College Wake Forest University (2) West Virginia University (2)

Class of 2013 Lifers Bullis Lifers, from left, Nick Funger, William Tavel, Zoe Goldberg, Justin Schuble, Jordan Sullivan, Alex Herbets, Alessandra Clark, Kyle Nemoroff, Nadia Fallahi, Max Nordeen and Jared Rubens

4

BULLIS magazine


Awards for Members of the Class of 2013 Award: Recipient: The Founders’ Award......................................................... Brooke Gutschick The Outstanding Scholar Award .............................................Justin Schuble The William H. Price, Jr. Citizenship Award ...........................Justin Schuble The Manuel Jose Baca, Jr. Joy of Living Award .................. Corbin Blumberg The Douglas London Award for Excellence in English ........................................................................Joseph Sageman The Barbara Marks Award for Excellence in Foreign Language .......................................................... David Fireman The John H. Dillon Memorial Award for Excellence in Science ..............................................................................Hanna Pordy The John W. Spencer Award for Excellence in Mathematics .....................................................................William Tavel The Irene Ford Smith Memorial Award for Excellence in Social Studies .................................................. Kristina Frye The Award for Excellence in Music ..................................... Joshua Czerwiec The Award for Excellence in Theater .......................................Dexter Warren The Award for Excellence in Art ................................................... Esther Kim The Michael Ivey Achievement Award .................................. David Harrison The Community Service Award .................................................CeMaia Wise The Alumni Award for Outstanding Achievement in Athletics ................................................. Nicholas Fields Idrienne Walker The David T. Hellekjaer Award ............................................ Daniel Copeland Dana Daniels *For a description of the awards, visit www.bullis.org/graduation.

At top, Outstanding Scholar Justin Schuble accepts the William Price citizenship award; above, Hanna Pordy receives the science award from Science Department Chair Tina Zazaris-Davis.

Graduates honored for excellence while at Bullis include, from left, Esther Kim, receiving the art award from art teacher Maire O'Neill ’05; Nicholas Fields, receiving the athletics award from Andres Parra ’99, director of boys athletics; and Brooke Gutschick, receiving the Founders’ award from Former Head of School Lawrence Bullis ’54. SPRING-SUMMER 2013

5


From left, Jai Paton, Dana Daniels, Kourosh Kalachi, Tejas Patel and Badri Glonti assemble to begin Commencement exercises.

CeMaia Wise and Brooke Gutschick

Alessandra Clark, Kaitlin Bushkoff and Amma Calhoun

Phil Bryant and Hunty Brown

Bullis Memories Favorite teachers: I loved the spirited conversations and debates Mr. Chellman was able to spark every day in his American Government class. Two other teachers who had a significant impact on me were Mr. Zimmer, who taught me how math can be applied in the real world and in almost every occupation, and Mr. Kinder, who showed how interesting English can be.

Corbin Blumberg Favorite memory: It was amazing to be part of the lacrosse team that defeated Landon in 2012 because it was the first time we had beat them in lacrosse. School spirit vastly improved during each of my four years at Bullis, so it was particularly rewarding to experience that game. 6

Future plans: I am attending the University of Kentucky where I will study equine science and management. Advice for future seniors: Take advantage of every single moment. It goes fast! It’s an awesome year. Work hard and have fun. Favorite lunch: Chicken patties

Amy Rose Oeschler Favorite memory: It’s a tie between the great times I had in art classes and making the Bullis Varsity lacrosse team. Favorite teachers: Ms. O’Neill for her infectious enthusiasm and love for art and teaching. BULLIS magazine


Adam Holland, Dr. Gerald Boarman and Michael Akinkoye

New graduates Kira Mo, Esther Kim and Amy Yang

Favorite teachers: Mr. Johnson helped me with understanding character development in the various productions we put on. Mr. Strunk incorporated lessons from other classes into choir, and Mrs. Lombardo always had time for banter before class, which I enjoyed.

Future plans: I am attending Virginia Commonwealth University School of Arts where I hope to study graphic or communication design. Advice for future seniors: Appreciate the time you have with your classmates; the year flies by after college applications are submitted!

Future plans: I am attending New York University where I will major in musical theater.

Favorite lunch: Curly fries Dexter Warren Favorite memory: The “Children of Eden” cast singing the finale as a memorial tribute to Cami Baruch. To me, that moment showed that Bullis students care about one another whether or not they are close, and I found that to be particularly meaningful. SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Advice for future seniors: Get your college applications done early so you don’t have to worry about it! Favorite lunch: Turkey melt

7


Class of 2013 Counted Down to Graduation 50 Days to Graduation Day On February 22, the Alumni Office hosted a “50 Days to Graduation” event for seniors. Set inside the Commons in North Hall, a barista served coffee, tea and treats to the seniors while the Alumni Office informed them of the important role they would play as future alumni of Bullis.

From left, Idrienne Walker ‘13, Tyler Allen ‘13 and Joseph Sageman ‘13 look ahead to graduation over a cup of coffee.

Senior Lunch On May 1, members of the senior class joined together for the annual Senior Lunch while learning about the importance of staying connected to Bullis after graduation. Alumna and Middle School Assistant Principal Kira Orr ’93 told the students how the Bullis community had always been there for her, even organizing a blood drive while she was fighting TTP, a rare blood disorder. Kira emphasized that the Bullis community is close-knit and will continue to be there for each other in the future. The Alumni Office also welcomed new class agents Brooke Gutschick and Danny

Assistant Director of Alumni Jennifer (Hayman) Okun ’99 presents newly elected class agents, Brooke Gutschick and Danny Copeland, with their Bullis alumni t-shirts.

Copeland, who will be the direct liaisons between the Alumni Office and the class of 2013.

8

BULLIS magazine


Camille “Cami” Marin Baruch Forever in Our Hearts Along with her family, the Bullis community mourned the loss of senior Camille Baruch, who passed away suddenly in February. “Cami was an exemplary student and a beautiful person, kind-hearted, generous and with a great sense of humor,” wrote Head of School Dr. Gerald Boarman. “Her absence will leave a large gap in our hearts and in our community and her memory will always be a part of our School.” Although illness caused her to miss many school days, she was a member of the National Honor Society and earned high honors posthumously upon graduation. From the left, Jessica and Nathan Baruch, with

“Cami had a quiet confidence about her,” recalled classmate Brooke Gutschick ’13. younger sister Cami. “She had a remarkable zest for life, which was reflected in her love of country music and infectious smile that lit up the room. She always had something insightful to say and was wickedly funny as well. Modest about her accomplishments and rather thoughtful, one of Cami’s strongest traits was her kind-hearted nature.” Cami played violin, trombone and piano, and recorded CDs for distribution to patients at local children’s hospitals. Deeply committed to community service, she also played piano for seniors at a local nursing home and her favorite activity was the Jensen-Schmidt summer tennis camp at Bullis. Before illness curtailed her participation in athletics, Cami was an exceptional athlete in soccer, a catcher in softball and played on an Amateur Athletic Union basketball team that twice competed at the national championships.

Her own health issues undoubtedly contributed to her career interest in medicine. Specifically, according to Ms. Baruch, Cami “had decided to become a colorectal surgeon—a male-dominated profession that could benefit from a female perspective.” Cami also loved animals and was fascinated with elephants for their sense of family, gentleness and the fact that they never forgot those who were kind to them. “People come and go through our lives,” said Brooke, “but Cami isn’t one of those people. Her strong will, determination and positive attitude will forever live in my heart.” Friends and family gathered outside The Marriott Family Library before the senior awards celebration for the dedication of the Camille Baruch Patio—constructed thanks to the generosity of the Class of 2013 and the Sullivan family. Cami’s friends Zoe Goldberg ’13 and Jordan Sullivan ’13 read the language they helped draft for the plaque, including the quote selected by Cami for her senior yearbook page: “It is our choices… that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” —Albus Dumbledore Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, J.K. Rowling Memorial donations can be made to: Save the Elephant Program at the Wildlife Conservation Network, The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America or the Ronald McDonald House of Cleveland. The Cami Baruch Patio. Inset, Jordan Sullivan ’13 and Zoe Goldberg ’13 unveil the plaque.


Generation to Generation Legacy Family Portraits Each graduation we capture photos of families with multiple graduate connections, including siblings, parents, aunts, uncles or cousins who had previously graduated from Bullis.

Alexi ’12, Abi ’11, Andrew ’86 and Kerry Blair

Corbin Blumberg ’13 and Brooke Ludder ’09 10

Bailey ’10, Jill, Kaitlin ’13 and Michael Bushkoff BULLIS magazine


Jordan ’06, Morgan ’13 and Erica ’08 Cafritz

Jason ’10, Jordan ’15 and Josh ’13 Czerwiec

George ’13 and Robert ’10 Fleming SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Gabriella ’11 and Alessandra ’13 Clark

Dominique ’05 and Brianna ’13 Davis

Josh ’13, Katelyn ’18 and Sam ’11 Foreman 11


Teddy ’09, Nick ’13 and Sam ’10 Funger

Brian ’10, Alex ’13 and Megan ’07 Herbets

Davis ’12 and Max ’13 Nordeen 12

Liana ’07, Allison ’13 and Jennifer ’09 Osterman BULLIS magazine


Tejas Patel ’13 and Priya Mehta ’09

Christina ’08 and Colette ’13 Roa

Kamar ’11 and Kia ’13 Saint-Louis SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Hari ’10 and Jai ’13 Paton

Jared ’13 and Courtney ’10 Rubens

Jaymi, Justin ’13, Jordan ’11, JR and Jessica ’18 Schuble 13


Will ’13 and Michael ’10 Stroup

Dexter ’13 and David ’10 Warren

Jordan ’13, Tommy ’11 and Courtenay ’09 Sullivan

Julia ’09, Sean ’13 and Cory ’05 Watkinson

Dignitaries joining this year’s ceremonies included Trustee Dell Warren, P’10, ’13, Upper School Principal Andrew Delinsky, Trustee Marian Bennett, P’06, Rev. Anne Benefield, Head of School Dr. Gerald Boarman, Former Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley, Chair of the Board of Trustees Tom Sullivan, P’9, ’11, ’13, Trustee Andrew Blair ’86, P’11, ’12, ’20, Trustee Adam Greenberg, P’14, ’16, ’19, and Trustee David Trone, P’12, ’14. 14

BULLIS magazine


academics Model UN Visits The Hague The Model United Nations (MUN) is more than an extracurricular club—it’s an opportunity for Bullis students to travel and experience first-hand the world of international diplomacy. For the past two and a half years the club has traveled to three or four MUN conferences each year, including one international trip. One of the most prestigious conferences on the Model UN circuit was hosted in The Hague, Netherlands, last January. Seven Bullis students traveled there to represent the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP). Chaperoned by Faculty Sponsor and Social Studies Chair Lisa Vardi and Dr. Mary Frances Bryja, director of college counseling, the group experienced a fantastic trip. Our Bullis students participated in global MUN meetings and bonded with other students from around the world, all of them sharing a dedication to making the world a better place.

represented their school and ESCAP “in an effective and impressive manner. I was so proud!” Ms. Vardi remembers. While attending the conference at the World Forum Convention Center in The Hague, the students watched some of the criminal proceedings against Radovan Karadzic, the former president of Serbia now accused of genocide. Despite a busy schedule, they also found time to visit Amsterdam, touring the Rijksmuseum and the Anne Frank house, and toured the city of Delft, famous for its medieval architecture and centuries-old pottery industry. On the blog kept throughout the trip, Ashlyn Coleman ’15 said the MUN trip was “life-changing.”

"Young people... will be the problem solvers of the future." —Lisa Vardi

Environmental sustainability was this year’s MUN conference theme, “a relevant topic for young people to discuss, as they will be the problem solvers of the future,” Ms. Vardi explains. “It was inspiring to watch the seriousness with which the 3,000 attendees approached this complicated topic and proposed solutions in the form of resolutions.” Throughout the five-day conference, Bullis students

Posing at the iconic “I amsterdam’’ sign are Model UN participants, top row from left, Samantha Zimmerman ’16, Idrienne Walker ’13, Ashlyn Coleman ’15 and Tyler Allen ’13; bottom row, Keon Manesh ’13, Thomas Liu ’16 and Andrew Goldberg ’16.

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

15


s

Fifth grader Jake Goldberg climbed into the car one winter afternoon and said, “Today was the best day ever.” Mom Tammy Goldberg smiled; Jake had said the same thing the day before. Jake and his twin brother Jonnie started at Bullis this year. “They are so chatty about everything they’re doing in school and how much they love their teachers and everyone at Bullis,” Tammy explained. “Since coming to Bullis, their confidence in academics has skyrocketed. They read without prompting and ask to go to the bookstore to buy books, not toys!” The Lower School is bursting with innovation: Accelerated Reading, individualized instruction, Responsive Classroom and much more. This activity is setting the foundation for students to successfully take on greater academic challenges as they advance in school, while providing a supportive, enriching and fun environment for students today.

direct correlation between reading skills and long-term academic achievement, and the most important method of developing reading skills is pure reading volume.” Each week, students met in small groups to discuss their reading, share recommendations and learn comprehension strategies. In writer workshops, they studied texts as readers and practiced them as writers. “Reading is really at the heart of the students’ daily experience,” says teacher Margaret Andreadis. “They bound into the room each morning chatting about their books.”

“The most important method of developing reading skills is pure reading volume.” —Betsy Kelly, Lower School Principal

100 MILLION WORDS

The heart of the Lower School’s new initiatives is its reading program. In September, Principal Betsy Kelly set a goal for each student to read one million words during the year. Students chose their own books and along with in-school reading were expected to read independently for 45 minutes every evening. For each book, students took a short online quiz to test comprehension and help teachers monitor progress. “Most important is the actual word count,” explains Lower School Principal Betsy Kelly. “Studies prove a SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Demetri Engel ’20 enjoys Read-in Day from the cozy confines of his sleeping bag.

17


Ms. Meghan Rose's science class built flexible knee braces as part of their Bodyworks unit.

The Washington Post featured a story about the 100 million word achievement in its KidsPost Section on June 11, 2013. (tinyurl.com/ohe9b2j)

By Read-In Day in May—when students settle into classrooms with sleeping bags, pillows, and an occasional tent to simply read all day—the Lower School had collectively read a whopping 100 million words. To kick off the event, the Lower School celebrated this achievement and each of the 38 “millionaire” students who reached their individual goals. Many millionaires exceeded the goal, including top-reader Caesar Wain, 5th grade, who plowed through more than five million words, and 4th grader Sam Bromberg, who devoured more than three million words reading fantasies and mysteries. Sam’s mother, Julia Beck, believes the “secret sauce” behind the reading program’s success is how students are encouraged to take ownership of their reading. “Sam poured a great deal of effort and energy into choosing his books. We spent time deep in conversation about what he might read next and he took so much pride in making those decisions.

18

The process built great confidence and self-esteem in Sam. It struck a careful balance between encouragement and autonomy and recognized Sam for the individual he is.” INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION AND THE EMERGENCE OF STEM

The Lower School has implemented individualized instruction in other subjects as well, through a unique hybrid of approaches that address content knowledge, skills and critical thinking. At the beginning of each math unit, teachers assess students’ proficiency and group them by ability for practice and skill development. “The groups are fluid, changing from unit to unit,” says Ms. Kelly. “Students may be in a more advanced group for one unit and in a different group for another. The focus is never on what group you’re in but on the individualized work each student is doing, and teachers can design their

BULLIS magazine


instruction around the specific needs of each student.” Livia Christensen recalls wondering at the start of the year how much her son Julian, who has just completed 3rd grade, would be challenged at Bullis, but was impressed early on with the individualized curriculum. “Teachers are constantly reevaluating and adjusting to make sure the challenge is just right for each student,” she said. “Julian is always challenged, never bored and never stressed.” Another reason students are so engaged is a burgeoning STEM program integrating engineering and math with science. Rather than simply studying the human body in 5th grade, students in Meghan Rose’s class designed knee braces. The project was inspired by “Engineering is Elemental,” an engineering curriculum designed at the Boston Museum of Science. RESPONSIVE CLASSROOM

Each Lower School class begins every day with a morning meeting—a key component of the division’s use of the Responsive Classroom approach, which facilitates social, emotional and academic growth in a strong, safe school community. According to 4th grade teacher Kate Powell, Responsive Classroom enhances the sense of community. By following a predictable routine that includes classroom jobs and a contract that holds kids accountable for their behavior, students learn social interaction skills,

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

empathy and self-control, along with problem solving and organization. “They remind each other about behavior and help each other out more,” she observes. The combined effect of the Responsive Classroom and the Lower School’s individualized approach is evident when students and parents describe their experiences at Bullis. “Everyone at Bullis is connected. This is the essential structure of our school— complete support,” said 5th grader Joe Martin at the year-end recognition ceremony. “People call to other people across the halls, always smiling, always enjoying time together… this is treasured here. My best word to describe how everyone is acquainted and connected here is family. I have never experienced such a vibe of collegiality. I have been taught how crucial it is to be part of a wider family.” Angie Jones, whose son Brendon, just finished 5th grade, agrees: “Ms. Kelly and the teachers help students realize what they can do, establishing self-worth and learning to move forward positively.” LOOKING AHEAD

The Lower School’s individualized focus led to the decision to add 2nd grade to the program next year. “Our focus is on kids, not teachers,” said Ms. Kelly. “We constantly evaluate where students are and how to move each one forward based on individual competency. This approach provides flexibility and resources to expand.”

“Julian is always challenged, never bored and never stressed.” – Livia Christensen, P’22

New families joining the Lower School this fall will find students eager to resume lessons, celebrate each other and work hard. Removing stress from the equation—and valuing each student’s educational trajectory—is achieving great results. Most importantly, the students will progress to Middle School and beyond with knowledge, skills and a sense of self that will propel them ahead confidently. As 5th grader Mark Williams wrote of his Lower School years: “We became artists, athletes and learners. We became friends. We became Bullis!” For Tammy Goldberg and her family, the effects have been life-changing. “We are a happier, stress-free family thanks in huge part to Bullis. There is nothing better than picking up your children after a long day and having them be so happy!”

19


Innovations in the Arts Bullis art students are discovering that the visual arts involve more than painting, drawing, sculpting and displaying artwork. This year, innovative programs are expanding student experience beyond technique to the responsibilities and opportunities of the art world. While art shows have been a staple of the Bullis program, students are learning more about the exhibition process. Cocaptains assigned to AP studio shows oversee each of four events, critiquing, curating and installing art pieces as well as advertising the show. “The students curate the most cohesive show they can,” says art teacher Maire O’Neill ’05, “and make sure that student work is well represented.” Organizing the art shows provides important learning opportunities. “The students want each show to be more professionally presented than the one before,” says Ms. O’Neill. “They hold critique meetings to continually improve what they’re doing.” Last fall, student artists designed tokens and comment boxes to invite visitor feedback on their art pieces. In Open Studio classes, older Bullis students acting as show captains worked with younger students to critique, curate and organize younger student exhibits. The “Postcard Show” and “Artwalk” in May provided opportunities for all Bullis students to showcase their art. Inspired by 20

Students from all divisions seized the opportunity to showcase their postcard art with the entire community.

“One Day,” Richard Blanco’s Inauguration poem, students in all divisions wrote poems, while other students illustrated the verses on postcards. Swapping creative efforts allowed students to both write and illustrate, resulting in nearly 300 postcards displayed in the Blair lobby. For the Artwalk, student guides escorted visitors through classroom displays. “They stamped the hands of guests,” says Lily Gillette, visual arts chair and Lower School art teacher, “making it fun to go from room to room to see all the great work the students have done this year.” New as well is Bullis involvement in the National Art Honor Society (NAHS); similar chapters for the performing arts are the Tri-M Music Honor Society and

International Thespians. Sponsored by the National Art Educators Association, NAHS inducts art students who meet national requirements. Many opportunities are available, including “some outstanding scholarships at top art schools,” explains art teacher Louisa Morris. Interested students meet to discuss new art projects, such as community service hours earned through painting scenery for Lower and Middle School plays, face painting at the Homecoming celebration and designing prom tickets. Grade point averages, meeting attendance and fundraising activities also help students satisfy NAHS requirements. “In previous years, art students always BULLIS magazine


pitched in to help with school events, but we had no real system in place to do so,” says art teacher Deb Donoghue. “NAHS provides guidelines and incentives while encouraging the same kind of art-related activities.”

or draw, says Esther Kim. “This year we are problem solving—learning to utilize space in a show or solve a problem in artwork. The teachers encourage us to find our own style and to reach out to the community, too.”

In the wider art community, six Bullis students were selected to exhibit in the “Best of Independent Schools” show held at Landon School this spring. The competition among local BaltimoreWashington private schools received over 200 submissions, with 83 artworks chosen for display—including pieces by Bullis students Nadia Fallahi ’13, Will Gansler ’15, Esther Kim ’13, Qiaoumei Li ’14, Robyn Mackenzie ’16 and and Jack Zhou ’14.

Collaboration among art classes in all divisions is a key aspect of the program, “inspiring younger students to think more seriously about their own art,” says Ms. O’Neill. “We see more interaction among students, and they see what goes on in later art classes.” The Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) offers summer scholarships to two Bullis students by juried decision, providing a two-week art intensive taught by college

art professors. “This immersion helps students understand what art school is really like,” says Ms. Donoghue. Dayna Clayton ’14 and Kali Engel ’14 participated this past summer. Darcy Argain ’14 and Yasmin Rucker ’14 both received CIA scholarships for this summer. “Our teachers are really supportive,” says Esther Kim of the Bullis program. She will be attending college at Maryland Institute College of Art.“I feel so ready to go to art school now.” To enable visitors to further appreciate the array of Bullis talent in visual arts, an online gallery is updated each trimester on the Bullis website. View it at www.bullis. org/arts/Gallery.

Art outreach and community spirit is also encouraged in the Lower School, such as the successful quilt project for this year’s Gala. A grant from the Parents Association made available plenty of materials for Lower School students to create unique squares for three quilts auctioned at the Gala. What do these initiatives bring to the arts at Bullis? “More serious art students,” says Ms. Donoghue. “They understand that being an art student means showing work, documenting pieces and giving back to the community through their talent.” Ms. Gillette agrees. “Our students are becoming more invested in their artwork at a younger age.” Art at Bullis is more than learning to paint SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Maire O’Neill ’05 inducts Esther Kim ’13 as the National Arts Honor Society chapter’s first president.

21


news Gala Success: A Red Carpet Affair On Friday, March 15, “A Red Carpet Affair” Gala raised $330,000 in support of financial aid and professional development programs, including a new record for Raise the Paddle of $139,000 to fund a new outdoor video display and scoreboard. With great appreciation, we thank Gala CoChairs Audrey Friedlander P’15 and Tammy McKnight P’15,’18 for their enthusiastic and dedicated leadership; Total Wine & More and David and June Trone, P’12, ’14 for their generous sponsorship; and the many parent volunteers who donated countless hours of their time to the Gala. Their efforts, combined with the energetic participation and generous bidding of the Gala’s attendees, produced a great event that displayed the positive impact and generous contributions of our community.

Gala Co-chairs Tammy McKnight and Audrey Friedlander pose with the red carpet backdrop.

Bullis Seniors Final at National History Day More than 600,000 students from all 50 states participate in National History Day events during the school year, including all Bullis juniors and those sophomores who take honors US History. After the school events, winning students compete at the county and state levels to qualify for the national event in College Park, Maryland each June. Six Bullis students made it all the way to this summer's NHD, and two from our delegation made it to the finals. Congratulations to Oriana Theo ’14, who

22

placed 13th for her solo performance, “When Hope Fell From The Sky: The Berlin Airlift” and to Brian Mitchell ’14 who placed 7th for his documentary “Baltimore Polytechnic Institute: A Model of Desegregation Before Brown” (tinyurl. com/p2ypadk). Brian also received the Star Spangled 200 special prize for incorporating unity in diversity in his entry.

Finalists Brian Mitchell ’14 and Oriana Theo ’14 at the national competition. BULLIS magazine


arts Imagination A sampling of artwork produced by students across the divisions.

Leah Mayo ’18 Demi Fragoyannis ’22

Adeline Hollars ’20 SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Sloan Bernstein ’21 23


arts

Monique Muse ’16

Bridget Conway ’18

24

Nadia Fallahi ’13

Alonso Flores-Noel ’18

BULLIS magazine


Nick Sussman ’14

Justin Schuble ’13

Minnie Wu ’15

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Drew Micholas ’14

25


athletics Outstanding Athletes ANTHONY THOMPSON Basketball

“Anytime we walked onto the floor,” says Bruce Kelley, varsity basketball coach, “we knew we had the best point guard in the game, and that good things were going to happen.” That point guard for the last three years was Anthony Thompson, who wrapped his senior year leading the Bulldogs to a 47-7 record over the last two years, along with two IAC banners and two IAC tournament championships. He was also named Montgomery County player of the year by The Gazette, and named to 2nd team All-Met by The Washington Post. Anthony heads to Holy Cross College next year, leaving behind other impressive statistics as well, including 15.4 points per game, 106 assists and 62 three-point

NICK BARPOULIS Swimming

“I actually love playing hockey,” says Nick Barpoulis, “but I’m a better swimmer!” He joined the swim team as a freshman, but did not get serious about it until the end of sophomore year when his coaches saw him begin to truly understand and appreciate the sport.

26

shots made during his senior year. “Very few students make a team win the way Anthony does,” declares Kelley. Anthony came to Bullis in 9th grade, and has played basketball—always at point guard—since he was four years old. “I love the passion and the competition of the game,” he explains, “and it’s great to see all the hard work pay off.” He looks forward to playing at Holy Cross, and might consider playing professionally here or overseas, but “college is more for life after basketball,” he says. He particularly enjoyed his economics classes here at Bullis, and hopes to work in business once basketball is behind him.

“We were shocked at his transition,” remembers Coach Bryan Jones, “from a goofy, non-serious swimmer to realizing that his commitment to get better would not only help increase visibility for the program and showcase Bullis but also aid in his development as a leader.” Nick became team co-captain as a junior, and went on to set a school record for 500 freestyle and share records for 200 free relay and 200 medley relay.

Swimming offers a unique combination of individual challenge and team spirit which appeals to Nick, who recognizes that in swimming “you can be whatever you make yourself to be. You will get better if you put in the effort.” Nick, who will attend Bucknell University this fall, was recognized for his work ethic and leadership when he won this season’s Coach’s Award.

BULLIS magazine


BRITTANY JACKSON Basketball

Incredible intensity and passion for the game gives varsity basketball co-captain Brittany Jackson the qualities that her coaches want to see in their players: hard work, respect and composure. “Brittany has a loving spirit and a positive word for her teammates all the time,” observes Head Coach Rod Hairston, “but her competitive nature and desire to succeed takes over once she steps between the lines. She becomes a warrior with the determination of a champion.” Brittany developed skill and leadership over seven years on Bullis basketball teams. Like her undefeated 8th grade season, winning this year’s Independent School League was momentous. “That victory was the whole goal,” says Brittany. “We were working up to it for years.” Younger players will now fill spots vacated

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

by graduating seniors, and Brittany anticipates returning to see “what we’ve created.” Off the court, Brittany sang alto with the Chamber Singers for two years. “I love the challenge of working with a group. Just like basketball, the effort requires chemistry to successfully blend together to accomplish our ultimate goal.” With a scholarship to play at George Mason University, Brittany will also pursue her other passion—English literature. College basketball is a big commitment, so she may not find time for many activities, but she is certainly among the many multi-dimensional students that Bullis helps prepare to meet the world.

27


athletics Outstanding Athletes JOSH FOREMAN Baseball

Josh Foreman prefers to play baseball rather than watch it, forgoing major league fandom for his own games. “I like the culture of baseball and the combination of mental and physical it requires,” he explains. After four years starting on the Bullis varsity team, he plans to play for Emory University next year. As shortstop, Josh is the point guard of the field, facilitating the defense and “getting the most balls,” Josh wryly adds. He started in more than 100 games during his time at Bullis. Aside from being a “team-first guy who leads by example on and off the field,”

Coach Brian Lumpkin named Josh the team’s Most Valuable Player. “He’s the most reliable defensive player I’ve ever coached,” says Lumpkin, pointing to Josh’s career fielding percentage of 93%. A two-time all-IAC player who also excelled on offense, Josh finished this season with 14 RBIs, 12 singles, 3 triples and 7 stolen bases. “Thanks to Josh, the last two seasons have been the best for baseball in school history,” said Lumpkin. Aside from playing, Josh was an avid writer for The Bulldog, and hopes to continue in sports media, maybe trying radio when he gets to Emory.

BRANDON BURKE Ice Hockey and Lacrosse

Most Bullis students participate in a variety of activities, but few are MVPs in two sports—standout athlete Brandon Burke ’13 has achieved that. Brandon played varsity lacrosse and hockey since his freshman year. The youngest of three boys, he followed his brothers onto the field and rink, becoming a leader in his own right in both sports. For Brandon, this winter’s hockey season was the best one in which he has taken 28

BULLIS magazine


CEMAIA WISE Softball

This summer will be the first in several years that CeMaia Wise will not be playing softball. “I’ve played since I was seven, including summer travel leagues,” she recalls.

for her performance on the field and off.” Before leaving to attend St. Johns University in the fall, CeMaia will help coach softball for Bullis Summer Programs, where her ever-present smile

will accompany her winning combination of skills and positive energy: “I try to encourage everyone—a smile can make any day better!”

CeMaia started as catcher for all four of her years on the Bullis varsity team. She earned all-ISL during her junior and senior seasons, with 18 put-outs and 20 assists. “Coaches from every school always commented on her impressive skills,” says Coach Heather Patterson. “She puts fear in her competitors with her strong arm and quick release, picking players off repeatedly from first and third.” Patterson also gave CeMaia the coach’s Leadership Award for the season, crediting her unmatched positive support for her teammates. “She definitely has left her legacy and will be missed tremendously

NADIA FALLAHI Lacrosse and Field Hockey

part. Although Bullis ultimately lost the IAC championship game, the team fought valiantly: “I’m really proud of how we stuck together as a team and hope that for the younger players this will be a learning experience for next year.” Brandon received the team’s Most Valuable Player award. As goalie for the lacrosse team, Brandon was awarded All-IAC and All-Gazette, and the team’s Most Valuable Player. Coach Robert Pollicino says Brandon “was the

consummate leader who pushed himself and his teammates to improve every day.” Brandon will play lacrosse next year at Colgate University. “At the end of the day,” he says, “I just want everyone to know that I left it all out on the field or on the ice.”

“Nadia Fallahi handles the pressurepacked job of varsity lacrosse goalie wonderfully,” compliments Coach Kathleen Lloyd. Nadia is a team player who holds a positive attitude and keeps the team in mind. “After every goal our team would score, she would run from her goal to midfield to congratulate the players,” Coach Lloyd recalls. Nadia had a game-changing moment when she overheard opponents doubting Nadia Fallahi continues next page

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

29


athletics her ability to defend penalty shots. “That fired me up to ramp up my game!” Soon everyone regarded her as a solid goalie. The Bullis girls will move to the upper division next year after being undefeated in the ISL this year. “We went out on a high,” Nadia says, “and I feel confident that I contributed to that success.”

to help others whether or not they hold leadership positions. Next year Nadia plans to study public

relations at University of Southern California and perhaps continue athletics on intramural teams.

For two years Nadia has played forward on the varsity field hockey team as well. “I don’t know what I would have done without sports,” she reflected on the eve of Graduation. “Playing two varsity sports helped me mature and learn to balance.” She hopes to inspire younger players

KASEY COUNTEE Tennis

After two years away from competitive tennis, it took rising senior Kasey Countee just one year to return to peak performance, wrapping up his season with an 11-1 record, the IAC individual championship and All-Met recognition. He seems well on his way to fulfilling Coach Steve Miguel’s prediction: “If he keeps at it diligently, tennis may be Kasey’s ticket to a college education.”

became team co-captain, calling for increased focus from a player known for his talent, energy and enthusiasm— and for not taking things too seriously.

“Instead of getting caught up in myself,” Kasey has learned, “I have to lead by example and make sure others stay on top of their games as well.”

Surprisingly, despite his domination as a singles player, Kasey prefers team sports, having played lacrosse, soccer and basketball, and running cross country since enrolling in Bullis as a 6th grader. Within a team, acknowledges Kasey, rallying together as a group is a powerful motivator. When alone on the court, he confides, “I sometimes struggle to rely solely on myself for internal motivation.” Adding to the challenge this year, Kasey 30

BULLIS magazine


Basketball Teams Clinch Victories

The Bulldogs won the ISL tournament with a big win over Georgetown Visitation. Players include, front row from left, Nicole Kittay ’16, Brianna Davis ’13, Brooke Gutschick ’13, Raven James ’16 and Dazia Hall ’13. Back row, Kyla Lewis ’15, Ashley DeLeonibus ’14, Lynee Belton ’14, Kirby Porter ’14, Lawrencia Moten ’16 and Brittany Jackson ’13.

The varsity boys team defeated St. Albans to win a second consecutive IAC title. Front row from left, Jamaal Greenwood ‘14, Jonathan Dyer ’13, Anthony Thompson ’13, Aaron Briggs ’14, Lamonte Armstrong ’14, Kyven Jones ’14 and Justin Herron ’14. Back row from left, Winton Lyle ’13, Joe Sageman ’13, Andre Walker ’14, AJ Metz ’13, Russell Sangster ’14, Brian Kelley ’14 and Chris Aust ’14. SPRING-SUMMER 2013

31


Building Support for Bullis One at a Time Engraved bricks are once again available! Purchase a personalized brick in honor or memory of a student, team, teacher, individual or family. Proceeds from brick purchases help to support the Annual Fund at Bullis. Thank you for supporting Bullis and showing your school spirit! Please print text as you wish it to be engraved on the brick. Limit: 15 letters per line – 3 lines maximum per brick.

One letter or character per block Please use a separate form for each brick ordered. Name: ____________________________________

Relationship to Bullis: _________________________

Address: ________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________

E-mail: __________________________________________

Preferred location: Front of The Marriott Family Library _____ or Kline Alumni Stadium _____

Brick orders are payable in full. Please complete this form and return with a check for $250 made payable to Bullis School. Mail to: Bullis School Advancement OďŹƒce, 10601 Falls Road, Potomac, MD 20854 Questions? Please email bricks@bullis.org All contributions are tax deductible to a 501(c)(3) organization in accordance with IRS regulations.

32

BULLIS magazine


advancement perspectives “Generosity nurtures this School.” Schools and growth go hand in hand—and this year, Bullis has seen record growth in every area, much of it due to the remarkable generosity and support of this wonderful community. Early in the school year we asked parents and the entire giving community to “Step Up” for Bullis. You did so with such enthusiasm that together we stepped right past our Annual Fund goal of $950,000—to reach one million dollars! That’s a milestone for any giving campaign, and we are grateful to all of you. Your high regard for Bullis and all that it represents for its students and community made new growth possible in programs and in campus improvements such as the brick patios outside The Marriott Family Library, including the lovely waterfall and sunny patio dedicated to Cami Baruch. This summer an impressive video scoreboard will be installed at the Stadium thanks to the record-setting donations on Gala night for Raise the Paddle. Every year with your help, we see more facets of the great potential in Bullis. The secret to our community’s strong culture of giving is not simply an appreciation of the importance of philanthropy—it’s the realization that generosity nurtures this school, and by extension, helps to ensure the future of every student who walks across this campus. Bullis benefits from donations of time and talents as well as resources. We are so grateful for the many parent volunteers, experienced and new, who stepped forward this year to help with everything from the snack bar to the Gala and the successful Bullis Gives Back 5K race. We thank each of you for “stepping up” in countless ways to encourage Bullis’s evolution. Our future looks bright—and as we move ahead to next year, we know that the School remains a priority for all of us. Enjoy a wonderful summer, and I look forward to seeing you in September! Sincerely,

Joanne Szadkowski Director of Institutional Advancement and Alumni

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

33


alumni Jerry May Alumni Golf Tournament For the last three years, Bullis Head of School Dr. Gerald L. Boarman and his golf partners have dominated the annual golf tournament. This year, though, a new team (in top photo at right) comprised of George Mavrikes P’14, ’17, Tom Mavrikes, Ryan Tendall and James Bannister, squeaked by Dr. Boarman’s team to take the title. The event attracted more than 70 golfers, including nearly half who were alumni. The tournament retained the fun, friendly competition and happy reunions that each Jerry May Alumni Golf Tournament features year after year.

Top photo, from left, Tom Mavrikes, James Bannister, Ryan Tendall and George Mavrikes P ’14, ‘17. Middle photo, Dean Sclavounos ’63, Glenn Hunter, Bruce Kelley and Andy Marusak ’66. Above, front row, Hunter Gosnell ’06, Josh Basile ’03, Craig Aronoff ’04 and Woody King ’09. Back row, Scott Crow ’11, Alex Friedlander ’11, Keith Cohen ’06, Brian Will ’08, Andres Parra ’99, Adam Janowitz ’00, Drew Prescott ’00 and Neil King ’07. 34

BULLIS magazine


alumni profile

Nicole Bernard Chaffin ’83 Alumna was one of the first women to graduate from Bullis. Nicole Bernard has always been comfortable being a pioneer. As a member of the first class of girls to enter the School in 1981 when she was in 11th grade, Nicole was a trailblazer then and has continued to be throughout her career, including in her current role as senior vice president for audience strategy at The Fox Group. The position was a new one at the organization, where Bernard has worked since 2005. While many organizations have departments that focus on diversity, Fox selected Bernard to take on a broader challenge “to ensure that each of our entertainment products, across every unit, incorporates and engages as diverse an audience as our country is made of,” she explains. Bernard’s department provides strategy and resources and establishes partnerships throughout the country to support all divisions of Fox, and the position allows her to play to her strengths

36

as well as her passions to follow her own path, travel and explore and appreciate different cultures. “People amaze me and I have always loved to see, feel and touch all the things that make a culture so unique,” she says. “Having a blank slate to create something unique fosters the visionary in me,” she recalls. “I was the only girl on the boys tennis team at Bullis, and the mere fact that I sought out Bullis knowing I would be a first in more ways than one was really the catalyst for my being confident enough to move myself in a direction I might innately know is right for me, even if it means being the first or only one there.” Bernard credits Bullis with establishing this spirit to see things as they could be and not just how they are. Bernard still thinks of her days at Bullis as some of the happiest in her life. She enthusiastically recalls the School’s dynamic environment and how it provided

exactly the challenges she sought even as a teenager. “When my friend Candice Mitchell ’83 mentioned Bullis and its academic rigor, prior military foundation and great tennis team—and the chance to make history as one of the first women to integrate the school—I knew it was for me.” She still remembers feeling both “terrified and amused” by General Price when she arrived first on campus, and loving the focus on college preparation and an expectation for excellence. “I even liked that you had to be ‘invited back’ every semester. The idea sparked the competitor in me and made me feel like I was joining an elite club that I would earn the right to be a part of.” She talks often about Bullis with her nieces and nephew, current Bullis students Gabby McIntosh ’14, Brynn McIntosh ’16 and Alec McIntosh ’18. Today’s dress code options are a far cry from the blazer and saddle shoes of Bernard’s era—“those

BULLIS magazine


Left page, Nicole Bernard's 1983 yearbook photos. Above from left, twin daughters Leah and Hayden share a hug; at right Nicole and her husband Lee vacation in Cabo San Lucas with their daughters.

saddle shoes were just wrong in so many ways!” she laughs. Among the many life skills she developed at Bullis, Bernard is particularly grateful for the strong work ethic, determination, appreciation for healthy competition and the value of being part of a community as important foundations for her career success. She also applauds the expanded opportunities in the arts at today’s Bullis, along with the dedication to academic success and engagement in sports that remain still at the high levels she remembers. As her own twin daughters—Hayden and Leah, now six years old—grow older, she hopes to find a similar educational program for them in Los Angeles that will provide an elite education that balances fun, friendships and academics. “Prioritizing and balance are great life lessons that we learned at Bullis.” Bernard regularly advises her nieces and nephews to take advantage of the “dynamic teachers and to raise questions about SPRING-SUMMER 2013

what they are taught and what they wish to see more.” She encourages them to recognize and “always remember the school’s historical belief that discipline, balance and effort can catapult you to greatness.” She encourages them to leverage and try every single opportunity that the school and the campus offer. “Experience something that takes you out of your comfort zone, she urges, “because you never know how that experience will serve you later in life.” Bernard still remembers a particular personal lesson, when “the fantastically eccentric Mr. Klinger” had his students recite the prelude to the Canterbury Tales in front of the class. This taught Bernard that “there is no mountain too high!” And yes, she can still recite it.

“Experience something that takes you out of your comfort zone, because you never know how that experience will serve you later in life.” —Nicole Bernard Chaffin

37


alumni class notes From left, Zoe Glasby, daughter of Rick Glasby ’85 and his wife Athena; Akilah (Owens) Harris ’97 with her husband Kelvin and children Ethan and Elle; James Thomas Hurst and Harrison Samuel Hurst, sons of Anna (Buffone) Hurst ’98 and her husband Mike Hurst.

1974

1991

Carl Taylor reports that he just finished coaching his 32nd year of youth lacrosse for the West Hartford Youth Lacrosse League and he is in his 12th year as a Superior Court Judge. For the past two years he has served as the presiding judge in the Manchester, Connecticut courthouse.

Congratulations to Seth Eaton who won the 2012 SCCA Regional Solo 2 Championship in his Porsche Boxster S. The battle for the championship was very close, with Seth carrying a three-point lead into the 12th final race in December. (See photo on page 41.)

1978

1993

Thomas Howe has worked for six years at Google as an enterprise vertical account manager in manufacturing. He and his wife Carrie recently relocated from Chicago to Key West, Florida.

Christy (Pratt) Lucia lives in McLean, Virginia with her husband Seth and their four children, daughters Caroline, Catherine and Elsie and son Nicholas. Christy also lives two doors down from former Bullis teacher and coach Bill Wieand, and says she enjoys seeing him often. Christy recently attended her 20 year reunion and says it was great to see everyone who attended! (See photo on page 42.)

1985 Rick Glasby and his wife Athena had a daughter, Zoe, on April 13, 2012, who joins Rick’s first daughter, Leah, 23. Rick and Athena both work at Bechtel Corporation and reside in Frederick, Maryland.

1989 Lisa Schatz resides in Baltimore and is the owner and operator of Cupcake, a contemporary women’s boutique in Fells Point. Cupcake is in its 7th year of business and recently launched its e-commerce website: www.cupcake-shop.com.

Kira Orr was recently acknowledged an ACC Women’s Basketball Legend at Duke University, where she was also the first Blue Devil to be drafted professionally. Kira is currently assistant principal of the Middle School at Bullis.

1997 Akilah (Owens) Harris and her husband

38

Kelvin had daughter Elle Riley, on January 21, who joins big brother Ethan, 1. Akilah works as a sales manager for Centex Homes and she and her family live in Arlington, Virginia.

1998 Best wishes to Anna (Buffone) Hurst and her husband Mike, who recently welcomed identical twin boys, Harrison Samuel Hurst and James Thomas Hurst, born on December 5. Anna works as a senior recruiter for Salesforce.com and Mike is the CEO of a start-up company called Exactuals. The Hurst family lives in Los Altos, California. After living in San Francisco and working at Comcast SportsNet Bay Area since February 2009, Adam Littlefield has accepted a job with NBC Sports to help launch their new English Premier League soccer coverage. Adam says this is his dream job, working for one of the most prestigious networks in sports television with the added bonus of solely focusing on the sport about which he is most passionate. Adam relocated to New York City in June and began his new position on July 1. BULLIS magazine


From left, Celeste Melanson ’99 and her fiancé Joe Sweeney enjoying some quality time together; Scott Levenson ’99 with his wife Tamara, daughter Sasha and son Blake; Jennifer (Hayman) Okun ’99 and her husband Jared with their daughter Olivia Sloane Okun.

1999 Congratulations to Celeste Melanson and Joe Sweeney who were engaged on November 24. The couple resides in West Chester, Pennsylvania, where Celeste teaches science and coaches the varsity girls’ soccer team at Episcopal Academy, and Joe works for his family’s business, Medical Equipment Contractors. Scott Levenson reports that since fall 2008 he has been executive director at Private Prep, a tutoring service offering individually customized lessons for a range of K-12 subjects and standardized test preparation (www.privateprep.com). Last summer, Scott co-founded a start-up called Present Value, a gift registry service that enables people to make lasting contributions toward a more secure financial future for engaged couples and expectant parents (www.presentvalue. com). Scott and his wife Tamara are the proud parents of son Blake, 3, and daughter Sasha, 1. The Levenson family lives in New York City. Jennifer (Hayman) Okun and her husband Jared are thrilled to welcome their first child, daughter Olivia Sloane SPRING-SUMMER 2013

Share Your News Newly married? Relocating? Expanding your family? Celebrating a career transition? Exotic travel in the works? Please send in your Class Notes for the next Bullis Magazine to keep your classmates and other Bullis friends up to date. High-resolution photos (JPEG format) are always welcome. Be sure to "like" us on Facebook—search Bullis School Alumni Association—and follow us on Twitter: @BullisAlumni. Email your updates to Jennifer Hayman Okun ’99, assistant director of alumni and events, at jennifer_okun@bullis.org.

Okun, born on December 9. Jennifer is the assistant director of alumni and events at Bullis and Jared works in commercial real estate at Rock Creek Property Group. Elliott Datlow recently traveled to Panama City, Panama to coach ATP tennis pro Jesse Witten at the ATP Visit Panama Cup, a pro tennis tournament. While there, Elliott also led a tennis clinic for 30 of the top junior players in Panama. (See photo on page 41.)

Rachel (Garff) Kirkham and her husband Jay are proud to announce the arrival of their son, Gabriel Dennis Kirkham, born on February 6. Rachel and Jay, along with their daughters Chloe, 4, and Lucy, 2, and baby Gabriel, live in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

2000 Best wishes to Jessica (Rafferty) Marx and her husband Jeff, who welcomed their first child, son Nathan Kurt Marx, on October 29. The Marx family resides in Dallas, Texas. 39


alumni class notes From left, Gabriel Dennis Kirkham, son of Rachel (Garff) Kirkham ’99 and her husband Jay Kirkham; Nathan Kurt Marx, son of Jessica (Rafferty) Marx ’00 and her husband Jeff Marx; Josh Basile ‘03, on right, poses with his classmate John Millar at their law school graduation in May.

2002 Liz Dufresne created and produces a health TV show on Montgomery Municipal Cable TV channel 16 called “Living Healthy,” co-hosted by Sport and Spine Rehab’s CEO Dr. Jay Greenstein and CCO Dr. Barton Bishop. Each episode focuses on a different health topic and features a guest who specializes in that area. Liz is also the senior marketing account representative for Sport and Spine Rehab. For more information, please visit www.ssrehab.com.

Lindsay (Gerber) Harris and her husband Josh welcomed son Mason on October 23, 2012. Lindsay works at Host Hotels & Resorts and lives with her family in Gaithersburg.

2004

Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Fletcher graduated from Army Sniper School in February 2013 and went through Special Forces Selection and Assessment. He has been selected to begin training to become a Green Beret.

2008

Ibrahim Diane and Josh Posnick ’03 have teamed up to create “Live from the Republic,” an annual concert tour held in Africa that features hip-hop, R&B and pop musicians. A portion of the proceeds from tour merchandise is donated to social causes that benefit children in the African community. For more information, please visit www.livefromtherepublic.com.

Thomas Rachlin graduated from the University of Colorado in 2008 with a degree in Mechanical Engineering and currently works as a technical development engineer in research and development at Covidien. Tom was featured in the November issue of GQ Magazine as a finalist in their entrepreneur contest, “A Gentleman’s Call,” which was in pursuit of an “idea that matters.” Tom’s idea was The Clean Water Reserve Project, and out of 3,000 entries nationwide, Tom was selected as one of five finalists. Tom currently lives in Boulder, Colorado. To view Tom’s video, visit www.youtube.com/ watch?v=1D8ClK1pLq

2003

2005

2012

Josh Basile graduated Magna Cum Laude from UDC’s David A. Clarke School of Law in May 2013. Josh is taking the bar exam this summer and is looking forward to beginning his job as an associate at Jack H. Olender & Associates.

Jordan Burke was named to the all-decade lacrosse team at Brown University.

Madeline Dahut just completed her freshman year at Georgetown University where she is majoring in nursing. This summer, Madeline is working with a researcher on a lab project at Georgetown as well as writing a paper for publication in an oncology journal.

40

2006 Fletcher Schoen joined the United States Army in May 2012 and is stationed at

Patrick Schoen graduated from Occidental College last year with a major in diplomacy and world affairs. This past year he worked as a research assistant for AIDS Project Los Angeles’ community-based research program. This fall, Patrick will relocate to London to start an MSc in reproductive and sexual health research at The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

2009 Zachary Weiner graduated from Muhlenberg College in May with a degree in accounting and international business. He will soon begin a new job at CohnReznick, an accounting firm.

BULLIS magazine


From left, Mori Diane (father of Ibrahim Diane ’02), singer/songwriter/rap artist Ryan Leslie, friend Yasmine Rahmaan, Ibrahim Diane ’02 and Josh Posnick ’03; Patrick Schoen ’08; Davis ’12 and Chris Nordeen represent Bullis at Mt. Kilimanjaro.

Davis Nordeen, along with his father, Bullis Trustee Chris Nordeen, and his cousin, climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in December. Though the climb took six days and the route crossed through five climate zones, Davis reports that the “top was gorgeous” and they had a great time. Davis just completed his freshman year at the University of Michigan and this summer, he is interning for a nonprofit organization in Hong Kong.

Past Faculty/Staff Former Bullis history teacher and cross country/track coach Nicholas Kent has been named high school principal of Concordia International School in Shanghai, China, to begin in the 2013-14 school year. Nicholas says that his love for China and school leadership was founded at Bullis from 2000-2002. Concordia International School Shanghai is a preK-12 school serving expat families.

Elliott Datlow ’99 with members of a tennis clinic in Panama.

I N M E MOR I A M We extend our deepest sympathies to the families of those in our close Bullis circle who have recently passed away: Camille Marin Baruch ’13 Anthony Carozza ’46 William Clyde Earl ’46 Ashley Ennis ’68 Scott Friedel ’87 Gregory Panawek ’40

Seth Eaton ’91 in the Porsche Boxster S with which he won the 2012 SCCA Regional Solo 2 Championship.

Robert C. Wood ’63

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

41


alumni class notes

Christy (Pratt) Lucia '93 and her husband Seth enjoy time with their four children Caroline, Catherine, Elsie and Nicholas.

Young Alumni Day

The fourth annual Young Alumni Lunch took place on January 10, bringing a good crowd of alumni back to Bullis. The students stopped by to enjoy lunch while reuniting with classmates, teachers and administrators, and sharing great stories of their time after Bullis. It was wonderful to see everyone! Back row from left, teachers Michael Chellman and Tim Hanson, KaQuan Little ’10, Aurian Darvishi ’12, Leigh Ulica ’12, Jay Barrera ’11, Alex Anderson ’11, Nick Mars ’12 and college counselor Lynn Kittel. Front row, teacher Heda O’Brien, Sam Thomas ’12, Steven Xue ’12, Morgan Williams ’12, Cami Uechi ’12, Tish Barton ’12, Dr. Mary Frances Bryja and Dr. Jerry Boarman.

42

BULLIS magazine


class reunions Class of 1993 Celebrates 20 Years!

Members of the class of 1993 gathered at RiRa Irish Pub in Bethesda to celebrate their 20 year reunion in June. Classmates remarked about how wonderful it was to see everyone and that a great time was had by all! From left, Kim Forsht, Mike Corrigan, Bradley Raymond, Sally (Kogod) Biederman, Dan Zubari, Christy (Pratt) Lucia, Lauren Shrensky, Kyle Blackstone, Alison (Colen) Wade, Liz (Myers) Barnhart, Dana (Gildenhorn) Wancjer and Todd Levine.

Class of 2002 Marks 10 Years!

The class of 2002 feted their 10 year reunion at Napoleon Bistro & Lounge in November. A special thank you to Courtney Abrams and Candace (Foulger) Morriss for their help with planning the evening. At right, Candace (Foulger) Morriss and Ross Koenig.

44

BULLIS magazine


Five Year Celebration for Class of 2007

The class of 2007 celebrated their five year reunion over Thanksgiving weekend at Tommy Joe’s in Bethesda. A big thank you to Kimberly Segal for all of her hard work in planning such a successful night! Of the night Kimberly said, “it was like a family reunion… Everyone was so excited to all get together and reunite.” Above from left, Alex Dresner, Molly Goodman, Megan Herbets, Ali Nemeroff, Andrew Zutz, Shaun Crow, Sarah O’Neill, Brandon Allen and Jaime Bernstein-Ansaldi. Below, back row from left, Alex Jackson, Spencer Kelly, Brooke Slowinski, Will Beck and Ben Carroll. Middle row, Andrew Zutz, Doug Silverstein, Alissa Lichtenstein, Neil King, Joey Goldberg, Molly Goodman and Andrew Gordon. Front row, Shaun Crow, Kimberly Segal, Sarah O’Neill, Megan Herbets and Ali Nemeroff.

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

45


class reunions Alumnus Revamps Radio Club He Founded Richard Hayman ’63 created Bullis’ first HAM Radio Club over 50 years ago to combine two of his interests, engineering and communication. While the Radio Club eventually dissolved with the move of Bullis from Silver Spring to Potomac and the introduction of newer technologies, Richard stayed active in the HAM Radio world. This past fall, Richard and a group of 10 Upper School students started Bullis’ new RC² club (robotics, computers and communication). The aim is for “kids to have fun and be practical with things they are learning in the classroom,” says Richard. While Richard’s expertise with HAM Radio influenced RC²’s initial projects, the club

also includes building robots and other computer-focused technologies. Junior Scott Bettigole ’14 says, “It’s very hands on. We’re working with real things and can see the product of our work.” Richard hopes that the use of radio will be an extension of what is being learned in the classroom—for example, foreign language classes being able to speak to students in other countries. “HAM Radio is the original social media. You’re talking

with Bullis to revive the Radio Club. “HAM Radio is a hobby that’s over 100 years old, and it’s today’s youth who are going to keep it thriving,” he says. “The only way to do that is to expose them to radio and its capabilities.”

to strangers and making relationships around the world, but without the use of the internet.”

Richard’s interest in HAM began when his grandfather gave him a short wave radio at the age of 10. “In fact, my parents bribed me and said if I got good grades at Bullis, I could get a newer radio.” It worked, and in 1960, Bullis’ first radio club was formed. Over 50 years later, radio is once again part of Bullis.

Energized after attending the Golden Years Reunion last fall, Richard reconnected

For more about the RC² club, watch the video at www.bullis.org/radio.

At left, Richard Hayman in the 1963 yearbook, developing photos. At right, Scott Bettigole ’14, Adam Cohen ’14, Brian Mitchell ’14 and Richard Hayman ’63 erecting their first radio antenna outside of North Hall.

46

BULLIS magazine


Mystery Alumni Photos

Can you identify the people in one of these photos? Please email your answers to Jennifer (Hayman) Okun ’99 at jennifer_okun@bullis.org by August 15. The first person to answer correctly will win a prize from the Alumni Office!

SPRING-SUMMER 2013

47


alumni notes Bullis Alumni Brain Teaser 1

2

3

4

5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12

13

14 16

15

17

18

19

EclipseCrossword.com

Across 1.

3. 7. 9.

10. 11. 13. 15. 48

Name of the stuffed bulldog Dr. Jung brought with him when he read to Lower School students in the 1990s Lyricist of the Bullis alma mater The area in North Hall reserved just for seniors What is the first word of the Bullis motto on the front entrance to the School? How is lunch served in the dining hall? Name of the Bullis yearbook Who first graduated from Bullis in 1983? The item that 3rd graders give to

16. 17. 18. 19.

seniors at the beginning of the year to plant on campus How many football IAC championships has Bullis won? Name of the Bullis student newspaper Who first introduced the bulldog as Bullis’ mascot? Name of the terrace between North Hall and the Dining Hall

5. 6.

8.

12.

Down 1. 2. 4.

The name of the annual holiday concert First location of Bullis School Name of the games that take place

14.

during Homecoming week Name of the all-boys area sports league of which Bullis is part Prior to The Marriott Family Library, the library was located in this building on campus Name of the “pageant competition” for men that took place each year during the 90s In 1995 this document was put in place by the School and signed by each member of the student body and faculty How many alumni currently work at Bullis?

For puzzle solution see www.bullis.org/ alumni/crossword BULLIS magazine


THANKS A MILLION! So many of you stepped up for Bullis in a big way this year— WE SURPASSED OUR ANNUAL FUND GOAL OF $950,000, totaling more than $1 MILLION! Because of YOU, this year was another outstanding success. The generosity and support that Bullis receives each year enriches the education experience of every Bullis student.

THANK YOU!


BULLIS

Bullis School 10601 Falls Road Potomac, MD 20854 301-299-8500 www.bullis.org

NON-PROFIT U.S. Postage PAID Rockville, MD Permit No. 2158

Address Service Requested

Caroline Martin ’19 Watercolor

Profile for Bullis School

Bullis Magazine, Spring/Summer 2013  

Bullis Magazine, Spring/Summer 2013