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Sports Downers Grove North topples Proviso West, York in girls b-ball Page 11

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News Deadlines passes for unemployment benefits

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Page 8

Our Village, Our News

DECEMBER 8, 2010

Vol. 2 No. 33

Robert Bykowski/Staff photographer

People shopping and browsing on Downers Grove’s Main Street on Sunday. The downtown area plays host to a variety of shops to fill holiday gift lists or family game nights.

Niche stores offer unique shopping experience By Debbie Lively Staff reporter

Shoppers may be able to find a different kind of shopping experience at some unique stores along Main Street in Downers Grove. At Cares Bears Candy Lane, owner Lisa Koma came up with the ideas of meshing candy with

bear-making to create her store located at 5221 Main Street in Downers Grove. And this Christmas she’s offering things like a “retro candy box,” filled with old-time treats such as flying saucers and marshmallow ice cream cones. She also offers new candy bouquets filled with current favorites like M&M’s, and Snickers bars.

“My store brings all generations together,” said Koma surrounded by candy and pink and blue bears.“We sell a retro candy box, and it’s good for anyone who’s into nostalgic candy,” she added. Koma, a Darien resident, opened the store about a year ago after managing a similar teddy bear stuffing business for an employer.

A large part of her unique business is creating candy/bear creation themed parties held on the second floor of the store. It’s a space bursting with reds, greens, and pinks decorated in a Candyland board game motif all hand-painted by her daughter. Anyone shopping on Main Street this holiday season will find unique items like the “retro

candy box” combined with better customer service. “You will find here a level of service and personal touch that you don’t get in the mall,” she said. For more information about Candy Bear Lane, visit www. candybearlane.com See STORES, page 220


NEWS 2

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

STORES Continued from page 1 Just across the street is Knitche, a knitting, yarn and espresso store, where people come in for both the classes and the coffee. Owner Kathy Ticho said what holiday shoppers could find at Knitche, at 5150B Main Street is a merger of knitting and espresso. Inside the store the walls are decorated with shelves of yarns, while an espresso bar and pastries counter centers the space. “Right now people are coming in looking for projects that they can complete quickly like hats, scarves and mittens to give away as holiday gifts,” said Ticho, whose store is busiest from October through March. “For us as soon as it gets cold people start to come,” she said. Ticho has run the businesses for six and half years. “I just had this idea to marry

Robert Bykowski/Staff photographer

Knitche, 5150B Main St., aims to keep visitors warm on the outside and inside with yarn projects and an espresso bar.

the espresso bar and the knitting, and now some people just come for the espresso,” said Ticho, who got the ideas for the knitting store when she realized how much she and her friends would

get together at local coffee shops to knit. The store offers classes, patterns, and eco-friendly yarn. For more information, visit www. knitche.com Fair Game, possibly the

newest store on Main Street, is an alternative game store that encourages families to connect over board games. The store opened its doors on Black Friday.

“I want to encourage families to pull the plug on electronics and reconnect – in an environment of challenge, competition and dialogue,” Josh Stein, owner of Fair Game, located at 5150 Main Street. As a father of three school-age children, Stein found inspiration for the store within his own family. “Playing interactively on a game console like Wii or Xbox,” he said, “We often found ourselves more focused on the screen than each other and … and dialogue really suffered. So, I wanted to give myself and other parents an alternative.” At Fair Game holiday shoppers can find parlor or,“hobby,” games including board, card, roleplaying and dexterity games, most of which are not available at mainstream retailers, said Stein, and the store has several table areas where people can play and enjoy the games before purchasing. For more information, visit www.fairgamestore.com.


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

$5.5 million in bonds issued for new senior facility By Debbie Lively Staff reporter

The village of Woodridge could soon begin construction on its first senior living facility. Last week the village placed $5.5 million worth of bonds on the market to fund the project that is expected to be built at the location currently occupied by the Pine Ridge Apartments at 8055 Janes Avenue, in Woodridge. “That (senior facility) has become a high priority for residents,” said Michael Mays, the village’s director of community development.“We’ve heard from residents at community town hall meetings. Seniors housing is at the top of the list.” The village has received the AAA rating by credit rating agencies Fitch Ratings and Moody’s Investor Services. “The Fitch rating noted the village’s continued ability to maintain sound reserve levels in the face of the potential for reduced state aide and sales tax collections,” said village officials. And Moody cited the village’s residential tax base, location to Chicago, and low anticipated draws on reserves. “It’s anticipated that the bond will be sold in the next couple of weeks. Because of the village’s

Robert Bykowski/Staff photographer

The site of the current Pine Ridge Apartments , 8055 Janes Avenue, in Woodridge, will soon be home to the village first senior living facility.

excellent bond rating,” said Mays. “The more secure a government entity, the more desirable the interest.” Proceeds of the bonds will be used for the purpose of a 32-unit,

3.4-acre apartment complex for future redevelopment as senior housing as well as support for a $10 million reinvestment by a local developer in a 123-unit multi-family complex.

Currently the Pine Ridge Apartment complex is owned be a developer who in the process of rehabbing the buildings. The developer will eventually sell two of the building to the

village, which will become part of the senior housing facility, and 123 of the units will be sold to the public at market rate. And the village is in the process of closing on the acreage in what will become the village’s first senior living facility. The village will demolish those two building in 2011, combining the property with the 3.4 acres and place the senior housing facility project out to bid to search for a developer.The village expects to spend 7.5 million on the project to purchase, build and provide developer incentives for the senior center. In 2006, the board approved a home rule sales tax of a quarter percent toward reinvestment of the Janes Corridor, an area of Janes Avenue between 75th and 83rd streets, and the village has collected about $2 million from that tax base. Officials predict that in 20 years, the value of the proposed land is expected to grow from its current value of $3 million, to over $20 million in equalized assessed value, said Mays. “It is a complex project but is one the village is eager to move forward on,” he added. For more information about the village’s bond rating, visit www.vil.woodridge.il.us. dlively@buglenewspapers.com

Give holidays a greener glow by recycling burned out lights By Debbie Lively Staff reporter

This holiday season local residents can recycle more than Christmas trees, the village of Downers Grove has set up an “green”way to dispose of tangled, frayed or burned-out Christmas lights in the village’s first lights recycling program. “I think what people typically do with their lights when they don’t work, they just throw them in the garbage,” said Mary Van Milligen, village’s municipal management intern “This is a good opportunity for people to have something else to do with

their lights.” Residents can drop off their lights during business hours, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Dec. 1 through Feb. 18, 2011, at the Downers Grove Public Works Facility, located at 5101 Walnut Avenue. “This is the first time that we’ve every done it. The village is constantly looking for ways to have more sustainable programs,” said Van Milligen. The village is working with Elgin Recycling to recycle the items. The copper wiring inside of the lights and extension cords is of interest to the recycling

company. “The copper wire is worth something. They pay us for the copper, but it’s very small,” said Van Milligen. “This is not intended to be a revenue driven program. It’s intended to give people something to do with their light.” Last year the village of Wheaton collected $600 in its recycled lights program. Items accepted in the seasonal recycling program are:mini-lights (also known as Italian lights), C7 lights, C9 lights, rope lights, LED lights, and extension cords. dlively@buglenewspapers.com

The Downers Grove Public Works Facility, located at 5101 Walnut Avenue will be accepting tangled, frayed or burned-out Christmas lights until Feb. 18, 2011.


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010 5

Sandack takes state senate seat, votes on civil union By Debbie Lively dlively@buglenewspapers.com

It was a whirlwind week for Mayor Ron Sandack who was sworn in as a state senator, and required to vote on the controversial civil union bill. Sandack replaced Dan Cronin in the Illinois Senate, who was recently elected to DuPage County Board Chairman. As the senate’s newest member, Sandack voted against the controversial civil union bill that will permit both same-sex and opposite-sex couples to enter into civil unions and receive the same benefits, protections, and

responsibilities under Illinois law that are granted to spouses. Sandack said that he wanted to vote in favor Ron of the bill, but Sandack that he didn’t see the bill as proponents had painted it. “I had to vote no,” said Sandack. “They called the bill civil union to get it passed. If you read the bill, it is gay marriage cloaked in civil union.” The bill passed the senate by a 32-24 vote.

“Gay marriage is different then civil union. I like the civil union part, but that’s not what was really in there. The sanctity of marriage means some thing to lots of people,” he said. The legislation was “poorly” written and that sponsors of the bill, although well intended, promoted the bill as “moderate middle ground” and pushed it through Springfield too quickly, he added. “True civil unions should require a heck more time to do it right, but it made for great theater,” said Sandack. The manner that the legislation was moved through

both the House and Senate could set the stage for democrats to gather momentum for upcoming legislation. And he further questioned why such weighty issues such pension reform, medicinal marijuana, modifications to the death penalty, and extending largescale gambling in Chicago were being voted on during a veto session just before the holiday. Sandack, who often spoke of pension reform in the months prior to his appointment, voted in favor of pension reform at the state level. A pension reform bill also passed in the senate during his first week in state office.

“It got bi-partisan support. Everybody gave up a little something,” he said. Sandack, who was sworn into office last week at the Downers Grove Village Hall, described his first visit to Springfield as a whirlwind. “It was baptism by fire. I learned a lot, and I largely kept my mouth shut because I’m trying to learn, but everyone was really nice and supportive,” he said. The civil union bill was introduced by Rep. Greg Harris and passed both the Illinois House of Representatives and the Illinois Senate.

31students from Dist. 99 chosen for music conference A total of 31 student musicians from Community High School District 99 were selected to perform at the prestigious 2011 Illinois Music Educators’ Association All-State Conference in Peoria in January.The students will be part of the All-State Band, Choir, Orchestra, Jazz Band, Future Music Educators Seminar and Secondary General Music Composition performances. Concerts will be held at the Peoria Civic Center on the evening of Friday, Jan. 28 and the afternoon of Saturday, Jan. 29.  In October,students auditioned in front of professional musicians and submitted recordings to composers from across the Midwest for the chance to receive one of the highly coveted slots in their respective categories. The IMEA District, which covers much of DuPage and Cook Counties, is one of the most competitive in Illinois.  x“This is a tremendous honor for these students,” comments Glenn Williams, Fine Arts Department Chair at South High. “All-State selection represents the pinnacle of musical achievement for a high school student musician. We are very proud of

our students, and look forward to hearing their performances in January.” “We are really thrilled for these students and their families,” says Brayer Teague, Fine Arts Department Chair at North High. “Many people helped these students achieve this success, beginning with their very first elementary school music teachers and extending to their private-lessons teachers today.  We are very proud.” Students who were selected to perform include: All-State Band Pat Bartlett –Tuba - Junior Brandon Broholm – Tuba  Senior Carly Charles – Horn - Junior Kirsten Keller – Orchestral Flute - Senior Marie Kirkegaard – Clarinet – Senior Billy Moroney – Clarinet   Junior Lexi Osborn – Flute - Senior Zach Plata – Clarinet - Junior Suzanne Segredo – Orchestral Oboe - Senior Stephen Shatzer – Orchestral Bassoon - Junior Jonathan Sheetz – Bass Clarinet - Junior

Michelle Spiewak – Horn Junior Isaac Stevenson – Orchestral Percussion - Senior Tiffany Wu – Flute - Senior All-State Choir Abby Gardner – Alto  - Senior Kaitlin Jeffries – Alto - Senior Josh Smith – Tenor  - Senior Lilly Space –Alto I – Senior Erin C. Walsh – Soprano I Junior Samantha Worlton –Alto II Senior All-State Orchestra Marisa Bellie – Double Bass Senior Aaron Collins –Violin  - Junior Lauren Kovanko – Viola Junior Meghan Lyda – Cello - Junior Nikki Mihelich –Cello - Senior Alana Osterling – Cello Sophmore Lisa Salazar – Viola  - Junior Hannah Young – Band Harp -

Junior All-State Jazz Band Mike Ruth –Alto Saxophone Junior All-State Future Music Educator Seminar Callie Sorce - Senior

All-State Music Composition Contest Zach Plata – Junior- 1st place – Arranging – Rhapsody on Two Familiar Folk Songs Meredith Richard – Senior1st place – Vocal Solo – In Our Hearts


POLICE BLOTTER Man arrested for counterfeit bills 6

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

By Debbie Lively Staff reporter

A Woodridge man was recently arrested for using counterfeit money to purchasing gift cards at a local Toys R Us store. Last week Downers Grove police charged Julius Unseld, 26, of 73005 S. Woodward Ave., Woodridge for purchasing two gift cards using counterfeit one hundred dollar bills at a Toys R Us store, at 1540 75th St. He was

arrested two hours later when he tried to use the cards at a second Toys R Us store, located at 1434 Butterfield Rd. Unseld entered the first store on the morning of Dec. 1 and purchased two gift cards, one for $500, and a second for $900, allegedly using one hundred dollar bills. The suspect initially asked for a $1,000 gift card, but changed his mind stating that he wanted one for $900. After Unseld left the store, the

manager immediately cancelled the gift cards, and alerted police, according to police reports. Police asked the cashier who made the transaction if there was anything unusual about the conversation with the suspect. The employee said that Unseld had asked for her phone number, and that she had declined to give it to him. Several hours later a store manager at the Toys R Us store on Butterfield Rd. called police

because he believed that the suspect was now at his location, along with a woman and a child. The store manager also said that Unseld had presented one of the cards purchased from the 75th St. store and attempted to purchase $400 worth of merchandise. The suspect also asked the cashier if funds from one gift card could be transferred to a new gift card, which the manager said was out of the ordinary, according to police reports.

“The store contacted us, and stalled the offenders who were taken into custody,” police said. The woman with Unseld, who was his wife, was released without charges, and a report of the counterfeit crime was sent to the United States Secret Service Department. Unseld was charged with a Class 4 Felony of theft by deception, and was taken to DuPage County Jail, where he was later released on bail.

was approached by several unknown black males, no further description, one who displayed an unknown black handgun, who then stole the subject’s wallet, phone and keys. The victim was struck by the suspects with an unknown object, but sustained no injuries.

from the 5600 block of Catalpa, Chicago, was charged with retail theft after she removed several electronic items from Target in the 2300 block of 63rd Street.

influence of alcohol following a traffic stop near the intersection of Lemont Rd. and Davey Rd.

Arrest Reports The following items were compiled from the official reports of the Downers Grove and Woodridge Police Departments. Appearing in the police blotter does not constitute a finding of guilt, only a court of law can make that determination.

Downers Grove • Maurie Velasquez, 31, of 3634 N. Kilpatrick was arrested at 8:27 p.m. Nov. 30 at 7500 Lemont for suspended registration for noninsurance. • Josefina Beatriz Meluzzi, 52, of 4322 Fairview, Downers Grove was arrested at 7 p.m. Nov. 30 at Ogden Avenue and Stonewall Street for driving with a suspended license.

theft. • Gladys Valenzuela, 46, of 1677 Briarcliff Rd., Wheaton was arrested at 6:07 p.m. Nov. 29 at 900 Ogden for driving with a license. • Julius Unseld, 26, 7332 Woodward, Woodridge was arrested at 11:14 a.m. Dec. 1 at 1434 Butterfield Rd. for theft by deception.

Woodridge • A criminal defacement of property occurred at approximately 10:40 p.m. Nov. 22 in the 2400 block of Meadowdale Lane. Unknown persons marked the walls in a stairwell with graffiti.

• Erica Rosales, 23, of 5249 Belmont Rd, Downers Grove was arrested at 10:05 p.m. at 6400 Woodward for obstructing identification and driving without a license.

• A theft occurred sometime between 9:30 p.m. on Nov. 22 and 8:00 a.m. on Nov. 23 in the 2400 block of Meadowdale Lane. Unknown persons removed all four tires and rims of a parked vehicle.

• David Levine, 21, of 508 Montrose Dr., Romeoville was arrested at 9:40 a.m. Nov. 29 at Main and Franklin streets for

• At approximately 7:10 p.m. on Nov. 24, an armed robbery occurred in the 7200 block of Woodward Ave. A subject

• A theft occurred at approximately 9:20 a.m. Nov. 25 at Thornton Oil in the 2400 block of 63rd Street. Unknown persons pumped 17 gallons of gas and left without paying for the purchase. • A criminal damage to property occurred sometime between 6:00 p.m. on Nov. 25 and 3:00 a.m. on Nov. 26 in the 3400 block of Foxboro Drive. Unknown persons punctured all four tires of a parked vehicle. • At approximately 12 p.m. Nov. 26, Jeremy Blizzard, 20, from the 2700 block of Jonquil,Woodridge, was charged with retail theft after he removed a pair of tennis shoes from Kohl’s in the 1000 block of 75th Street. • At approximately 12 p.m. Nov. 26, Janet Rodriguez, 27,

• A criminal damage to property occurred sometime between 9:00 p.m. on Nov. 26 and 2:00 a.m. on Nov. 28 in the 3400 block of 83rd Street. Unknown persons damaged the front and back passenger side tires of a parked vehicle. • At approximately 4:30 a.m. Nov. 27, Patrick Snell, 25, from the 500 block of Charlestown Drive, Bolingbrook, was charged with driving under the influence following a traffic stop near the intersection of 75th Street and Janes Ave. • At approximately 1 a.m. Nov. 27, Kevin Yessa, 49, from the 7300 block of Trent Rd., Downers Grove, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop in the 1800 block of 75th Street. • At approximately 3 a.m. Nov. 27, James Pigatto, 23, from the 13000 block of Parker Rd., Lemont, was charged with driving under the

• At approximately 9 p.m. Nov. 27, Mark Schuering, 55, from the 10 block of Deerpath Ln., Lemont, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol following a traffic stop near the intersection of Janes Ave. and 83rd Street. • A burglary to motor vehicle occurred sometime between 10:15 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. Nov 29 in the 900 block of S. frontage Rd. Unknown persons smashed the driver’s side window of a parked vehicle and removed a GPS unit. • A burglary occurred sometime between 10:30 p.m. on Nov. 29 and 8 a.m. on Nov. 30 at Janes Pantry in the 2300 block of 75th Street. Unknown persons broke a glass door, and removed $170 in cash from the register. • At criminal defacement of property occurred sometime between 12:30 a.m. and 7:15 a.m. on Nov. 30 in the 2400 block of Forest Ave. Unknown persons marked the side of a building with graffiti.


FORUM

Please write You are invited to use the Forum page of The Bugle to express your opinions about matters that affect our community. E-mail your letter to Grace Tucker, managing editor, at gtucker@ buglenewspapers.com; send your letter to The Bugle, P.O. Box 1613, Plainfield, IL 60544; or drop off your letter at our office at 23856 S. Route 59; or fax to 815-436-2592. For more information, call (815) 436-2431. Letters to the editor must be signed and include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone number for verification purposes. Please try to limit your comments to 500 words or less. The editors reserve the right to publish, condense, revise or reject any submissions.

Publisher Rich Masterson publisher@buglenewspapers.com Editor-in-chief Andrew Schneider aschneider@buglenewspapers.com Managing Editor M. Grace Tucker gtucker@buglenewspapers.com Sports Editor Rob Valentin rvalentin@buglenewspapers.com Reporters Sherri Dauskurdis Rick Kambic Laura Katauskas Debbie Lively Sports Reporters Mark Gregory Scott Taylor Staff Photographer Robert Bykowski Editorial Deadlines Calendar & News: 3 p.m. Monday, three weeks before date of publication Letters to Editor: 9 a.m. Friday

Vice President of Advertising and Marketing Michael James mjames@voyagermediaonline.com Production Director Andrew Samaan andrew@buglenewspapers.com Advertising Sales sales@buglenewspapers.com Published by Voyager Media Group, Inc. P.O. Box 1613 23856 W. Andrew Rd. Plainfield, IL 60585 (815) 436-2431 • Fax (815) 436-2592 www.buglenewspapers.com news@buglenewspapers.com Office hours Mon. - Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Ad Deadlines Space and Copy deadlines for Display and Classified Ads is 3 p.m. Friday before date of insertion. (Except holidays & special sections.) Legals, Obituaries and Happy Ads are due at noon Monday.

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

Illustrated Opinions

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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

Unemployed face uncertainty as deadline passes By Laura Katauskas Staff reporter

With an unemployment rate of 7.2 percent in DuPage County alone, a move to delay legislation that would extend unemployment benefits will affect thousands right in time for the holidays while Democrats and Republicans battle over how to pay for it. Unemployment benefits began to expire November 30, with nearly two million people losing benefits by the first of the year without an extension. House Republicans recently blocked legislation, the Emergency Unemployment Compensation Continuation Act that would extend Federal unemployment insurance (UI) programs for three months. According to news reports from the Associated Press, President Obama announced Monday, an emerging agreement with Republicans on long-term unemployment benefits, among other issues. Reportedly under the plan, unemployment benefits would remain in effect through the end of next year for workers who have been laid off for more than 26 weeks and less than 99 weeks. The report said, in his announcement, Obama said he had agreed on a bipartisan framework, and said he wanted Congress to approve it before

lawmakers adjourn for the year later this month. In a telling sign that the White House recognizes the extent of Democratic opposition, officials said they would prefer the Senate vote first. The Republican House of Representatives charge that Democrats attempted to add another $12 billion to the nation’s debt by refusing to provide a fiscally sound way to extend federal unemployment benefits. According to the House and Ways Means Committee Republican Office, there have been eight extensions of federal unemployment insurance benefits since mid-2008, adding a total of $123 billion to the nation’s nearly $14 trillion debt. “Members on both sides of the aisle have supported unemployment benefits in the past, but there is strong disagreement about whether we can continue to extend benefits for millions of people without paying for them,” said U.S. Representative Judy Biggert (R-IL-13).“The best way to extend benefits is to offset the cost with spending cuts elsewhere, not by adding to the $14 trillion debt that already is burdening our economy.” Democrats point to a U.S. Department of Labor Survey, that reports that the Unemployment Insurance (UI) system helps the population most directly affected

by recessions—those who have lost jobs through no fault of their own. The survey reports that the focus of UI makes it one of the most effective targeted tools for maintaining American families’ purchasing power and keeping the economy on track during an economic downturn. Survey results indicate that unemployment creates a snowball effect where people who have lost their job reduce their spending causing businesses to lose money and others to lose their jobs. Unemployment insurance acts to reduce this effect by helping the unemployed to continue to purchase vital goods and services for their family. The temporary federal unemployment benefits programs started to be phased out at the end of November, when Congress failed to extend them. This means that even individuals exhausting the six months of regular, state-provided unemployment benefits are now ineligible for Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC). “The experts agree—two out of every three people who get unemployment benefits are middle class,” said Subcommittee on Income Security and Family Support Chairman Jim McDermott (D-WA) in a press release on the issue. “While the Republicans don’t mind

bankrupting the country to give $700 Billion in unpaid tax cuts to the rich with one hand, the Republicans are using the other hand to push unemployed middle class Americans out of their homes, to prevent them from having food on their table, and to keep their children from being properly clothed.” According to the Committee on Ways and Means Democratic Office, consistent with past Democratic and Republican Congresses, the bill is considered emergency spending and is estimated to cost $12.5 billion. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) found that because unemployment benefits increase consumer demand and spending, while preventing people from falling out of the labor market, “the extensions of unemployment insurance benefits in the past few years increased both employment and participation in the labor force over what they would otherwise have been in 2009.” The House and Ways Means Committee Republican Office argues that the Democrats’ trillion-dollar ‘stimulus’ plan signed in 2009 failed to deliver on the promise that it would create 3.7 million jobs and lower the unemployment rate to 7 percent by now, but instead has increased debt and has seen the unemployment rate spike to 10 percent. While both Republicans and

Unemployment percentages per town, not seasonally adjusted

October 2010 (most current month available)

Downers Grove: 7.0 Woodridge: 7.8 Bolingbrook: 8.5 Romeoville: 9.0 Plainfield: 7.9 Illinois average: 9.2 National average: 9.0 Source: Illinois Department of Department of Employment Security

Democrats support helping the long-term unemployed, Republicans are arguing for a more responsible way to pay for these benefits by cutting less effective stimulus spending. Biggert said that it is expected that Congress will vote on the issue again in the coming weeks. “I am hopeful that Democrat leaders agree to bring a bipartisan compromise to the floor,” said Biggert. “The American people spoke clearly on November 2; they want Congress to start taking fiscal responsibility seriously and stop borrowing money like there is no tomorrow.” katauskas@buglenewspapers.com

Despite deadlines, claimants should continue benefits filings By Rick Kambic Staff reporter

Some important unemployment deadlines have come and gone, but state officials are trying to keep applicants on track. The timetable is based on what level of benefits applicants were receiving and when those benefits began. “You had to end a program by a specific date in order to be eligible to graduate to the next tier, not the other way around,” said Greg Rivara, spokesperson for the Illinois Department of Employment Security. While a lack of awareness is a common problem, Rivara said information can be found without waiting in long lines at

the local IDES offices. “There are approximately 389,000 claimants in Illinois today,” Rivara said.“Each claimant has been sent paperwork telling them what program they’re collecting under. We would encourage individuals to refer to that paperwork or go to our Web site if they misplaced that paperwork.” Congress set the deadlines through legislation, but another continuation was recently blocked by Republicans in the House of Representatives. However, Rivara said it may be just a matter of time and applicants should stick to their schedules. “We’ve been at this junction

before and benefits have been extended or expanded several times already,” Rivara said. “An individual who has exhausted the allotted benefits is encouraged to continue to certify for benefits in case Congress does reauthorize these programs. He said claimants can create a user name and password on the IDES Web site and verify what program they’re in, as well as recertify and monitor other personal information. Some people recertify via the phone system, but Rivara said using the Web site connects the user with more information and resources. State officials also want claimants to keep up with the IDES job training and job search

programs because state trends are looking positive. “In past recessions, the country recovered more quickly than the state,” Rivara said. “Right now, we are not seeing that. In fact, the Illinois economy is growing faster than the national economy — slightly faster, but still faster none the less.” The national unemployment average was at 9 percent in October, as Illinois’ rate was 9.2 percent. “As Illinois emerges from the national recession, its unemployment rate has declined for seven consecutive months while employment has grown in nine of the past 10 months. This steady, consistent trend shows

Illinois is moving forward,” IDES Director Maureen O’Donnell said. “As we move forward, we must continue the successful strategy of intelligent, focused tax incentives and tailored workforce training programs.” Illinois added 8,000 jobs in October, its largest monthly gain in the last six months. Job sectors leading Illinois’ growth trend are Professional and Business Services (+18,200); Educational and Health Services (+14,600); Trade, Transportation and Utilities (+8,900); and Manufacturing (+8,600). In October, Construction (+3,000 jobs) and Health Care (+1,300 jobs) reported strong job growth.


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010 1 Very, in music

linen

6 Therefore 10 Skeleton piece

43 Swedish cash 44 Not kosher

16 Pig or cast

47 Edible red

14 “Guys and __” 15 Bring up follower 17 Texas shrine

seaweed 49 Most recent

18 Cleave 19 Donate

20 Colorado scenic attraction 22 Sports group

23 Pineapple ���rm 24 Actress Judd 26 Combined 30 Orchestral

instruments 32 Profess 33 Superlative

endings 35 Freeze over

39 Last Supper

room 41 Dining-room

Protect your personal privacy without being pig-headed. Not that there is anything wrong with pigs. An exaggerated sense of your own importance can impede your common sense in the week ahead.

Even fullfledged flirting fails to fulfill fantasies. In the week ahead, your eyes may wander - even if you have a steady Freddy or Hedy waiting in the wings. Wear blinders and stick to the tried and true.

With the new moon in your opposite sign, there can be a realignment of focus over the next several weeks. You might be more aware of relationship dynamics or get caught up in a loved one’s situation this week.

A new moon can set sparks flying in your workplace. You may become increasingly aware of how you can provide services for others in the week ahead, especially an overworked partner.

Today’s new moon moves the focus to fun. Over the next several weeks, you may become progressively more involved in personal entertainments, hobbies or creative endeavors. Work hard to play hard this week.

Nothing beats a good book. This is an excellent week to begin a study or to perform research. Whether your quest for knowledge leads you to the library or the Internet, don’t believe everything you read.

It is sometimes feast or famine. You enjoy the thrill of the chase this week, but aren’t sure what to do if you catch your prey. You quickly lose interest in anyone that succumbs to your charms too easily.

Watch and weigh your words. A restless inability to do anything without a congenial partner along for the ride can interfere with harmony. You can easily say something that offends this week.

The new moon in your sign might shift your interests. The rhythm of daily life might subtly realign during the next several weeks as your attention is drawn to personally appealing subjects.

Schedules and routines can rile you up. In the week ahead, repetitive activities can sour your mood. You may need to work harder than usual to keep on top of existing obligations and may tire easily.

The workplace is no place for horseplay. Too much chatter and banter, or socializing around the water cooler, can earn a black mark from the boss. Honor your highest ideals in the week to come.

The more you see, the more you want. Your eyes could be bigger than your stomach and your dreams can be bigger than your wallet in the week to come. Watch a tendency to be extravagant.

46 Greek goddess of discord

51 Repair shoes 54 Ride the wind

56 Earthenware jar 57 HOMES 63 Port of Yemen 64 Staffs 65 Italian fascist

Balbo 66 Swim alternative 67 La commedia dell’ __ 68 Sub detector 69 Turner and Williams

70 Scottish loch

71 Small, silvery fish

1 Hebrew month 2 Go it alone 3 Bowl over 4 __ mater 5 Tristan’s love 6 Actor Flynn 7 Put back up 8 Band of hoods 9 Trying experience 10 National preserve in Texas 11 Bay window 12 Exploding stars 13 Foe 21 Hofstadter’s “__, Escher, Bach” 25 Lapse in concentration 26 Ted or Connie 27 At any time 28 Nevada city 29 Shoals off Newfoundland 31 Slave of the past 34 Solidifies 36 Irish homeland 37 Les Etats-__

38 Hey you! 40 Greater omentum 42 G-sharp 45 Holds a grudge 48 Admirer of Betty Grable? 50 George of “Disraeli” 51 Freewheel 52 Nostalgic song 53 Mix together 55 Watering places 58 Spotted infrequently 59 Particle 60 Welles character 61 Israeli carrier 62 Ilk

©2010 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

Last Week’s Answers Jumbles: QUEEN PRIME INDICT YEARLY Answer: What the new pensioner did after his going away party “RETIRED”

SUDOKU


INSIDE: North can’t rally past OPRF in boys basketball, page 12; buy sports photos online at www.buglenewspapers.com

www.buglenewspapers.com

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

11

North weathers storm, takes it to Proviso West By Rob Valentin Sports editor

Proviso West’s run and gun offense had Downers Grove North flustered early on in the two teams’ conference opener last Thursday night. But the Trojans quickly refocused and dominated the Panthers, rolling to a 55-44 West Suburban Silver win in Maywood. “The pace of the game in the first two or three minutes really made me nervous,” North coach Leslie Dehn said. “I didn’t think we could stay up with that but our kids did a nice job of getting back on defense. “The top thing on our scouting report was transition defense. We saw them play and knew they would like to run fast breaks.” The Panthers started the contest showcasing their speed and athleticism. Before North (52, 2-0) could take a breath, they faced a 7-1 deficit. But Amelia Echemann came through with a field goal and two free throws to keep it close. Trailing 9-6 late in the quarter, the Trojans started to take the game over. Katie Hunzinger’s oldfashioned three-point play tied the game at 9-9 and Alison Schuster

GIRLS BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHT: Downers Grove North picked up two conference wins beating Proviso West (55-44) and York (51-46) last week. COMING UP: The Trojans host Leyden on Thursday while traveling to OPRF on Friday.

came through with a pair of big field goals to give North a 13-9 lead after one. Schuster remained on fire to start the second quarter scoring six points during a Trojans 10-1 run. Proviso West, which trailed 2919 at halftime and 40-32 after the third quarter, continued to fight. The Panthers pulled within 4742 late in the fourth but North did a good job sealing the win by hitting its free throws. The Trojans were 11-of-14 in the fourth with Hunzinger doing most of the damage. She was 8-for8 from the line in the quarter (11for-11 overall) and finished with 15 points. “We focus on free throws in practice every day and I get extremely upset if I don’t go 10for-10,” Hunzinger said. “They’re free shots and I’m not going to miss them. I deserve them so I’ll take it to them. See TROJANS, page 14

Rob Valentin/Bugle staff

Downers Grove North’s Alison Schuster goes up for a layup against Proviso West.


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

North falls short By Rob Valentin Sports editor

One big run was more than Downers Grove North could handle against Oak Park-River Forest last Thursday night as the Huskies prevailed 53-48 on the road in a West Suburban Silver contest. Holding a slim 17-15 lead at halftime, OPRF opened the second half with an 8-0 run. The Trojans could never fully recover as the Huskies never trailed in the second half. “We’ve done it all year long,” North coach Jim Thomas said.“We come out in the third quarter and we don’t play defense. It’s a lack of effort, a lack of communication and a lack of rebounding. “We have to do a better job of coming out after halftime. That’s the only thing we talk about at halftime and it’s the downfall of us. We’re giving up way too many points in the third quarter and that’s where they create that spread and we can’t get it back.”

BOYS BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHT: Tom Wengren’s 17 points weren’t enough for Downers grove North to get past Oak-Park River Forest as the Trojans fell 53-48. COMING UP: The Trojans travel to Hinsdale Central on Friday before hosting Willowbrook on Saturday.

The good news for the Trojans (3-3) is that they didn’t quit when the going got tough. Trailing 2515, Tom Wengren did everything he could to light a spark in North. The senior guard scored 10 of his team-high 17 points in the period as the Trojans trailed 34-29 after the third quarter. “I was just trying to get the team going, hitting shots, finding the open player, hoping it would lead to some momentum going into the fourth quarter,” Wengren said. A three-pointer by Wengren gave North life to start the final quarter but the Huskies responded with a 7-0 run. The Trojans fought hard to hang See NORTH, page 16

Rob Valentin/Bugle staff

Downers Grove North’s Tom Wengren drives to the basket against Oak Park-River Forest.


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

13

Consistent Mustangs keep picking up victories By Rob Valentin Sports editor

Downers Grove South upped its record to 5-1 on the season after picking up a pair of wins last week. The Mustangs defeated Hinsdale South 58-52 last Friday while they knocked off Oak ParkRiver Forest 61-45 last Saturday. “The season’s going pretty well but we’re not where we want to be,” said senior center Ziggy Riauka. “We have to keep practicing to get to that level. Practice works really well for us. We push each other and we weren’t doing that to start the season.We really go at it and that helps us in the games.” In South’s West Suburban Gold win over Hinsdale South, Riauka, Kevin Honn, Jerron Wilbut and Jamall Millison all scored 11 points each. “It was a good night and we all shared the ball,” Riauka said. “If we do that we can win. Everyone on the team can score.”

BOYS BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHT: Downers Grove South picked up wins over Hinsdale South (58-52) and Oak Park-River Forest (6145) improving to 5-1 on the season. COMING UP: The Mustangs travel to Willowbrook on Friday and host Lyons Twp. on Saturday.

The Mustangs (5-1, 1-0) trailed for much of the game and they found themselves down by seven with just six minutes left. But South hit a three-pointer and started pressing. A turnover led to another field goal and the Mustangs were right back in the game. “We had to step up our intensity and started working harder,” Riauka said. “Jamall was working hard and he got us into the game. We had a lot of intensity.” “At first everyone wasn’t really into the game,” Millison said. “When we went into the locker room I talked to the guys trying to get everyone playing tighter (on defense).” The next night, the Mustangs

kept things rolling with an easy win over Oak Park-River Forest. Riauka went 7-for-7 from the free throw line and finished with 15 points. “We came out pumped and the free throws, I actually air balled one the night before and was 1-for-6,” he said. “I tried to work on my free throws. I believe I had a pretty good game but my opponent did score 15 points. I didn’t do as well on defense as I should have but I’ll work on that and get better.” Wilbut had 11 points while Millison and Danielius Jurgutis finished with 10 points apiece. “We were just doing good defensively and sharing the ball,” Millison said. “Our energy was there. It wasn’t really our best night. We still have a lot to work on offensively and defensively.” The Mustangs have looked pretty impressive even though the season is still young. They’re defense has been very solid and no one is selfish on offense.They have plenty of players who can

score and they’re making sure to share the ball with each other. “We’re just really trying to work on stopping everyone,” Millison said.“We just really want to have a good defensive game. (On offense), it’s important for everyone to get involved, It doesn’t matter (who scores) as long as we’re winning.” South travels to Willowbrook on Friday for a WSC Gold game

before hosting Lyons Twp. on Saturday. “I don’t know that much about (Willowbrook) but we need to come out with the same intensity we did against OPRF,” Riauka said.“If you lose a game it can ruin your chances of winning conference.We have a really good conference with Morton, Proviso East and Hinsdale South.” rvalentin@buglenewspapers.com


14

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

TROJANS Continued from page 11 “Honestly, when I was a kid I marked out where the free-throw line should be in by driveway. I’ve always just practiced free throws, free throws, free throws.” While Hunzinger was doing her damage from the charity stripe, Schuster was tearing it up in the paint. She completely dominated the Panthers in the first three quarters scoring 20 of her gamehigh 21 points. “I just tried to drive when they were overplaying me,” Schuster said. “They were a really quick team so they had that on us. We worked our butts off tonight. I know everyone of our players on the court was working hard.” Thursday’s victory was a perfect way to start the conference season for a team that has its sights set on winning a conference championship. “Going on the road and getting a win at Proviso is a great start for us,” Dehn said.“Proviso has a great team, the kids are scrappy and aggressive and they’re a tough team to play.” “They have a lot of speed and great hands on defense,”Hunzinger said. “So it was an awesome win that we were able to keep it together and hold our own.” Schuster was pleased with the win, but there’s a whole lot more work to be done.

Rob Valentin/Bugle staff

North’s Katie Hunzinger drives to the lane.

“Definitely a win is always great, especially in conference,” she said. “Obviously we want to try and be conference champions but we’re going to have to keep working like we were (against Proviso West).” Hunzinger kept her mojo from the line going last Saturday against York going 9-for-9 from the line as the Trojans pulled off a 51-46 win over York to improve to 2-0 in the Silver. Schuster led the way against the Dukes with 13 points while

Hunzinger was close behind with 12 points. Echemann did the dirty work down low pulling down six rebounds. The Trojans held a narrow 3534 lead after three quarters and once again they salted away the win from the line. As a team, North was 22-for-27 from the charity stripe. Up next for the Trojans is Leyden at home on Thursday at 7:30. On Friday, North travels to Oak-Park River Forest for a 7:30 game. rvalentin@buglenewspapers.com


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

15

Mustangs split pair, show improvement By Rob Valentin Sports editor

It was an up and down week for Downers Grove South, which knocked off Addison Trail 61-57 on Dec. 30 but fell to Proviso East 55-37 last Saturday. The Mustangs (4-3, 1-1) showed a lot of resiliency in both West Suburban Gold contests. Against Addison Trail, South found itself trailing by seven points three different times late in the game. But the Mustangs kept pushing forward and went on a 15-0 run in the fourth. “We regrouped in the fourth quarter,” South coach Ellen O’Brien said. “A lot of teams when they start to fall behind they give in but our kids will fight and I’m really proud of that. Saraceno led the way with 21 points thanks to five three pointers including a 50-footer to beat the buzzer at the end of the third quarter. Alison Dec also had a nice game scoring 12 points on 6-of-8 shooting from the floor. “Alison played really well defensively and she sparked the comeback and Carly had some nice threes,” O’Brien said. “Obviously five in a game is pretty good.” South faced a different type of adversity when they traveled to Proviso East last Saturday. The Mustangs managed just two points in the first two quarter and just two more in the second quarter as they faced a 28-4 deficit at halftime. The Pirates press wreaked havoc on South “It’s a different atmosphere and different from what they’re used to,” O’Brien said. “It’s tough to play at Proviso East. You just have to settle down and do what you can do instead of saying ‘Oh my god, what’s going on?’ Sometimes a team jumps on you and you forget how to play.” “They pressed and that’s a gamble but it paid off. In basketball whatever you do, there’s a way to beat it. If you make their strengths work against them, a little more ball fake or is a little bit of this or that can work for you.”

GIRLS BASKETBALL HIGHLIGHT: Downers Grove South picked up a win over Addison Trail (61-57) but fell to Proviso East (55-37) last week. COMING UP: The Mustangs travel to Glenbard North on Saturday for a 7:30 p.m. tipoff.

The good news for South was that they never quit. Despite being down by 24 at halftime, they kept working hard and outscored Proviso East 33-27 in the second half. “We’re still young and we’re learning,” O’Brien said.“They’re going to get it. Each week we’ll get a little better. You have to be patient and stay poised.” One thing that worked against South on Saturday was they had to play without Dec, one of their top scorers. The senior was out of state for a family wedding. “That hurt us,” O’Brien said.“A starter is not there and you have a different kid and it’s not the same dynamic. And Proviso East is the best team we played on our schedule.” The Mustangs are getting plenty of early season tests. They’ve already faced two ranked teams in Proviso East and Willowbrook and West Chicago is a team to watch out for. And O’Brien has had plenty of girls step up throughout the year. Christyl Thurman, Kristen Zemke, Sara Ludwig, Brandi Bradley and Katie Schmitt have all stepped up in addition to Saraceno and Dec. “It’s different kids on different days,” O’Brien said. “If they’re playing us with zone we’ll go with a couple kids and if they’re playing man we can go with a couple different kids.” The Mustangs have a pair of games this week, a WSC Gold showdown with Leyden early in the week and a nonconference game at Glenbard North 7:30 p.m. on Saturday. “We always try to scout teams,” O’Brien said. “After Proviso East I went to scout Morton afterwards. You want to scout to help give your team a better chance. “My assistant scouted Glenbard North. We’re just trying to work some kinks out and get the kids ready to play different types of defense.” rvalentin@buglenewspapers.com

Rob Valentin/Bugle staff

South’s Kaity Stanger shoots a free throw during a game.


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

NORTH Continued from page 12 around and pulled within 51-48 after a beautiful layup by Alex Vogler with 3.7 seconds left. North fouled immediately but OPRF sank a pair of free throws to seal the road win. “We gave up 17 points in the third quarter and that was huge,” Wengren said.“We came out ready to play the first two quarters and held them pretty well and then the third quarter killed us. I think we weren’t focused and ready to come out and get defensive stops.” “(OPRF) is averaging 80 points a game and we held them to 55,” said Ross Johnson, who was the only other Trojan in double digits. “In the first half we were playing unbelievable defense. In the second half we just got lazy or something. “They came out more hyped than we did. We were calm and laid back because we thought we were in a good spot but they just jumped on us.”

What Thursday night showed is that the line between winning and losing is very thin. A couple of breaks or one or two fewer mistakes could have meant a Trojans win instead of a loss. “It’s a matter of hitting some shots here and there,” Thomas said. “It’s about execution on the defensive end but we had to do a better job on the offensive end because we don’t move very well yet.” “We definitely need to work on our third quarter performance,” Wengren said. “We have to come out ready to play in the second half.” Thomas was pleased with Wengren’s performance, but there’s always things to work on. “He’s been really good for us,” Thomas said. “He’s been there almost every night for us offensively. I’d love to see him gear up on the defensive end and take control of the team.” Wengren isn’t the only one that’s been doing well. Thomas likes how the team is coming along off the court. “They’re a great group of kids,” he said. “They’re all friends and

hang out. We just have to find a way to transfer that onto the floor.” “We should be doing a little better,”Wengren added.“Hopefully we’ll get that going and play up to our potential as a team.” The Trojans won their only other game last week, a 41-40 decision over fellow Silver team Addison Trail. “We learned we can compete in conference,” Johnson said after North split its first two conference games. “We just need to play harder defense because we let up way too many points (against OPRF).” On Friday, North travels to Hinsdale Central for a West Suburban Silver showdown at 7:30 and on Saturday the Trojans play host to Willowbrook for a West Suburban crossover game at 4:30. “Hinsdale Central is a big rivalry so that will be a big one for us if we can get that,” Wengren said. “Willowbrook is a good team and they’re athletic and we’re home so we’ll definitely come out and try to win big.” “Hinsdale Central is a

Rob Valentin/Bugle staff

North’s Ross Johnson goes up for a basket in the post.

conference game and we have three games in the next week so we’ve got to be really focused in on game plans and focused

in on practices,” Thomas added. “Hopefully we can have a good weekend and get two wins.” rvalentin@buglenewspapers.com


CALENDAR THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

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ONGOING

DECEMBER 15

Job club. Come to the Library Job Club on Mondays from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Job Club members learn to write résumés and cover letters, develop interviewing skills and find job leads. No sign-up, no fee, just drop in. For further information call 630-964-7899 or email askus@woodridgelibrary.org or visit www.woodridgelibrary.org. The Library is located at 3 Plaza Drive, Woodridge. The Library Job Club is co-sponsored by the Woodridge Public Library and Lisle Township Youth and Family Services, 630-968-2087.

White Christmas. 1:30, 4, 7, and 9:30 p.m. showings at the Tivoli Theatre, 5021 Highland in Downers Grove. During A successful song and dance duo team up with a sister act to save a failng Vermont inn owned by their former commanding general in this holiday favorite starring Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, and Rosemary Clooney. Admission is $4.

Until JANUARY 2011 Arboretum enchanted railroad. Through Jan. 2, visit the Morton Arboretum at I-88 and Rt. 53 in Lisle. Up to nine trains can oporate at the same time in this model trail display, and tracks even cross one another. See trains of various colors and styles on a holiday and nature themed track. One train even has a camera on it so visitors can see what it’s like to ride on the train. For more information, go online to www.mortonarb.org Flora illuminated. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Morton Arboretum, I-88 and Rt. 53 in Lisle.A beautiful display of historical botanic art is accented with poems, song lyrics, and facts in ‘Flora, Illuminated!’ Before there were photographs, everyone from explorers to local nurseries relied on artists to create visual representations of the natural world. Art from the exclusive Suzette Morton Davidson Special Collections of the Sterling Morton Library will be showcased for visitors to explore. For more information, go online to www.mortonarb. org

Until FEBRUARY 28 Magic Winter Garden. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. (weather permitting) at the Morton Arboretum at I-88 and Rt. 53 in Lisle. Mystical creatures have escaped and are now hiding in the ‘Magical Winter Garden.’ See how many gnomes, fairies, and wise old trees you can uncover. For more information go online to www. mortonarb.org

DECEMBER 9 Care and Feeding of your Brain. 7 p.m. Learn how to live smarter and longer as neuropsychologist,Dr.Jan Remer-

DECEMBER 16

Osborn, Outpatient Behavioral Health Services, discusses the dos and don’ts of brain care. Discover how your thinking, physical activity, emotions, and diet can make a difference. Register for these events at the Downers Grove Public Library, 1050 Curtiss St., online at www. downersgrovelibrary.org, at the Circulation Desk, or by calling (630) 960-1200.

DECEMBER 10 In the sweet midwinter. 8 p.m. at 1234 Arlington Heights Rd. in Arlington Heights. Concert featuring familiar carols, sacred texts, small ensembles, singalongs, and improvisations. Combines Christmas,Hannukkah, Solstice, and winter. For ticket and other information go to www.newclassicsingers.org

DECEMBER 11 Saturday Sitter Service. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Just in time for the holidays! Activities and lunch for children ages 2 -10 at Zion Hinsdale Early Childhood Education Center, 204 South Grant Street, Hinsdale, 630/323-0065 DuPage Symphony Orchestra. “Sugarplums and Song:” Seasonal favorites including excerpts from Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutracker” and a variety of traditional holiday songs presented with the Glen Ellyn-Wheaton Chorale at 8 p.m. at Wentz Concert Hall, North Central College, 171 East Chicago Avenue in Naperville. For information visit w w w. d u p a ge s y m p h o ny. o r g or a call 630-778-1003. Nonperishable food and toiletry items will be collected at the concert and donated to Loaves & Fishes Community Pantry for distribution throughout DuPage County.

DECEMBER 12 DuPage Symphony Orchestra. “Sugarplums and Song:” Seasonal favorites including excerpts from Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutracker” and a variety of traditional holiday songs presented with the Glen Ellyn-Wheaton Chorale at 3 p.m. at Wentz Concert Hall, North Central College, 171 East Chicago Avenue in Naperville. For information visit w w w. d u p a ge s y m p h o ny. o r g or a call 630-778-1003. Nonperishable food and toiletry items will be collected at the concert and donated to Loaves & Fishes Community Pantry for distribution throughout DuPage County. In the sweet midwinter. 4 p.m. at the McAninch Arts Center in Glen Ellyn. Concert featuring familiar carols, sacred texts, small ensembles, sing-alongs, and improvisations. Combines Christmas, Hannukkah, Solstice, and winter. For ticket and other information go to www. newclassicsingers.org Life of Charles Dickens. 4-5 p.m. at Naper Settlement Memorial Chapel, 523 S. Webster St. in Naperville. Historian Terry Lynch portrays Dickens and discusses some of his best known works including the beloved classic “A Christmas Carol.” Advance tickets are $6 for adults, $5 for students, youth, and Heitage Society members. Call 630-420-6010 for tickets and information. “The Bishop’s Wife.” 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. at the Tivoli Theatre, 5021 Highland in Downers Grove. During the holiday season, a powerful and handsome angel teaches a pastor and his wife some lessons about

romance starring Cary Grant, Loretta Young, and David Niven. Admission is $4.

DECEMBER 13 “Meet John Doe.” 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. at the Tivoli Theatre, 5021 Highland in Downers Grove. Reporter creates a fake letter from an unemployed man who threatens suicide in protest to social ills starring Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyk. Admission is $4. Christmas in Williamsburg. 7 p.m. at the Woodridge Library, 3 Plaza Dr. in Woodridge. This slide lecture, presented by Nancy McCully, will take a look at the beautiful decorations of Colonial Williamsburg, discuss Williamsburg’s role as the colonial capital of Virginia, and how you can make your own similar decorations. The program is free, but registration is requested. For information call the young adult reference desk at 630-964-7899 or go online to www.woodridgelibrary.org.

DECEMBER 14 Plains, Trains, & Automobiles. 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. at the Tivoli Theatre, 5021 Highland in Downers Grove. John Hughes’s classic tale of holiday travel gone awry in this screwball comedy with heart starring Steve Martin and John Candy. Admission is $4.

National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. at the Tivoli Theatre, 5021 Highland in Downers Grove.The Griswolds’ plans for a big family Christmas predictably turn into a big disaster starring Chevy Chase, Beverly D’Angelo, and Randy Quaid. Admission is $4.

DECEMBER 21 Joint book group gathering. 7 p.m. in the Woodridge Library second floor meeting room. Discuss the best books you’ve read in 2010. Register for any or all discussions and pick up a copy of the book at the adult/young adult department reference desk. For more information call 630964-7899 or go online to www. woodridgelibrary.org.

JANUARY 23 Sunday Afternoon Concert. Sueños Latin-Jazz Quartet at 2 p.m. at the Downers Grove Public Library, 1050 Curtiss Street, Downers Grove, (630) 960-1200. Steve Hashimoto leads this virtuoso jazz ensemble featuring the rhythms of AfroCuban, Caribbean, and Brazilian traditions. Charles Darwin and the Voyage of the Beagle. 4-5 p.m. at Naper Settlement Memorial Chapel, 523 S. Webster St. in Naperville. Storyteller and science teacher Brian “Fox” Ellis steps into Darwin’s shoes to model the scientific process and engage listeners in a discussion.


BUSINESS & REAL ESTATE 18

THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

A new model for profiting from the Internet Q. I’m the marketing manager for a mediumsized company and trying to figure out how to use the Internet more effectively to reach our consumers. I see people using banner ads and search engines to sell what they do, but these turn me off. Is there any new model that appeals emotionally to people looking for services or products? A. Many readers have written to me about how the Internet has hurt, not helped, their business by providing a glut of low-quality content. How does your consumer tell the good from the bad, the expert from the huckster, or effective products/ services from the snake oil? One promising Internet

model has been developed by a company in the health-care industry called Sharecare. It has set up a website that allows consumers to ask increasingly complicated medical questions and receive thorough, accurate and useful information about health. A consumer knows who is providing the answers and can go as deeply as they want in researching information that will keep them healthy. Organizations and experts must first apply to participate on the site and then are screened by a team of medical experts before they are allowed. The information is free to site visitors. The real payoff of the site is that it connects customers with providers in a way that builds confidence and connection. Sharecare offers providers a way to reach out to customers, and provides customers a way to interact with and gain confidence in the providers before buying the good or service.The hope is that

the organizations and experts will transform the site into an online learning community that advances the knowledge and resources within the industry. Bottom line: Everybody wins! So many of my readers have complained that they are seeking but not finding a model that lets them really use the internet to increase their business. Traditional advertising just annoys consumers, and websites are helpful but old hat. “Traditional advertising focuses on benefits and features rather than providing immediate useful knowledge to their customers,” says Jeff Arnold, Sharecare’s chairman and chief architect. “There are 17 billion searches happening in the U.S. on the Internet every 30 days. It doesn’t matter if you are an accountant, mechanic, or beautician if you have expertise someone on the Internet is looking for that expertise. This new model lets business people

become fisherman and the bait is knowledge!” What I found most fascinating about Arnold’s model of integrating the Internet with business is the combination of social benefits and profits for organizations. Companies that are willing to contribute knowledge to these types of business ecosystems can increase customer traffic, educate their customers, reduce the suffering people experience due to ignorance, and share ideas with their brightest peers to advance breakthroughs in their industries. Here’s the takeaway point for innovative business readers: Recognize that your customers are using the Internet this minute to get enlightened, to help make tough decisions, and to get information they need to solve problems. Stop thinking of yourself as merely selling a product or service and start to think of your company as selling

Smart money to refinance for lower interest rate Dear Dave, How do you feel about people refinancing their homes? Is it smart to refinance a house in order to have a lower

mortgage payment? Anonymous No, it’s not. But it is smart to refinance a house to get a lower interest rate. By doing this, you pay off the home faster. Think about this. Right now, with a 15-year fixed rate mortgage and one point paid, you can get an interest rate under

four percent. That’s awesome! Let’s say you have a $300,000 mortgage, and you refinance from six percent to four percent. A two percent savings equals $6,000 a year, and that’s $500 a month in interest saved. In my book, that’s worth doing! So, refinancing definitely makes sense in cases where

you’re going to stay in the home a long time and you get a lower interest rate. Good question! Dave Ramsey is a personal money management expert, popular national radio personality and the author of three New York Times bestseller— “­The Total Money Makeover,”“Financial Peace Revisited” and “More Than Enough.”

education first. Your business will win new customers; your customers will find new solutions. And the information you provide may even contribute to improving the world. Work doesn’t get too much better than that!

The final word(s) Q. I tend to hire people who are just like me. Is that a problem? A. Yes, no one on your team will have the complementary strengths to your weaknesses.

Daneen Skube, Ph.D., executive coach, trainer, therapist and speaker, also appears as the FOX Channel’s “Workplace Guru” each Monday morning. She’s the author of “Interpersonal Edge: Breakthrough Tools for Talking to Anyone, Anywhere, About Anything” (Hay House, 2006). You can contact Dr. Skube at www. interpersonaledge.com or 1420 NW Gilman Blvd., #2845, Issaquah, WA 98027. Sorry, no personal replies. (c) 2010 INTERPERSONAL EDGE


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF DUPAGE, STATE OF ILLINOIS U.S. BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC. 2006-AMC1, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AMC1, ASSIGNEE OF ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, L.L.C., Plaintiff(s), vs. ESWARI ALLURI AND ALLURI NARAYANARAJU, UNKNOWN TENANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). 09 CH 5680 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment heretofore entered by the said Court in the above entitled cause, JOHN E ZARUBA, the Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois, will on January 13, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at the DuPage County Sheriff’s Office, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE, 501 N. COUNTY FARM ROAD, WHEATON, IL 60187, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described premises and real estate in the said Judgment mentioned, situated in the County of DuPage, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment, to wit: Common Address: 9140 WITHAM LANE WOODRIDGE IL 60517 P.I.N. 10-07-109-003 Contact the Law Office of IRA T. NEVEL, LLC, 175 North Franklin, Suite 201, Chicago, Illinois 60606, (312) 357-1125, for further information. The terms of the sale are: Ten percent (10%) due by cash or certified funds at the time of the sale and balance is due within 24 hours of the sale. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. The property is improved by a single family residence, together with all buildings and improvements thereon, and the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenants thereunto belonging and will not be available for inspection prior to sale. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). Attorney No. 22638 LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC Ira T. Nevel Timothy R. Yueill Greg Elsnic Michelle R. Ratledge Lauren Lukoff 175 North Franklin Suite 201 Chicago, Illinois 60606 (312) 357-1125 I328874 Published 12/8, 12/15, 12/22

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY - WHEATON, ILLINOIS HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., PLAINTIFF vs. JEAN M. PESCI; ROBERT H. PESCI; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR INTERVALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; DEFENDANTS 10 CH 3044 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 30, 2010, I, Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois, will on January 20, 2011 at the hour of 10:00 AM at the Dupage County Sheriff’s Office, 501 N. County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage, State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: COMMON ADDRESS: 5897 Walnut Ave., Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 P.I.N.: 08-13-108-008 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT WAS: $346,071.78 Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds; the balance, by certified funds, is due within twenty four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representations as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. Pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amounts of any surplus bid will be held by the sheriff until a party obtains a Court Order for its distribution, or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus, it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, 230 W. Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60606, telephone 312-541-9710. Please refer to file number IL 10 6942. Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 10 6942 DuPage County No.: 182011 I329992 Published 12/8, 12/15, 12/22


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010 LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE LEGAL SHERIFF’S SALE

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF DUPAGE, STATE OF ILLINOIS U.S. BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE IN TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC. 2006-AMC1, ASSETBACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AMC1, ASSIGNEE OF ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, L.L.C., Plaintiff(s), vs. ESWARI ALLURI AND ALLURI NARAYANARAJU, UNKNOWN TENANTS, UNKNOWN OWNERS AND NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, Defendant(s). 09 CH 5680 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment heretofore entered by the said Court in the above entitled cause, JOHN E ZARUBA, the Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois, will on January 13, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at the DuPage County Sheriff’s Office, DUPAGE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE, 501 N. COUNTY FARM ROAD, WHEATON, IL 60187, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described premises and real estate in the said Judgment mentioned, situated in the County of DuPage, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment, to wit: LOT 239 IN GALLAGHER AND HENRY’S FARMINGDALE VILLAGE UNIT 25C, BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTH 1/2 OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 37 NORTH, RANGE 11, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 25, 2005 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2005-084105, AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED JUNE 21, 2005, AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2005-129160 AND CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION RECORDED JULY 20, 2005 AS DOCUMENT NUMBER R2005-154685, IN DUPAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. Common Address: 9140 WITHAM LANE WOODRIDGE IL 60517 P.I.N. 10-07-109-003 Contact the Law Office of IRA T. NEVEL, LLC, 175 North Franklin, Suite 201, Chicago, Illinois 60606, (312) 357-1125, for further information. The terms of the sale are: Ten percent (10%) due by cash or certified funds at the time of the sale and balance is due within 24 hours of the sale. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. The property is improved by a single family residence, together with all buildings and improvements thereon, and the tenements, hereditaments and appurtenants thereunto belonging and will not be available for inspection prior to sale. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). Attorney No. 22638 LAW OFFICES OF IRA T. NEVEL, LLC Ira T. Nevel Timothy R. Yueill Greg Elsnic Michelle R. Ratledge Lauren Lukoff 175 North Franklin Suite 201 Chicago, Illinois 60606 (312) 357-1125

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 18TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DUPAGE COUNTY WHEATON, ILLINOIS HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., PLAINTIFF vs. JEAN M. PESCI; ROBERT H. PESCI; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR INTERVALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; DEFENDANTS 10 CH 3044 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on August 30, 2010, I, Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois, will on January 20, 2011 at the hour of 10:00 AM at the Dupage County Sheriff’s Office, 501 N. County Farm Road, Wheaton, IL, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of DuPage, State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LOT 11 IN BLOCK 6 IN ARTHUR T. MCINTOSH AND COMPANY’S SCENIC VIEW SUBDIVISION, IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 12, AND THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 38 NORTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED APRIL 9, 1925 AS DOCUMENT 190961, IN DU PAGE COUNTY, ILLINOIS. COMMON ADDRESS: 5897 Walnut Ave., Downers Grove, Illinois 60516 P.I.N.: 08-13-108-008 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT WAS: $346,071.78 Sale terms: 10% down by certified funds; the balance, by certified funds, is due within twenty four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “as is” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representations as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. Pursuant to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512, the amounts of any surplus bid will be held by the sheriff until a party obtains a Court Order for its distribution, or for 60 days following the date of the entry of the order confirming sale, at which time, in the absence of an order directing payment of the surplus, it may be automatically forfeited to the State without further notice. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, 230 W. Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60606, telephone 312-5419710. Please refer to file number IL 10 6942. Sheriff of DuPage County, Illinois Johnson, Blumberg, & Associates, LLC 230 W. Monroe Street, Suite 1125 Chicago, Illinois 60606 Ph. 312-541-9710 Fax 312-541-9711 JB&A # IL 10 6942 DuPage County No.: 182011

I328874

I329992

Published 12/8, 12/15, 12/22

Published 12/8, 12/15, 12/22


THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010

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submitted photo

Downers Grove South High School was host to a unique fundraiser over the weekend, a designer jean sale.

Designer jeans: a different kind of fundraiser By Debbie Lively Staff reporter

People who may have grown tired of the typical school fundraiser of purchasing candy and scented candles were recently able to buy discount designer jeans at Downers South High School. Over 3,000 pairs of designer jeans were on sale at South High School Dec. 4 and 5 with a percentage of the proceeds benefiting the school’s booster club. Naperville resident, Mary Dismore, came up with the idea to sell discounted jeans after watching fundraising efforts at her daughter’s grade school. “I was really inspired by my daughter and the fundraiser that they were doing at her school,” said Dismore, “People are tired of the same old fundraiser. They don’t just want to do the same old thing.” With most jeans discounted as much as 75 percent, some brands Dismore carries include DKNY, Blend, Laguna Beach, Adriano Goldschmied, Lucky,

and Hudson; prices for the jean can range from $80 to $280, with about 80 percent of the jeans available for women, and 20 percent for men. “They’re all current trendy good looking jeans,”said Dismore, “they’re the kind of jeans that would be found at a premium outlet store.” Dismore started the business after getting laid off from a job in the wholesale industry. And as a single mother she wanted the flexibility to be available for her young daughter. She gathered small loans from investors, and launched “Designer Jeans Warehouse.” “I was working downtown, and didn’t get to see my daughter very much,” said Dismore and when she got laid off from her job it was kind of a blessing, said. Now she runs her jean business while her daughter is at school or in between after-school activities. Dismore’s first jean sale was held last month at Plainfield Central High School, where about 100 people attended and as many

Bugle 2010 file photo

A jeans fundraiser was first held at Plainfield Central High School in the fall. The next such sale will be Dec. 11 in Joliet Township West High School.

as 98 percent of the customers purchased from her stock of jeans. Schools are able to raise funds from the event by charging a $2 entrance fee, and after 200

pairs of jeans are sold, the school earns 10 percent on each pair of jeans sold. The next jean sale will be held Saturday, Dec. 11 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Joliet Township West

High School. For more information, visit Dismore’s Facebook page under Designer Jeans Warehouse. dlively@buglenewspapers.com


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THE BUGLE DECEMBER 8, 2010


FINAL-DG-WR-120810