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annual report Buddhist Council of NSW 2013

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Contents Message from Our Chairman

4

Our Vision

6

4 Sources of Value

7

Our Key Programs Special Religious Education

8

Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care

10

Training Unit

11

Member Services

12

Governance 14 Board Report Card

15

Financial Summary

17

The Buddhist Council of New South Wales Incorporated is a member of the Federation of Australian Buddhist Councils (FABC). Our constitution was first ratified at the inaugural Annual General Meeting in June, 1985 and formally incorporated in March, 1991 under founding chairman Graeme Lyall AM. Our Logo. Our logo has been revised to reflect our vision. The multicoloured lotus represents the robes of many Buddhist Sangha. The eight-spoked Dharma wheel in the centre represents the original teaching respected by all Buddhists. A Dharma Community with Open Arms can therefore be seen as the different lotus petals reaching out to embrace all beings, and united by the One Dharma. Printed on Monza Satin, an unbleached coated paper made from 100% recycled post-consumer waste, using vegetable-based inks. Editor: Neil lee Design: Crunch Design (www.crunchdesign.com.au) Printer: Aviva Print ABN 18-550-218-989 Published May 2014 Š Copyright Buddhist Council of NSW 2014

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Message from our Chairman

Welcome to the Buddhist Council of New South Wales Annual Report for 2013. Council (in training classes) who previously did not know much about what we do. In this way, it is like a marketing function for the Council. But more than this, the wide range of training courses fill a gap in the community. We like to think of our Training Unit as being half-way between a TAFE and a temple; that is, formal training methodologies, but to put Dharma in action within the community.

2013 was the first year of a three year transition for the Buddhist Council of New South Wales. In late 2012, the board went through an extensive consultation with team managers, staff and volunteers. The board realised that the existing staff and volunteer structure was not sustainable. The board decided, and this was supported by the team managers, staff and volunteers, to build the organisation by having more part-time or casual staff. These new roles would attend the office on a more consistent basis (one or two days per week), and would take on a broader range of functions and responsibilities. Overall, the organisation would employ more staff and would achieve more, in areas like helping members, donation tracking, fundraising, website functionality, and giving better support to the finance team, chaplaincy, SRE and the Training Unit.

We also completed a review of our branding and marketing. We arrived at a new motto, which sums up what we do: Connecting the Buddhist Community. Our challenges for 2014 are still to diversify our funding base, to get closer to our members, to improve our team effectiveness (with extra part-time staff) and for our website to become the obvious place to find out what is happening within the Buddhist community.

The difficulty with this strategy was that the benefits of improved capabilities and increased income, would come after two or three years, whereas the increased costs of extra staff would be in the first year. In adopting this strategy, the board accepted that the financial position may be in the red for two or three years (2013 to 2015). To some degree it was a risk worth taking, but the board agreed that the risk was even greater with the status quo. In other words, the status quo was burning out our key staff and this was not sustainable under any circumstances.

I would like to thank the many who make it possible for the Buddhist Council of New South Wales to do its work in the community. Without them, the Buddhist Council would not exist. I sincerely thank our member organisations, our dedicated and hard working staff, our many volunteers, our generous donors, friends and supporters.

What have we achieved in 2013? The Training Unit has proven to be a major success, because not only does it diversify and increase our funding base, it also introduces new people to the

Brian White

Yours in the Dharma,

President and Chairman

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Our challenges for 2014 are still to diversify our funding base, to get closer to our members, to improve our team effectiveness

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Our Vision Our vision is for a “Dharma Community with Open Arms”. Our Life-Force

Buddhism varies in its practice from country to country, from tradition to tradition, and from teacher to teacher. The Buddha himself recognised that the vehicle for his Dharma teaching would adapt and change over time and in different places.

What is the life-force of the Buddhist Council of New South Wales? Our

A Dharma Community brings all Buddhist traditions and schools together. While respecting the distinct value and heritage of each tradition, a Dharma Community emphasises the essence of the Buddha’s teachings which are common to all Buddhist schools and traditions. The Buddhist Council of New South Wales therefore encourages all Buddhist groups, temples and societies to come together to appreciate each other through the essence of the Dharma itself.

motivation

comes from our passion for the Buddha’s teachings (Dharma).

A Dharma Community brings all Buddhist traditions and schools together. While respecting the distinct value and heritage of each tradition.

Our energy comes from our freedom to innovate, experiment, ask questions and learn. Our fulfilment comes from knowing that what we do together multiplies in the community, that is, our diverse Dharma-related activities and programs reach out to assist all Buddhist communities, traditions, groups, cultures and geographies.

The Council does not compete with any other person or organisation, so where possible, we try to collaborate and support worthwhile activity of others

To have Open Arms is to be open to everyone in the general community, to build bridges of understanding and to act compassionately towards all beings.

Our Mission

Our Motto

To support our member organisations, who in turn serve the Buddhist community

Connectiing tbe Buddhist Community

To represent the Buddhist community to inter-faith groups, media, government and the NSW public, in accordance with the Dharma To promote the understanding and practice of the Dharma 6


[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

4 Sources of Value

Our organisation is structured around the goal of providing four sources of value to our various constituencies.

Member Services

Buddhist Education

Supporting our Members through: • Advice • Insurance • Information

Applied Buddhism • Special Religious Education (Buddhist scripture in schools) for children • Training Unit

Buddhist Connection

Reaching Out and Building Links • Website • Content, Analysis and Publishing (CAP) • Community Projects and Events • External Relations and Public Relations

Buddhist Care

Providing Care and Support to the community • Hospital Chaplaincy • Prision Chaplaincy

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Our Key Programs The Buddhist Council runs a range of programs in line with our mission of supporting and representing our members and the Buddhist community, and promoting the understanding of Buddhism. An outline of some of our key programs, results and desired outcomes is provided in this section. Special Religious Education (Buddhist Scripture in Schools) The Buddhist Council of NSW is authorised by the Department of Education to accredit SRE (Special Religious Education) teachers as part of the Department’s Special Religious Education (SRE) program for primary and secondary schools.

Our teachers come from all walks of life, some are ordained monastics however most are lay people. All are committed to teaching and sharing the Buddha’s teachings with young people.

become an SRE teacher; Work with the Buddhist Council’s Training Unit to ensure that new teachers are receiving adequate and appropriate training; Provide ongoing support (including texts and teaching materials) to existing teachers; Ensure SRE teachers meet legislative requirements e.g.. implementation of new Working With Children check

What We Do

Aims and Objectives For 2013

The Council performs a range of activities to support Buddhist SRE Teachers including:

One of the key aims of the Council for 2013 was to implement the new training program with the aim of increasing teacher numbers in 2013.

• •

Answer enquiries from prospective SRE teachers Support people through the process of accreditation to

SCHOOLS Active Schools

54

Waiting Schools

70

Total Schools

124

TEACHERS

Active Teachers Prospective Teachers Total Teachers Lay:%, Ordained:%:

65 33 98 94%: 6%

Value and Life Skills “Values and Life Skills” lies at the core of our curriculum and is aimed at teaching children values such as compassion, truth and patience. Classes include meditation and discussing how values may be applied in daily life both inside and outside the classroom.

STUDENTS Average Number of Students per teacher

38

Estimated Total Number of Students in SRE Program 2,435

Primary %: Secondary %:

96.5%: 3.5%

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Activities in 2013 • • • •

Eight training sessions for new teachers; A fundraising dinner to support SRE teachers and the Council’s program; In-service training for existing teachers; Brian White, the Buddhist Council’s Chairman spoke about and promoted SRE at His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s Teachings in Sydney .

and meant we were able to maintain the level of SRE teachers in NSW. There has been only a small gain in terms of the number of teachers.

Better Training and Clarity The biggest impact in 2013 has been better trained teachers. The teachers learn how to deliver “Value and Life Skills” classes to children.

Brian’s talk increased the awareness of Buddhist SRE in the community and we had many wanting to attend training. The introduction in 2013 of the Buddhist Council Training Unit coupled with the funds raised at the fundraising dinner has enabled the Council to run training sessions to support the increasing number of new teacher applicants. The eight training sessions run this year ensured we had sufficient new teachers to replace leaving and retiring teachers

North Coast 16%

South West 4% North Shore 6%

Western Sydney 13%

Northwest Sydney 15% Location of Active SRE Classes

Blue Mountains 4% Western NSW 6%

Eastern Suburbs 16%

Southern Highlands 4%

Central Coast 6%

Inner West 10%

Our Activities

Immediate Results

Desired Outcomes

Recruiting, training and supporting SRE teachers in NSW public schools

Children from K to year 6 learn values and life skills.

Children can implement the “Values and Life Skills” in their daily lives

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care Buddhist Chaplains work in both hospitals and prisons and aim to offer emotional and spiritual support for those in need. They aim to relieve suffering through the practice of loving kindness, compassion and listening.

Ordained 37%

Chaplaincy can be a demanding role and our chaplains are expected to have a mature outlook, strong listening skills and a caring and empathetic nature.

Lay and Ordained Chaplains (%)

The Buddhist Council provides training for prospective chaplains and has a special Chaplaincy Support Team to deal with the special requirements and demands of chaplains.

Lay 63%

Growth in Chaplaincy Numbers in 2013 In 2013 there were 19 Buddhist chaplains offering pastoral care in 14 hospitals around NSW. An increase of 6 chaplains since 2012. There are currently 10 prison chaplains offering pastoral care to 9 correctional facilities. In 2012 there were six Prison chaplains. 2013

2012

Active Lay Chaplains

11

8

Active Ordained Chaplains

8

5

19

13

14

14

Active Lay Chaplains

7

4

Active Ordained Chaplains

3

2

10

6

Prison Chaplains 32%

Hospitals

Total Hospitals Covered

Chaplains by Area of Pastoral Care

Prisons

Total

Hospital Chaplains 68%

The growth in 2013 reflects an increase in the selection and training of prospective chaplains. We expect this trend to continue in 2014 and 2015. In November 2013 we trained a record 18 new chaplains.

Our Activities

Immediate Results

Desired Outcomes

Recruiting, training and supporting chaplains in hospitals and prisons

Visits and contact with inmates, patients and their families

Helping patients and their families overcome crisis. Helping inmates make a new life.

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Importance of Training and Workshops

First Prison Chaplain Only Workshop

Workshops and on-going training are an important part of the training and development of our chaplains.

In 2013 we had the first prison chaplains workshop and several chaplains made the effort to come to Sydney for the illuminating and constructive workshop, delivered by Mr. Graeme Lyall.

They provide an opportunity to exchange information, learn from each other’s experience and develop new approaches.

Training Unit In 2013 the Council established a dedicated unit to oversee and coordinate all training managed and offered by the Buddhist Council including SRE and chaplaincy training.

(Prior to 2013 training for the SRE teachers and for Buddhist chaplains was organised by the SRE Unit and Chaplaincy Unit respectively. )

Long Term Goal

Develop and deliver workshops that might be of interest to members and to the community (for example: Mantras to Music)

The long term goal of the Training Unit is to build a training structure and system that leads to the Buddhist Council being established as a Registered Training Organisation (RTO).

The focus provided by the Training Unit allows the Council to increase both the quantity and quality of its training and develop systems for the continual assessment and improvement of the training it offers.

2013

Immediate Goals

SRE Basic Classroom Skills I

4

The short term goals of the Training Unit are to:

SRE Basic Classroom Skills II

4

Appreciation of All Traditions*

4

Value and Life Skills**

4

CPE Chaplaincy Workshop

1

Mantras to Music Workshop

2

• • • •

Support and facilitate the SRE and Chaplaincy Units to deliver training that supports and further enhances SRE teacher and chaplain skill sets; Increase number of workshops and training to support SRE program and chaplaincy program; Develop a training structure that ensures all training relates back to the Council’s Core Functions Develop training and workshops to support member organisations (for example: A Buddhist Approach to Social Networking” and “Buddhism in Recovery” training)

Total

19

* Core requirement for SRE and Chaplaincy ** Core requirement for SRE

Our Activities

Immediate Results

Desired Outcomes

Develop and provide workshops for members and non-members, and coordinate SRE and Chaplaincy training

Workshops and training for SRE teachers and chaplains. Training for members

Enhanced training for SRE teachers and chaplains. Increased knowledge and skills for members and community

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Member Services The Member Service team provides general information and resources to support the activities of our members.

Australia such as those governing not-for-profits and the need (for example) for annual reporting to the Office of Fair Trading.

The Council recognises there is a great diversity of Buddhist traditions, languages and cultures in our community and among our 119 member organisations.

The establishment of our Training Unit in 2013 provides us with another way to provide support to our member organisations and in 2014 the Unit will run courses on “Good Governance” for committees of non-profit organisations.

Staying in Touch

Providing Technical Expertise

The Council aims to contact each member organisation, at least once a year, via email or phone to obtain updates or discuss any areas of interest relating to their organisation.

Through the Member Service Program the Buddhist Council has gathered a pool of expertise from our volunteers and put together a package of professional services to help bridge these gaps by providing information and timely advice to our member organisations.

These calls are part of our goal of continuing to improve our understanding of our members’ needs and how we may help.

Bridging Gaps

The value-added benefits include:

Most Buddhist organisations are run by volunteers. Typically their main aim is to support their local temple and their ordained Sangha, so that they can focus on providing spiritual care and propagation of Buddhist teachings.

• • • • •

They might not have all the necessary expertise to operate an organisation or to comply with regulations and laws in

Mahayana 35%

Vajrayana 28%

Public Liability Insurance The work of the Member Service team includes specially tailored low cost insurance policies. For example, the Public Liability Insurance policy has saved the 41 Members participating in the scheme between $500 and $1,000 per member every year, funds that can now be used more effectively elsewhere in their activities.

Council Members by Tradition (%)

Theravada 35%

management advice and specialist knowledge legal and financial matters such as taxation status fundraising advice information technology management; and group insurance policies for volunteers/staff members and public liability insurance.

Non-Sectarian 9%

Our Activities

Immediate Results

Desired Outcomes

More communication between Buddhist groups and the Council.

Understanding of members and their needs. Buddhist groups more in-touch with sources of help, other groups, access to parliament

A stronger, more effective and more sustainable Buddhist community Better image of Buddhism, external relationships and levels of donor support

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Culture

Number

Bangladeshi

1

Burmese Cambodian

6 4

Chinese

19

Gelupa Indonesian Japanese Kagyu Korean Laotian Nyingma Sakya Sri Lankan Thai Vietnamese Western

11 1 3 6 7 4 4 5 2 11 7 24

Youth

4

Bangladeshi

Youth

Burmese Cambodian

Western Chinese

Council Members by Culture

Vietnamese

Gelugpa

Thai

Sri Lankan

Indonesian Japanese

Laotian

Sakya Kagyu Nyingma

Member Breakdown by Culture as of 31/12/2013

13

Korean


[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Governance

Director Responsibilities and Board Meeting Attendance Director Brian White

Tissa Mohotti

Ranmal Samarawickrama

Brent Carswell

Melody Lin

Ben Webster

Area of Responsibility and Biography Chair and President Brian was elected President of the Buddhist Council of NSW in December 2006. He has experience in both secular and Buddhist not-for-profit organisations and has completed the company directors course. Since he was introduced to Buddhism 30 years ago he has been extensively involved in Buddhist youth issues. One of Brian’s interests is in helping Buddhist organisations of all traditions, so that the Buddha’s teachings are more accessible and better understood across society

4 out of 4

Treasurer and Director Responsible for Finance Tissa is a Certified Practicing Accountant (CPA) and also has a Masters of Business Administration. His work experience includes not-for-profit corporates.

4 out of 4

Secretary Ranmal has extensive experience supporting Buddhist organisations in Malaysia and Australia. He has worked closely with Buddhist youth having been involved in university Buddhist societies for many years and has also presented at the World Parliament of Religions on interfaith dialogue in developing communities. (Retired as Director 2012)

3 out of 3

Vice President Internal (newly appointed) Brent is the Creative Director of Crunch Design, a Sydney based branding and web development company. He has over 30 years experience in design and has been designing for the digital world for more than 10 years. Brent’s goal is to bring this expertise to the Buddhist Council’s online presence. He is a practising Buddhist and lives and works in Sydney.

4 out of 4

Director assisting Member Network Melody has been a Buddhist for 20 years and is a Chan practitioner of the method of the Guan Yin Bodhisattva. Her interest in the Mahayana tradition includes the study of sutras and the application of the Dharma in daily living. She sets her life goal as a bridge for Dharma exchange between East & West.

4 out of 4

Vice President External (newly appointed) Ben was admitted in 2005 as a solicitor to the Supreme Court of NSW and the High Court of Australia, and practised briefly as a lawyer. He has worked for the Australian and NSW Governments in a number of policy and program areas including Indigenous Affairs and Education, and is currently working in the Families area. Ben has been a practicing Buddhist and serious meditator for more than ten years.

Dr Lawrence Ong

Attendance

Retiring Director assisting Youth Issues. Lawrence Ong is a medical practitioner and psychology graduate currently practising in the public hospital system. He was president in 2001 and Dharma Officer in 2002 of Unibodhi, Sydney University and founder of the Mitra Youth Buddhist Network. Lawrence is currently involved in the Metta Portal project, which will bring together the Buddhist community online.

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Director Trevor Robertson

Brendan Coutts

Merran Dawson

Area of Responsibility and Biography

Attendance

Retiring Vice President External Relations Trevor first became actively engaged with Buddhism in Melbourne in 1970, joining the Buddhist Society of Victoria. That involvement and his later membership of the Buddhist Society of the Northern Territory acquainted him principally with the Theravada tradition, while inclusion of the Mahayana and Vajrayana traditions in the Darwin-based Buddhist Society taught him the need for a deeper knowledge and understanding of Buddhism’s breadth.

1 out of 1

Retiring Director assisting Member Service Brendan Coutts has worked for ten years as a business advisor and analyst, particularly focussing on the relationship between the performance of an organisation and the well-being of the people involved with that organisation. He has been a practicing Buddhist and managed a local Buddhist group for more than ten years. In the last year he has also begun teaching meditation/Dharma classes.

1 out of 1

Retiring Director assisting Chaplaincy Program Merran is the Sangha Relations Coordinator for Zen Open Circle and is a Buddhist chaplain at Westmead Hospital. Previously, she worked in policy and teacher training leadership positions in the Department of Education and Training; and in training management positions in the public service and University of Technology Sydney, before launching her own training consultancy business.

1 out of 1

More information about our current Directors can be found on website: www.buddhistconnection.org

Board Report Card Self Assessed Rating Clear Vision, Mission and Values

Good

Board

OK Constitution

Risk Management

Financial Management External Audit

Reporting and Compliance

Strategic Direction

Good OK

Governance System in Place

Refer to our website for information about Our Vision, Mission and the Golden Rules

Outstanding Issues No outstanding issues

The Board includes an outstanding range of skills and relevant experience. Directors are committed and hard working.

Retirement of directors results in a smaller board while portfolio responsibilities have been reduced

Constitution modified in recent years to keep relevant to internal and external environment

No outstanding issues

Preliminary risk assessment in place

Risk Management System needs review

Good

MYOB financial management system, financial budgeting and internal reporting

No outstanding issues

Good

Legislation does not require an external audit but BCNSW has performed an independent audit each year since 2007.

No outstanding issues

Good

We report to the Office of Fair Trading on an annual basis and we comply with ATO and other relevant regulations

No outstanding issues

Significant work has been completed over the past two years on developing long term directions and short term priorities.

No outstanding issues

Good

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

The Council does not compete with any other person or organisation, so where possible, we try to collaborate and support the worthwhile activity of others.

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Financial Summary Five Year Financial Summary of the Buddhist Council*

Income Expenses Operating Surplus Increase in Members’ Funds Total Members’ Funds

2009 100,880 97,560 3,320 3,320

2010 192,243 166,817 25,426 25,426

2011 143,534 131,711 11,823 11,823

2012 122,267 120,961 1,306 1,306

2013 146,924 132,538 14,386 14,386

56,542

81,968

93,791

95,097

109,483

Training Revenue SRE Donations 7.3% 8.2%

Surplus The Buddhist Council generated a surplus of $14,386 in the year 2013.

General Donations 9.5%

Revenue Total revenue $146,924 (2012: $122,267) has increased by 20% due to increased revenue from the Training Unit covering SRE teachers and Chaplaincy training and increased revenue from Donations from general and SRE donations. An overview of our finances shows Chaplains we continue to rely on chaplaincy income from Health and 18.4% Corrective Services.

Interest 1.8% Fundraising 2.4%

Revenue

Expenses Total expenses $132,538 (2012: $120,961) increased by 10%. The increase in staff and volunteer costs by 28% reflect additional support services provided for the Council’s programs. The Council’s success in delivering a dynamic program of strategic and cultural change has been skillfully guided by the Board and supported by our committed staff and our dedicated volunteer community.

Other Admin Costs 9.7%

Financial position The Council continues on a strong financial trajectory with cash balances of $112,571 (2012: $72,100).

Rent and Utilities 17.0%

In 2013 the Buddhist Council’s financial position has further increased by $14,386 and the five year results shows it has achieved long term sustainability and growth in member’s funds. *A full set of 2013 financial statements and the auditor’s statement have been published. Please contact our office for a copy.

Fundraising Costs 0.9%

Chaplaincy 52.4% Chaplaincy Stipends 42.4%

Expenses

Website 4.5% Staffing 25.5%

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[ BCNSW 2013 Annual Report ]

Connecting the Buddhist Community

AABCAP Adeikhtan Buddhist Missionary Company (Aust) Aloka Community Inc. Amitabha Buddhist Association of NSW Inc. Amitabha Foundation (Australia) AMRTA Monastery Association of Engaged Buddhists Australian Buddhist Mission Australian Chinese Buddhist Society Australian Institute of Buddhist Learning and Practice Australian Institute of Tibetan Healing Practices Bangladesh Bouddha Samiti Barom Kagyu Chodrak Drupju Chuling Bhante Sujato in Sydney Group Blue Mountains Insight Meditation Centre Blue Padma Services Inc. Bluegum Sangha Bodhi Books & Gifts Bodhikusuma Buddhist & Meditation Centre Buddha’s Light International Assoc of Aust Inc Buddhist Blissful Voice Mission of Australia Buddhist Compassion Relief Tzu-Chi Foundation Aust Buddhist Peace Fellowship (Sydney) Buddhist Youth Initiative for Interconnectedness Inc. B.U.D Zen Centre Inc Bul-Kwang Meditation Institute Bup Bo Temple Cambodian Buddhist Society Inc of NSW Cat Tuong Temple Central Coast Zen Centre Inc Chagdud Gonpa Australia Dalai Lama in Australia Ltd Dhammaduta Buddhist Association of Australia Dhammaduta Buddhist Asssociation (Coffs Harbour) Dhammaduta Foundation Incorporated Dhammakaya International Society of Aust Dharma Drum Mountain Sydney DharmaCloud Diamond Cutter Buddhist Study Centre Diamondway Buddhism Sydney Ding Hui Monastery Drogmi Buddhist Institute Golden Wheel Buddhist Association Hongwanji Buddhist Mission of Australia Huayen Buddhist Community of Australia Inc Indonesian Buddhist Society of NSW International Cham Shan Temple Kadam Sharawa Institute Inc Kalyanamitra & Bodhicitta Foundation Kampuchea Krom Cultural Centre Inc. Karma Dro Phan Ling Institute Karma Samten Choeling Inc. Karma Yiwong Samten Ling Khachodling Khmer Krom & Aust Buddhist Assoc Koyasan Shingon Mission Of Australia Kuan MEMBERS OF THE BUDDHIST COUNCIL Yin Buddhist Temple Kwan Um Sa OF NEW SOUTH WALES Kwan Yin Kur Temple Kyegu Buddhist Institute Lao Buddhist Society of NSW Liberation Prison Project Australia Ltd Lin Yim Buddhist Institute Ling Yen Mountain Temple (Australia) Macquarie University Buddhist Association Maha Bodhi Monastery Mahamakutwat Buddharangsee Stanmore Inc. Mahamevnawa Bhavana Monastery & Meditation Centre of Sydney Man Su Vihara Mitra - Youth Buddhist Network Mukyoho Nan Tien Temple No Problems Publishing Inc. Open Way Zen Centre Phuoc Hau Temple Prajna Monastery Australia Inc. Prasarn Bun Prasarn Jai Group Rigpa Fellowship Inc. Sakya Kechari Institute Sakya Tharpa Ling Santi Forest Monastery Inc. Sasana Daja Burmese Temple Siddhartha’s Intent Australia Singmo Institute Inc. Siangthum Phrapotiyan Incorporated Sri Lankan Buddhist Vihara Association Sunnataram Forest Monastery Sydney Buddhist Centre Sydney Burmese Buddhist Vihara Inc. Sydney Insight Meditators Sydney Meditation Centre Sydney Zen Centre Tashi Choling Buddhist Institute Thai Buddhist Student Association The Korean Buddhism Jongbopsa Society The Quan Am Thien Tinh Buddhist Charitable Association Inc The Vinh Nghiem Pagoda Buddhist and Charitable Soc. Theravada Buddhist Association of Australia Inc. Tibetan Buddhist Society (Sydney) Tinh Xa Minh Dang Quang Unibodhi-University of Sydney Buddhist Society Unified Vietnamese Buddhist Congregation of A-NZ University Buddhist Education Foundation UTS Buddhist Meditation Society Vajrayana Institute Inc. Vien Giac Temple Wat Buddha Dhamma Wat Buddhalavarn Wat Buddharangsee Wat Buddhavongsa-Yaram Wat Dhamma Sameakky Wat Lao Buddhametta Wat Pa Buddharangsee Well-Aware-Ness Psychology Wisdom Song Won Buddhism of Australia Won Buddhism of Gosford Assoc Inc Yeshe Nyima Indo-Tibetan Yoga and Meditation Zen Open Circle Inc 18


OUR GOLDEN RULES We try to find ways to spread the understanding and practice of the Dharma, without duplicating what our member organisations are doing. We work for the Dharma, not for ourselves. We are mindful of all our other responsibilities, so that whatever we do for the Buddhist Council of NSW is the practice of the Middle Path We use the Dharma in our work for the Buddhist Council of NSW so that whatever obstacles we face, we can endure and overcome as part of our Dharma practice

Buddhist Council of NSW PO Box 593, Crows Nest NSW 1585 Sydney Australia Tel: (02) 9966 8893 e: office@buddhistcouncil.org www.buddhistconnection.org

Connecting the Buddhist Community

Buddhist Council of NSW

Buddhist Connection


Annual Report of the Buddhist Council of New South Wales for 2013