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SPECIAL ISSUE Earth Day articles look at Nanaimo’s natural assets, ocean protection and more.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 2018

EARTH DAY

VOL. 29, NO. 97

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EARTH DAY

RDN plan calls for apartments to recycle more Solid waste management plan could demand recycling, organic collection GREG SAKAKI NEWS BULLETIN

CHRIS BUSH/THE NEWS BULLETIN

Basia Henoch, community school coordinator, left; Jaimie Smythe, event ambassador; Michael Geselbracht of the Mid-Island Community Development Cooperative; and Chris Brown, Earth Day event coordinator; are getting everything ready for Earth Day 2018, a celebration of community and the environment at John Barsby Secondary School.

Community can get together to celebrate the Earth TAMARA CUNNINGHAM NEWS BULLETIN

Meet baby goats, munch on wild foods and hear the buzz about bees at this year’s Earth Day party. Earth Day 2018, a celebration of stewardship and community, kicks off at John Barsby Secondary School this Saturday, April 21.

Event coordinator Chris Brown, a garden facilitator for John Barsby, has heard people say that it sounds like awareness is expanding about environmental and food issues but action isn’t keeping pace. So he’s making the event all about Earth service – not only demonstrating action but showcasing Nanaimo’s environ-

mental stewards. “It’s kind of like lead by example and here are some examples,” said Brown, who also hopes to introduce youths to different Earth and community service professions, like farming. Farmers will be at the event to talk about growing food, as well as to sell seeds, seedlings and produce.

There will also be artisans, live music, baby goats, garden tours, face-painting and garden work parties. Food trucks will be parked on site and the school cafeteria will serve up local and wild-harvested foods. Event goers can also expect a little buzz at the high school that recently earned its title as Bee City School. Continued on A12

Homeowners have helped the Nanaimo region become a leader in waste reduction. Pretty soon, more of the onus could start to fall on residents who live in apartments and condos. The Regional District of Nanaimo’s new solid waste management plan is expected to go before the board of directors next month. A change that’s being considered is mandatory waste source separation, which means all multi-family complexes, as well as businesses and institutions, would be required to separate garbage, recycling and organic waste. “There’s lots that are already doing it, so we’re a long way down that path already,” said Larry Gardner, the RDN’s solid waste manager. The provincial government mandates that all regional districts have solid waste management plans, and

Gardner said it was time for the RDN to renew, update and seek board and ministry approval on a plan to guide the next decade of program delivery. Currently, the RDN estimates it has a 68 per cent diversion rate as it works toward a stated goal of 90 per cent. Based on a 2012 composition study of the waste stream, Gardner said the region believes the “opportunity for the greatest gains” comes from source separation at multi-family residences and businesses. That won’t happen without rules and regulation, though, since recycling costs more than landfilling. Along with mandatory source separation, the RDN plans to license waste haulers and ask them to opt into a system meant to incentivize recycling through a decrease to local tipping fees and a disposal levy for waste landfilled or incinerated elsewhere. Continued on A35

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Thursday, April 19, 2018 A3

EARTH DAY

Nanaimo adds up the value of natural infrastructure Environmental assets have dollar value, study finds

Gabriola Island residents argue against freighter anchorages KARL YU NEWS BULLETIN

TAMARA CUNNINGHAM NEWS BULLETIN

A natural stormwater system at Nanaimo’s Buttertubs Marsh is worth millions, a new study has found. Buttertubs Marsh, a 40-hectare wetland that’s storing water and controlling floods, is providing a system the City of Nanaimo would have to pay millions to replicate, according to a pilot study that’s helping to change the way communities see natural infrastructure. Nanaimo was chosen in 2016 as one of five Canadian communities to participate in the Municipal Natural Capital Initiative pilot study, organized by the David Suzuki Foundation, Town of Gibsons and other partners. The idea was to calculate the financial value of natural infrastructure like wetlands and the costs that can be saved by protecting and maintaining nature. For anyone looking at a wetland or watercourse, the value is clear but it’s also subjective, said city environmental planner Rob Lawrance,

EARTH DAY

TAMARA CUNNINGHAM/THE NEWS BULLETIN

Rob Lawrance, City of Nanaimo environmental planner, said a natural capital study put Buttertubs Marsh in the context of a physical utility asset. who notes the study put the marsh in the context of a physical utility asset and a language city financial planners speak. The study hasn’t been released yet, but Lawrance told the News Bulletin it shows even in areas of the marsh without any control structures or weirs, water is still being retained and that as climate change progresses and storm events become more severe, the value of what the marsh does doubles. The natural system is able to handle increased pressure and has resiliency, he said, adding it has more value than he thought.

There’s real financial value that wetlands provide the community. A hydrological model considered what it would cost to build an engineered system matching what Buttertubs does and found the replacement cost would be anywhere from $4.7 million to $8.3 million. “Doing that just kind of underscores

the point that the city does not have to pay that kind of money to have that kind of service provided to the community,” Lawrance said. “That was the main point of the exercise and the pilot study is to prove there’s real financial value that wetlands like this provide the community.” The Town of Gibsons has already created a natural asset management strategy, and it’s that work that’s being replicated across the country. Emanuel Machado, chief administrative officer and strategic advisor for the study, said the benefits of

valuing natural assets is “tremendous.” Natural areas are resilient to climate change, he said, adding creeks can flex and compress as needed much more than a pipe with defined capacity. There’s also no upfront or replacement costs for natural systems, no depreciation and natural assets can last into perpetuity. Gibsons, has a watershed, for example, with ponds, creeks and a forest, that treats a lot of the community’s storm water, but a development prompted the need to upgrade those services. Continued on A11

Gabriola Islanders continue to fight against freighters dropping anchor off their waters. Five of these anchorage sites are proposed off Gabriola Island and there is a grassroots group, Gabriolans Against Freighter Anchorages Society, voicing opposition. According to Chris Straw, society president, there are numerous issues. The group became involved when a proposal, seeking new anchorage sites off Gabriola’s northeast coast, came to light in 2015, said Straw. Since then, there has also been an increase in usage of existing anchorages – there are about 33 sites throughout the southern Gulf Islands. Concerns have been expressed about the anchors dragging along the sea floor, damaging the habitat and Straw said there are risks of ships running aground, but the most immediate impact for residents that live near anchorages is the noise. Even when ships aren’t running, diesel generators are used to keep the equipment going and fuel circulating, he said. “So they’re running 24/7 and then there’s a lot of noise associated with the anchor chains going up and down and opening and closing of the big hatch covers and this sort of stuff, plus other equipment that they operate. So there’s kind of an industrial level of noise that has an impact, not only on the people, but obviously on the environment and birds and everything else.” Sheila Malcolmson, Nanaimo-Ladysmith member of Parliament and Gabriola resident, presented petitions in the House of Commons last month, asking the Government of Canada to discontinue five bulk anchorages off the island, which would be used in the exporting of coal from Wyoming to China for power plant fuel. Malcolmson also wrote to both Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Transport Marc Garneau and was notified last week that her correspondence has been received. Continued on A5


A4 Thursday, April 19, 2018

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GREEN THE STREAM

Vic Brice lugs garbage through a wooded area at the federal Green Party’s Green the Stream event at Bowen Park on Saturday. The Green Party of Canada NanaimoLadysmith riding association put on the event and rounded up volunteers who cleaned up the area around the park and the Millstone River shoreline and raised awareness about the trash produced.

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Thursday, April 19, 2018 A5

EARTH DAY

EARTH DAY

MP awaits word Continued from A3 “I just have been feeling like I’ve heard enough people say, ‘No, we just don’t think this is viable,’ even people that are pretty close to the government. I just keep thinking that I’m giving them an opening to announce that it’s been cancelled, but I thought that in December and so I’m surprised we still don’t have that good news,” said

City gets a greening grant

Malcolmson. In an e-mail, Annie Joannette, spokeswoman for Transport Canada, said the ministry will consider the proposed changes as part of the Oceans Protection Plan national anchorages review, which is determining a set of standards for the selection and use of existing or new anchorage locations in Canada.

Nanaimo’s Adopt-A-Park program is about to get a financial boost thanks to the TD Friends of the Environment Foundation. The City of Nanaimo will get a $6,600 grant on Earth Day, April 22, from the national charity, which is committed to protecting the environment and greening communities across Canada, a press release says. “[TD Friends of the Environment Foundation] is supporting parks and recreation’s Adopt-APark program, which allows environmentally conscious groups to complement and enhance the regular maintenance [done by] Nanaimo parks staff in contributing to a cleaner, healthier, safer, invasive-free environment in local parks,” said Deborah Beck, the city’s recreation coordinator, in the release. Mandip Kharod, regional manager of the foundation, said at TD, the goal is to make a lasting impact.

NEWS BULLETIN FILE

Residents of Gabriola Island continue to express concerns about ships and freighters dropping anchor off the Island’s waters.

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Thursday, April 19, 2018 A7

EARTH DAY

Choices made every day to protect sea life Information is key to making environmentally sustainable decisions CHRIS BUSH NEWS BULLETIN

Prawns aren’t just good to eat. They’re a complex species: two years into their four-year life span, prawns begin to switch gender, transitioning from males to become mature females that at age three can produce and carry eggs. Decades of scientific research have gone into uncovering the life cycle of prawns, which has shed at least a little knowledge about how to protect or at least help sustain the species in a time when prawns, like other invertebrates, are under pressure from fishing, climate change, ocean acidification and other environmental influences. Scientists know it’s important to get informed and share that information if they want to help the planet. Shannon Obradovich, stock assessment program head for marine invertebrates research division at the Pacific Biological Station in Nanaimo,

CHRIS BUSH/THE NEWS BULLETIN

Shannon Obradovich, who develops mathematical models to help researchers study marine invertebrates, says staying informed about everything from fishing regulations to menu choices when dining out can go a long way toward helping the environment. develops mathematical models, based on available information about species populations and known environmental influences that affect them, to help other scientists conduct better research

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and recommendations about how to protect a species through regulations, such as harvesting limits or even fisheries closures. “My models are built of math and

they’re looking at how a population of species is growing or functioning – and they could be very simple if we don’t have a lot of information, or they can be very complex,” Obradovich said. “There’s an entire group here – the quantitative assessment modelling group – that’s what they do is develop new tools.” Better research tools have led to a new regulation for recreational prawn fishers. As of April 1, all female prawns carrying eggs must be released when caught to help ensure prawn populations continue to thrive. “One of the things, thinking about Earth Day, that you can do, is thinking that these regulations are in place for an actual purpose and it’s not just to have more regulations,” Obradovich said. She also says people can make sustainable choices when they go shopping or dine out. Several programs, including the Marine Stewardship Council at www.msc.org/, Vancouver Aquarium’s Oceanwise at http://seafood.ocean.org/, and Sea Choice, http://www.seachoice. org/, offer advice about choosing sustainable fish and invertebrates and all of them have mobile apps. photos@nanaimobulletin.com

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opinion

A8 Thursday, April 19, 2018

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EDITORIAL

Spread the message of Earth Day’s meaning Nanaimo scarcely needs an Earth Day for motivation to make the natural world a better place. People here are already making environmentally conscious choices every day, we see it everywhere we look, and it’s a good feeling. In recognition of Earth Day coming up on Sunday, April 22, we at the News Bulletin compiled a smattering of environmentally focused articles about different projects and causes in our community that deal with steward-

ship, sustainability and the like. Really, there were endless opportunities to tell stories about the work that is being done. There are so many examples of leadership on environmental issues, be it from government, non-profits or anyone else who rallies in support of the planet. In interviewing for an article on the Regional District of Nanaimo’s solid waste management plan, one of the advisory committee members commented that he felt like everyone at

that table is committed to getting closer to zero waste. “It’s really hopeful for Nanaimo and I don’t think all other jurisdictions would be like us, and I think it’s because of how much work has been put into education and awareness and recycling already,” said Ben Geselbracht. We think that’s the case. Our education system deserves a lot of credit for instilling some of what we think are the right values when it comes to protecting and caring about the en-

vironment. Parents, too, are passing along these same values and it makes a difference. Every day there are people advocating to save the whales and hug a tree. All the evidence seems to show that people in Nanaimo want to be leaders on recycling, want to be rabble-rousers for eco-justice and want the best for our pristine part of the world. Maybe we’re well aware, here, of the meaning behind Earth Day. Even still, let’s honour the occasion by continuing to spread the message far and wide.

It’s urgent that we reverse biodiversity decline Our health, well-being, over three years to assess food security, energy and the state of biodiversity and to determine the economic progress decauses and solutions for pend on healthy, diverse declines in Africa, the nature. Clean water Americas, Asia-Pacific, and air are essential to and Europe and Central human life and health. Asia. Nutrient-rich soils are IPBES chair Sir Robnecessary to grow food. Diversity makes the eco- ert Watson said, “The systems on which human best available evidence, gathered by the world’s life depends resilient. leading experts, points But, as more than us now to a single con550 experts from over clusion: we must act to 100 countries recently halt and reverse warned, “BioSCIENCE the unsustaindiversity – the able use of naessential variety MATTERS ture – or risk not of life forms on DAVID SUZUKI only the future Earth – continwe want, but ues to decline even the lives we in every region currently lead. of the world, Fortunately, the significantly reevidence also ducing nature’s capacity to contribute to shows that we know how to protect and partially people’s well-being.” restore our vital natural On March 22 in Meassets.” dellín, Colombia, the The reports conclude Intergovernmental Scithat “biodiversity and ence-Policy Platform nature’s capacity to on Biodiversity and contribute to people are Ecosystem Services being degraded, reduced approved four peer-reand lost due to a number viewed regional reports. of common pressures Researchers examined more than 10,000 studies – habitat stress; overex-

LANA JOHNSON PHOTO

Protecting ecosystems, which can store more carbon, is one of the solutions to protecting biodiversity, says columnist. ploitation and unsustainable use of natural resources; air, land and water pollution; increasing numbers and impact of invasive alien species and climate change, among others.” Biodiversity of plants, animals, fungi and other organisms is important. Each species plays a unique ecosystem role. Diverse nature offers numerous ecosystem services, including ensuring we have access to a variety of foods and medicines. It also creates resilience – a variety of species ensures that

some will continue to function if others fail. The economic consequences alone are staggering. Researchers estimate that land-based natural systems contribute services worth about $3.6 trillion in Canada. Although many solutions lie in government policy, individuals can also help. Watson told National Geographic that eating less meat, wasting less food, using water more efficiently, reducing toxic chemical use and shifting from fossil fuels are all necessary. Emma Archer,

How to reach the Nanaimo News Bulletin: General: 250-753-3707 www.nanaimobulletin.com/contact-us Address: Nanaimo News Bulletin, 777 Poplar St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9S 2H7 Publisher: Sean McCue publisher@nanaimobulletin.com Editor: Greg Sakaki editor@nanaimobulletin.com Production Manager: Darrell Summerfelt production@nanaimobulletin.com Circulation Manager: Ryan McKinnon circulation@nanaimobulletin.com Classifieds: 1-866-865-4460 bcclassifieds@blackpress.ca

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co-chairwoman of the African assessment, said, “as citizens, we need to vote and lobby for political leaders and policies that support these choices.” As a Desmog Blog article points out, “Many of the solutions for stemming the loss of species would have simultaneous benefits for the climate, such as protecting and restoring ecosystems (which can store more carbon), cleaning up energy sources (fewer greenhouse gas emissions), and practicing more sustainable and diverse agriculture (lowering emissions, storing carbon).” As with climate change, we have ample evidence that we’re facing a biodiversity crisis, we know what’s causing it and we have numerous solutions. It’s time to act.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

There’s the community coming together to celebrate, but also creating a feeling of empowerment to change our lifestyles and behaviours. – Earth Day 2018 coordinator Chris Brown on the intent behind the community event Saturday, April 21, at John Barsby Secondary School, page A1.

Written with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation senior editor Ian Hanington. The Nanaimo News Bulletin is published every Tuesday and Thursday by Black Press. The News Bulletin is distributed to more than 32,000 households in Cedar, Chase River, Gabriola Island, Nanaimo, Lantzville and Nanoose Bay. All orginal content in this publication is copyright material belonging to Black Press. Any re-use or reproduction without the express, written consent of the copyright owner is strictly prohibited. The Nanaimo News Bulletin is a member of the National NewsMedia Council, an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, contact editor Greg Sakaki at 250-734-4621 or e-mail editor@nanaimobulletin. com. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint,visit http://mediacouncil.ca/complaints/ or phone 1-844-877-1163.


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LETTERS

Tanker traffic poses a risk to B.C.’s coast

All Canadians have rights in pipeline disagreement To the editor, Re: Pipeline opposition is unconstitutional, Letters, April 12. Unfortunately, the letter writer takes a narrow, outdated view of Canada’s constitution as it relates to Alberta’s and Canada’s attempt to bulldoze the Trans Mountain pipeline through British Columbia. Since 1982, Canada’s constitution has included Section 35(1): “The existing aboriginal and treaty rights of the aboriginal people in Canada are hereby recognized and affirmed.” A number of court cases have spelled out what those rights include and they give First Nations protection against companies riding roughshod over their territory. First Nations have to be consulted in a meaningful way and this has not happened. As a result several First Nations in the pathway of Trans Mountain have launched a court case in the Federal Court of Appeal against the National Energy Board’s approval of the project. Prime Minister Trudeau has not dealt honestly either with First Nations or with the rest of Canadian society. In a fine-sounding campaign promise in

NEWS BULLETIN FILE

People protest outside the Vancouver Island University gymnasium during Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s town hall there this winter. 2015, Trudeau said “while governments grant permits for resource development, only communities can grant permission.” How can he square that with his present decision that the Trans Mountain will be built regardless of community opposition? Although this issue will keep constitutional lawyers busy for some time it is much more than a constitutional squabble. Scientists have genuine concern over the impact of a bitumen spill on the British Columbia coastline and the B.C. government is right to demand a halt to construction until there can be assurance that the coast will be protected. Jim Manly Nanaimo Showtimes: April 20 - 26

TOMB RAIDER (PG) (VIOLENCE,COARSE LANGUAGE) RECLINERS FRI,SUN-THURS 4:10; SAT 4:25 TOMB RAIDER 3D (PG) (COARSE LANGUAGE,VIOLENCE) RECLINERS FRI-WED 9:20 A WRINKLE IN TIME 3D (G) (MAY FRIGHTEN YOUNG CHILDREN) RECLINERS FRI-WED 6:45 BLOCKERS (14A) (SEXUALLY SUGGESTIVE SCENES,NUDITY,COARSE AND SEXUAL LANGUAGE) RECLINERS FRI,MON-THURS 4:30, 7:10, 9:40; SAT-SUN 2:00, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40 A QUIET PLACE (14A) (FRIGHTENING SCENES,VIOLENCE) RECLINERS FRI,MON-THURS 4:00, 7:30, 9:50; SAT-SUN 2:10, 4:40, 7:30, 9:50 INDIAN HORSE (14A) (SEXUAL VIOLENCE) RECLINERS FRI,MON-THURS 4:20, 7:00, 9:30; SAT 11:20, 1:45, 4:20, 7:00, 9:30; SUN 1:45, 4:20, 7:00, 9:30 ISLE OF DOGS (PG) (VIOLENCE) RECLINERS FRI,MON-WED 4:40, 7:00, 9:30; SAT 11:30, 1:30, 3:40, 7:00, 9:30; SUN 1:30, 3:40, 7:00, 9:30; THURS 4:40 THE LEISURE SEEKER (PG) (COARSE LANGUAGE,VIOLENCE,SEXUALLY SUGGESTIVE SCENE) RECLINERS FRI,MON-WED 4:20, 6:15, 9:00; SAT-SUN 4:00, 6:15, 9:00; THURS 4:20 I FEEL PRETTY (PG) (COARSE LANGUAGE,NUDITY,SEXUALLY SUGGESTIVE SCENE) RECLINERS, NO PASSES FRI,MON-THURS 4:00, 6:30, 9:10; SAT 11:35, 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10; SUN 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: SEMIRAMIDE ENCORE () RECLINERS SAT 12:00 AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR 3D () RECLINERS, NO PASSES THURS 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:30 SUPER TROOPERS 2 (14A) (COARSE LANGUAGE,SEXUAL CONTENT,NUDITY) RECLINERS, NO PASSES FRI,MON-THURS 4:50, 7:20, 9:45; SAT 11:45, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45; SUN 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45 SGT. STUBBY: AN UNLIKELY HERO (PG) (VIOLENCE) RECLINERS SAT 11:10, 1:20; SUN 1:20 PUP STAR: BETTER 2GETHER () RECLINERS SAT 11:00 TIMON OF ATHENS - NATIONAL THEATRE OF LONDON () RECLINERS SUN 12:55

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To the editor, Re: Pipeline opposition is unconstitutional, Letters, April 12. The PM may be suggesting the pipeline is in the national interest, but it’s not. It’s in Kinder Morgan’s interests. They make the money. We the citizens of B.C. get to do the clean up when there are oil spills on land and ocean. It’s not like the oil industry has been good at cleaning up after themselves. Cleaning up the abandoned gas and oil wells in Alberta will cost the Albertan government approximately $8 billion. The court in Alberta ruled bankrupt oil companies’ remaining funds will go to pay creditors first and not the clean up of the oil wells, which

Thursday, April 19, 2018 A9

in many cases sit on people’s properties. Quebec has already signaled discomfort over Trudeau’s attitude towards pushing the pipeline through B.C. It’s a matter of provincial rights. This issue is not for the politicians and their financial supporters in the oil and gas industry to decide but rather the Supreme Court of Canada. Alberta and its foreign oil friends in the tar/ oil business can surely wait until the courts decide what the constitution has to say about all of this. As to the federal government’s threats to withhold money, sure go for it. My suggestion: levy fees on wheat and on everything coming through our harbours. We will have to make up the money somehow. Of course should the federal government go this route, other provinces may decide confederation isn’t such a good idea if the interests of foreign oil companies take precedence over the interests of the citizens of Canada. Is pandering to the interests of American oil companies and China really what Canada is all about? E.A. Foster Nanaimo

To the editor, I want Alberta to get its product to customers. I just do not want those of us on B.C.’s lower coast to take the largest part of the risk in shipping a toxic mix of bitumen and even more toxic dilutant to Alberta’s customers. The Salish Sea is a special place that cannot be put at any more risk. In the summer months there is nowhere better to boat or beachcomb and just enjoy the wildlife, including almost daily sightings of seals, dolphins, whales, kingfishers and eagles as well as many other fish, mammals and birds. The sea life in the area is abundant, especially in the many narrows which can have tidal currents making boating hazardous but creating an amazing environment for fish and plant life. Picture a very large tanker filled with toxic material trying to navigate these narrow tidal passages between islands in a storm. One mistake or equipment failure and the ship is pushed by the wind and strong currents onto one of the many jagged rocks that line our passages, torn open and leaking toxins into our waterways. There is no way to clean up this material – some sinks, lots of it washes up on the pristine beaches on every part of the Salish Sea’s coastline. There is no amount of money or technology that will bring our coast and its wildlife back to its previous state. I cannot judge whose economy is more important, that of the B.C coast or that of Alberta. But I do know that for me, and many others, our water and land are more important than any amount of money that can be put on the table. Daniel Lines Nanaimo

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B.C. Ferries Departure Bay-Horseshoe Bay Leave Departure Bay: 6:15 a.m. 8:25 a.m. 10:40 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 3:20 p.m. 5:55 p.m. 8:45 p.m. 10:10 p.m.

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*=except Sunday **=except Saturday ***=April 30, May 1-2, 7-9, 14-15 only ****=April 10-11, 17-18 only *****=April 5, 9, 12, 16 only ******=April 20, 27, May 4, 11 only

Government Sheila Malcolmson MP Nanaimo-Ladysmith 250-734-6400 sheila.malcolmson@ parl.gc.ca

Doug Routley MLA Nanaimo-N. Cowichan 250-245-9375 douglas.routley.mla@ leg.bc.ca

Leonard Krog MLA Nanaimo 250-714-0630 leonard.krog.mla@ leg.bc.ca

Michelle Stilwell MLA Parksville-Qualicum 250-248-2625 michelle.stilwell. mla@leg.bc.ca

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Nanaimo News Bulletin

www.nanaimobulletin.com

Thursday, April 19, 2018 A11

EARTH DAY

Opportunities exist to enhance community’s natural assets Continued from A3 The town priced out an engineered option, which would cost $4.5 million, and then looked at building upon the natural system and found by expanding some of the ponds and planting more trees, it could get the same service for $300,000, according to Machado.

It’s a good example of the importance of understanding what services nature provides in the community and the value of those services, he said. Lawrance believes the information from the pilot will help when the city looks at how to improve or enhance the value of the marsh with further restoration or

building upon the habitat. There are things that degrade the environment, like invasive species, and there are also opportunities to enhance the tree canopy or wetland around riparian areas. “Maybe those are costs we should be looking at to kind of factor in to help maintain and enhance the value of places

like this and perhaps this is something that gets blended into storm water utility at some point in the future,” Lawrance said. He doesn’t believe the city has the full picture for whether it’s possible to put a dollar value on natural capital in the same way as engineered assets, but said it’s a tool

for having a discussion with financial staff. “Before, they wouldn’t even let me in the room,” he said with a laugh. “It’s just not conventionally considered as part of financing or accounting practice but there are other communities that are starting to look at this now.” The city plans to build

on the study with a further assessment of community wetlands. The pilot study is also expected to be publicly available once complete. To read previous articles about the City of Nanaimo’s participation in the natural capital study, search www.nanaimobulletin.com. news@nanaimobulletin.com

NATIONAL VOLUNTEER WEEK IS APRIL 15-21 The Nanaimo & District BC SPCA

We would like to thank our many volunteers for all the hard work they have put in throughout 2017 and 2018! Without help from these wonderful people we would not be able to provide the level of care that we do. To our dogwalkers, cat and small animals carers, foster families and to those who simply help us maintain and clean the shelter we thank you. The donation of one’s time is such a valuable and selfless act and we so appreciate all of you. You make our jobs so much easier. Thank you! Learn more about volunteers online at: spca.bc.ca/branches/nanaimo

We wish to thank past, present & future volunteers. Without you we would not have been able to serve the community since 1985. – Sincerely, the Board and Staff of the Nanaimo 7-10 Club Society

7-10 CLUB SOCIETY SERVING PEOPLE WITH DIGNITY & RESPECT SINCE 1985 www.nanaimo710club.com/volunteer

250-714-0917

Thank you for joining The fighT Celebrating 37 Years in our Community Over15,000 15,000people people across BC and Over across BC and the the Yukon volunteer the Canadian Yukon volunteer for thefor Canadian Cancer Cancer It’s Society. It’sVolunteer NationalWeek Volunteer Society. National and Weeklike and thank all of for we’d to we’d thank like all oftoour volunteers ourimportant volunteers foryou thedo. great work the work Thanks to you they Thanks to you we can lead we cando. invest in life-saving research, invest prevention, in life-saving and cancer and research provide support prevention programs and by support services for people impacted cancer. people living cancer. Together we arewith stronger.

A huge THANK YOU to the 250 dedicated volunteers who donated 39,000+ hours of their time in 2017 supporting the work of hospice in our community. They provide support for the dying, their caregivers and families in their homes, care facilities, the

palliative care unit in the hospital, the work place and our Hospice Thrift Shoppe and here at Hospice House. We could not offer this support without the generosity of time and talent from these amazing and dedicated people.

Phone: 250-591-8811 Email: info@nanaimohospice.com 1080 St. George Crescent, Nanaimo, BC V9X 1S1 www.nanaimohospice.com


A12 Thursday, April 19, 2018

Nanaimo News Bulletin

www.nanaimobulletin.com

EARTH DAY

EARTH DAY

Work party organizers hope the city and residents will pull together to rip up invasive plant species. The city is hosting a new se-

Event is a reminder to respect the planet

City hosts work parties to pull up invasive plants ries of work parties targeting invasive plant species, which can negatively impact local ecosystems. English ivy, Scotch broom and Himalayan blackberry are

well-established in Nanaimo and other plants, such as knotweed and giant hogweed, are spreading. A Broombusters Work Party

will be held Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m.-noon at the Visitor InfoCentre along the Nanaimo Parkway. Visit www.nanaimo.ca for more information.

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Continued from A1 Brown said he worked to get vendors who are doing bee-friendly activities, which he said will demonstrate to students how to take the importance of pollinators to an action level. There will also be honeybees at Earth Day and a presentation on pollinators. “There’s the community coming together to celebrate, but also creating a feeling of empowerment to change our lifestyles and behaviors even if it’s just a little bit, to be aware of the importance of pollinators and local food and using less water and using less plastic,” said Brown. Community school coordinator Basia Henoch, who helped with the event, said everyone has experienced climate change at this point, that it’s very real and urgent. “We really have to be careful about how we treat the world around us so I think that anything that we can be involved in that respects Mother Earth is important,” she said. There will be many activities at Earth Day that are good for anybody and people don’t have to commit to the whole day; they can come by listen to music and visit the goats, said Henoch, who likes the work parties because the idea is to be of service to the Earth. “That is an important aspect so that people have that experience of connecting, or even if they don’t have time, but see that people are giving back to the Earth, I think that’s important,” she said. The event is by donation. It goes from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. April 21 at John Barsby Secondary School, 550 Seventh St. news@nanaimobulletin.com


Nanaimo News Bulletin

www.nanaimobulletin.com

Thursday, April 19, 2018 A35

EARTH DAY

New recycling regulations are ‘needed more than ever’ Continued from A1 “If we really want to get zero waste, I myself don’t think we can rely on people volunteering to do the environmentally friendly thing,” Gardner said. “I think we’d be far more effective if we can make it more of a reward that capitalizes on that positive behaviour… “If they’re more successful marketing and selling diversion and making it easy for you as a waste generator to divert your materials, they put more effort into providing services around that and that’s where we start to drive innovation.” Ben Geselbracht, vice-chair-

man of the Nanaimo Recycling Exchange and another member of the solid waste advisory committee, said he thinks the region has to put measures in place to move closer to zero waste because it won’t happen on its own. “With the requirements of having non-contaminated streams [of recycled material] and also people educated enough and then trained enough to do it, there’s a negative market pressure to accomplish that because it’s just way cheaper for everybody to throw it all in one bin and then ship it to landfill in the

CROSSWORD

States,” he said. Derek Haarsma, another advisory committee member and district manager of hauler GFL Environmental, said most buildings have recycling programs, but those programs vary. “Some will have to change dramatically because they’re not doing anything at all, but for the most part, there’s recycling programs everywhere and this would make it really easy, because every building [would be] exactly the same. In a lot of ways, it would make our life a lot easier,” he said. Enforcement under a new plan won’t be difficult, he said.

SUDOKU

The haulers “don’t want to have to be the bad guy” at the buildings, because they’re dealing with their customers there, but they won’t be happy about regular fines at the landfill, either, so they’ll co-operate and communicate with RDN staff and let the region take care of any compliance concerns. Gardner said the regional district’s current zero waste strategy costs $3.4 million a year and the measures in the new plan would raise costs to $4.9 million. If the board approves the solid waste management plan this spring, Gardner said the

Last Week’s Answers

next steps in 2018 would be ministry approval, consultation and requests for proposals, so residents probably won’t notice “substantive change until well into 2019.” Haarsma said there are a lot of haulers in Nanaimo and plenty of capacity to take on the additional recycling everyone wants to see. “Initially when you brought in recycling programs, it reduced your garbage costs. Now, that’s not the case and that’s the issue,” he said. “I think [this plan is] needed more than ever right now.” editor@nanaimobulletin.com

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Last Week’s Answers

CLUES ACROSS 1. Maintained possession of 5. Dropsy 10. Type of music 12. One who is deliberately cruel 14. 411 16. Rhode Island 18. Follows sigma 19. Baked dessert 20. Craftsman 22. Austrian river 23. Distributed 25. Close 26. Midway between east and southeast 27. Thunderstorm code 28. Where wrestlers work 30. Away from (prefix) 31. Canadian law enforcers 33. Shade 35. Sir Samuel __, Brit. statesman 37. Della __, singer 38. Existing in fact 40. Tennis matches have at least two 41. Reunifying Chinese dynasty 42. Not just “play” 44. Angry 45. Photomultiplier tube 48. Slovenly person 50. __ and Diu 52. Cologne 53. What actors deliver 55. Campaigned 56. Cash machine 57. Spanish be 58. Animal that eats insects 63. Colonists who

23. The best player 24. Male parent 27. Harm the reputation of 29. Allow for the tare of 32. Grand __: wine classification 34. Soak 35. Bother 36. Ophthalmologist 39. Preceded 40. __ Francisco, California 43. Touch gently 44. Lithuanian given name 46. Matched 47. Stomach 49. Mother of all gods in Scots’ Celtic mythology 51. Partner to cheese 54. Fit of irritation 59. Visit 60. Suffragist Wells 61. Swearing to the truth of a statement 62. Old Red Sandstone 64. Sacred Hindu syllable

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Earth Day - Nanaimo News Bulletin  

A special issue of the Nanaimo News Bulletin published April 19, 2018

Earth Day - Nanaimo News Bulletin  

A special issue of the Nanaimo News Bulletin published April 19, 2018

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