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The Builder A Builders Association Publication

July 2013, Volume 17, Issue 2

Safe Starters In Another Example Of Dedication To The Safety Of Chicagoland’s Construction Workforce, BA Members Hold Chicagoland’s First Safety Stand Down Also in this issue... Retirement of Association President Albert Leitschuh, and welcome of new Executive Director Daniel McLaughlin Information on August’s AGC of America ITForum, held in Chicago More on the 2013 Builders Scholarship Foundation honorees


Association News

Honoring Albert After Three Decades In Associations And Close To 17 Years At The BA, Al Leitschuh Retires As President Al Leitschuh has never really looked at himself as a “technically inclined” individual. It was hard enough to program his new phone, let alone mess around with HTML. Be that as it may, you wouldn’t be able to tell from what went on at the Builders Association in his tenure. Leitschuh is retiring in early July, having served as the Association’s Chief Executive since 1997. In that time, the BA has made giant leaps in terms of its website, the ability to register for events online, the development of the Builder Blast weekly email, and technology education for contractors interested in Building Information Modeling, lean construction and other topics. “The BA has expanded its educational and safety programs, and this association has really expanded its industry outreach in the time I’ve been here,” Leitschuh said. “Those are some of the positives, but we had to fight our way through a recession and some other obstacles, as well. “The hardest situation I have dealt with was legal issues the association faced in 2003. That’s actually the hardest thing an association I was working for faced in my entire career.” Despite the improvements and challenges Al has seen, he believes the biggest challenge the BA will face is serving the new industry that is transforming in the Chicago business market. “The Union market is changing, and as it shifts the BA is going to need to shift with it,” he stated. “The organization has to be open to new types of industry firms and evaluate its services to see what it can do for them. The improvements under Al’s watch didn’t stop at technology. He worked to expand all of the Association’s educational offerings and oversaw the creation of the Construction Carpeer Opportunity Program, the Builders

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Association’s Safety Alliance with OSHA, the Builders Scholarship Foundation and the Builders Education & Training Foundation. The BA also greatly expanded its labor services in the last 17 years, due to the hard work of Al and Denise Herdrich, who has worked with Al for close to 20 years. During a late June gathering at the Rosewood Restaurant in Rosemont, Al greeted well-wishers and heard remarks from Jim McShane of McShane Construction Company, Jim Valenti of Valenti Builders and Mike Faron of W.E. O’Neil Construction Company on what was accomplished during his tenure. Association Chairman Jimmy Akintonde of Ujamaa Construction, Inc. served as emcee and Herdrich also had a few words. “This is truly the best organization I’ve worked for,” Leitschuh said. “It’s a great group of contractors who do things the right way in terms of safety, ethics and everything else. “I’ve really enjoyed working with the people of the Association and I wish them the best of luck in the future” Al is a Past Chairman of the AGC of America’s Executive Leadership Council and served on the Executive Board. He holds an MBA from Lake Forest Graduate School of Management, a B.A. in Business from the University of Minnesota, and earned his Certified Association Executive (CAE) designation from the American Society of Association Executives. Al’s official experience as chief executive officer began in 1977. Al was CEO for the American Society of Home Inspectors, National Precast Concrete Association, and the National Building Material Distribution Association. In his retirement, he plans on golfing, traveling enjoying spending time with his wife, two children and two grandchildren.


Association News

Welcome, Dan McLaughlin The Builders Association is excited to announce that on July 8th, Daniel J. McLaughlin will assume the role of Builders Association Executive Director. McLaughlin will be just the third such officer in 30 years for the Association, following Al Leitschuh and Don Dvorak into the position. Daniel served as the Executive Director of the Plumbing Contractors Association of Chicago from 1991 to 2013, and as the Executive Director of the Plumbing Council of Chicagoland from 2008 to 2013. Daniel has been elected Mayor of Orland Park five consecutive times beginning in 1993. During his time

as Mayor, he has implemented a water conservation and energy savings educational program, served on the North East Illinois Water Supply Planning Group through CMAP and started two tiered Water Conservation pricing. Daniel has been a board member of United Trust Bank since 2010. He is also a member of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the Illinois Municipal League, PlumbingHeating-Cooling Contractors Association (National and Illinois), and Union Affiliated Contractors. See future copies of the Builder Blast, www.bldrs.org and our other communications vehicles for more.

Jim Valenti (left photo), Jim McShane (middle photo) and Mike Faron (right top photo) were among Builders Association members speaking at a retirement gathering for outgoing President Al Leitschuh (right below). More photos of this and every other BA event on the Builders Association’s Flickr Photostream.

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Education Education Labor

Four Take Swings At Future 2013 Builders Foundation Scholarships Four students with a passion for the construction industry are a little bit closer to achieving their goals, thanks to the help of the Builders Scholarship Foundation. The Scholarship Foundation Board awarded four students from the Chicagoland area with construction-related majors an annually renewable award of $4,000. This group of honorees brings the total number of scholarships awarded by the Foundation to 42. Since the Foundation’s establishment in 2003, the Foundation has raised over $600,000 for tuition assistance, with the help of a generous and dedicated group of Builders Association members. Here’s a bit more about this year’s honorees:

Michael B. Drake, Illinois State University Michael found his passion for the construction industry five years ago while working for a small residential contractor. Since then, the junior Construction Management major has worked at Lake Bros. Construction as a carpenter as well as Divane Bros. Electrical Contractor as a Project Management Intern. Not only has Michael maintained a 4.0 GPA and been honored on the Dean’s List, but he is an active member of Illinois State University’s Construction Management Student Association. He aspires to earn an executive board position within this association in order to further development his knowledge of the construction industry as well as provide leadership to this organization. “My career goal is to be a competent and successful project manager for a large general contractor of commercial buildings, Drake said. “I want to share my knowledge and expertise to achieve success for my employer and promote team concepts. I feel that my focus, motivation, and work ethic will get me there.”

Cristina Flores, Marquette University Cristina is a junior Construction Engineering and

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Management major who has been able to apply her studies in one distinct hands-on opportunity. She has worked with the Walsh Group over the course of two semesters. During this time, Christina worked on the renovation of an underground garage in downtown Chicago and the construction of a New Orleans prison. “I was responsible for measuring, tracking, drawing, and documenting the repairs,” said Flores of her time at the Walsh Group. “I was also introduced to the submittal review process and updating record drawings.” Cristina continues to be an active member of the Marquette community through several student organizations including the Builders Coalition, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and Pi Beta Phi Fraternity for Women. She hopes to work in the field of commercial construction after graduation.

Rebecca Genualdi, Marquette University Rebecca began her collegiate career as a Civil Engineering major, but the junior became intrigued with Construction Engineering and Management because of its combination of engineering problem solving and managerial coursework. As President of the Builders Coalition of Marquette (an AGC student chapter), Rebecca organized an OSHA Safety Training for its members. “Being able to lead the organization and manage a team of officers has helped me to recognize the managerial skills I possess and how I will continue to use them in the construction industry,” said Genualdi.


Education Labor Along with her involvement on-campus, Rebecca also completed two work terms as a Co-op student with Builders Association member McShane Construction Company. This allowed her to assist in the supervision of both preconstruction and construction phases of a warehouse and several distribution centers. “During her two internships, Rebecca has exceeded our expectations for a new intern,” stated Brian Sundermann, the Project Manager who worked with her. “She proved to be a reliable member of my team and has been able to handle and perform with increased workload and responsibility.”

Golf Outing Sponsors

Alexandra Sexton, Purdue University There are two things that shaped and solidified Alexandra’s decision to become an engineer: The architecture of Chicago and her father. As a junior Construction Engineering major, Alexandra maintains a 3.60 GPA while also participating in a widerange of student activities and service projects. Alexandra has worked with the Walsh Group as a PreConstruction Intern. During this past summer, she enhanced her skills in technical proposal writing, estimating and subcontractor acquisition, and project tracking. She is an active member of Purdue Society of Women Engineers. “The Purdue Society of Women Engineers has singlehandedly kept me within Engineering and provided me with the professional development skills I need after graduation,” Sexton said. Jennifer Gadzala, an MS4 Operator for the Town of Chesterton, Indiana, commented on Sexton’s excellent work ethic. “She takes her studies seriously, as she does her work,” Gadzala stated. “I have every confidence that she will complete her studies and complete them in a way that brings honor and esteem to the traditions and goals of any organization.”

LABORERS - EMPLOYERS COOPERATION AND EDUCATION TRUST

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Member Milestones Safety

1,500 Construction Workers

70 Jobsites

30 Minutes

14 Contractors

1 Great Event 6


Safety

Member Dedication Leads To Chicagoland Area’s First Successful Safety Stand Down At the Builders Association, we’re proud that our members value the safety of their laborers more than deadlines, because no job is worth more than the health of a worker. On June 12, contractors around Chicago shut down more than 70 jobsites for a 30 minute long Safety Stand Down in order to discuss fall protection. The Safety Stand Down steering committee worked with Builders Association Project Manager Stacey Kelly to put together this event, modeled after Stand Downs performed successfully every year by AGC of America chapters around the country. With over 1,500 workers taking part, it’s safe to say the Association and its members would like this to become a yearly event. We’d like to thank the contractors who participated in the First Annual Stand Down. We look forward to many more years of safety promotion.

• AT Mechanical, LLC • Bulley & Andrews, LLC • The George Sollitt Construction Co. • Herlihy Mid-Continent Company • Industria, Inc. • McShane Construction Company • Oakwood Contractors, Inc. • Omega Demolition Corporation • Pepper Construction Company • Ryan Companies US, Inc. • Valenti Builders, Inc. • W.E. O’Neil Construction Company • William J. Scown Building Company Interested in what a Stand Down looks like? Check out pictures from Stand Down sites on this page or on the Builders Association’s Flickr account.

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AGC News

Tech Talk XML Initiative Among Topics At AGC’s ITForum In Chicago By Abby Koppers Contractors know that in the matter of a day, jobsites can completely transform, and IT specialists know the same to be true of technology. It’s no wonder that the construction industry is making the final plunge into embracing technology: both industries are here to stay. In fact, the AGC of America is so committed to encouraging the use of technology in construction that this August it will be holding its 5th Annual AGC IT Forum Conference in Chicago. One of the many hot topics to be discussed is the revived agcXML initiative. In 2006, the AGC of America led an industry-wide initiative to improve interoperability between software systems. The end result was the first 10 agcXML schemas, which allow different software systems to communicate using a standardized data convention. Despite its usefulness and practicality, the construction industry wasn’t ready to embrace the technology upon its release, and the initiative stalled. However, the AGC recently decided to revive the initiative with a new team and priorities. One of the major driving forces behind the push to begin embracing acgXML is Builders Association member Christian Burger of Burger Consulting Group, Inc. “The usefulness of agcXML lies in its interoperability and

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integration of different software to facilitate uncomplicated communication,” states Burger, whose company is now the Project Management Office (PMO) for the initiative. agcXML may have had a slow start in 2006, “but now,” says Burger, “the timing and technology are far better.” Burger Consulting will work with the Advisory Board members of the agcXML initiative which is comprised of four construction industry members, six software developers who are sponsoring in the initiative, two members of the AGC IT Steering Committee as well as three members of the PMO. “[agcXML] improves communication through document sharing and collaboration, provides instant access to accurate information, and ensures the delivery of a quality product in the end,” said Fara Francis, Chief Information Officer of AGC of America, and this seamless flow of information is exactly what agcXML provides. “It’s the means to an end, not the end itself,” Burger explains. Burger is scheduled to give a progress report on the agcXML initiative at the AGC IT Forum Conference. “The AGC IT Forum Conference is that one meeting where IT professionals within the construction industry can gather and share ideas and learn from their peers,” describes Francis, who sees the conference as “a way for attendees to learn how they can add to the bottom line of their respective firms, by understanding new and innovative ways to make decisions.”


Project Spotlight Association News

One Company’s Lean Journey While Only At “The Beginning,” Mahalko Already Sees Beefy Benefit Of Lean For Ragnar Benson By Ashley Mastervich Since Ragnar Benson Construction began their Lean journey in 2010, RB has been in the process of completing three projects under Lean construction techniques. Two of these notable projects include Mid-Campus Green Site Improvements and Feinberg School of Medicine Laboratory renovations, both on the campuses of Northwestern University. Jim Mahalko, Manager of Business Development at RB, explained that the journey began in lecture halls before moving to the jobsite. “We started in 2010 by attending lectures to learn how to apply lean tools and principles to our projects,” he stated. “Training and informative sessions took place over the course of late 2011, which then led several of our clients to express interest in participating in RB’s newly founded Lean implications. “Interest from our clients is what really pushed us in the right direction with using Lean.” He also explained that the two projects that are currently underway at both of Northwestern’s campuses can be considered “test projects.” “We are definitely at the beginning with lean construction,” he said. “Many people were skeptical about this process at the beginning, but Lean and its implications have been paying off.” The main difference from past RB projects to their current projects consists of the level of collaboration between owners and their contractors. Other important differences,

that are attributed to Lean construction techniques, include an increase in communication and general teamwork. Overall, Mahalko clarified that, due to Lean’s concept of intense planning and collaboration, this process helps eliminate excessive waste, materials, and time for all stakeholders involved. Not only does he credit Lean techniques with improving a construction project, but the Percent of Plan Complete (PPC) also is credited to successfully completing a construction project with a certain time-frame. Mahalko explained that the average PPC on construction projects is 50-55 percent. By using lean construction techniques on these two project helped improve RB’s follow-though on commitments resulting in them averaging 65-70 percent PPC. In relation to Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine Renovation Project, Mahalko writes, “Pull Planning scheduling has driven a ‘bottom up’ approach to scheduling the construction activities. Our trade partner foremen closely interact while planning the work, greatly streamlining the scheduling process and improving jobsite communications.” “Of course, any project isn’t perfect. However, we have seen improvement with timeliness and the level of collaboration within these specific projects,” Mahalko said. “With additional training and focus, we plan on continually improving our PPC and continue to be encouraged by Lean construction techniques.” The AGC of Wisconsin and Wisconsin’s Lean Construction Institute Community of Practice will host a workshop at Glacier Lodge in Wisconsin Dells July 17.

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Member Milestones Feature

Diving Into The P3 Pool? Contractors Considering P3 Projects Would Be Wise To Test The Waters Before Taking the Plunge By Logan Hollobaugh, Associate at Ogletree Deakins Public-private partnerships (P3) have made a recent splash in the construction contract world as an attractive project delivery method for cash-strapped public entities. P3s allow public entities to address overdue infrastructure and facilities projects without fronting large sums of taxpayer capital. Under typical P3 arrangements, a public owner contracts with a private sector partner (typically referred to as a franchise) to finance, design, build and operate a project for a pre-determined length of time referred to as the “concession period.” The private partner, in turn, benefits by its ability to collect all revenue from the project during the concession period. P3 projects pose unique risks to contractors, and contractors considering bidding on P3 projects need to understand the risks inherent in P3 projects and take steps to minimize those risks from the outset. This article addresses several risks contractors should consider before “taking the plunge” into P3 arrangements.

1. Increased Bidding/Procurement Costs P3 projects are generally large, complex projects which require sophisticated planning, estimating, designing and pre-construction services. P3 projects also demand cost feasibility studies with respect to estimated revenues, operating expenses and return on investment. Contractors must be prepared to bear the upfront time and expense for P3 projects which can be significant. Similar to other construction projects, all of these costs may be lost if the franchise is not selected for the project or if the franchise is selected for the project but the project does not ultimately come to fruition for various reasons. Contractors should consider several components of a P3 project to decrease the chances of losing pre-bidding and procurement costs. First, prior to bidding, contractors should perform additional research on the viability of the project, proposed funding, public interest, and whether the public entity has ever completed a P3 project before. Next, contractors should be selective and seek out projects which

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pre-qualify a short-list of bidders or which offer a stipend for estimating and preparing bids.

2. Increased Contractual Risks Although P3 contracts can be arranged in a variety of ways, many times the contractor selected for a P3 project takes on the role of a design-builder. Contractors familiar with the design-build delivery model are likely aware of the contractual risks presented by a design-build delivery (e.g. single-point responsibility). P3 projects require contractors to take on additional contractual risks over and above singlepoint responsibility. Most P3 projects involve liquidated damages or other liabilities for delays in completing the project which are fundamentally different than typical contractor liabilities. In addition, contractors take the risk of cost escalations during the project (another reason why public entities find P3s so attractive). Finally, contractors must be cognizant of the long-term warranties inherent on P3 projects. Concession periods can extend 25 years or longer, leaving the contractor at risk for warranty issues for a much longer time than standard construction projects. Contractors can avoid some of these additional contract risks by reviewing and agreeing to reasonable contract terms. While contractors will not likely be able to avoid all the additional risks presented on P3 projects, clear and concise contract documents that address the issues arising over the course of the long-term relationship are critical.

3. Payment Protections Mechanics’ lien laws generally do not allow contractors to place liens on public land. This creates a potential problem for contractors (and subcontractors) working on P3 projects in which a federal, state or local government owns the land on which the project is constructed, leaving the contractor


Feature

without any significant lien rights. Before starting work or bidding on a P3 project, contractors should determine whether lien rights exist on the particular project by evaluating legislative language, financing and contract relationships and property interests. For example, one California court performed a similar analysis on a toll road project and determined that the contractor could lien the “private interest” (leasehold and franchise rights) on the public land. However, this presents contractors with a costly and time-consuming state-by-state or even a project-by-project undertaking. For example, the wording used in the Nevada’s lien statute may allow a

contractor to file a mechanics lien but that right depends entirely on whether the P3 deal is structured as a lease transaction.

Conclusion The need for updating public facilities and infrastructure will continue well into the future and P3s offer a new and attractive project delivery method for public entities. As a result, more and more P3 projects will be available as public entities gain experience in this area. However, P3s come with both risk and reward. Contractors aspiring to work on P3 projects should be selective when bidding on P3 projects and should negotiate reasonable contract terms before diving in.

More About Logan Hollobaugh... Mr. Hollobaugh was a member of the Ogletree Deakins’ Construction Industry Practice Group. The core of his practice involves the representation of general contractors, construction managers, design-builders and subcontractors in contract negotiations and project close-out, payment disputes, delay damage and change order claims, contract disputes, and the enforcement of mechanics liens. He has now moved to work for a construction firm in the South. We thank him for his contributions to the Builder and the Builder Blast and wish him the best of luck in all his future endeavors. 11


Safety potential liabilities outside of OSHA regulation, please contact Mark Lies at mlies@seyfarth.com.

Beating The Heat

OSHA LIABILITY FEDERAL

OSHA Campaigns To Protect Employees From Heat Hazards Written By: Mark A. Lies, II, Attorney and Partner at Seyfarth Shaw LLP and Sam Burch, Senior Litigation Counsel with AGL Resources, Inc.

INTRODUCTION As seasonal temperatures climb along with OSHA’s aggressive enforcement efforts, employers must consider their potential liabilities for not protecting employees against the hazard of heat. On April 22, 2011, OSHA announced its Campaign to Prevent Heat Illness in Outdoor Workers. The campaign includes a website, public service announcements, and materials for both workers and their employers. In announcing this Campaign, Hilda Solis, U.S. Secretary of Labor, remarked that heat “can be a real danger for workers in jobs ranging from agriculture and landscaping to construction, road repair, airport baggage handling, even car sales.” Thus, OSHA can be expected to enforce this agenda across the entire spectrum of industries where heat is a factor in the workplace, including the natural gas supply industry. OSHA’s agenda

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regarding heat illness is also focused upon what OSHA believes to be a disproportionate number of Latino worker injuries and fatalities due to outdoor heat exposure in certain occupations. For this reason, it is especially important for employers to evaluate their work sites and conditions for heat hazards and to implement a program to address any such hazards-and to provide training and information to employees in a language they understand. The hazards of heat exposure can involve employer legal duties under many laws, including: • OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act), State OSHA regulations • Americans with Disabilities Act • Criminal Law • Worker’s Compensation • Third-Party Liability (Outside Contractors) For further written information on these

While federal OSHA does not have a standard relating to the hazard of heat, it regulates the hazard of heat exposure in the workplace under the General Duty Clause (Section 5(a)(1)). Heat is a “recognized” hazard to human safety and health. Its impact on employees ranges from nausea to death, depending upon exposure. OSHA requires that employers evaluate whether a heat hazard exists by evaluating the temperature and humidity conditions within the workplace. If a heat hazard exists, employers must develop means and methods to protect employees from heat hazards. These range from changes in work practices (rest breaks, job rotation), to personal protective equipment (cooling vests) to engineering controls (ventilation, cooling rooms). Employers who fail to take such steps are subject to citations and monetary penalties. When an employee becomes incapacitated by heat and requires medical treatment, loses consciousness, has days away from work or restricted duty -- or dies -- this information must be recorded on the OSHA 300 Log. Widespread heat related illnesses may prompt an employee to contact OSHA, resulting in an on-site inspection. Heat-related illness can temporarily diminish an employee’s mental capacity and physical coordination and excessive heat can cause employees to lose focus or muscle control injuring themselves or co-employees. This is a particularly acute problem when operating mechanized equipment or working around hazardous machinery.

OSHA also mandates there be adequate First Aid assistance to provide emergency medical


Safety assistance to heat stricken employees, which must either be provided by the employer or reasonably available from third party responders (e.g., EMTs, fire department) within three to five minutes after the emergency occurs. The likelihood of OSHA enforcement in this area is very high--OSHA has recently issued citations and/or notices of alleged hazards to employers in both the manufacturing and outdoor landscaping industries. These recent efforts, in conjunction with the newly announced Campaign to Prevent Heat Illness in Outdoor Workers as well as OSHA’s enforcement directive on training non-English-speaking workers, issued in May 2010, mandate that employers take immediate steps to address the potential hazards posed by heat exposure.

STATE REGULATION - CALIFORNIA California has promulgated a regulation for Heat Illness Prevention (T8 CCR §3395), which contains extensive requirements to protect employees who may be exposed to the hazard of heat illness. The regulation was initially intended to apply to agricultural employment but the Division of Occupational Safety and Health has attempted to expand its application beyond such employment activities. Federal OSHA has also looked to the California OSHA heat illness standard as a framework for general duty clause enforcement.

INDUSTRY RESPONSE As an example of industry response to this hazard, AGL Resources Inc. has implemented a number of procedures to reduce the risk of heat exhaustion and to promote awareness about the hazard. Some of those procedures include the following: Training • Field employees are provided full-day, comprehensive first aid training, with refreshers every two years. During this training, employees learn how to identify and treat heat exhaustion, as well as how to administer CPR and to provide on-site aid for certain types of injuries. The Company uses both third-party trainers, as well as several in-house certified trainers, to teach these classes. • Supervisors, with the assistance of Corporate Safety, are further encouraged to promote awareness about heat exhaustion on an annual basis by providing field employees with written materials and handouts or conducting on-site safety meetings. • Supervisors are also encouraged to conduct “tailgate meetings” from time to time during especially hot days to remind employees about the importance of remaining hydrated and cool.

Participating Contractors Airtite Contractors Bernhard Woodwork Ltd. Bulley & Andrews, LLC Clark Construction - Chicago Custom Contracting, Ltd. Frank H. Stowell & Sons, Inc. Herlihy Mid-Continent Company Interior Alterations Inc. Interior Construction Group McShane Construction Company Oakwood Contractors, Inc.

Pepper Construction Company Ragnar Benson Construction Ryan Companies US, Inc. The George Sollitt Construction Company The Levy Company Thorne Associates, Inc. Ujamaa Construction Valenti Builders, Inc. W.B. Olson, Inc. W.E. O’Neil Construction Company Wm J. Scown Building Company

Interested in joining them in the Chicagoland area’s most comprehensive Safety Alliance? Contractors can apply at any time. Contact Stacey Kelly at 773-444-0465 or skelly@bldrs.org for more information. 13


Education

Social Media is Benefiting Businesses, and BA Members are Catching on BY ABBY DONALDSON

B

etween the tweets, likes, pins and updates, it is easy to get lost in the social media world. But according to some construction industry firms, all of that lingo may be worth your while. Not only does it help your business branch out, but the new media doesn’t seem to be going anywhere anytime soon. While some may view social media as just a way for teeny-boppers to stay connected, the new media platform is a necessity for businesses and that includes those in the construction industry. “At first, we weren’t sure it would be appropriate in our industry, but we decided to do it anyways and are happy we did,” said Candace Johnson, Marketing Director of Rose Paving Company. Rose’s Twitter feed has cleared 1,700 followers. A lot of other companies who put themselves out into the social media world have seen great returns, and Builders Association members had the opportunity to hear about the risks and rewards first

“An obvious benefit is increased reach.”

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hand at the 2010 Spring Meeting. Detroit’s Barton Malow Construction has seen its social media platforms grow at an incredible rate under the watchful eyes of Marketing Director Donna Jakubowicz and Marketing Systems Manager Kelly McNair. “An obvious benefit is increased reach,” said a statement from Jakubowicz and McNair. “When a publication like ENR retweets one of our tweets, we immediately reach a much larger audience. Social media also allows us to more easily connect with our clients and peers in real-time. This helps deepen relationships and boosts our brand.” See what Jakubowicz and McNair are tweeting by following Barton Malow Company on Twitter @BartonMalow. “Another benefit we’ve found is the use of social media as a recruiting tool. The best and brightest check out potential firms before they apply. One place younger potential employees check is social media,” said Jakubowicz. James McHugh Construction Company has tweeted about charitable enterprises, progress on buildings, and even the NBC show Chicago Fire when it shot part of an episode at one of their sites. According to Marketing Coordinator Shelly Griggs, the company started to use both Facebook and

Twitter in 2009. “We realized what a great marketing and promotional tool each are,” Griggs said. “It is a great tool to connect with a wide variety of people. We are able to promote our clients, connect with architects, engineers, subcontractors and other industry organizations, and also share news with our employees, laborers, and family and friends of McHugh Construction.” Chicago law firm and Builders Association member SmithAmundsen, LLC began with a Labor Employment Blog and built to an increased presence on Twitter, Facebook, FourSquare and Pinterest. “It’s an excellent tool for reaching those new audiences, and it allows us to write and connect with audiences outside of the traditional marketing or sales sphere that our traditional website or brochures would be in, which often allows for a greater connection with a contact,” said Sara Kornaus of SmithAmundsen. Many in the construction industry have stayed away from social media, wary that it is just a time consumption without any return. However, therein lies one of the best things about social media, according to those who use it. “It’s free and you are able to dedicate as much time to it as you desire,” Griggs said. “It’s something you can do easily no


Education matter what size your company is. You’d Jakubowicz said. “It helps if you empower be amazed at how many of your clients are your employees. A number of employees using social media.� have access to post on both our Facebook One key to maintaining any momentum and Twitter sites. By encouraging gained from new media has been employees to post, we have regular updates consistently producing relevant copy. and, most important, the conversation stays Weis Builders current. Marketing Coordinator “Stop worrying about Jen Bolsted was quick employees wasting time to point out that it’s not on Facebook, we haven’t just a matter of finding seen that at all. Instead, a short phrase and our challenge has been being done with it. She reminding employees to said it has been worth tweet or post to Facebook. the hard work though. We all get so wrapped up in “You just have our real jobs that we forget to keep an eye to take a few seconds to out,� Bolsten said. post an update.� “You can’t just slap For those companies something out there, that are just beginning you need to maintain to use social media, it streams of relevant can be hard to make the content. It takes some transition. Johnson and preparation, but it’s other social media buffs well worth the effort.� Donna Jakubowicz, Spring 2010 Meeting suggest having a solid Along the lines of plan beforehand, including relevant content, Kornaus said that too knowing exactly what you want from those often she has seen inconsistent postings kill platforms to accomplish. a new media effort before it has a chance to “It’s okay if you don’t think you’re truly find its’ legs. technically savvy,� Johnson said. “There “Companies decide they want to start are experts and consultants that can help a blog and then will post something once and guide you in the right direction. Also, a month,� she said. “It’s actually more for those businesses that just don’t have harmful than not having a social media it all figured out yet, I think it’s worth it presence at all. The challenge is to always to partner with an expert and determine remember audience and always provide the what your goals are. Do you want to get audience with a takeaway- in social media. your name out there, or offer discounts or It’s all about the consumer, transparency, incentives? It’s important not to go into it and two-way communication. blind.� “When social media first began, “If you are not using the general consensus was that it social media, you are would never be a platform for B2B missing the boat,� (business to business) companies to Jakubowicz said. use. Hopefully SmithAmundsen and “Your competition the thousands of other B2B companies is online and your that are now using social media clients and the media successfully, have proved that wrong.� are listening and Jakubowicz cited numbers to prove watching. In today’s her point: 50 percent of the population communications currently uses Facebook, and more environment, if than 37 percent use Twitter. With that you’re not on social much of the populace involved, she media, you don’t says many employers miss a built-in exist. benefit and a way to save both costs and “Social media is not a fad, it’s a time. significant tool. The platforms may change “Barton Malow’s use of social media overtime, but social media isn’t going away isn’t limited to one or two individuals,� and therefore, we can’t ignore it.�

“The platform may change over time, but social media isn’t going away.�



























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Member Milestones Coming Attractions

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Coming Attractions Member Milestones Association

Golf Outing Thursday, July 11, 2013 Orchard Valley Golf Course, Aurora, IL

Golf Package:

Foursomes:

$300 Donation Per Person

$1,200 Donation

Includes lunch, golf, cocktails, giveaways, hors d’oeuvres & dinner

Receive a foursome AND a $400 Hole Sponsorship for $1,495 o Take advantage of this offer

Reception Only: $100 Donation Includes cocktails, hors d’oeuvres & dinner

Please complete the following (duplicate this form if necessary): Company: Address: o Golf o Reception Only Name, Title, Company (if different from above), Email Shirt Size Men's: o M o L o XL o XXL Women’s: o S

o M o L o XL

o Golf o Reception Only Name, Title, Company (if different from above), Email Shirt Size Men's: o M o L o XL o XXL Women’s: o S

o M o L o XL

o Golf o Reception Only Name, Title, Company (if different from above), Email Shirt Size Men's: o M o L o XL o XXL Women’s: o S

o M o L o XL

o Golf o Reception Only Name, Title, Company (if different from above), Email Shirt Size Men's: o M o L o XL o XXL Women’s: o S o M o L o XL

Sponsorship Information: Company: o My company will be a

Name: sponsor for the Builders Scholarship Foundation Golf Outing

Donation (made payable to Builders Scholarship Foundation): Total: $ Check enclosed o Name On Card: Card Number:

Charge my: o VISA

o MasterCard

o AMEX

VCode (on back of the card)

Signature: Expiration Date:

Billing Address:

Check or Fax Payments: Checks should be made payable to the Builders Scholarship Foundation. Donations can be mailed to: Builders Association, 8430 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 710, Chicago, IL 60631 or faxed to 773.444.0469. Register online at www.bldrs.org.

17


Coming Attractions

BUILDERS SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION GOLF OUTING SPONSORSHIPS Event - $5,000 One Available Sponsor identi!cation banner at entrance and reception; Foursome for golf & reception; Display space during event

Shirt - $3,000

SOLD

One Available Sponsor name and logo on golf shirts

19th Hole Cocktail Reception - $1,500 One Available Sponsor identi!cation on signage at bar; Display space during event

SOLD

Prize - $1,500 One Available Sponsor identi!cation on signage; Special recognition during reception

Course Refreshment Sponsor - $1,500

SOLD

One Remaining Sponsor identi!cation on beverage cart signs; Display space during event

Water Bottle - $1,500

SOLD

One Available Sponsor name and logo on water bottles

18

9


Coming Attractions

BUILDERS SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION GOLF OUTING SPONSORSHIPS Lunch - $1,200 One Available Sponsor identi!cation on event signage

Each includes recognition in promotional materials and mention during the event reception, in addition to the listed bene!ts. Sponsorships are !rst come, !rst served. Contact Andy Cole at 773.444.0465 or acole@bldrs.org to ask about availability.

Golf Ball - $1,000

SOLD

One Available Sponsor name and logo on golf balls; Event signage

Sunscreen - $1,000 One Available Sponsor name and logo on sunscreen Event signage

SOLD

Lip Balm - $1,000

SOLD

One Available Sponsor name and logo on lip balm

Granola Bar - $1,000 One Available Sponsor name and logo on granola bar wrapper; Event Signage

SOLD

Hole-In-One - $600 Two Remaining Table at hole

Hole - $400 Five Available See the registration form for more on a special discounted offer for a foursome AND a hole sponsorship

19


Member Milestones Coming Attractions

BUILDERS ASSOCIATION CONTRACTOR SAFETY FORUM Thursday, August 15, 2013 Breakfast: 7:30 a.m. Program: 8-10 a.m. Builders Association Of!ce Building First Floor Conference Room 8430 W. Bryn Mawr Avenue, Chicago

Not many like to spend their time doing paperwork. When it comes to safety, however, paperwork can make the difference between a day on the job or a day in court, making it a vital part of your safety program. Join us for breakfast and our quarterly Contractor Safety Forum as Bradford Purcell of Purcell & Wardrope presents “Critical Safety Documents Used In Litigation.” Learn how to best prepare yourself regarding which documents will help or hurt the litigation of bodily injury claims. As always, the program will include our open Forum to allow Chicagoland’s best construction safety directors to talk about current issues all companies are seeing on the jobsite and how best to handle those issues. For more information, or if interested in sponsoring this event for $300 contact Stacey Kelly at skelly@bldrs.org or 773-444-0465.

20


Coming Attractions Member Milestones Association

Contractor Safety Forum Thursday, August 15, 2013, 8-10 a.m. Builders Association Of!ce Building First Floor Conference Room 8430 W. Bryn Mawr Avenue, Chicago, IL 60631

Answers To Your Safety Questions...On Demand Safety Forums put construction professionals from all over Chicagoland in the same room, allowing you to the opportunity to see how other companies are meeting the same challenges you face when it comes to safety. Help us create your Safety Forum agenda by submitting at least one safety question youÂ&#x2019;d like to see addressed at the forum. Use additional sheet if needed.

Registration Information: $45 for members Mail checks to: Builders Association, 8430 W. Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 710, Chicago, IL 60631 Fax credit card registrations to: (773) 444-0469 or register online at www.bldrs.org Company Information: Company Address City, State, Zip Phone

Fax

People Attending: Name, Title Name, Title Name, Title Payment: Amount Enclosed Charge To VISA q MasterCard q AmEx q Card Number Billing Address

Email Email Email

VCode (on back) Expiration Date

Name on Card Signature 21


About Us

The Builder is published periodically by the Builders Association, a trade association of commercial, industrial and institutional contractors and affiliated industry firms dedicated to quality construction in Chicagoland.

2013 Board Of Directors Chairman Jimmy Akintonde Ujamaa Construction, Inc.

Vice Chairman Jeff Raday McShane Construction Company

Treasurer Ken Egidi Pepper Construction Company

Immediate Past Chairman Ben Johnston James McHugh Construction Company

Mark Bernhard Bernhard Woodwork, Ltd.

Steve Lenz George Sollitt Construction Company

Mike Mozal Joseph J. Duffy Company

Matt Sprenzel Installation Specialists, Inc.

Dave Trolian Clark Construction Group-Chicago

Ray Wojkovich Bulley & Andrews, LLC

2013 Builders Association Staff President Al Leitschuh

Project Manager Stacey Kelly

Labor & Membership Director Denise Herdrich

Communications Intern Abby Koppers

Communications Manager Andy Cole

Builders Association 8430 West Bryn Mawr Ave. Suite 710 Chicago, IL 60631 22

Phone: 773-444-0465 Fax: 773-444-0469 www.bldrs.org


The Builder, Vol. 17, Issue 2