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UTV OFF-ROAD SPECIAL REPORT

NEW 2009

POLARIS RANGERS BY CHRIS RADEMACHER // PHOTOS DON MERRIFIELD

When Polaris means business, they really mean business! For Polaris, 2009 is the biggest new product launch since the introduction of the Sportsman ATV. For us, the consumers, it’s probably the most exciting, as well. Between their two product lines of ATVs and UTVs, I’d say we got lucky and have a healthy dose of new exciting stuff to keep a strain on our wallets, that’s for sure. So, we know you’ve all heard the rumors, and today we’re going to give you as many details about the new Polaris UTV line as we can. If we miss something, we apologize. I’m sure we’ll be able to give you all the nitty gritty details once we have our hands on these machines for a little longer than the day we had to test them. UTV Off-Road Magazine

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UTV OFF-ROAD SPECIAL REPORT

XP

Finally! The Rangers get tilt steering, new adjustable coil over front suspension and a host of refinements. SO, WHERE DO WE START? In 2009, Polaris has really paid attention to what consumers have wanted in their Ranger line up. To begin, let’s just make a list of updated items on the exciting redesigned Ranger 4x4 and XP: • Completely redesigned body providing a much sportier, aggressive look • HD Front Bumper with inset light mounting points, tow hooks and tie down points • Fixed main hood with flip-up center, providing good access to electronics • No more front struts = Welcome all new adjustable coil over front suspension • 2” more front suspension travel • 50% easier steering effort • 140% more usable storage and 50% more than nearest competitor • Larger cup holders in better location • Removable sealed under seat storage = No more side opening door under driver’s seat • Tilt steering wheel that’s centered in front of the driver instead of off-center • Improved seating geometry = 8 degrees more lean-back to the seat with small side bolsters • Repositioned parking brake And, as if that wasn’t enough for the Ranger product line, there’s a new version of the Ranger XP called the Ranger HD! So, what is the Ranger HD, you ask? Well, it’s Polaris’s answer to the ultimate do-everything ranch or construction utility vehicle. Here’s what items it adds to the drastically updated Ranger XP: • Variable Power Assisted Steering = Literally pinky finger effort is all it takes • Self Leveling Nivomat Rear Suspension = Full ground clearance up to maximum payload capacity • Optional Lift and Carry System So, now that we’ve cut to the chase and given you all the updates up front, let’s describe what some of these updates have done for the drivability of the new Rangers. To start, let’s talk about the new front suspension of the Rangers. If you’ve ever driven a Ranger XP before, you know that the suspension, especially up front, is very plush

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but offers no adjustability. That has proven awesome in slow speed situations like mud riding or rock crawling, but when the speeds increase, being able to adjust the shocks is paramount for keeping a good ride quality. In the past Ranger models, you couldn’t do anything about the stiffness of the front suspension. This year, Polaris eliminated the front struts and replaced it with dual A-arms and coil over shocks. What does this mean? Well, this opens up the long travel market quite a bit for the Rangers. Not only that, you have the same level of adjustment in the front as you do the rear. Plus, you can move the upper shock mounting locations outward or inward to increase shock dampening. By moving the upper shock mount outward, essentially what’s happening is that the motion ratio is increasing. What does this mean exactly? Well, in the case of you having the same spring and dampening inside the shock, it means you can carry more weight and the dampening is more effective or stiffer. The only downside is there’s slightly less wheel travel, because the shock shaft moves more for each inch of wheel travel. For example, if the motion ratio of the shock in the inward most position is .6, this means for every inch of wheel travel the shock moves .6”. If you move the shock’s mounting position outward and the motion ratio say changes to .7, instead of .6, this ultimately means that with a 6” shock stroke you would lose approximately 1.5” of wheel travel. Now, this has just been an explanation of how it works and not true numbers for the Polaris. It’s probably not that drastic on the Ranger, but the nice thing is now you don’t have to run rubber spring spacers when running a plow, because all you have to do is move out the upper shock mount and stiffen the spring preload. The second most noticeable changes made to the Rangers this year is by way of ergonomics, and Polaris really delivered what consumers wanted. I swear they updated everything the consumers wanted, except for maybe the engine being the bigger 800 that we would all love to have. No more bus-like steering wheel that’s off center from where you sit. Now you have a nice tilt steering wheel similar to the one in the RZR that is directly in front of the driver. On top of that, for those long rides, you can now relax even more with 50% less steering effort required. The second most noticeable thing is the extra 8 degrees of angle to the back of the bench seat. This definitely added to the comfort of driving the new Rangers. Not only that, the seats now have slightly more contour to them, which is designed to keep the drivers and passengers better planted and comfortable. Although nice, you still find yourself trying to hold yourself in more than a bucket seat. But, the advantage a bench seat has over the buckets is 3-row


2009 POLARIS RANGER XP 700

“The front suspension really gives the new Rangers a sporty feel to them with precise steering and a firmer, sportier valving setup to absorb the bigger bumps at higher speeds.� UTV Off-Road Magazine

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UTV OFF-ROAD SPECIAL REPORT

2009 POLARIS RANGER XP seating. Make sure you read the accessory section, because there are some new accessories that really increase the comfort of the Rangers. In addition, by way of ergonomics, Polaris added a little separator on the floorboard to prevent the middle passenger from getting in the way of the gas pedal. The two other things that definitely need mentioning are the much larger cup holders and 140% more usable storage than last year. You’ll notice in some of the pictures that there are all kinds of places to put gear in the Rangers, not that it was much of a problem before. The last things to point out on the Rangers are the styling and overall functionality changes made to the exterior. To start, Polaris did a fantastic job this year in changing the styling of the new Rangers. It has a much more aggressive body style that doesn’t just look good, either. Up front, not only did they change the hood design drastically, they also shortened it a few inches. What does this do, you ask? Well, when you sit down in the new Ranger, you have more leg and knee room, which is a very welcome improvement for us taller drivers and passengers. Secondly, with the new pop-up hood, you now have easy access to the stock battery, but also a pre-molded location for a second battery for all those interested in adding major electrical accessories. There’s also pre-molded places for your winch electronics, as well. This brings me to the very front of the Ranger. Ever wondered where the best place is to tie down your Ranger? Well, this year, Polaris made built-in tie-down locations along with tow hooks and inset light mounting points for aftermarket lights. So, now that we’ve talked about all the nice additions to the new Rangers, you’re probably wondering how it drove, right? Well, needless to say, the engineered changes to the Ranger this year make it almost a totally different machine. Upon initially stepping on the gas and beginning to maneuver the vehicle up the trails, you’ll notice right off the steering takes less effort. The power delivery feels relatively the same as last year, but one thing they did this year is change the gas pedal to further enhance slow speed drivability. The first half of the gas pedal stroke only opens the throttle body ¼ of the way. The last half of the pedal stroke opens the throttle the remaining ¾ of the way. So, essentially, you’ll notice that feathering the throttle at slow speeds, whether rock crawling or traversing a technical trail, you’ll find is just like a car…smooth as silk. And, most noticeably you’ll begin to realize you’re not driving your grandpa’s farm utility vehicle anymore. The front suspension really gives the new Rangers a sporty feel to them with precise steering and a firmer, sportier valving setup to absorb the bigger bumps at higher speeds. At slow speeds, it’s definitely firmer than previous models, but not by too much. I noticed that for whatever reason, whether it was the front steering geometry or weight bias, but you could really flick the rear end of the Rangers around into nice controllable power slides, which was nearly impossible with past year’s models. Overall, Polaris really delivered with the 2009 Rangers.

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RANGER XP Cooling

Liquid-cooled

Engine Type

4 valve 4-stroke Twin Cyl.

Top Speed

50 mph

Lubrication

Wet Sump

Oil Capacity

2 qts./1/9 ltr

Carburetion

Electronic Fuel Injection

Fuel Capacity

9.0 gal/34 ltr

Coolant Capacity

3.25 qts / 3 ltr

Alternator

500 watts

Starting / Battery

Electric /12V - 30 AH

Drivetrain Transmission

Automatic

Gear Range

In-line

Drive

4 wheel shaft drive

Suspension Front Suspension

9.63 in. Dual A-Arm / 24.5 cm

Rear Suspension

9.0 in. Dual A-Arm / 22.9 cm

Tires (front/rear)

25 x 10-12 / 25 x 11-12

Dimensions Wheelbase

76 in. / 193 cm

Turning Radius

158 in. / 401 cm

Dry Weight

1237 lb / 561 kg

Ground Clearance

12 in / 30 cm

Length / Width / Height

113 in. / 60 in. / 75 in. (287cm / 152cm / 190cm

Brakes

4 wheel hydraulic disk

Parking Brake

Hand-activated

Load Capacity Box Dimension/Capacity

54x36.5x11.5 in (143x101.5x31.5 cm)/1,000lb.(454kg)

Payload Capacity

1500 lb. /681 kg

Hitch Tow Capacity

2000 lb. /907 kg

Cargo System

Lock and Ride

Seating

3

Skid Plate

Full


2009 POLARIS RANGER HD 700

HD

New with Variable Power Assisted Steering, Self Leveling Nivomat Rear Suspension and optional Lift & Carry System.

AS IF INTRODUCING SO MANY CHANGES TO THE RANGER XPs WASN’T ENOUGH, the Ranger HD has a few major additions to the Ranger XPs to make them even better. To start, the Ranger HD is probably designed for ranchers and construction workers that are looking for the ultimate do-anything vehicle around their sites. But, to me, I can see a lot of these units being sold to the recreational folks, too. There are 2 primary reasons I think this. Number 1 is who the heck wouldn’t want power steering? And, can you imagine how well it would ride with all your camping gear, coolers, and extra gas cans for your weekend excursions? UTV Off-Road Magazine

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So, we’ve mentioned what the additions are to the HD over the XPs, but how does it drive, right? Well, the reality is, it’s essentially the same machine, yet the steering effort is drastically reduced and can literally be steered with your pinky finger if so desired. It really works that good! And, even when combined with the optional lift and carry system, the steering effort never seemed to change. It literally makes the Ranger a breeze to drive. And, I’m sure for those with weaker upper bodies, the new Ranger HD would be a very welcomed feature. Secondly, the new self leveling Nivomat shocks in the rear are simply amazing. Hearing briefly how these shocks worked from Polaris was intriguing, because I had never heard of them before. Unlike all other UTVs out there, the new Ranger HD can carry its maximum cargo box payload of 1,000lbs without losing any ground clearance. You’re probably wondering how it works, right? My initial thought was they were some sort of air shock, but I was wrong. There’s no compressor, require no electricity of any type, no external hydraulic pump, and produce zero emissions. In a nutshell, the Nivomats contain all necessary system components (supporting element, pump, accumulator, reservoir, regulator, etc) all in one housing. And, without knowing the exact engineering behind them, the Nivomats adjust the ride height automatically using energy produced from the relative movements of the suspension in relation to the body of the Ranger. In a nutshell, the shocks somehow know where normal ride

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height is, and after driving around for a short distance with the added weight in the bed, it automatically adjusts to this optimum ride height and ground clearance as if there was no weight in the bed at all. It’s simply amazing! No more do you have to worry about dragging bottom over logs or terrain when hauling out your deer while hunting, or bottoming on curbs and drainage ditches at your job site. They provide the same level of ground clearance and ride as stock with no weight in the back, which is a first for the industry. Not that Polaris designed it for the purposes of putting kids in the back or 4-seat roll cages, but imagine the enhanced ride quality you’d have for those types of setups. But, as you probably imagined, there had to be one downfall to them, right? Because of the dynamics and required motion ratios needed to have properly functioning Nivomats, the Ranger HDs have 1.5” less suspension travel in the rear when compared to the standard Ranger XPs. The way I look at it is for most ranchers and construction workers, you’ll never know the difference. For recreational users, I doubt you’ll really be able to tell either, because you won’t be squatting and bottoming out at much as before. The main thing you’ll lose for recreational units is that you’ll most likely just have a little less down travel, because your up travel will actually be more providing a much nicer ride. And, just to point out, the only other difference between the HD and the XP is that the HD with the Power Steering, the steering radius is 8” wider. Last, but not least, we’ll discuss the Lift and Carry system in the accessory section of this article.


2009 POLARIS RANGER HD 700

The new Ranger HD gets a Variable Power Assisted Steering, tilt wheel, more compartment space and easy to reach cup holders.

Up front, Ranger 4x4, XP and the HD gets all new adjustable coil over front suspension new bumper and the HD has an Optional Lift and Carry System.

Engine

RANGER HD

Displacement/HP

683cc / 40 HP

Cooling

Liquid-cooled

Engine Type

4 valve 4-stroke Twin Cyl.

Top Speed

50 mph

Lubrication

Wet Sump

Oil Capacity

2 qts./1/9 ltr

Carburetion

Electronic Fuel Injection

Fuel Capacity

9.0 gal/34 ltr

Coolant Capacity

3.25 qts / 3 ltr

Alternator

500 watts

Starting / Battery

Electric /12V - 30 AH

Drivetrain Transmission

Automatic

Gear Range

In-line

Drive

4 wheel shaft drive

Suspension Front Suspension

9.63 in. Dual A-Arm/ 24.5cm

Rear Suspension

7.5 in. Dual A-Arm/ 19 cm

Tires (front/rear)

26 x 9-12 / 26 x 11-12

Dimensions Wheelbase

76 in. / 193 cm

Turning Radius

166 in./422 cm

Dry Weight

1262 lb / 572 kg

Ground Clearance

12 in / 30 cm

Length / Width / Height

113 in. / 60 in. / 75 in. (287 cm / 152cm / 190cm)

Brakes

4 wheel hydraulic disk

Parking Brake

Hand-activated

Load Capacity

In the rear of the HD is a Self Leveling Nivomat Rear Suspension that provides full ground clearance up to maximum payload capacity of 1500lbs.

Box Dimension/Capacity

54x36.5x11.5 in (143x101.5x31.5 cm)/1,000lb.(454kg)

Payload Capacity

1500 lb. /681 kg

Hitch Tow Capacity

2000 lb. /907 kg

Cargo System

Lock and Ride

Seating

3

Skid Plate

Full

UTV Off-Road Magazine

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UTV OFF-ROAD SPECIAL REPORT

RZR S

With 5” over factory long travel kit , Fox Podium X Shocks with reservoirs, 800 High Output Engine and top speeds of 63 mph, the RZR S will be hard to beat. Well, we’ve all wondered what Polaris was going to do to the RZRs this year, especially after having such a successful introduction. We’ve heard the rumors of larger engines, different shocks, to long travel, to who knows what, but today we’re going to walk you through what we find as being the most exciting vehicle of 2009. And, we thought the first introduction was exciting, huh? Before we jump into the specifics of each RZR for 2009, let’s cover all the updates that Polaris addressed over last year for both RZRs this year: • New heal pocket = No more jerky throttle response at slow speeds • Improved shifting • Reinforced front frame • Thicker gauge rear upper shock mounts • Reinforced rear frame • Quieter ride • Improved side nets • Sealed under seat storage • 30% stronger roll cage • Turned down exhaust tip = Less fumes in the cab So, now that we’ve listed all the changes out to you, let’s jump into the exciting new RZR S. Well, for 2009, Polaris has quickly realized that ATV sales are down and UTV sales are still in the double digits. In addition, it appears that there are a lot of current sport quad and utility quad owners that have since sold their ATVs and converted to UTVs for many different reasons. And, because of this and other factors, the new RZR S is Polaris’s answer for the ultimate sport and recreational SxS to date. So, what’s different you might ask? Well, it’s pretty obvious that Polaris has added a long travel kit, just from looking at it, but here are the specific updates for the RZR S: • 5” over factory long travel kit = 12.5” ground clearance and 12” of suspension travel • Fox Podium X Shocks with reservoirs including compression dampening and preload adjustability • 800 High Output Engine = 55 HP instead of 52 HP on stock RZR • Top speed of 63 mph • All new 5K mile MBL clutch belt • Fender Flares = Less mud in your face • Additional rear roll cage section = stiffer overall frame and better protection

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So, what do all these things add up to? More fun than you can possibly have in any other SXS out there…period! If you’ve never ridden a RZR with an aftermarket long travel system installed, you’re really missing the boat. And, for those thinking that it’s too wide to go down trails, think again. Yeah, if you indeed have 50” trails that have gates, then the stock RZR is the machine for you. But, if you’re not limited by those restrictions, I’d highly recommend taking a look at the new RZR S. We all know the stock RZRs ride and handle amazingly well, but when you extend the A-arms 5” per side and add Fox Podium X shocks, the ride takes you to a totally different level. No longer do you feel the little bumps, and the large whoops and jumps are absorbed like no other stock SxS has ever been able to do. It’s about time an OEM manufacturer stepped up and did this from the factory, that’s for sure. Keep in mind that there are a few 6”-8” long travel kits out on the market that provide as much as 16” of wheel travel, but if you want an out of the box SxS with full factory warranty and financing options, this is the only way to go, in my opinion. And, Polaris didn’t stop there. They could have easily gone with a 6-8” over kit like the rest of the systems out there, but then it wouldn’t still fit in the back of a full-size pickup truck. But, the RZR S does! And, this brings me to another point about long travel equipped SxSs. The RZR S is the same width as a Ranger XP, so if your Ranger XP can make it down your trails, the RZR S can, too…only way faster! And, keep in mind the RZR’s main body is still only 50” wide, so you’ll be getting smacked by branches a lot less, as well. The RZR S gained 55 lbs by adding the longer A-arms and additional tubing for the cage, but Polaris equaled this out by equipping the RZR S with the 800 H.O. engine, which is 3 HP more than the stock RZR. If you do the math, that’s 5.5% more weight and 5.5% more power. So, between the trail capable RZR and the RZR S, the acceleration and power are virtually the same. They achieved the power gains by changing the exhaust header tubing, the head, and probably a few other things. The new RZR S is equipped with a new, stronger, and more durable clutch belt. We didn’t get the specifics from Polaris, but my guess is that if these belts prove to hold up better than the stock belts, it might be a great upgrade for us existing owners, possibly. Anytime we can add strength and longevity out of a wear item, it’s a good thing. Last, but not least, the new RZR S has some stylin’ new fender flares that really help to keep the mud out of your face when cornering with the long


2009 POLARIS RANGER RZR S 800

UTV Off-Road Magazine

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UTV OFF-ROAD SPECIAL REPORT

travel. The nice thing is these same fender flares will fit on existing RZRs, as well. They really make the look of the new RZR S, when combined with the cool looking graphics, macho and aggressive looking. So, now that we’ve covered all the new additions for the RZR S, let’s talk about how it drove. One of the first things I noticed is that it’s not stiff like a lot of aftermarket long travel kits I’ve driven. After talking with some of the Polaris engineers, I learned a lot on why it rides the way it does, and we’ll get into it shortly. There’s something amazing that happens with extra width and more travel. You quickly find yourself having to press the brakes harder because you’re entering corners a lot faster, power sliding like a champ, and jumping things at full throttle instead of babying it. I’ve also ridden many long travel kits that don’t quite have the same steering characteristics as stock or even worse. One of the things you learn to do when racing or driving these SxSs aggressively is to tap the brakes to load the front end and get the vehicle to turn. Because of the adverse conditions we had while testing these vehicles, it was needed even more because the ground was slick and muddy. And, this is where I was amazed. I had no problem at full speed turns to get the RZR to turn on a dime. So, back to the plush ride it provides at slow speeds. We all know the common problem we have with our SxSs bucking in the back, right? I mean, most SxSs when launched through the air tend to land on their noses, which we all know causes quite the pucker factor. The best stock machine that we’ve tested has been the Kawasaki Teryx, but all the others, no matter what we did, always tended to buck and land on the front end. So, after a discussion with the head engineer for the RZR S, Aaron described in simple terms why this happens. In the past, I’ve always thought the

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bucking could be prevented by increasing the rebound dampening of the rear shocks and maybe reducing the rebound dampening up front. But, this is all wrong, actually. The reality of the situation is that the rear shocks don’t have enough compression dampening, causing the rear to fully compress and rebound viscously from the bump stop to full extension. So, when Polaris designed the shocks for the RZR S, now you understand why they only provide compression dampening adjustment and not rebound adjustment. What amazed me is how effectively this worked at letting the vehicle still be plush at slow speeds, yet when the speeds increased it still didn’t buck or bottom out over the large jumps. Plus, with more compression dampening, you can run a lighter spring. And, a lighter spring means there’s less force upward when rebounding, which also means less rebound dampening is needed. All I can say is when you watch the videos of us running the whoops and jumps at full throttle, you’ll see exactly what I’m talking about. Go watch some aftermarket company’s videos on Youtube in slow motion, and you’ll quickly see how they react differently than a lot of kits I’ve seen out on the market. I guess there’s something to be said about good ‘ol OEM Polaris engineers after all! All I can say is Polaris really stepped it up this year with the new RZR S. The great thing about it is you can get full factory warranty on a longtravel equipped RZR. Plus, if you wanted to race it in short course or some desert races, all you need to add is a fuel cell, doors, window nets, 5 point harnesses, and you’re good to go. One precautionary measure would be to add a stronger roll cage too, but some extra gusseting could easily get you by. Not having to spring for a $5-7K long travel kit on your own dime is huge, especially when you can finance the whole thing at your local dealer.


2009 POLARIS RANGER RZR S 800

Engine

RANGER RZR

RANGER RZR S

Displacement/HP

760cc

760cc HO

Cooling

Liquid-cooled

Liquid-cooled

Engine Type

Twin Cylinder

Twin Cylinder

Top Speed

55 mph

63 mph

Lubrication

Wet Sump

Wet Sump

Oil Capacity

2 qts./1/9 ltr

2 qts./1/9 ltr

Carburetion

Electronic Fuel Injection

Electronic Fuel Injection

Fuel Capacity

7.25 gal. / 27.4 ltr

7.25 gal. / 27.4 ltr

Coolant Capacity

4.8 qts / 4.5 ltr

4.8 qts / 4.5 ltr

Alternator

500 watts

500 watts

Starting / Battery

Electric /12V - 30 AH

Electric /12V - 30 AH

Transmission

Automatic PVT

Automatic PVT

Gear Range

In-line P-R-N-L-H

In-line P-R-N-L-H

Drive

4 wheel shaft drive

4 wheel shaft drive

Front Details

Double A-arm with anti-sway bar

Double A-arm

Rear Details

Rolled Independent w/anti-sway bar

Rolled Independent w/anti-sway bar

Front Suspension

9.0 in. / 22.9 cm

12 in FOX Podium (comp adjust / res) / 30 cm

Rear Suspension

9.5in./24cm

12 in FOX Podium (comp adjust / res) / 30 cm

Tires (front/rear)

25 x 10-12 / 25 x 11-12

26x9-12, 26x12-12

Wheelbase

77 in. / 196 cm

77 in. / 196 cm

Turning Radius

101 in. / 258 cm

149.5 in. / 380 cm

Dry Weight

945 lb / 429 kg

1000 lb / 454 kg

Ground Clearance

10 in / 25 cm

12.5 in / 32 cm

Length / Width / Height

102in./50in./69in.(259 cm/127 cm/ 75 cm)

106in./60.5in./70.5in. (269 cm/ 154 cm/ 179 cm)

Brakes

4 wheel hydraulic

4 wheel hydraulic

Parking Brake

N/A

N/A

Box Dimension/Capacity

42x22 in. (107x56 cm)/300 lb. (136 kg.)

42x22 in. (107x56 cm)/300 lb. (136 kg.)

Payload Capacity

740 lb./ 336 kg

740 lb./ 336 kg

Hitch Tow Capacity

1500 lb. /681 kg

1500 lb. /681 kg

Cargo System

Lock and Ride

Lock and Ride

Seating

2

2

Skid Plate

Full

Full

Drivetrain

Suspension

Dimensions

Load Capacity

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RZR

Improved throttle response, shifting, side nets, new colors, 30% stronger steel in the roll cages, turned down exhaust tip and more. So, now that we’ve got you all hyped about the new Rangers and RZR S, let’s not forget about the trail capable version of the RZR. This is where we’ll talk about all the updates that were made to both the RZR and the RZR S that we listed above. First off, the 2009 RZR lineup no longer has the jerky throttle syndrome. Polaris recessed the floorboard of the new RZRs to keep your leg from jerking around and causing your ankle from repetitively hitting the gas pedal. And, it really works. You don’t need any special springs or some fandangled contraption to stiffen the pedal, because Polaris truly fixed the problem. Another area Polaris addressed this year is in the shifting. In the past model years, it was found that when parked on a hill where the vehicle’s weight was holding against the transmission, it was oftentimes very difficult to get it to shift out of park. In 2009, Polaris perfected the linkage, and now it shifts not only out of park easier, it shifts smoother through all the gears. Another area of concern was the strength of the frames, especially when adding long travel kits. So, given the fact that Polaris agreed when designing the RZR S, now all RZRs come with thicker gauge steel up front and better suspension mounting points in the rear, as well. No longer do we have to worry about the extra forces of leverage by long travels or extremely hard hits in the rear bending upper shock tabs, because it’s all been fixed to withstand much longer durability cycles. When I say Polaris really stepped up and fixed nearly all the concerns of the public, I’ll say it again. I’ve never seen a company in one year fix nearly every complaint or issue that folks had in one year. Usually, it takes manufacturers multiple years to see if indeed it’s a real issue, then they might get around to it. This just goes to show that Polaris is able to dynamically change with the market, which I would imagine is crucial in today’s economic climate. And, another area they updated was the exhaust decibel level and the amount of fumes present in the cab. To do this, they ran tests on the dyno and came up with a way to reduce the decibel level with a little metal ring inside the tip of the exhaust. In addition, by turning the tip of the muffler downward, they drastically reduced the fumes that would re-circulate into the cabs, especially with a windshield on. One of the other areas Polaris addressed this year is storage for the RZRs. Although I’ll admit I’d still really like to see more storage incorporated

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under the dash of the RZR, the new sealed under seat storage was a welcome surprise. And, last but not least, if you’ve removed your factory netting because it got caught in trees and ripped off or just was too much of a hassle to get in and out of, Polaris redesigned the netting to only require one latch to be unclipped to get in and out of the vehicle. Plus, the netting right against your shoulder has been replaced with a durable plastic that won’t get ripped off like the previous design. Plus, all in the quest for safety, Polaris is using a 30% stronger steel in the roll cages to further prevent folks from getting hurt if they get out of control and roll their RZR. Overall, as mentioned numerous times before in this article, Polaris has really stepped it up this year with so many new products and updates to be excited about. We hope you’ve enjoyed learning about their new products, and don’t forget to go to our video gallery on our website at: www. utvoffroadmag.com/videos.html to view the videos we put together. We’ve got the specs and action videos to make you drool all the way to your local dealer for your second RZR or Ranger purchase!


2009 POLARIS RANGER RZR 800

Engine

RANGER RZR

Displacement/HP

760cc

Cooling

Liquid-cooled

Engine Type

Twin Cylinder

Top Speed

55 mph

Lubrication

Wet Sump

Oil Capacity

2 qts./1/9 ltr

Carburetion

Electronic Fuel Injection

Fuel Capacity

7.25 gal. / 27.4 ltr

Coolant Capacity

4.8 qts / 4.5 ltr

Alternator

500 watts

Starting / Battery

Electric /12V - 30 AH

Drivetrain Transmission

Automatic PVT

Gear Range

In-line P-R-N-L-H

Drive

4 wheel shaft drive

Suspension Front Details

Double A-arm with anti-sway bar

Rear Details

Rolled Independent w/anti-sway bar

Front Suspension

9.0 in. / 22.9 cm

Rear Suspension

9.5in./24cm

Tires (front/rear)

25 x 10-12 / 25 x 11-12

Dimensions Wheelbase

77 in. / 196 cm

Turning Radius

101 in. / 258 cm

Dry Weight

945 lb / 429 kg

Ground Clearance

10 in / 25 cm

Length / Width / Height

102in./50in./69in.(259 cm/127 cm/ 75 cm)

Brakes

4 wheel hydraulic

Parking Brake

N/A

Load Capacity Box Dimension/Capacity

42x22 in. (107x56 cm)/300 lb. (136 kg.)

Payload Capacity

740 lb./ 336 kg

Hitch Tow Capacity

1500 lb. /681 kg

Cargo System

Lock and Ride

Seating

2

Skid Plate

Full

Body

The RZR’s sporty new color option ”Nuclear Sunset” and silver cage.

Color options

Red, Green, Nuclear Sunset, Camo

SUGGESTED PRICE

TBD UTV Off-Road Magazine

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UTV OFF-ROAD SPECIAL REPORT

ACCESSORIES

One of the areas that Polaris has really caught onto is the OEM supplied accessory market. We guess Polaris realized quickly that by allowing customers to buy all the accessories they wanted and finance it into their initial vehicle purchase, they were drastically increasing their bottom line. Plus, it makes customers happy to be able to afford more accessories for their vehicles, especially when trying to keep up with their neighbors down the road. So, with the RZR, there’s roughly 65 new accessory items available in 2009. We’re not going to go through all of them, just the ones we think are neat additions for the RZR this year. To start, Polaris has designed some nice aluminum front and rear bumpers that are roughly half the weight and integrate with a winch, plow, and even has tabs for aftermarket lights. Secondly, if you want a substantially better ride, Polaris offers adjustable Walker Evans Shocks to make the ride much better than stock.

74 www.utvoffroadmag.com


2009 PURE POLARIS ACCESSORIES

r look to shion and bette to add a little cu rs ve co at se r fibe Here’s the carbon your RZR. ws you e driver that allo seat slider for th a seat is e th ar ye ise is ra th r es item fo ter drivers. It do Another handy d back for shor an d ar rw fo at to slide the se ll. height 2”, as we

And, if perf ormance is what you’re an aftermar after, Polari ket header s has design pipe that in for an addi ed tegrates wit tional 5% of h FMF’s muffl power. er

If the stock undercarriage plastic skid plate doesn’t suite your fancy, full aluminum skid plates are now available from the factory. Additional protection and be added with the new CV guards.

UTV Off-Road Magazine

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UTV OFF-ROAD SPECIAL REPORT

And, if hunting is your thing, Polaris has adjusted and added many new accessories to make your hunting expeditions that much better. To start, here are the fender protectors for front and rear.

If extra cargo capacity is something you need, they came out with the bed extenders to hold in all your gear. There’s a new tie down bar for the bed that fully adjusts to allow you strap down just about anything you need in any place. Below are the sharp new fender ares that will help keep the mud out of your face.

76 www.utvoffroadmag.com


2009 PURE POLARIS ACCESSORIES Plus Pure Polaris will have a whole line of billet accessories coming out for those searching for the ultimate bling. There’s going to be cloth and poly rear panels to reduce dust and exhaust when putting a front windshield on. Overall, 90-95% of the accessories designed for the RZR will fit the RZR S, as well.

Another great storage accessory is the new lockable glove box.

As far as the Rangers go, there’s going to be 80+ accessories available from Polaris this year. One of the big items is Cabs that range from $1300-$4500.

UTV Off-Road Magazine

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UTV OFF-ROAD SPECIAL REPORT

2009 PURE POLARIS ACCESSORIES

Also available from Polaris, is the Boss plow available for the Rangers if you live in cold country.

Another few nice items this year are purpose built bumpers such as the extreme and pre-runner bumpers. They give you options of mounting your winch above and below the top part, allowing you to run aftermarket lights, as well.

One of the neatest accessories they’ve added is a Flexsteel bench seat that allows the driver to adjust the seat forward and back. Plus it has higher side bolsters to help you stay put when the going gets rough. And, you just flip up the driver’s seat to get to the under seat storage.

78 www.utvoffroadmag.com

And the #1 selling gun scabbard has been lifted up so you can fit Polaris dog cages or your own beneath them with no problem. Plus, you can fit that huge game you shot, as well. Although the in-cab heaters have been available for a while, Polaris has added a vent in the dash that directs air flow right on the windshield to keep it defrosted. Last, but not least, they have a nice center console that’s held in by the center seat belt.


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