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PORTFOLIO of CREATIVE WORK AUBREY FAN 2016-2019


Pluvious Situated Technologies

This interactive installation makes use of the motion of its participants to set off a dynamic, integrated series of responses.

spaced such that they would create a randomized pattern of light and color meant to evoke the childhood sensation of playing in the rain.

Fifty-six custom rainsticks were mounted to servo motors, whose rotation was initiated through a grid-eye sensor. The infrared sensor gathered body heat data from the visitors which was then translated to pixels that controlled the degree of rotation and speed of motion of each of the hanging rainsticks.

Designed in collaboration with: Shayan Amirirad, Zach Fields, Heidi Flores, Ramoa Khamitkar, Frank Kraemer, Jelani Lowe, Rania Moussa, Nishika Niraj Dhariwal, and Devanshi Shastri.

To complete the atmosphere, a series of custom ceiling panels containing 60 programmable neopixels were suspended in tandem with the motion display. The light from each neopixel distributed through a bundle of fiberoptic cables. These cables were

The classroom is transformed by the installation in use

Fall, 2018. Situated Technologies with Mark Shepard


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Wiring and layout diagrams for respective embedded technologies: servo and LED

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Acoustics were derived from actual rainsticks; an integration of natural and technological methods


Axonometric diagram and lighting panel design


Atmosphere of final installation


Lightbox/Sounddata In conjunction with Pluvious, the creation of a responsive artifact served as a preliminary exercise for instantiating responsive environments on a smaller scale.

These technologies are hidden inside a 20” x 8” x 15” ‘lightbox’ that also houses thirty glass tubes encased with translucent baffles for the transmission of light.

The Lightbox artifact functions through the coding of a Huzzah microcontroller and a circuit which collects sound data via a hidden microphone, and translates that data to a light output, the color of which was mapped to a strip of programmable LEDs, the color of which corresponds to the volume of sound.

The function of the box is such that with increasing volume, the color of the lights turns from blue to yellow, passing through white as an intermediary stage. Fall, 2018. Code and Space with Jason Geistweidt

1/8” Black acrylic

1/8” Clear acrylic

SECONDARY FEEDBACK LOOP: ENGAGEMENT WITH THE LIGHTBOX

5/16” Clear PVC gasket

3/32” x 9 7/8” Glass rod (30)

OUTPUT: LIGHT (COLOR AND CONSISTENCY)

1m Neopixel light strip

Plywood shelf to hold neopixels and house other electronics

INPUT: SOUND (AMPLITUDE)

SENSOR: MICROPHONE

1.5” Plywood base

Construction details of the lightbox


Function of the LED strip in response to increasing amplitude of sound


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Data representations of sound collected and recorded in the studio over the course of three days


Ripple A modern art gallery

This proposal for a modern art gallery in the Allentown neighborhood of Buffalo, NY, features an undulating roof form that creates a variety of experiences and gallery options within the second floor open plan space. At once an object building and an integration into the city fabric with its bush-hammered concrete facade, the ground level design incorporates a variety of public offerings vital to sustaining the growth of this rapidly developing area. These functions, including a cafe, shop, eduation center and public forum, are distinct from the gallery and can operate after hours. Foot traffic from the subway and nearby medical center will aid in sustaining the vibrancy of this new cultural center.

Plan view of model

Functionally, the dynamic roof incorporates columns that double both as structural supports and vehicles for rainwater collection. The building integrates sustainable practices including the reuse of a brownfield site, geothermal wells, and the use of the concrete mass to reduce heating and cooling loads. Designed in collaboration with Zach Fields Spring, 2018. Integrated Design with Annette LeCuyer


From an aerial perspective, the building acts as a sign for the gallery

View of the gallery entrance on the busy urban corner of Allen and Delaware

Final model


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Gallery layout options within open plan floorspace


Ground floor and basement plan


Performance section showing systems integration and multiplicity of uses


Slice model view showing all floor levels


Physical Modeling Tectonics and techniques

The act of model-making is both a formal and experimental process. The following design studies explore a range of materials, structural applications and physical manipulations to generate or express form.

Designed in collaboration with Zach Fields, Sasaki, Shioya Sangyo and John Costello for the respective courses:

A variety of construction methods are reflected in the model samples shown. From corrugated cardboard and paper pulp to more conventional modes of layering, stacking or triangulating, the act of making reflects the inherent beauty of structure for both real and proposed works.

January 2019, Internship at Sasaki

Whether utilized as studies or as final representations of a given project, modeling is a way in which the lesseasily-defined properties of architecture can be made tangible, as spaces form and atmospheres come to life through experimental manipulations of material.

Spring, 2018. Integrated Design with Annette LeCuyer

Fall, 2017. School of Music with Brian Carter Summer, 2018. Study Abroad Tokyo with Nick Bruscia Fall, 2018. Materials Matter with Annette LeCuyer

Study model for undulating roof form of Ripple; corrugated cardboard and glue composite on inflatable armature (removed); roughly 2.5’ x 4’


Material studies for daylighting: cardboard, porcelain on wire, fiberoptic embedded concrete


Aerial view of topography with access routes etched into museum board

Site model for Bonnet Springs Park; created for Sasaki during winter internship. Scale: 1/32� = 1’0


Exploration of form and structure for free-standing piano room (grout on wire armature, paper pulp and papier mache on plasticine mold, plywood ribs)


Study abroad Tokyo; spiral pipe design. Fabrication courtesy of Shioya Sangyo. Fukushima, Japan


Scale models of San Giacomo and Lanxi Curtilage built in collaboration with John Costello

Cross section of San Giacomo Church (Perugia, Italy), 2009; Fuksas. 3D printed inner walls and roof with hydrocal plaster exterior. Scale 1/8” = 1’0”


Details, pxerspective and elevation views of parametric brickwork; diagram of physical spacing jig used to replicate construction methods


Things Fall Apart Rumination on ruins

The things we build will inevitably return to nature. This project - concept designed absent of program - embraces the eventuality and the stolid beauty of decay. Following a radial pattern, the core of the structure is stable, branching out from the center like a tree. The untreated wood is allowed to deteriorate, disintigrate, and ultimately become compost that will fodder new growth. Thus the cycle of life and death is encapsulated in the structure. The exclusive reliance on timber and natural materials begs a truly sustainable architecture. There is no formal roof or wasteful, faddish facade: this building’s intention is to let nature clad and complete her. Eventually, it will become overgrown with vines, moss, and strategic plantings while the interior alone remains untouched.

Aerial view of model

Spring, 2017. Design Studio 2 with Georg Rafalidis


Precedents and process diagrams: radial structure; aging and decomposition; crumbling and collapse; projection drawing of the Ise Shrine as rubble


Wood typologies mirror this trend from new at the center to old and worn at the edges


Model photos showing the radial nature of the floor plates, the stability of the core, and the decreasing tangibility of the structure towards its extents


The Sphere: Architecture of the Ideal Directed Research with Hadas A. Steiner, Spring 2019

The sphere in architecture is more than a simple form: it is an embodiment of ideals that characterize the time, people and place in which it was conceived. Spheres may best be categorized as projections of thought: when elevated they represent dreams, genius, creativity. When grounded, sunken or submerged, they act as vessels or repositories of memory, as may be seen in the many contemporary spherical libraries for both books and film. Yet the sphere as a built object is always forward-looking. It does not age in the same manner as traditional buildings, but rather comes to stand as an emblem unto - and also outside of itself. Consider: even the spheres of the 60’s are still considered ‘futuristic looking’ to this day!

Extensive historical-theoretical research led to the following categorizations: celestial domes (god-sphere), the representation of an idea (spheres of abstraction), spheres as vehicles of exploration, spherical monuments representing nationalism, and spheres of social critique. Additionally, consider: spherical housing utopias (including drop city), the spherical theatre and their corollary in modern-day mediaspheres, biospheres (spheres of reflection and protection), and the sphere of the Self. Collaged are the representations that embody these specific ideals, and a timeline showing the progression and link between spherical typologies, and how time (not unlike the form) cycles back upon itself, as new becomes old, and old may once again be seen as innovative.

1969: a turning point in human history coinciding with mass adoption of the geodesic dome; through structure, spheres enter the realm of possibility


South Campus School of Music The structure of song

The program for a school of music is intense and demanding. This proposal makes use of the entire allotted site to increase campus-wide circulation and encourage greater connectivity amongst the student body at the University at Buffalo’s South Campus. Derived from the patterns found in the sheet music to Max Richter’s Written on Sky, the structure originates from the ordered bars of the music, and its apertures are inspired by rising notes and pauses. By carving passageways through, around, and under the practice rooms, and by situating the 250-person theatre in a central location within the building, the building seeks to create a sense of place, and an infusion of energy into the site.

Conceived of as a stand-alone, suspended wooden shell, the theatre design of the inner ‘egg’ is set against the rigid lines of the stone-clad exterior. Constructed of resonant srips of glulam, the inner form contrasts the exterior by the warmth of its materiality, enclosed by the harder, more reflective surfaces of travertine, aluminum and glass. By combining inspirations found both in composition and material, the project is one of sharp contrast when viewed from its exterior. However, the interior aims to foster unity and connections by supporting the vibrancy of university life. As the bars embrace the shell, the project as a whole embraces the spontenaity, freedom and universal appeal of music echoing out and throughout. Fall, 2017. Design Studio 3 with Brian Carter.

Interior render showing the school of music, and its central performance space: the shell


Spanning most of Parker and Kapoor hall, the strcture offeres a covered walkway or colonnade to aid in student travel during the winter months

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Ground floor plan showing the range and extent of programming within the vast space


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Structure of Song: An Analogy

Roof: Key Signature

Structure: Staff

Shell: Double Measure

Program: Notes & Melody

Colonnade: Rhythm and Repetition

The overall form of the school is derived from the physical structure of sheet music


Axonometric Drawing: Construction and Materials The structure is composed of layers of materials that are alternately warm and cool, absorptive and reflective. The heart of the school, the performance space, contains the warmest materials: carpeting and wood. Subsequent layers are colder and more reflective, which will create echoes as sounds bounce throughout the hallways, filling the structure with the audible hum of activity and student life.

Materiality axonometric


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Elevations along South Campus give a nod to the Neoclassical buildings that surround it


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Sketches, precedent studies, concept model and final 3D printed version of interior theater shell; final model shown in situ


Hat In pursuit of silence strategically around the skull. The base of the construction is modeled after a 1920’s cloche (or ‘bell’) hat, from an era where women were first breaking their silence.

The pursuit of silence has driven people to extremes over the centuries. Isolation, selfseclusion, advancements in technology, all are noted as ways in which we try to block the outside world from disrupting our inner reverie.

The final version - consisting of six distinct layers - was coated in a fiberglass resin, creating a hardened shell or helmet-like structure, also meant to protect from the intrusion of sound.

In this project, the pursuit of silence was approached from both a psychological and physiological standpoint. The perceived silence and stillness of the woods was found not to be so, with decibel readings averaging 15-20dB higher than the internal environment of the house!

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Spring 2019. Silence with Chris Romano

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Yet our perception of stillness and reverie is such that nature still evokes a sense of calm. The materials for this wearable were all derived from nature or as close to nature as possible. In a series of layering and lashing of bags on top of one another, a custom headpiece was formed with lessporous to more-porous materials placed

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To enhance the perception of silence, the visual field was restricted by an exaggerated bill of winter reeds. Unlike the cloche, which made women cast their eyes down demurely, the brim is at once the loudest aspect of the piece - and the one that allows the wearer to become camoflauged when in situ.

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Overlay collage of sound field, helmet in profile, and visual acuity zone

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caesura (an)ecoic: without echo; removal of sound chamber: container, enclosure, pocket

to be without sound is to reside more completely within the chamber of the self. (sans) distraction, stimuli are heightened, attention is turned inwards, awareness of the body is heightened. the body is a chamber. the body houses our past and present, thought and emotion, action and latency. to be so close to the self can be awkward, uncomfortable, dissonant, terrifying. these effects are unwanted if the aim is to allow the occupant to arrive at deeper understanding of within. design can mitigate somewhat by selecting form and material that bring the occupant into a more harmonious integration of self, (absence of ) sound, and space. (en)vision: a chamber that encloses the occupant gently in stillness; an embrace, a return to the womb. organic in form, resembling the cochlea or a seashell, the shape attempts to soothe the seeker’s foray into total silence. reversal upon entry: crawl up and into the body of the shell, suspended from and enclosed within a second simple volume: a cube with firm, slightly convex edges. the cube protects and reflects sound from reaching the stillness of the inner volume. lifting a wedge (that is replaced to become the floor), the seeker climbs into a seat of repose. the journey into center is the process: the search for silence, and under the complete control of the seeker. seated, the seeker observes the walls: curved with variegated and irregular edges from the stacked and interlocking pieces that create the interior surface. the effect is soft, absorptive seclusion. as the material absorbs the seeker’s vibrations, self and the shell are fused. a willing entry into total silence, stillness, repose. Sounds of silence collage, silence graphic, and montage of wearable shown in the location from which materials were sourced


The structure of the hat took the shape of a series of close-fitting layers sewn one on top of the other, in order of material porosity, with gaps for air


Headspace An anechoic experience

The intention of Headspace is to understand the Self with a clear mind. By separating the mind from physical experiences of the body, we seek to impart a state of heightened presence and awareness in our visitors. A large cube is suspended above the gallery floor. Its mirrored finish prodces a visual echo, reflecting the dissonance of the outside world. Incoming light and sound cannot penetrante. The entrance is hidden. To enter is to be consumed. A threshold, tightly lined with folds of pleated fabric absorbs both light and sound while guiding the body inwards to the center. Squeezing up through a series of soft layers - materials that embrace and

View from inside the chamber

accomodate the human form, the head alone enters the innermost chamber. Custom melamine cones line the shell’s interior, absorbing all remaining sound and creating a feeling of detachment. The mind is held alone, in absolute silence: the body is lost in space. One exits as they came.

Designed in collaboration with: Lemma AlGhanem, Fab Bozzolo-Fabia, Fatima Mohammed, Unnati Patel, Jonathan Wan and Nicholas Wheeler.

Spring 2019. Silence with Chris Romano


Series showing fabrication methods and assembly of geodesic dome


Assembled dome, suspended and with lighting prototypes applied


Concept models of the inner chamber


Exploded axonometric showing assembly and construction details


Materials photographed in order of absorptiveness and porosity: plywood, acoustic tile backing, fleece, SAE felt, melamine foam, fiberglass board


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Headspace plan (previous) and section drawings with call-out details. Outer cube dimensions: 6’ x 6’ x 6’; suspension height: 2’6” from bottom of cube


Installation suspended in the studio


Headspace occupied

Profile for Aubrey Fan

Portfolio  

Portfolio of my most cherished work completed during the course of my M.Arch (3.5 year) at UB!

Portfolio  

Portfolio of my most cherished work completed during the course of my M.Arch (3.5 year) at UB!