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b u k a m b i b i g

volume 01 / issue 04


About Bukambibig Bukambibig began as most things do - with a small group of people, and an idea. The idea was that good literature deserved not only to be written, but to be read - and read by all. Our shared dream was to bring performance poetry to Filipinos everywhere, and to ensure that literature exposure remained a two-way street: writers would be able to reach a wider audience, and readers would be introduced to works of poetry that they might otherwise not have known. We wanted to push the limits of accessibility that exist between writer and reader, by providing an avenue where the poetry is excellent enough to lend a voice to itself, and where the audience, unhampered by geography, can listen. Bukambibig is the country’s first multilingual and digital folio of performance poetry in Binisayå, Bikol, English, Hiligaynon & Kinaray-a, Ilokano, Pangasinan, and Tagalog written by Filipino poets residing in the country or in diaspora. We hope that with this folio, we will be able to bridge the performance to the page, one issue at a time.


Bukambibig Poetry Folio of Spoken Word Philippines Volume 01 / Issue 03 Copyright 2016-2017. Illustrations by Sofia Hurtado Bukambibig is the country’s first multilingual and digital folio of performance poetry in Binisaya, Bikol, English, Hiligaynon & Kinaray-a, Ilokano, Pangasinan, and Tagalog written by Filipino poets residing in the country or in diaspora. Authors retain copyright of their work. No part of this book may be reprinted or reproduced in any means whatsoever without the written permission of the copyright holder. Correspondence may be addressed to bukambibig.ph@gmail.com Creative Direction by Jose Chipeco Art Direction by Sofia Hurtado


Bukambibig poetry folio of spoken word philippines

volume

01 issue 03 : disAsters


FOLIO IMPRESSUM

Alton Dapanas General Editor

Roy V Aragon Ilokano Editor

Rina Garcia Chua Issue Consultant

Mark Anthony B Austria Pangasinan Editor

Mark S Angeles Vim Nadera Resident Consultant

Aivee C Badulid Waray Editor

Chesca Hurtado Managing Director Jose Chipeco Creative Director Sofia Hurtado Art Director

April Mae M Berza English Editor Jose Jason L Chancoco Bikol Editor Jesus C Insilada Hiligaynon & Kinaray-a Editor Joel Donato C Jacob Tagalog Editor Cindy A Velasquez Binisaya Editor


O P E R AT I O N S C L U S T E R

Chesca Hurtado Operations Head Meivelyn Caliboso Deputy Head Alton Dapanas Folio Editor Jose Chipeco Sofia Hurtado Design Loretta Anna Ariaga Socials Chloe Francisco Marketing & Finance


FOREWORD

‘the word ignore is a verb.’ Apprehension in the Spoken Word of Disasters Rina Garcia Chua University of British Columbia Okanagan There is a sense of urgency in Bukambibig’s anthology of disaster poetry that looms beneath the lines like another flash flood waiting to happen. At the same time, there is also a sense of curiosity that runs through the words like a thread that has yet to be unraveled. This curiosity oftentimes translates to a feeling of peace that I, at first, found troubling. How can half of the poems in this folio emanate a sense of calmness when disasters – whether figurative, literal, spatial, temporal, or experiential - beg for the swiftness of survival? The adrenaline has to keep running in these pages, I thought to myself as I perused the poems, we have to fight or flight. Yet, I am reminded of Rob Nixon’s concept of slow violence1: the unseen consequences of environmental disasters brought about by neoliberal third party corporations or communities that affect, mostly, the marginalized and, especially, the third world – us. I believe that the slow violence in this folio alerts of two things: first, that we have mastered traversing the innermost hurts of our memories in order to bear witness to what had happened, and second, that all the disasters remembered in these poems – volcanic eruptions, monsoon floods, category five typhoons, heat waves, storm surges, landslides – may have been survived (thus, the poems), but they are still killing us inside. Nixon further expounds slow violence using one word, apprehension, and says that the term itself draws together in one domain three things - perception, emotion, and action. To apprehend – to arrest – the disasters survived, there should be inquiry and testimony. It is plain in this folio that there indeed is an apprehension; the poems question the disaster, asking who is at fault or even who are you; the future is criticized, thinking if there is still one to look forward to; the nature of a disaster is also mitigated, wondering where it came from, why did it happen, and how will lives return to “normal” after such a catastrophe. However, what is imperative in this folio is that it testifies for/against2 the disaster. I believe in the power of testimony the Spoken Word holds – memory is created not only in the creative writing process, not even just in the publication of this folio on a digital platform, but in the moment that a spoken word poet stands behind a microphone, in front of a crowd, and performs. The performance shares the memory and stops the threat of forgetting.

Rob Nixon’s book, Slow Violence and the Environmentalism of the Poor, is a poignant inquiry into the endured suffering of those frequently ignored in ecocritical discourse – the postcolonial third world. It was published by Harvard University Press in 2011 and remains one of the critical idioms of ecocriticism. 1


And why not forget, you may ask? The effects of disasters, as documented in this folio, are monstrous. There is the blame that gets passed around until it lands on the “stranger,” a faceless nomad in our islands who comes and goes but always, always leaves enough memories that stay; there are the clipped words to remind us how the possibility of survival nowadays is bureaucratized – duck, cover, run or leave, evacuate, lives are at peril here, and the retired names that have become verbs in our vocabulary – na-Ondoy kasi; na-Yolanda; na-habagat ... and the surprise these disasters bring that either creates a survivor or a statistic. How delicious, temptingly so, it is to forget. Memory, Benzi Zhang3 reminds, is what allows a wide, enriching landscape for a writer to not only relocate the deep dimensions of their identities, but also to claim the feeling of collective awareness and self-consciousness. Memory, I argue, is what the poetry of disaster gifts us with – the sting of remembering and the erasure of forgetting. When these poems are performed in front of a crowd, a friend, or read by even the literary lurkers, what is remembered is that these disasters happened … and they can happen again. The lives lost are more than just statistics; they can be someone you know, someone you love. When these poems are performed, they bring the memories to a platform where they can be honored and shared. They also bring to life what has been killing us all along – may it be the guilt of survival or the wish of turning back the hands of time – and they allow the acknowledgment of these feelings so that, collectively, the healing can begin. Of course, it does not end there. For to be brave enough to remember is one thing, but to continue holding onto the memory is another. Kari Marie Norgaard4 has noted that, “to ignore is a verb. Ignoring something – especially ignoring a problem that is both important and disturbing – can actually take quite a bit of work,” and I agree with what she has said. What has been compiled here in Bukambibig’s Disaster folio is an upheaval against ignoring. These days, when climate change is no longer a stranger but an unwelcome acquaintance at the tips of our daily conversations, ignoring is a crime. We cannot risk ignoring what the memories of these disasters have been telling us all along – that we cannot fly away anymore; we have to fight. Not climate change, because you do not fight something that is abstract, and not the disasters – natural or manmade – because they will happen. What we have to fight against is ourselves. We have ignored the realities of these disasters for far too long. Here it is, if you have forgotten, right in our faces … all of them. Fight or flight? No, survive. Always, survive. Then, write. Kelowna, Canada 19 April 2017 I operate the prepositions for/against here to denote that disasters are not just enemies in the archipelago; we live within the Pacific Ring of Fire and disasters will happen. It is part of what I believe is our geographic destiny. That being said, the scale of disasters are those that we are against, for external or internal factors at the moment of a natural occurrence make a disaster a disaster worthy, tragically, of our words. 3 Benzi Zhang’s Asian Diaspora Poetry in North America, published by Routledge in New York, 2011, is one of the few critical anthologies that creates a discursive space for Asian diaspora and identity seeking/forming in the United States. 4 Kari Marie Norgaard’s book, Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions, and Everyday Life, published by MIT Press in 2011, is an exploration of how climate change affects everyday lives to the minutest of levels, especially as to how it is not seen as a concern for the future in most wealthy industrialized nations. 2


CONTENTS

DENNIS ANDREW AGUINALDO, Hatid

B A LT A Z A R L AY E S E , Tinahi-tahing Paglaum

JAN RUPERT ALFECHE , Disney Might Sue Me (Eeyore)

REA MA AC, Bakit Kay Lupit Mo

TENIZA LIANNE ANDUIZA, Little Changes

ARVIE JOY MANEJAR, Si Intoy

G MAE AQUINO, Endospore

V I N C E N T N AVA R E Z , Pakikipagsapalaran

JOH BALAONG, A l i n g Yo l l y

E L S I E C A B A L L E R O - PA D E R N A L , Yo l a n d a

J A N I N N C A B U G WA N G , Ispiho Kaagaw

MARITESS RULONA, Kampanang Kay Tibay

C H I N A P E A R L PA T R I A D E V E R A , Pagsusukat sa Baha M A R K D I M A I S I P, 1992, 1991, 1990 JUNE KIERVIN DIOSO, Basang Panggatong LORD JANE CABALLERODORDAS, Baha A D E VA J A N E E S PA R R A G O , I Still Shudder AMBER GARMA, one day, this poem will break your heart MARK JABRICA, banana manners in a painting session ARNOLD LAPUZ, Bisita

JULS RUZ, Catalyst KING VINCENT SALAZAR, Sigwa J O S E P H A L E E N S A LVA D O R , Abo Fo r t h e L a s t T i m e HERMIE SANCHEZ, Ruby (Hagupit) MAI SANTILLAN, Pagbiya KIRT JOHN SEGUI, Bisita RODA TA JON, D a k e s A Ta g t a g a i n e p S a P a g d a t i n g n g Ta g - u l a n RONALD TUMBAGA, Isda RICO VILLERE, Ku w a g o A t A n g M a a l i n s a n g a n g Mundo


disasters


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Hatid Dennis Andrew S Aguinaldo Makalipas itawid ang bawat bunso sa ibabaw ng panganay na katawan, darating at darating ang maghahatid ng tubig. Masasabi nating, “Oo, kahit husto pa” o di kaya’y “Hindi muna, gayong uhaw na ang mga silid.” Ang tanong na kung ilang gallon ay nais mong tumbasan ng, “Bakit, ano ba ang pagkakakilala mo sa kanya?” Samantalang gusto ko ng kalahating baso sana, muna, upang manigurado. “Wala kaming barya, iho,” ngunit nagkalat ang sobre. At ilan sa mga papel na ito ay salarin. Mababayaran ka namin, pero mag-iingat ka. Lumabas ka na, kami na ang kikilos. Mag-iingat ka sabi.

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Dennis Andrew S Aguinaldo • 2


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Disney Might Sue Me (Eeyore) Jan Rupert Alfeche Twenty-thirteen was the year Eeyore, in the form of dull rain clouds (cumulonimbus or nimbostratus? I can’t seem to tell the difference), decided to quietly stroll towards the city and make himself at home for awhile… A long while. The supposedly brief period he was to stay appeared to elongate, his grey, pillow-ish form folding across the sky as he settled in for a night… or two. Then three, four, five, six, a week, two weeks(!), more… It seemed to stretch on for ages. The city streets donned hoodies and thick rain-jackets to keep the cold from seeping in through their pores. Air-conditioning was a moot point: open a window and you’re good to go. Switching between a stifling, stuffy room and the incessant, cool atmosphere drove everyone, eventually, either edgy or inebriated. Which probably didn’t help matters for everyone else driving. This isn’t to say this lovely seaside city wasn’t used to the perpetual precipitation, it’s had its fair share of morose clouds, it’s just… how are we supposed to put up with Eeyore? He’s dampening everyone down on the last month of the year. Oh, did I forget to mention? It’s not spring-time this happened. I haven’t been entirely clear that this wasn’t in the States (admit it, ya’ll were thinking ‘SEATTLE’ weren’t you?), was I? Rain in the middle of winter sounds like hell to me 3 •

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besides, we have heating when the winter season rears its ugly head. Probably Seattle gets this kind of weather in Spring, but what does that matter? No, I’m talking a little closer to home, where the four winds were let loose a little more often than Eeyore’s month-long visit, more than we’ve been comfortable with. Hello! Eeyore stayed in CDO.

Jan Rupert Alfeche • 4


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Little Changes Teniza Lianne Anduiza The sun is high and in solitude on a blue canvass— a blue as light as cigar’s smoke. Beneath it laid the still and calm deep that crippled the wind and kept the sails rolled up clean. The heat slaps my cheeks, leaving a burning flush of red. The sea rolls down my forehead, tracing my outlines ever so gently. I swing myself on an outstretched hammock, with eyes gazing at the few green spades, looking at the gaps and spaces, and listening to the whisper of blown horns. I close my windows and sink in a pitch black slumber… The sun is high and in solitude on a blue canvass— a blue as light as baby’s breath. Beneath it laid the calm rolling deep that swayed the wind and hoisted the white sails. The heat brushes my cheeks, leaving a flush of soft red. The light breeze sweeps my forehead, tracing my outlines ever so gently. I swing on an outstretched hammock, with eyes gazing at the countless green spades, peeking through the gaps and spaces, and listening to the whisper of the waves. I open my windows.

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Endospore (a sung poem) G Mae Aquino They say the world is ending. They say the end is near, and I am done pretending that I don’t need you here. Before escape becomes too late Our course, you say, is clear: We must leave. Evacuate. Lives are at peril here. It’s time to stop denying the trouble that’s at hand: Storm clouds above are gathering; we built our homes on sand. You come for me with courage then brave the rain to clear the path for our entourage to reach the shelter near. We watch the rivers rising. Our houses? Swept away. The world we know is dying. Your faith? It does not sway. You keep me optimistic. Where do you get your cheer? I would have gone ballistic had I not had you here. For though this world is ending and home is not the same, I dream of new beginnings and live because you came.

G Mae Aquino • 6


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G Mae Aquino • 8


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Aling Yolly Joh Balaong Nakapanlilinlang na liwanag at katahimikan. May sumisigaw sa trompa na napadaan, Di naman namin naintindihan, Ano ba ang storm surge, ano ba ‘yan? Bigla na lang bumunghalit ang hangin! Malakas! Napakalakas! May dagundong! May pakpak lahat ng bagay... Parito't paroon. Parang inaani. Iniisa-isa ang bahay at lubi1. Kamuntik pa kaming madaganan. Si amang ay kawawa, bulag pa naman. Buti na lang siya’y maalam, At malakas kanyang pakiramdam. Iyong baha sa sumunod na baryo. Kinulong niya kami dito. Ilang araw pa kaya ito. Ilang linggo aabot itong tuyó? Ilang buwang walang bahay na matino? Ilang araw na walang damit na tuyo? Ilang linggong biglang natutulala ang mga tao Ilang taon kaya bago kami makatayo? Pero ‘di dito natapos ang delubyo, Ilang pulitiko ba ang sa amin pa'y nanggago? Ginamit ang pondong para sana sa tao. NGO lang ang nakarating sa liblib naming baryo. Hindi namin sila mahihintay. Kailangan naming magpatuloy! Kumain. Tumawa. Mabuhay. Kahit mahirap, kailangan sumikhay. Hindi kami tumutigil sa paggunita. Hindi lumilimot, lalo kaming nasalanta.

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Sa mga salimuot na aming naranasan. Gayon din naman sana ang pamahalaan. Gawin sana nila ang trabahong dapat lang.

Joh Balaong • 10


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Ispiho Janinn Cabugwang Ispiho Ispiho Hin-o an pinakamahusay Ha amon nga magburugto? Ako, hi Ate kun an am’ puto? “Hoy Inday!” Baraw han akon magurang. “Ano pa’t im’ ginhuhulat? Kay-ano ka pa dida napungko? Hasus! Nangispiho ka na liwat ha salog ano? Danay la kita kumanhi. Tara na, pangarigo!” Haguy! An akon pakiana waray kabaton Gin-anod usa la ka segundo hinin matin-aw nga ispiho. Makarigo nala anay lugod ako, Pagbalik ko sunod, mapakiana utro. Ispiho Ispiho Hin-o an pinakamahusay Ha amon nga magburugto? Ako, hi Ate… Anay! kay-ano diri ka na klaro? Naglubog na an matin-aw mo nga tubig Naglutaw-lutaw na an mga hugaw. Nawara na an imo kahusay Tikang pagbisita ko, unom ka bulan na an naglabay. Umuli ako nga masurub-on. Tumangis liwat an langit hin waray hunong Nabuong an kasinahon nga ginhinilom Gin-awas tanan nga kangaralson. Nag-iba an postura han ispiho Ginbuak an kabablayan ha iya kasubo. Gindanas tanan nga maagian, waray pasaylo. Nagsamwak an tanan nga taga baryo. Matarom bumulos an ispiho Halarom makasamad an iya bildo Tungod nga an iya kahusay gin-abuso, 11 •

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Nahimo hiya nga alok, gindaot an mga tawo.

Janinn Cabugwang • 12


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Kaagaw Janinn Cabugwang Hindi ko sineryoso Ang tinig ng mga paalalang Maghanda raw sa paghampas. Baka wala nang bukas. Hindi naman ako masyadong nangamba Inakala kong lilipas agad pagkatapos ng panunuya. Ngunit ang dating huni ng ibon, Biglang naging ungol ng pagbabanta. Luntian ay naging itim. Dating haplos ng hangin, Ngayo’y kumukurot sa balat. Lamig sa buto at kalamnan kumakagat. Nawala ang buwang ngumingiti. Bumuhos ang ulan ng matindi. Walang payong ang kakayaning sumalo, Sapagkat hindi ito matamis na patak o malamyos na tulo. Ito ay buhos ng galit. Mula sa ngayo’y tumitiling langit. Nagdabog ang tubig, biglang tumaas Hanggang sa lumubog ako makailang hampas. Nakabibingi sa ilalim, masakit ang di paghinga. Binabalot na ako ng dilim, nanlalamig sa kaba. Nang bigla akong nakaahon, nabuhay ang pag-asa. Sa malabo kong paningin, nakita ko ang pamilyar na mukha. Hinila ako ng aking sinta. Isinampa sa lumulutang na sanga. Ang dating tagabigay lilim, ngayo’y nagsisilbing huling pag-asa. Ngunit isang malaking alon ang dumating. Mahigpit niyang kapit, kumawala sa akin. Wala akong magawa kundi isigaw ang pangalan niya sa hangin.

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Sabi nila, mag-ingat ako sa mga ahas. Mang-aagaw daw sila, sadyang mapangahas. Ngunit mas marahas ang naging kaagaw ko. Tuluyang tinangay ang sinta ko. Natagpuan siya sa aplaya— Nakahilata, maputla, kaawa-awa, putol ang hininga. Wala akong masisi. Suntok sa buwan ang pagganti. Dahil ang may sala, Humupa at tuluyang nawala. Sa isang iglap biglang naglaho. Isa rin siyang biktima tulad ko. Hubad na langit ang siyang nagsisilbi kong bubong. Tanging pusong nasalanta ang natira sa akin ngayon. Mananatili itong bangungot Na hindi matatapos sa pagdilat. Sa hapdi at lalim ng sugat, Habang-buhay magiging pilat.

Jannin Cabugwang • 14


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Pagsusukat sa Baha China Pearl Patricia De Vera Nais kong sukatin ang baha, kung gaano kalalim ang tubig na lumunod sa mga gamit namin ni Nanay. Ilang tabo o balde kaya ang katumbas para mapalikas ang aming komunidad? Kung may tumbas na salita para sa mga naburang araw na ginuhit ko sa sementadong bakuran, sasapat na kaya ang pagkawala? Nagkakawalaan madalas sa evacuation site: bigas, kumot, delata, sabon, tubig at kahit sarili. Sinubukan naman ni Nanay, habulin ang kanyang bait, naunahan lang siya ng bahang lumamon noon kay tatay. Paano’t bubong lang ang tinira sa amin. Kailangan kong masukat ang baha, gusto kong malaman kung ilang dangkal ko pa kaya ang kakayanin kong lusungin.

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China Pearl Patricia De Vera • 16


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Sun-kissed, Windswept, Weather-beaten Mark Dimaisip In the Philippines, we jump over puddles after a typhoon. We gather clay from volcanic ash, making shapes that make sense. After the earth rumbles, we run to the wreckage, make do with the broken and assemble something whole. I was born in an Archipelago that spells disasters. It's 7100 islands born out of wedlock between 59 volcanoes and 1200 km of fault lines cleaving, transecting, intersecting like friction between lovers who love too much. When the earth is not shaking or spewing rocks, rain comes down hard, cleansing the country; lives, livestock and livelihood washed away to seas, to oceans, to points of no return. 1992. Before I've memorized names of my classmates, I've memorized names of typhoons: Asiang, Biring, Konsing, Ditang. And before I understood the mechanics of how storms would come and go, I learned that we have brownouts so we could have fun. The adults made sure that the raging storm is silenced by the joy that is happening inside the house. My cousins and I would race to see who could match the most candles. We would play with shadows and lights and rabbits and dogs and eagles and spaceships and when the light comes back on we would each get a candle, each sing, "happy birthday to you" even if it is nobody's birthday just so we could make a wish before blowing the candles out. We wished for less deaths. We wished for less flood. We wished for less damaged homes. But we never wished for less rain because we connect as a family when it rains. With candles and photo albums we learned how my lolo fought Japanese men during the second world war. With candles and instant noodles we learned how my lola fit three eggs, half a spoon of salt and one kilo of rice to feed a family of eleven. With candles while doing homework we learned how my mom and her siblings would climb three mountains everyday just to get to school. With candles and storm raging outside, we learned how to listen. And when the sun comes back on, we would run outside to play. We would jump over puddles after a typhoon, as if to say "it’s over" as if to say "we’ve won." 1991. I was only six when Mount Pinatubo became the world's second largest terrestrial eruption of the 20th century. It was the only recorded event to affect temperature at a global scale. Of course I didn't understand what was happening back then. All I knew was people were very afraid. All I knew was relatives from overseas were calling everyday. All I knew was the sky was gray; the clouds were gray; the streets were gray; the roads were gray; the rains were gray; the rainbows were gray. Adults told us to stay indoors; warned us to always carry an umbrella; cautioned us that something in the air could be toxic. But we were children. We see colors in the colorless. We gather clay from volcanic ash making 17 •

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shapes that make sense. And while we were only figuring out the difference between squares and rectangles and oblongs and circles, from the ashes, we were making complex prisms and detailed pyramids and perfect spheres. One hot August afternoon, adults called us to the streets. There were sightings of blue moons a few days back but it was barely evening so it shouldn't be that. When we stepped out we saw the most beautiful sunset that we've ever seen. A burning bursts of navy blue, violet, lavender, magenta, maroon, and all the other colors that I couldn't even pronounce or identify back then. We were given months of gray and gray and gray, but that afternoon we saw a rainbow colored sky. The heavens were electrified, screeching with life, and for a moment we all found peace. 1990. When the great Luzon earthquake hit us, the other kids and I, we were dancing. Our two left feet were zigzagging across the floor, arms flailing in graceless abandon while the world spins and the earth trembles beneath us. It wasn't until the adults screamed at us to take cover that we realized, this isn't supposed to be fun. For a month, Baguio was all that is being discussed. The earthquake has destroyed all the roads; there is no way to send in help. Convinced that there were no more survivors, international rescue operations have pulled out barely a week after the disaster. But we were too stubborn to accept defeat. That day I realized that there were no dead ends, only people who have given up. After the earth rumbles, we run to the wreckage, make do with the broken and assemble something whole. Our knees haven't even stopped shaking yet, but with trembling hands and steady hearts we picked up the shovels and started digging. Those weeks, there were no miners, no farmers, no students, no teachers, no mothers or fathers or brothers or sisters; there were only rescuers. And brick by brick, rubble by rubble, we started digging for what was lost. Under one ruin, we were able to recover two hotel workers after the eleventh day. And under the same pile, one man fought darkness and hunger and death for fourteen days. To this day, their stories are still being used as barometers for hope. We, the sun-kissed, the windswept, the weather-beaten, our stories are still being used as barometers for hope.

Mark Dimaisip • 18


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

I was born in an Archipelago that spells disasters. It's 7100 islands born out of wedlock between 59 volcanoes and 1200 km of fault lines. But we are also 100 million people strong; 100 million people surviving and 100 million people ready for more. In the Philippines, we jump over puddles after a typhoon. We gather clay from volcanic ash, making shapes that make sense. After the earth rumbles, we run to the wreckage, make do with the broken and assemble something whole.

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Mark Dimaisip • 20


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ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Basang Panggatong June Kiervin Dioso Walang pagdiriwang bukas. Walang misa sa parokya. Walang malinaw na bakas. Wala pang umuulang biyaya. At hindi malaya ang mga batang makagawa ng bangka dahil tinangay na ng agos ang notebook at bag na magagamit sana sa eskwela. Bale wala pa. Bale, wala pa ring pasok sa makalawa, pero ‘di masaya ang mga bata. Dahil hindi naman sila ang nagdasal na, “Sana, sana umulan! Sana umulan bukas.” Bukas, umulan sana ng biyaya. Gulong naman ng trak ang bumakas. Malamnan ang mesa ng mga bakwit sa parokya. Ngunit hindi malaya makapapasok ang mga trak dahil dumausdos ang mga bato mula sa bundok at nangahulog ang mga punongkahoy na ‘di pa nakokolekta ng mga trak Ay! Napurnada pa! 21 •

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Ang mga kahoy na sana, na sana ay nakalakal pa sana ng malalaking kumpanya. At nasa’n na ang sisi? Pasan sa bandang huli ng mga tagaroong panggatong lang ang pakay. Pakay na panggatong na inagaw at pinanakot. Ang iba’y pinakulong, na wari ba’y bulong ang mga sigaw na kinolekta ng hangin maihatid man sa patag ay wala rin. Dahil tatlo ang nakaumang na mga panganib: ang baril na nakatutok sa bibig, o tubig na lulunod, o putik na maglilibing sa ‘di makabangong mga ina at mga bata, na tinakasan na ng ulirat. Nakaluluhang dumilat. Basa na ang papel ng nangagbalewala sa baha.

June Kiervin Dioso • 22


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ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Baha Lord Jane "Lagdungan" Caballero-Dordas Baraghal nga baras kunina pa sa wakwak, Ada pa sa nagailog nga mga sapa kag suba, Masinaw nga tubig ada pa nga inmilig, Nagasinanisani i mga isda, kagang, urang kag banag, Tubig nga nagailig halin sa tuburan makabuul kauhaw. Inmano nga kabtanga anong kahistoraha? Hinali nga gindara ka daganas gadugmon nga rurok, Mapintas nga hitabo gaguba ka dunang manggad, Malawig nga panahon nga gintipigan ka mga tigda Insa’t karon sa masami nagaabot ang kakugmat ka baha? Mal-am run magurang i kalibutan? Ukon bangod sa katawhan nga hangad mag-umwad i parangitan-an? Sin-o magaantos dulot ka mahugakumon nga katuyuan? Sin-o magaagum ka pag-antos tuga ka makaharalit nga gumontang? Indi bala wara’t iba kundi kita tanan? Daw kasan-o lang nga nami, matinlo ang suba sa bukid ukon patag, Dukaron kalbo ang bukid, sa pagkarako nga basura sa siyudad, Ginputos ka plastik ang palibot, lapnagon ang pulusyon, Kita tanan may problema, may sarabton? San-o naton sabton ang pagpanghangkat? Sin-o magasapupo ka pagbag-o?

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Lord Jane Caballero-Dordas • 24


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

I Still Shudder Adeva Jane H Esparrago I still shudder On rainy evenings. I remember the sound Of scratching on wood. Like a dog begging to come in. But my dog is right beside me As I slept on the rattan sofa. The scratching grew louder. I am more awake now. The stranger entered, Damaging everything he touched. Leaving traces on the wall. I watched, with eyes wide open. The stranger touched my ankles. Then my knees. As he made his way up my legs, I found the courage to run. The bed was floating. Run. The table topples and crashes. Run. The dog whimperedThe stranger has taken control Of our house. Run. The stranger is at my hips now, And he's tugging me. Tugging me away From my parents who Are still swimming in their sleep. "Wake up!" Bloodshot eyes dart Left and right. They see the stranger everywhere. We run. 25 •

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The stairs are our savior. One step, two, three, four, We're safe for now. Lights flash. Rescue? No, it's a taxi carried By the current. I peek at the White fingers, Holding on for dear life. Gripping slippery steel. The stranger is greedy, He has taken everyone's homes. I remember the screaming. Then the silence. Then wishing That the shouting would come back. But there's no going back For everyone. There's no going back For anyone. I remember the morning after. My mother walked with us. Made us bow our heads, As if in prayer. "Don't look." She said. But in the corner of my eye I can see everything. Hands that once touched. A small doll A child must have loved. A father and son In tight embrace, But a father's arms Can only do so much. Adeva Jane H Esparrago • 26


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

What dreams did they have? What dreams have they lost? What dreams are left? So do not ask me Why I still jump At the sound of thunderclaps, Or shut my eyes As lightning Tears up the sky. I still shudder On rainy evenings. Even if the body forgets The cold of the water. The smell of damp earth. The mind Will always remember The thief in the night. The stranger in our home. Yes, I still shudder on rainy evenings. Do not ask me why. Listen with meFor my ears are strained, Waiting for the sound Of the stranger Scratching at our door.

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Adeva Jane H Esparrago • 28


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

one day, this poem will break your heart Amber Garma people peak towards a particular point in their lives where they’re allowed to not be angry anymore, even when soldiers die in their sleep and no one’s done nothing to not kill the great barrier reef they can talk about peace, and that’s okay, that’s the dream, a crown and three elections away. for now I’m a murderess because I eat meat and I’m okay with it because my guts aren’t spilled out on the street any way you see it, you’re blind to something. for now quiet quotes catch up to me, shrapnel of speech about how this is such a good world we have no idea and once we see it as that, my god, we’ll be such good people but I’m not Malala or MLK or Mandela my words are blasts of air. even when it’s this way I’ve learned to care they say I’m too young to have yet be troubled with truth as if it ever gets easier to read the damn news they think I don’t think about these things? people’s bodies are blocks of print pressing to the rhythm of keyboard clacks like it’s normal my friends are shooting friends through invisible windows like it’s personal like as a person, you’re either taking life away, like a light, or you’re thrusting us all upon darkness. for now can’t it be because I don’t fear you? you sponsors of death, like I’ve done for the rest, I can like you? i can make you (like) me? can’t i be made famous and want to make people happy and have that be enough? for now I’m better sad than hollow, so I flip the pages, they say one day the gray catches on your elbows and you don’t know an ear from an epitaph. one day it’s still the same war we’ve been winning from the start except you never did become one of those people. one day they’ll need your scholarship to do its damn part, and cave, one day, this poem will break your heart.

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Amber Garma • 30


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

banana manners in a painting session Mark Jabrica golden bananas were piled up by the man, a former amorsolo fan on the unloved rattan tray exported from the south a million trees beheaded, valence of sentiments then a lady, whose hair has faded, came, curled her eyebrows she’s looking for discipline, poetics in the marketplace the bananas all smiled at the sight of her lumpy body ‘no politicking…’ fruit of eve lord of accent ‘or bathe in hell’ they said —the greatest advertising ever

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Bisita Arnold Lapuz ‘Di ko kailanman malilimutan ang pagdating. Tumataghoy ang hangin sa 'yong paglapit. Napapako ang mga tingin namin sa nagngangalit na langit habang lumuluha ng dahon ang mga puno sa paligid. Taon-taon ka naman kung bumisita ngunit ‘di masanay at laging puno ng pangamba. Lumalakas kang lalo sa bawat pagbalik. Nakapanghihilakbot na tunay ang ‘yong bagsik. Pananahimik ang hiling sa pagpikit ng mga matang alam naming dudungaw sa bingit. Ilang oras ka ring maglalagi sa bayan naming matagal na ngang sawi. Hanggang mapusukan mong lisanin kami saka magpapakita ang araw na hinawi. Tatanawin namin ang pinsalang binitbit Mangingiyak habang nagliligpit Isasalba ang maaari pang magamit. Babangon kahit namimilipit.

Arnold Lapuz • 32


BUKAMBIBIG

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Tinahi-tahing Paglaum (pahinungod alang sa mga igsuon natong nakalingkawas sa katalagman) Baltazar A Layese Nilurang na ang ulan, Apan nagpabiling basa ang mga matang napuno sa luha. Mikalma na ang haguros sa hangin, Apan nagpadayon og kusog ang mga panghupaw sa kahanugon. Misidlak na ang adlaw, Apan makanunayong bugnaw ang kadasig sa pagbangon. Nipahilayo na ang bagyo, Apan wala pa nahanaw ang kakulba sa dili matino nga kaugmaon. Utang buot, Pintala sa makausa pa ang nawong sa paglaum. Ikulit pag-usab sa akong dughan ang mihanap niyang panagway. Suginli ko sa tukmang hinungdan Aron akong hulmahon og balik ang nagupok kong mga pangandoy. Hatagi ko sa igong kadasig Aron makigharong sa laing higayon sa mga pagsulay. Kon mahupay lang sa hugot kong gakos ang imong kasakit, Dili ko magmakuli sa pagpaambit. Kon matagbaw lang sa akong balak ang samaran mong dughan, Dili ko mohunong sa pagpatik sa akong dalit. Apan nasayod ko nga dili sarang ang tanan. Tugoti ko nga moagak sa imong mga kamot, Ug atong tahi-tahion ang naggusbat mong paglaum. Tinuod, sakit ang duslak sa dagom ug duot sa hilo Apan kining tanan angayan masinati ug matagamtaman. Aron makita nato ang mga bililhong hinungdan, Nga nagpahipi luyo niining katalagman.

Baltazar A Layese • 34


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Bakit Kay Lupit Mo Rea Maac “Magsipaghanda kayo, may bisita tayo,” ang sabi ni itay. Darating ka raw sa pagsapit ng gabi Lahat ay aligaga at sadyang hindi mapakali Ligpit dito, balot doon, pukpok dito, tukod doon. Napaka-espesyal mo; bukod tanging ikaw lang Ang bisitang dala ay takot at agam-agam. Idudulot mo’y walang katiyakan— Malaking palaisipan at puno ng katanungan. Gabi na, unti-unti na nga kitang nararamdaman. Ihip ng hangin ay tila sumusuot sa aking kalamnan. Parang nais butasin ng pagbugso ng ulan ng aming bubungan. Dagundong ng kulog, tila isang napakalaking pasabog, Kasabay ng pagguhit ng kidlat sa kadiliman ng ulap. Isa, dalawa, tatlo... Tatlong oras na ang nakalipas pero tila wala kang kapaguran Sa paghagupit ng malakas ng hangin at pagbuhos sa malalaking patak ng ulang tila ikaw ba ay inuupahan. “Panginoon, huwag mo po kaming pababayaan,” ang tangi kong nausal. Sapagkat higit sino man ay siya lamang ang tanging makakaalam. Hatinggabi na at mulat pa rin ang aming mga mata, nais maging handa sa panganib na iyong dala. Naramdaman kong tila nababasa ang aking mga paa. Bakit kaylupit mo, ngayon, loob ng bahay namin ay baha na. Pero teka bakit parang dinuduyan ang aming kabahayan? Ulan, hangin, baha, hindi ka pa nakuntento. Bakit kaylupit mo pati lindol ibinigay mong regalo? Ang duyan ay lumakas na tila bahay namin ay nais bumagsak. Mga kaldero, kutsara sa kusina ay nagkalampagan. Bakit kaylupit mo, hanggang saan ka patutungo? Bakit kaylupit mo? Paghinto mo ay hindi matanto. Sa isang iglap, bubungan namin ay lumiwanag, Inakala kong umaga na ngunit hindi pa. Bubong namin ay nilipad mo, dingding na nagpagiwang-giwang. Sa ilalim ng mesa, doon kami ay nagsikubli upang maiwasang ang hagupit ng ulan 35 •

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at sa pangambang kami ay mahulugan ng mga bagay na nagliliparan. Langitngit sa paligid, tila ba galit na galit. Puso namin sa pag-aalala ay tigib. Oh, bagyo bakit ba ikaw ay kaylupit? Tahanan namin ngayon ay paano, bakit kaylupit mo? Sa pagsapit ng umaga,aking nasaksihan Bangungot na kapalaran nitong kapaligiran Nakapanlulumo, lungkot ay walang pagsidlan Pananim ni Itay, nasira ng tuluyan, Palayang napuno ng tubig-ulan. Mga punong natumba at nakaharang sa daan— Tahanan ng kapitbahay, lugmok na't tila wala ng buhay. Hinagpis at tangis, dulot ng iyong pagsapit. Delubyong dumaan sa isang iglap, pinsala’y hindi matawaran. Paano aahon, saan magsisimula? Ilan pa bang katulad mo ang sa amin ay manggugulo? Ilan pa bang kasinlupit mo ang aming haharapin? Makatarungan ba? Nararapat bang ito ay aming danasin? Ikaw ba o ako, ang dapat sisihin? Bakit kaylupit mo, sino ba ang salarin?

Rea Maac • 36


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Si Intoy Arvie Joy A Manejar Ako si Intoy. Isa ako ka Tumandok sa kabukiran sang Calinog. Malayo-layo pa amon balay, talakdon, Pila pa ka barangay ang imo lakbayon. Ang amon payag gamay lang gid, Napalibutan ka nanarisari nga mga puno. Indi ka magsiling nga sa bukid lang ako nagatinir. Bay, nagapanaog man kami, Nagasaka-bukid kag nagapanaog liwat para makaeskwela. Sa payag kami ginatudloan, wala pader, indi sementado, Wala mga libro, manila paper lang ni Ma’am. Isa lang ka semana nagakadto mga maestra sa amon Kay kuno malayo, mainit kag makapoy. Pero ginahulat ko gid ila mga hitsura sa kada bulan, Luyag ko gid magtuon kag mag-alam. Kon magtaas amon grad, sa pihak-barangay kami nagakadto. Gasimpon sa mga taga-banwa sa eskwela

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Arvie Joy A Manejar • 38


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Pakikipagsapalaran Vincent Navarez Ang pagdilat ng talukap ng mata— Sa pasada ng nagraratrat na alikabok tuwing umaga; Nakasanayang uhog at peste na naglipana, Makukulay na banderitas ng sampayan na pinagpipiyestahan ng naglalakihang langaw. Ang pagbukas ng tainga— Sa plema ng nangngangalit na ingay ng bunganga. Sigaw dito, sigaw doon; Nakabibinging putak ng kapitbahay, kaliwa't kanan. Ang pagsinghot ng butas ng ilong— Sa bumubulusok na samyo ng basurang gabundok At hangot ng nagkalat na rugby at upos ng sigarilyo Na bumubungad sa pagbukas ng durungawan. Ang pagdampi sa balat— Sa pagdampot ng mga plastik at latang nakabara sa imburnal; Nangingitim na pulbos at hanging kumakapit sa katawan. Ang paglasa ng namumutlang dila— Sa hibla ng de-lata at kakarampot na kaning pilit inutang sa kalapit-tindahan; At paglasap sa tuyong tira pa ng hapunan, Makaraos lamang ng umagahan ang tatlong-kapat na dosenang miyembro ng bahay. Ganito ang ikot ng buhay— Kapos sa paglagak ng laman sa sikmura. Magulong komunidad, walang kongkretong kaayusan; Nakakatakot at nakakatuliro ang nagbabadyang pagkalam. Ngunit kailangan ang lakas at tuso upang makaraos, Kailangan ang tumindig at humakbang sa mga baitang upang makatulay, Magtiis sa mga latay at hagupit ng latigo ng araw-araw na pagkabuhay. Ganito ang palad ng buhay— Ang buhay na disastro at kapahamakan; Ang buhay na paligsahan. Kung mandato ang makipagbunong-braso sa paligsahan ng pagligwak sa kapahamakan, Malamang, buong araw na lamang haharap sa arenang lamesa upang makalaya sa unos. Ngunit hindi— 39 •

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Dahil ang buhay ay paligsahan sa pagalingan ng pakikipagsapalaran; Sa pagtaya't pagsugal ng barahang kapalaran maging pag-ayon ng tadhana, kapaligiran, at kalikasan. Kaya kung ang mundo na ang lumikha ng kapasiyahan, Huwag nang bitawan; lumipad palayo sa hawla Tangan ang pag-asa at kabutihan.

John Carlos D Evangelista • 40


BUKAMBIBIG

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Yolanda Elsie "Lamingan" Caballero-Padernal O mga senyores, inyo pamatii akon igaasoy masubo nga komposo, Sa Rehiyon Bisayas, Pungsod Pilipinas may hitabo tuman ka lakas, Biyernes nga adlaw, Sabado pagkaaga, ikawalo ka Nobyembre, dos mil trese, Bagyong Yolanda nag-atake, indi matupungan ang kabaskog nga pwerte. Ika-siyam nga takna, hangin nag-umpisa mga katawuhan nagsinalasala, Anhon ta lang abi hay alang-alang run, wara it mahimo mga biktima, Iwanon ta run lang hangin nagangurob, wara’t patawad kaakig mabaskog, Mga kahoy kag pamalay ginpangtumba, imol kag manggaranon ginsararama. Sa Isla Panay ginatos nagkaramatay, sa Norte ka Iloilo ang mata kang bagyo, Pay ya anang ulo sa Capiz, kag Antique kag Aklan ana man nga ginhapitan, Sa Tacloban, Leyte, pinakamakaruluoy ang mga pamalay una gin-atake, Gilayon ginbulos evacuation center ka baha kag hangin wara ginpaurihi. Sa andang karsada mga patay gahinanlag, nagtarangison ang banwa, Paano ilubong ang sobra lima ka libo ka yadto nga tiempo? Ang halit ka bagyo sa biktimang Filipino - balatian, gutom, kasubo, kunsimisyon, Wara parangabuhian, wara man iristaran, pirit ginpakigbatuan ang nadangtan. Hanggod nga pagturun-an nga sa tion ka bagyo indi magpabuyanbuyan, Nagakaangay nga pagahandaan ang ano man nga sahi ka kalalat-an, Wara ma ti madura kon mag-aligmat, mag-andam, mangin handa ang tanan, Sa pag-atubang sa trahedya nga kon kaisa kita man ang may kahimuan.

Elsie Caballero-Padernal • 42


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Kampanang Kay Tibay Maritess Rulona Makasaysayang pook sa Sugbu, Parating dinadayo ng mga deboto. Pananampalataya nila ay nagpapatotoo Na walang makakapigil ni delubyo. Minsan na ring niyanig ni Siyete, Ang pinakalumang simbahang ito. Bumigay ang kampanang de torre, Humandusay sa tibag-tibag na bato. Sa panahon pa ng mga Kastila, Naipatayo ang Minore de Basilica. Maraming taon man ang lumipas, May iilang pagbabago ang dinanas. Ngunit sa isang iglap ay bumigay, Kampanang Kastilang sobrang tibay. Patunay ito na sa ganti ni kalikasan, Magkapantay, bahay man o simbahan.

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Catalyst Juls Ruz The way she looked at me was the spark That began the wildfire, orange flames Eating their way across my skin To places even the highest flood can't reach Her every footstep was a tremor in the earth Signalling her presence, even from miles away And sending waves, higher than mountains Crashing into formerly landlocked plains She was a heatwave in the frozen north Melting ice caps, raising the sea In the drought, she was the monsoon rain Slaking thirst, but bringing lightning with her In time, her flames carved blackness into my skin Her rain, once welcome, now drowning Her heatwave passing, ebbing like her tidal wave Leaving only blizzards, wreckage, and finally, ruin The days turned to months, months into years Trees sprung from black scars to reach for the sky A land once ravaged, slowly healing Time may have passed, but I will not forget.

Juls Ruz • 44


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Sigwa King Vincent Gaudine G Salazar Naluom ang maiinit na hangin Sa lupaing tigang sa dugot pawis, Napispis ang payat na nilalang, Nilamon nang mapanlinlang na putik! Banlik! Tudlik! Talsik! Tumilapon ang ipokritong hayop sa bukid, Umiikot ang hangin na tila nagngangalit, Hanggang sa ang mga ulap ay unti-unting pumikit… Malamig ang bangkay, May patay, Ay, Anong sanhi ng pag-alimbukay? Ang tao! Ang tao! Ang siyang pinagmulan nito! Siya ang salarin? Siya ang nakatingin? Siya ang sumaksi? Siya ang may kasalanan… Nang lahat ng sakuna at paglikha ng sigwa! Nawasak na ang ganda ng kalikasan, Mula sa sinumpamg gahaman! Huwag mong itanggi mangmang, Kaisa ka niya sa paglalaro ng kapalaran. Isa ka ring manlilinlang, na ang biyaya ng Diyos ay yinurakan! Sanggahin mo ang sigwa na ‘yong nilikha. Ang bagyong dumadaluhong, Ang lahat ng sakit mula sa iyong kapabayaan, Damhin mo ang haplit ng habagat, Higupin ang nangingitim na hangin, Namanamin ang pagkasira ng lahat, At ang pagkawala nang buhay ng mga nilalang. Huwag kang tatakas sa iyong kagarapalan! Huwag kang magrereklamo na akala mo walang kang alam! At huwag na huwag kang iilag dahil ikaw mismo ang lumikha niyan!

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King Vincent Gaudine G Salazar • 46


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Abo Joseph Aleen S Salvador Sa gitna ng gabing tahimik, sa loob ng isang lumang bahay, naiwan ang isang kandilang nagbabaga. Sa pagtapik ng kadiliman, ito’y natumba at muli akong nabuhay. Ikinalat ko ang aking presensya at naramdaman ng bahay ang takot. Wala man taong naroroon, ngunit ang mga alaala’y buhay pa, at ito ang aking pakay. Tinunaw ko ang mga plastic na bulaklak, binasag ang mga litratong naiwan. “Mga sinungaling…” aking nasambit. Sinunog ang mga sertipiko at diploma sa loob ng kanilang mga kwarto. “Ang mga ito’y walang halaga,” nasabi ko. Sa kusina, nakita ko ang isang kutsilyong nababalot ng kalawang at dugo. “Isang napakaruming lanseta” bulong ko. Sa aking paghawak, nanginginig ang bahay. Sa aking paghinga, nasisira ang nakaraan. Ngayo’y ang bahay ay isang libingan na dinaluhan ng mga nagising, mga matang nanonood na lamang sa aking masuyong paghihiganti. Ako’y tumingin sa buwan at mga tala at unti-unting naglaho kasama ang makapal at maitim na usok. Sa halip na abo ang matira, dumaloy ang mainit na dugo.

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For the Last Time Joseph Aleen S Salvador Through her bloody bandages that cover her cracked porcelain face, she sees how every soul wail on the surface of parched hope. Robed in ragged eternal white, she smells the poison and fumes floating on the ashen air, slowly losing the blessed oxygen. She steps on a human cadaver, eyeballs eaten by crows, but instead of being horrified, her eyes show tired apathy. Flora and fauna become merely terms that remember a small paradise; here, water is boiling blood, and food is the guts of others. As her filthy hair waves with the wind, she looks up to see if there is a sun; on the other hand, she sees a black hole consuming the remains of the past. She raises her hands, trying to hallucinate a promise: tender loving care on the hands of those who left generations. Yet, she cries the tears of power, and with her final words, she lost essence. Take me to highest abstraction.

Joseph Aleen S Salvador • 48


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Ruby (Hagupit) Hermie Sanchez ayaw ako bilngi hin kalooy yana nga panahon nga damo an nagruroydoy ayaw ako bilngihin hiyom yana nga panahon nga damo an masurob-on ayaw iglatag it im bisyo panruba— an am umhanan an am kalubian an am kamaisan an am kapayagan an am kabalotohan an am pantalan an am kakalsadahan an am sarayawan an am eskuylahan bis makadali la pahudma lugod ako hin higayon makagsaad ha matam-is mo nga ngaran makapanumat ha kadam-an nga bisan ano nga kataragman— mabagyo, malinog, o mabaha man— maupay it’ nag-aandam.

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Pagbiya Mai Santillan Tutoki ang bungbong. Ang mga gidibuho nimo niadtong bata pa ka nahimo nalang halap na subay sa Crayola. Nakadlit na kini sa delubyo nga wala nato damha. Ang atong mga sapatos ug tsinelas, Mga vinyl ug cassette, Mga kaldero ug kalan, Naanod na sa pita. Kinahanglan na natong putoson og mantalaan ang mga baso ug piloon na ang mga nabiling sinina aron isulod sa mga karton. Buhii ang mga handurawan nga gababag sa gilaraw nga paghawa. Karon lang ni. Laomi lang nga bisan asa man ta mahimutang, aduna kay puluy-anan kanako.

Mai Santillan • 50


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Bisita Kirt John Segui Dumating ka Habang tahimik na nagmamatyag Ang aandap-andap na mga bituin. Pinakawalan mo sa himpapawid Ang sunod-sunod na buntong-hininga. Napalitan ng ginaw ang alinsangan. Kinumutan mo ang langit Ng makapal at maitim na lambong. Binulungan mo ang lupa Na maging handa sa iyong pagluluksa. Dumating ka Upang ibuhos ang hinanakit. Pumatak ang mga pinong luha Sa yero at bubong na pawid. Ginising mo ang dagat Nakipaglaro ka sa mga alon. Sabay kayong hiningal Pinasayaw mo ang matitikas na puno. At litong inihele ng dagat Ang mga bangka sa kaniyang sinapupunan. Dumating ka Dinalaw ng luha mo ang mga tahanan. Naging lagaslas ang mga patak At unti-unting inabot ang langit. Matagal kang namalagi. Pinilay mo ang mga bundok. Binuwag ang matatayog na tore. Isa nang kayumangging lawa Ang kaninang pawisang lupa. At naglalayag ang mga biktima. Dumating ka. At sa iyong pag-alis Nagising ang malamlam na araw. Nalantad ang iyong alaala. Sa iyong pag-alis Dinala mo ang maraming pangarap. Kinuha mo ang sanlaksang hininga. Dumating ka

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At sa iyong pag-alis Iniwan mo ang aming kaluluwa.

Kirt John Segui • 52


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Dakes A Tagtagainep Roda Tajon Pumigpigsa a pumigpigsa ti angin. Mapatayabna saan laeng a dagiti mulmula, Sabsabong ken pinuon kaykayo. Karaman pay dagiti bobeda, bubongan Ken tattao! Pumigpigsa a pumigpigsa dagiti dalluyon, Kasla higante a makapungtot, Saan a makateppel: Rinebbana dagiti balay Dinadaelna dagiti pagay Inyanud ken inlibasna Dagiti arapaap… Nargaay ti daga manipud kadagiti bantay. Kasla agkakaribuso a kabalio Naitabon dagiti biag Naipumpon dagiti kari Ti biag nga agnanayon, Gapu iti awan sarday a pananggamrud Dagiti ganggannaet ken agum a negosiante! Gapu kadagiti agtuturay nga agbibisin Ken manglimlimo! Agsagana, agsagana! Sumupiat, lumaban! No kayat pay a maisalbar ti masakbayan! No kayat pay a makariing Iti tengnga ti nakabutbuteng a batibat! Piman, ay!

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Disasters


DISASTERS

Sa Pagdating ng Tag-ulan Roda Tajon At bumuhos ang ulan, malakas, malakas, malakas na malakas. bumuhos, umagos, dumilig sa lupang tigang na tigang. Sumingaw ang init sa lupa. maalingasaw. Mahapdi sa balat. At bumuhos ang ulan, binura nito ang mga bakas ng tag-araw, inanod, inanod, habang umaapaw ang tubig sa kalsada, tinunaw ang mga alikabok, na nanuot sa dahon, halaman tulad ng mga alaalag pilit itinatabi at isinasalanan upang manatili, at bumuhos ang ulan, nagngangalit na ulan. Minsan pa, hayaang isalba kahit iilang putik na nakamantsa sa damit dulot ng paglaya sa tag-araw, bukas makalawa’y tiyak wala na maski isang matitirang bakas.

Roda Tajon • 54


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Isda Ronald Tumbaga Nakapaniningkit ang alat ng dagta sa taklap ng isda, Paano maaapula ang natutupok nating baga? Nasusulasok ang lalim ng mga gubat Sa palitong kasakiman, Kapalit ng minimina, sa laot na may ginto. May galimdim ang taal, nag-aapoy na bato, Pagbutlak ng dinamitang bulkan, Pagtindig ng ipo-ipong malabay, Tiyak ang pagbangon ng poot Sa putik na may namumuting mata; Pabulong na sisipa ang daluyong, Kita'y mangangalisag na mga damong Ibabaon sa ibabaw ng sarili nitong puntod; Magpipinid ang araw Sa pintuan ng nilamong mga ilog, aplaya't dambuhalang mga dam; Sa sihay ng ating sisiran, O bukal ng buhay sa kamalig ng baog na palay, Magsisimbangis tayo ng tubig at maantot na langis, Wala kitang masisilungan, walang mapanighawan, Wala kitang mananalbos sa lawa ng ating kabataan. Sa ganitong paghahamok, ng basura at dagat, Sina lapu-lapu, tawilis at sinarapan ang binabaugan. Kumilos tayong iisa gaya ng mga isda, Pagbubo ng dagtang-tagumbabaw mulang ulap, Hihingang muli ang putik na sisidlan, Babalik tayo sa anyong-magsasakang Mga semilya ng Inang-Kalikasan. Pag-ibig ang kalikasan, ito ang kaniyang tahanan, Walang hindi mabibiyayaan, Sa salpukan ng bagyo at mga kulubot, Naruruon ang pag-ibig.

55 •

bukambibig ph

Disasters


DISASTERS

Ronald Tumbaga • 56


BUKAMBIBIG

ISSUE 3 • VOLUME 1

Kuwago At Ang Maalinsangang Mundo Rico Villere Muli kong ikakampay itong abuhing pakpak, At lalakbayin minsan pa yaong alapaap; Sa masukal na gubat ako ay maghahanap, Nang matayog na puno na gagawin kong pugad. Di ko na maunawa ang lakad nang panahon Pagkat kasalukuyan ay iba na sa noon; Lahat ay nagbago maging yaong kalkulasyon, Wala nang nakababatid nitong mundo ngayon. Bilang isang kuwago sa aking paglalakbay Ay nasasalamin ko nga ang mga patunay; Pinag-aaralan ko ang mga bagay-bagay, Kung pa’no ipepreserba ang mundo at buhay. Pa’no ipaliliwanag bawat pangyayari, Dinaranas sa daigdig ng aking sarili; Mga mata ang siya ngang nagiging kong saksi, Na ang mundo’y hindi na halintulad ng dati. Pagkat iba na ang asal ng kapaligiran Di na matutukoy sa mga bilang ng buwan; Sumasalto na rin ang panahon ng tag-ulan, Para bagang taong kayhirap pakibagayan. Ramdam sa aking bagwis ang buwan ng tag-init, Tinatantiya ko habang ito’y papalapit; Katanungan sa isipan ko’y nagpupumilit, Bakit ganito na nga ba ang ating daigdig? Sabi nitong syensya ang mga likas na sanhi, Ang mundo sa araw papalapit unti-unti; Putok ng bulkan sa karagatan maaari Kaya nadaramang init ay di mawawari.

Mayroon din namang mga tao ang dahilan , Itong pagpatayo ng gusali’t pagawaan; 57 •

bukambibig ph

Disasters


DISASTERS

Pagsunog ng plastik mga buga ng sasakyan, At ang pagkakaingin sa mga kabundukan. Kaya heto ngayon ang s’yang nagiging epekto, Palagong temperatura ng init sa mundo; Na sanhi nitong pagkakaroon ng El Niño, At yaong pagdagsa ngayon ng maraming bagyo. May pagtaas sa antas ng tubig-karagatan, Pagtunaw ng yelo sa hilaga’t katimugan; Lahat ng ito ay posibleng maging dahilan, Ng mga kakaibang init at alinsangan. Ikaw tao paano mo masosolusyunan? Panahon ay hindi na natin mapipigilan; Ano nga ba ang natatanging mga paraan? Upang temperatura ito’y magdahan-dahan. ‘Di ka na parang isang walang muwang na bata, Pagkat nalalaman mo na ang mali at tama; Maging isa ka sa huwaran ng iyong bansa, Pagkat ‘di lang ikaw ang nabubuhay sa lupa. Kaming mga kuwago sadyang umaasam din, Na malunasan ninyo ang mga suliranin; Anong daratnan ng inyong mga bagong supling, Kung kayo ang nagdudulot ng mga hinaing. Isa lang yaong inaasam ko’t panaginip, Maging responsible at lagi mong isaisip; Iwasan na ninyo ang pagsusunog ng plastic, Upang muling maghilom ang sugat ng daigdig. Sa aking paglipad minsan pa sa hinaharap, Makanumpong muli ako ng magandang pugad; Bilang isang kuwago ay wala akong hangad, Sa magandang layunin magkaisa ang lahat.

Rico Villere • 58


ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS Nagtuturo ng mga kursong Panitikan si Dennis Andrew S Aguinaldo sa Departamento ng Humanidades, Unibersidad ng Pilipinas Los Baños. Noong kabataan niya’y naging fellow siya sa mga pambansang palihan sa malikhaing pagsusulat ng Ateneo Institute for Literary Arts and Practices, UST Center for Creative Writing and Literary Studies, UP Likhaan Institute of Creative Writing, at DLSU Bienvenido N Santos Creative Writing Center. Inilathala online ang kaniyang mga piyesa at collab sa The Cabinet, Plural Online Prose Journal, High Chair, Kritika Kultura, at Bukambibig Issue 01: Crowds. Napabilang na ang kaniyang mga akda sa mga antolohiya ng PEN, ANI, at The Literary Life ng Sunday Times. Ang kaniyang mga tula ay naisasama sa mga antolohiya gaya ng ANI ng Cultural Center of the Philippines. Tagapayo siya ng mga organisasyon ng mga kabataang manunulat gaya ng UPLB Writers’ Club at PANTAS.

Jan Rupert I Alfeche is a Filipino-American who has since called Cagayan de Oro his home. His avid interest in writing poetry led to his involvement with CDO Poetry Night, and accordingly, Nagkahiusang Magsusulat sa Cagayan de Oro (NAGMAC). He is currently a junior fellow for poetry for NAGMAC. He has previously published his work in the inter-Ateneo collaborative literary folio, Habi. As to his actual writing, he does his best to write about a variety of things, but indulges in sappy romantic poetry more times than he is ready to admit. He has also been involved with the Xavier Philharmonia as a violinist. He is currently acquiring his MA in Sociology in Ateneo de Manila University after receiving his AB in Sociology at Xavier University-Ateneo de Cagayan. His MA thesis involves study of ‘Third Culture Kids’ whose high mobility as well as near-constant negotiation of their sense of “place” in differing cultural/relational contexts is something he personally understands and experienced.

Teniza Lianne G Anduiza studies BSE English at Capitol University in Cagayan de Oro. Little Changes, the poem published in the present issue, is a product of her undergraduate Creative Writing class with her instructor, the poet Ton Daposala.

Genevieve Mae Aquino (G Mae Aquino) is scientist by profession, with a clutch of diplomas in molecular biology and genetics. She was a fellow for poetry in English at the Iigan National Writers Workshop, the Ateneo National Writers Workshop, and the IYAS Creative Writing Workshop. Her lifetime dream is to produce a body of work that combines her two great loves: science and poetry. She was born in Quezon City, raised in Davao City, and currently works as a university researcher.

Si Joh Balaong ay tubong Nueva Ecija. Nag-aral siya sa Unibersidad ng Pilipinas at patuloy na nakikipag-sama aralan sa lipunang kanyang ginagalawan. Naging bahagi siya at saksi sa pag-responde at pag-ahon ng mga matatapang na nilalang na humarap sa bagyong Yolanda. Alagad ng musika at sining ang kanyang pagkatao. Si Joh at ang tatlo pa niyang kaibigan ay mayroon ding gawa-gawang libro ng tinipon nilang mga tula.

Janinn Cabugwang is a BA Communication Arts graduate of University of the Philippines Visayas Tacloban and is currently living in Mayorga, Leyte. She is one of the contributors of the book Lunop Haiyan Voices and Images wherein she shared her personal experience as a victim of typhoon Yolanda.


Nagtatangkang manunulat, storyteller at dating guro si China Patria M De Vera. Naging fellow sa Palihang Rogelio Sicat at Cordillera Creative Writing Workshop. Ang mga akda niya ay makikita sa TAYO Literary Magazine 2016, Unrest In Peace zine, High Chair 2013, Eastlit, ZiggyZag Arms Poetry Journal, Bukambibig Issue 1: Crowds at Issue 2: Resistance, at ANI Journal 2011 ng CCP. Nakapagpresenta ng papel sa Elite Conference sa De La Salle Taft, Literature Studies Conference at Equator Symposium sa Yogyakarta, Indonesia, Mayroon siyang experimental at collaborative zines. Dating miyembro ng UP Ugnayan ng Manunulat. Kasapi ng Sining Supling. Sinisikap tapusin ang MA Araling Pilipino sa Unibersidad ng Pilipinas.

Mark Dimaisip’s work sits somewhere between nerdville and personal essay—in that little space where poetry and seemingly needless trvial information collides. Using subjects like anatomy, statistics, history, topography and physics as backdrops for self-discovery and introspection, his work has been described as “desire wrapped into logic”, “incredibly insightful”, “calmly enlightening”, and a “$100-per-hour shrink”. He has performed for events such as Filipino Readercon, FRINGE Manila, Ampalaya Monologues and Intramuros Rising in venues such as CCP, PETA Theater, Manila Polo Club and World Trade Center Manila. Featured in literary publications such as A Literation Magazine, Human Parts and The Brazilia Review, he has also released a poetry chapbook back in 2014 called Near Things. He is a graduate of Ateneo de Manila University and is currently heading Human Resources team for a technology solutions company. He is also a member of ALAB, The Loudmouth Collective, and Collaboratory PH. He is currently working on his second chapbook which he hopes to release before 2018. You can stalk his work and the work of other poets that he’s obsessed with at http://dimaisip.tumblr.com and http://youtube.com/dimaisip.

Madalas mamaos si June Kiervin G Dioso o mas kilala sa paaralan na Ginoong Dioso dahil sa pagtuturo ng Filipino sa kolehiyo at senior high school sa isang institusyon sa Quezon City. Ilang araw lang matapos ng pag-aaral sa The National Teachers College, sinuwerteng natanggap agad siya sa trabaho sa maikling resume na ipinasa niya sa HR. Minsan na rin kasi siyang nakapagsalita sa mga panayam at napabilang bilang isa sa mga editor ng sining at pagsulat sa EduZette ng Kolehiyo ng Edukasyon ng NTC. At minsan na ring nakapaglimbag ng mga akda sa nasabing pahayagan, Dahil requirement sa major subject nabuo niya ang kalipunan ng kanyang mga tula sa Panday-Isip. Minsan ding naligaw ang mga tula at mga drawing sa mga exhibit. Nag-aambag din siya ng mga nangingiliting sulatin sa mangilan-ngilang kopya ng zine na Chonggoloidz Kolektib. Na-inlove siya sa kultura ng mga katutubong Pilipino kaya naging bahagi ng kanyang pilosopiya bilang guro at manunulat ang paglalantad sa mga pagsasamantala sa pambansang minorya.

Lord Jane Caballero Dordas teaches at Wright Elementary School in Tapaz, Capiz. As her contribution to propagating the Panay Bukidnon culture, she has conducted numerous studies on Panay Bukidnon oral literature. During Saturdays, she shares her time and her expertise on culture to kids at Balay Turun-an at her ancestors’ place at Brgy Garangan, Calinog, Iloilo.

Adeva Jane H Esparrago hails from Cagayan de Oro. She graduated cum laude from Xavier University-Ateneo de Cagayan where she took up BSE English. She is currently working on her MA thesis in the same institution. She is currently teaching English in Xavier University Junior High School. She is a resident spoken word artist and a poetry fellow of the Nagkahiusang Magsusulat sa Cagayan de Oro (NAGMAC) and has been a fellow in the 1st Cagayan de Oro Writers Workshop. Her works have been published in Dagmay Literary Journal, Bulawan Literary Zine of Northern Mindanao, and Bukambibig Issue 1: Crowds and Issue 2: Resistance.


Amber Garma is a fifteen-year-old Disney princess studying Creative Writing at the Philippine High School for the Arts. She currently resides in Cabanatuan City, Nueva Ecija. She has won poetry competitions in America and the UK, and will soon be launching her first collection of poems.

Mark Jabrica is a Communication Arts graduate from South Luzon State University. He currently works as a multimedia director in a marketing company in Manila.

Si Arnold ‘Arnie’ Rosales Lapuz ay mag-a-anim na taon nang propesor ng mga asignaturang pangAgham Panlipunan sa Quezon City Polytechnic University sa Novaliches. Nagtapos siyang magna cum laude sa kursong Bachelor of Arts sa Araling Pilipino noong 2009. Kasalukuyan siyang kumukuha ng kaniyang masterado sa Philippine Studies sa Unibersidad ng Pilipinas-Diliman. May sertipiko rin siya sa malikhaing pagsulat sa Filipino mula sa UP. Isa siya sa 10 fellows ng prestihiyosong 2016 Virgin Lab Fest Writing Fellowship ng Cultural Center of the Philippines. Lumabas na rin ang dalawa sa kaniyang mga tula (‘Babae’ at ‘Berde’) sa Bukambibig Issue 1: Crowds at Issue 2: Resistance. Nakatira si Arnie kasama ang kaniyang mga magulang at dalawang kapatid na babae sa Lungsod ng San Jose del Monte sa Bulacan. Dalawampu’t siyam na taong gulang siya.

Baltazar Layese is from Bantayan Island, Cebu and is a graduate of AB Political Science at the University of San Carlos. An environment advocate, his works often portray the resemblance, metaphors and significance of Mother Nature in our existence. When he is not at home nurturing his garden and fishes, you will certainly trace his footprints at the great outdoors communing with the natural environment. Moreover, he is passionate in recycling leftovers into something valuable and beautiful. His poems entitled Sayaw sa Balud and Tagay sa Balak has been included in the Cebu Literary Festival Poetry Folio Volume 1. He is currently working at the Municipality of Bantayan as resettlement and sustainable livelihood program coordinator.

Rea M Maac is currently in Singapore and has been working as domestic worker for 7 years. She was recently joined Singapore Migrant Poetry Competition and has been shortlisted for the finals. As of now, she has an on-going poetry workshop in Singapore.

Arvie Joy A Manejar is a graduate of the University of the Philippines Visayas with a degree in Economics. She hails from Pototan, Iloilo; and currently works as a researcher for the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources. She has a passion for poetry and storytelling and her advocacies include environmental protection, social justice, and heritage conservation.

Si Vincent Navarez ay isinilang sa Lungsod ng Marikina at kasalukuyang naninirahan sa Del Gallego, Camarines Sur. Sa ngayon, siya ay nag-aaral ng kursong Bachelor of Secondary Education, major in Mathematics sa Alfelor Sr Memorial College, Inc. Naging punong patnugot sa pahayagang pangkampus noong elementarya at hayskul; at kasalukuyang punong patnugot din sa The Sparkle, ang opisyal na publikasyon ng nasabing kolehiyo. Siya ay isang manunula at manunulat sa likod ng pahinang Blangkong Papel sa Facebook, at patuloy na hinahasa ang talento sa mundo ng online writing.


Elsie Caballero Padernal is an outstanding teacher awarded by the Bato Balani Foundation in 2014. As a Panay Bukidnon herself, it has been her advocacy learning more about her culture and passing on her knowledge and skills to her learners at Intapian Elementary School and at Balay Turun-an, a school of living traditions (SLT) located at Brgy Garangan, Calinog, Iloilo.

Maritess A Rulona is a graduate of BA in Mass Communication from the University of San Jose-Recoletos on 2007. She was born and raised in Cebu City but she relocated in Davao City on 2013. She is currently the senior high school coordinator of Proverbs Ville Christian School where she serves as the school paper adviser for The Proverbian Chronicles and Ang Pahayagang Proverbian. Her first writing workshop was with Bukambibig consultant Dr Vim Nadera in US Embassy of Manila’s Democracy Summer Fest on 2006. She has attended the 17th Ateneo de Davao University Summer Writers Workshop and the 8th Davao Writers Workshop. She recently published an essay in Dagmay Literary Journal.

Jules Ruz, a contributor of Bukambibig Issue 1: Crowds and Issue 2: Resistance, is a simple student. The hashtag #LaudeBagoLandi no longer applies to them. In between messing around with source codes for fun and being on duty as a volunteer first responder, they lock themselves in their room to write and get away from everyone else.

Si King Vincent Gaudine G Salazar o Hari Salazar sa kaniyang sagisag-panulat ay isang makata na tubong Calapan City, Oriental Mindoro. Siya ay kumukuha ng kursong Bachelor of Library and Information Science sa City College of Calapan. Isang lagalag sa online writing world, kasapi ng iba’t-ibang grupo ng mga manunulat at kasalukuyang literary editor ng The Innovators sa nasabing paaralan.

Joseph Aleen S Salvador is a fourth year college student taking his bachelor’s degree in the Ateneo de Naga University. Currently, he is a member of Ateneo Literary Association, an organization of readers and writers who seek to strengthen the literary scene in the university and in the Bicol Region. He had two published poems, namely Muted I and What I Have, in the third volume of the organization’s online literary folio titled TILAD: Matì and a published poem entitled The first one in Bukambibig Issue 2: Resistance.

Hermie Sanchez is a poet, writer, composer, and artist. He is a graduate of Civil Engineering at the DWU Tacloban, and Theology in St. John the Evangelist School of Theology, Palo Leyte. He is a fellow of various writing workshops: 43rd UP National Creative Writing Workshop, 13th Iligan National Writers Workshop, UP Tacloban All Waray Creative Writing Workshop, 4th/5th/10th/11th Lamiraw Regional Creative Writing Workshop, UP VisWrite Creative Writing Workshop, and 16th Iyas National Writers Workshop. He writes Sik-on nga Susumaton (Waray short shorts) and Siday in English, Cebuano, Pilipino and Waray. A presentor on regional language concerns, a performance poet and a member of KATIG Writer’s Network. He is the creator of HAGSI or Haglipot nga Siday. He published his first book HAGSI (Haglipot nga Siday) Waray in September 2016. He works in the Provincial Government of Samar and lives in Catbalogan City with his wife Ena, and Paulus and Paulinus his two sons.


Mai Santillan is a spoken word artist, poet, and playwright from Cagayan de Oro. She received fellowships at the 2012 Stereologues Playwriting Workshop, 2013 Sulat-Dula Mindanao Playwriting Workshop, and 2014 Davao Writers Workshop. She was part of Dulaang Atenista and is active in the local performing arts scene. Her literary works were published in Dagmay Literary Journal, Kabisdak Cebuano Literary Lighthouse, Manila Bulletin’s Bisaya Magasin, and The Carayan Journal. She is the founding chairperson of the Nagkahiusang Magsusulat sa Cagayan de Oro (NAGMAC). She is the drama editor of Bulawan Literary Zine of Northern Mindanao.

Si Kirt John C Segui ay isinilang sa Bayan ng Quezon sa Isla ng Alabat. Kasalukuyang tinatapos ang programang Batsilyer ng Artes sa Filipinolohiya sa Politeknikong Unibersidad ng Pilipinas sa Sta Mesa, Maynila. Naging punong-patnugot ng Pahatid Kalatas, ang opisyal na pahayagan ng kanilang kagawaran. Naging OJT Practicumer sa Sangay ng Salita at Gramatika ng Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF). Naging student assistant/teacher at nakapagturo ng mga asignaturang Filipino sa PUP. Siya ay tagatangkilik at tagasuporta ng mga akda at manunulat na Filipino.

Roda Tajon is a development worker. She is currently affiliated with the Center for Disaster Preparedness (CDP). She has a degree in psychology, and currently takes up women and development studies. Her poems appeared in Bukambibig Issue 1: Crowds and Issue 2: Resistance.

Isinilang at lumaki nang panahong namamayagpag ang Olongapo bilang ‘red district’, ito ang nakaimpluwensiya kay Ronald Tumbaga para magsulat. Ikalabintatlo ng Setyembre 2004 unang nalathala sa Liwayway Magasin ng Manila Bulletin ang isinulat niyang Huling Halik ng Bampira. Isang maikling kuwento ng di magaping paninindigan ng isang kolehiyalang entertainer sa isang nightclub na nahawaan ng AIDS na pinili ang daan para makatulong na makapagmulat sa lipunang Filipino. Isa pa sa naisulat niya, ang Isanlibong Piso, na itinanghal na kuwento ng linggo ng nasabing magasin nuong ikaapat ng Enero 2006 ang tumatalakay sa kaso ng isang mayamang dayuhang pedopilya. At kung paanong sa tutuong buhay nakatakas ito palabas ng bansa gamit ang pera. Sapagkat isang personal na adbokasiya rin niya, kaya marahil nagwagi siya bilang ikalawang gantimpala sa patimpalak sa pagsulat ng Dalit sa 2015 Text Tula Contra-Climate Change ng Philippine Climate Change Commission. Sa kasalukuyan, isang tulang makabayan at isang maikling kuwentong inspirational na isinulat niya ang nakasama sa magkahiwalay na antolohiya ng dalawang self-publishing group. Nakatakda nang ilabas ngayong taong 2017 ang dalawang nasabing mga libro.

Rico Villere is an OFW in Doha, Qatar.


ABOUT THE CONSULTANTS Rina Garcia Chua is taking up her MA and her PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies at the University of British Columbia. She is the editor of the first anthology of Philippine ecopoetry, Sustaining the Archipelago, which is forthcoming in the University of Santo Tomas Publishing House. She obtained her MA in Language and Literature, major in Literature, from De La Salle University. Her thesis was awarded the gold medal for outstanding thesis and all of its chapters have been presented in international and national conferences. She has been a fellow of several national literary workshops and her works have been published in different journals, literary magazines, and books.

Mark Angeles, or Mark Anthony S Angeles, was declared this year’s Makata ng Taon by the Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF). He was writer-in-residence at the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program in 2013. He is a two-time Palanca awardee for Tula category (2010 and 2013) and two-time Mananaysay ng Taon (2013 and 2015). He is a columnist of Pinoy Weekly, the literary editor of bulatlat.com, and features contributor of GMA News Online. Currently, he studies MA in Malikhaing Pagsulat at the University of Philippines Diliman and teaches Filipino and Literature courses at a senior high school.

Vim S Nadera, or Victor Emmanuel Daelo Carmelo Nadera Jr, is a University of the Philippines Diliman professor who has taught performance poetry for more than 10 years at the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He was able to form groups like Gatula (1996), Oratura (1997), Toki (1997), Cofradia (1998), L (1998), amorphous mass (1999), and others known for promoting orature until 2006. The most popular among them was The Batutes, noted and notorious for deconstructing Balagtasan. On the other hand, around that time, in 2003, he became the Lakandiwa of the Balagtasan team called MTV -- for Mike (Coroza), Teo (Antonio), and Vim (Nadera) -- who has performed here and abroad like the Bowery Poetry Club in New York; the Union City Hall in Union City; San Francisco Library in California; and The Gallery Hotel in Singapore, among others. In 2008, the National Book Development Board (NBDB) hired Vim to serve as coach to celebrity readers -- Christine Bersola-Babao, Lyn Ching, Chinchin Gutierrez, Edu Manzano, Miriam Quiambao, Rhea Santos, et al. -- for their poetry recording for its project Tulaan sa Tren – which you can still hear while riding LRT and MRT. Ten years before that, he celebrated our 100th Independence Day through the spoken word. On 12 June 1998, through the partnership of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) and Unyon ng mga Manunulat sa Pilipinas (UMPIL), he had the chance to direct, produce, and perform in his biggest and best performance literature project ever -- the literary gathering entitled (KA)LAKARAN: Sentenaryo ng mga Makata ng Bayan -- wherein the performance poets played the role of their favorite Filipino heroes. In their costumes and makeups, they introduced their heroism to the shoppers at the Glorietta for almost an entire day highlighted by a poetry reading in the middle of the said mall in the heart of Makati. He, too, is a performance artist who represented the Philippines in art festivals in Malaysia (2000 and 2001), Taiwan (2001, 2006, and 2007), Singapore (2002 and 2008), Thailand (2006 and 2012), Japan (2010), United States (2011), Germany (2013), and South Korea (2013). As an actor, he was a delegate to the 27th Tokyo International Film Festival as the Godfather in Khavn de la Cruz’s indie film Ruined Hearts. Vim was chosen as the Festival Director of the first Performatura: Performing Literatures on 6,7, and 8 November 2015 at the Cultural Center of the Philippines. On secondment, he is serving the Philippine High School for the Arts as its Director IV.


ABOUT THE EDITORS General Editor

Alton Melvar M Dapanas is the associate editor of Mindanao Odysseys: Anthology of Travel Essays on Mindanao and founding co-editor of Libulan: Binisaya Anthology of Queer Literature. He has authored two forthcoming books - ‘The Cartographies of our Skin,’ a collection of lyric essays, and ‘An Archipelago of Napes and Nipples,’ a collection of prose poems. Writing and translating in English and in Binisaya, his works have appeared or are forthcoming in online and print magazines, journals, and anthologies in the Philippines, Australia, Singapore, India, the United States, and Germany. He is a member of the Bathalad Mindanao and served as the workshop coordinator of the annual Cagayan de Oro Writers Workshop. He spearheads the writers collective Nagkahiusang Magsusulat sa Cagayan de Oro (NAGMAC). His upcoming projects include writing a narrative history of his hometown. He lives with two cats and is currently in love.

Binisaya Editor

Cindy A Velasquez, poet, lyricist, spoken word artist, children’s fiction writer, Cebuano translator, and literary critic, is an assistant professor of literature at the University of San Carlos. She has a BA in Linguistics and Literature, cum laude from the University of San Carlos and an MA in Literature from same university. She is currently pursuing a doctorate degree in Communications and Literature in Cebu Normal University. Her poems in English and Cebuano have been published in local and national anthologies. Her first book titled Lawas was published by Ang Bathalanong Halad sa Dagang (BATHALAD). She is currently working with Charmaine Carreon of putting together a mutli-lingual anthology of poems by emerging writers from the Bisaya region. She attended various literary and cultural fellowships particularly KRITIKA National Workshop on Art and Cultural Criticism, the UST J. Elizalde Navarro National Arts Criticism Workshop, the Iligan National Writers’ Workshop, IYAS National Writers’ Workshop, and the Cornelio Faigao Workshop.

Born Editor

Born in Dupax del Norte, Nueva Vizcaya, Roy V Aragon studied Bachelor of Arts in Catanduanes State Colleges. Most of his writings are in Ilokano, many of them published in Bannawag Magazine. He also writes in Tagalog. He has won awards in various literary competitions, which include three first prizes in Ilokano short story and five first prizes in Ilokano poetry. He has also won prizes in the Carlos Palanca Awards: three third prizes in Ilokano short story and a second prize in Filipino short story. He was a fellow, representing Ilokano fiction, in the 1996 UP National Writers Workshop. He also represented Ilocos region in the 9th Lamiraw Workshop held in Calbayog City, Western Samar in 2012 by being a fellow in Ilokano poetry. He was a delegate and panelist in the 2011 Taboan International Writers Festival held in Davao City. He published his first printed book, BAGI: dandaniw, a collection of his selected Ilokano poetry, in 2015. In 2000, he released a digital book of his Ilokano poetry, Napili ken Saan a Napili a Dandaniw ken Dadduma Pay a Riknakem, which is considered as the first Ilokano poetry e-book. He is working on a forthcoming book of his selected Ilokano short stories. He also co-edited various anthologies of Ilokano fiction and poetry. He is currently a member of the board of directors of GUMIL Filipinas, the most active organization of Ilokano writers in the Philippines and abroad, where previously he was secretary general. He works as a freelance translator, writer, editor, and book designer.

Pangasinan Editor

Mark Anthony B Austria received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English from Pangasinan State University where he is currently the chairperson of the languages, professional, and general education department and teaches language, literature, and creative writing courses. His research on Pangasinan language titled “Assimilation and Reduplication in Pangasinan Adjectives: A Morphophonemic Analysis” won first prize (faculty category) in the University In-House Research Review in 2012. A number of his works appeared in the Philippine Panorama, ANI 39 of the Cultural Center of the Philippines, Manila Bulletin, AboutFilipino.com, and FanBox.com. His suite of poems entitled “Biek Taew Tan Arum Ni’ran Anlong” is included in the Kurit Panlunggaring Anthology (2012-2014). His poem “Sa Aplaya” also appeared in the Atlantis issue of the Paper Monster Press. He also received Pangasinan Literary Awards for his poetry in 2013 (Third Prize, Biek Taew Tan Arum Ni’ran Anlong) and 2016 (First Prize, Sibék Tan Arum Ni’ran Anlong). He was a fellow of the 3rd Cordillera Creative Writing Workshop of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) and the University of the Philippines Baguio (UPB).


English Editor

April Mae M Berza is the author of Confession ng isang Bob Ong Fan (Flipside, 2014) and Berso de Berza (Charging Ram, 2012). Her poems and short stories appeared in numerous publications in the United States, France, Canada, Romania, India, Japan, Great Britain, and the Philippines. Her poems were translated in Crimean Tatar and Filipino. Some of her poems appeared in Liwayway, Belleville Park Pages, Haiku Journal, The Siren, Poetica, Three Line Poetry, Calliope, Maganda, Metric Conversions, Ani, The Manila Times, Asahi Haikus Network, Contemporary Verse 2, and elsewhere. Her poem E-Martial Law was broadcasted on IndoPacific Radio on KPFA 94.1 FM (kpfa.org). She is a member of Poetic Genius Society and a product of the LIRA Poetry Clinic.

Bikol Editor

Born in Pasay City, Jose Jason L Chancoco grew up in Iriga City and now lives in Naga City with his partner, Chel, the expectant mother of his first born, Jose Daniel. An AB Literature and Law graduate, he is member of Linangan sa Imahen, Retorika at Anyo (LIRA) and he has attended the 2nd Ateneo National Writers Workshop (English Poetry), Ricky Lee’s 14th Scriptwriting Workshop for Film and TV, 3rd UST National Writers Workshop (Tula), 1st Juliana Arejola-Fajardo Workshop for Bikol Writing (Rawitdawit), 2004 IYAS Creative Writing Workshop (Tula), 12th Iligan National Writers Workshop (Tula) and the Silliman National Writers Workshop (Poetry). A regular panelist in creative writing workshops, his works have appeared in magazines and journals here and abroad. He has edited literary collections and anthologies including Salugsog sa Sulog and Blank Paper Will Always be At the Ready. He has won various literary prizes including the Transition Literary Contest 1999 (1st Prize, One-Act Play in English), Philippine Star’s Fresh Ink Literary Contest 2000 & 2001 (Tula), Maningning Miclat Award for Poetry 2003 (Tula), Talaang Ginto: Gawad Surian sa Tula, Gantimpalang Collantes 2004 (Second Prize, Tula), Premio Tomas Arejola para sa Literaturang Bikolnon 2004 (Bikol poetry), Premio Tomas Arejola para sa Literaturang Bikolnon 2005 (1st Prize, Bikol Short-story for Children and 1st Prize, Bikol One-Act Play for Children), Premio Tomas Arejola para sa Literaturang Bikolnon 2006 (Bikol essay), Talaang Ginto: Gawad Surian sa Tula, Gantimpalang Collantes 2007 (honorable mention, Tula), Gawad “Soc” Rodrigo 2007 (KWF and NCCA, Filipino Poetry), Homelife Magazine Poetry Contest 2007 (1st Prize, Tula), Achievement Award for Literature (from AdNU), 1st Annual Bicol Bloggy Awards: Best Literature Blog for 2011 (For Hagbayon), Talaang Ginto: Gawad KWF sa Tula 2012 (honorable mention, Tula) and Dionatext Kontra Depresyon 2012 (AWIT Foundation). His first book Pagsasatubuanan: Poetikang Bikolnon (Bikol Literary Criticism) was published by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts in 2008. It was awarded the Premio Bibiano Sabino para sa Librong Bikolnon as a pioneering work on Bikol poetics. He is an active literary practitioner in his community. He organizes poetry workshops and readings such as the WG and the VerSosimo. He was part the core group of Bikol Slam 2012, the very first slam poetry contest in the Philippines. He sings and plays lead guitar for his poetry band The Super Poet Genome Project. A rifleman and a martial artist, he has a collection of swords and knives.

Hiligaynon & Kinaray-a Editor

Jesus C Insilada, from Calinog, Iloilo, earned his MA in English and Literature and Doctor of Education major in Educational Management from West Visayas State University (WVSU). He has received three awards from the Palanca for his short stories in Hiligaynon—3rd Prize (2010), 2nd Prize (2012), and 1st Prize (2015). Liwayway has published his Filipino poetry while his Hiligaynon poetry, short stories, and novels have been included in Hiligaynon, a sister magazine of the Liwayway of the Manila Bulletin Publishing Corporation. He authored three literary books–Ang Mamalaybay Kon Maghigugma, a poetry collection, Walingwaling, a short story collection, and Amburukay, a chapbook. He is a product of the following writers workshops: 7th San Agustin Writers Workshop, 6th Lamiraw Regional Creative Writing Workshop, 10th Iyas Creative Writing Workshop, Ikaapat na Palihang Rogelio Sicat, 11th Ateneo National Writers Workshop, and 19th Iligan National Writers Workshop. He is presently the principal of Alcarde Gustilo Memorial National High School at Alibunan, Calinog, Iloilo.

Tagalog Editor

Joel Donato C Jacob has been a member of the Linangan ng Imahen, Retorika, at Anyo (LIRA) since 2013. He was a fellow at the UST National Writers Workshop in 2014, Iligan National Writers Workshop in 2015, and the Amelia Lapena-Bonifacio Writers Workshop (formerly UP Basic Writers Workshop) in 2016. His works appeared in Liwayway, LONTAR Journal of Speculative South East Asian Literature, Plural Online Prose Journal, Ani, Sawi Anthology, and LIRA 30. He is certified HIV Counselor and Search and Rescue Respondent.


Waray Editor

Aivee C Badulid is a graduate of the BA Communication Arts program from UP Visayas Tacloban College where she taught Philippine Literature and Communication courses briefly. She now works full-time with UP Professor Emeritus Merlie M. Alunan as editor, translator and copyreader. She has participated in several writing workshops in the Visayas, namely Lamiraw. VisWrite and Tagik Landasan, as fellow for Waray poetry and translation. She writes her creative works exclusively in her mother tongue Estehanon Waray as a way of promoting the Eastern Visayas region’s diverse experiences through its language, literature and culture.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We’d like to thank the following people for their unending support and dedication to making this folio a reality. To the godfathers of literatures in the local languages, Edgar S. Godin of Manila Bulletin’s Bisaya Magasin, Jerry B. Gracio of Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino, and Santiago Villafania of the Pangasinan Historical and Cultural Commission for their support; recognized poet and the consultant of the fourth and final in the first volume: Zola Gonzalez-Macarambon of Monash University; our foremost consultants, Mark S. Angeles and Dr. Vim Nadera. We would also like to thank Vladimeir Gonzalez and Om Velasco of Philippine Literature Portal (panitikan.com.ph) and the Philippine Literary Portal of UP Likhaan Institute of Creative Writing; Jose Ardivilla of UP College of Fine Arts and Inez De Leon of Ateneo de Manila University Department of Communications. We also extend our gratitude to Jam Pascual of Youth STAR, and Jon Andrew Sison of InqPOP, as well as Splice Resto Bar, our foremost sponsors for the launching of this folio. We would furthermore like to recognize our editors for the local languages: Roy V. Aragon (Editor for Ilokano), Mark Anthony B. Austria (Editor for Pangasinan), April Mae Berza (Editor for English), Jason Chancoco (Editor for Bikol), Jesus C. Insilada (Editor for Ilonggo), Joel Donato C. Jacob (Editor for Tagalog), Cindy A. Velasquez (Editor for Binisaya), and Aivee C. Badulid (Editor for Waray). We would also like to recognize the efforts of certain members of our team, who contributed to our work in the third issue: Valene Lagunzad, Ivan Mella, Robert Pulgo, Earle Gregorio, Reneil Sandaan, Trina Tuquib, Allyana Deveza, Cara Mags, Jana De La Pena, Jelo Narag, Martin Tongol, and Rica Lopez. We would also like to thank Charisse Aganinta of DAYO Creative Solutions (dayoplayground.com) for her tireless work on helping construct our official logo, Max Santiago from Career Academy Asia, and for the following literary groups and institutions for working with us in forwarding the goals of literature in the Philippines: Pugad Adarna Network, The Loudmouth Collective, National Commission for Culture and the Arts, Cultural Center of the Philippines Intertextual Division, and the Nagkahiusang Magsusulat sa Cagayan de Oro (NAGMAC). This folio would not have been possible without all of you. With love and gratitude, the Bukambibig team.


CALL FOR PERFORMANCE POETRY Bukambibig’s Issue 04: ‘Social Movements’

Bukambibig Poetry Folio of Spoken Word Philippines is now open for contributions to its first volume’s fourth quarterly issue themed ‘Social Movements’. The folio is looking for spoken word pieces that talk about relevant social conditions—a spectrum of human rights violations, social inequities, econo-ethnic vulnerabilities, extra-judicial killings, etc.—seen through theoretical lenses. It seeks contributions from emerging and established Filipino poets who reside in the country or abroad. Entries should be composed of two to three poems (not more than 60 lines each) meant for performance and written in Bikol, Binisaya, English, Hiligaynon, Kinaray-a, Ilokano, Pangasinan, Tagalog, and Waray, or combination of these languages. (A poem written in a local language must have a three-sentence synopsis in English.) Submissions are assumed to be original and previously unpublished. Poems should be written as one document, single-spaced in Garamond font 12 (in MS Word format). The name of the author shall not appear in any of the pages. On the email’s body, write the author’s name, mobile number, email address, and a short bionote (in the third person). The bionote (150-300 words) may include the author’s location in the Philippines or anywhere in the world, academic background, and if applicable, current professional work, writers group affiliations, publication history, and writing workshops attended. All entries must be submitted before 11:59 PM on 5 June 2017 to spokenwordph.poetryfolio@gmail.com with the email subject: Language(s)_Last Name_First Name_MI (example: Binisaya_Dela Cruz_Juan Carlos_P). The general editor of the folio is Alton Melvar Madrid Dapanas, with Mark Anthony S Angeles— writer-in-residence of the 2013 International Writing Program and Komisyon ng Wikang Filipino’s 2016 Makata ng Taon—and Dr Vim S Nadera—the father of Philippine performance poetry—as consultants. Zola P Gonzalez-Macarambon, avant-garde poet, art critic, and scholar, will write this issue’s critical introduction. The editorial board is also composed of renowned poets Jose Jason L Chancoco (Bikol editor), Cindy A Velasquez (Binisaya editor), April Mae M Berza (English editor), Jesus C Insilada (Hiligaynon & Kinaray-a editor), Roy V Aragon (Ilokano editor), Mark Anthony B Austria (Pangasinan editor), Joel Donato C Jacob (Tagalog editor), and Aivee C Badulid (Waray editor). For updates about the folio and its spoken word artists collective, follow Bukambibig on Facebook, facebook.com/BukambibigPH, and Twitter, @BukambibigPH. The folio is still open to editor-applicants for Kapampangan language. See tinyurl.com/BBCallforKapampanganEditor for core qualifications and submission guidelines. Read previous issues here: https://issuu.com/bukambibigph Note: The copyright of the poems published remains with the authors. The folio is unable to give payment for accepted works because it operates with a volunteer-workforce and remains independently published online.


Bukambibig Volume 1, Issue 3: Disasters  

Bukambibig is the official poetry folio of Spoken Word Philippines, a community of Filipino spoken word artists across geographic and aesthe...

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