__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

BUCKS COUNTY MAGAZINE’S GUIDE TO

Arts & Antiques


Lambertville

New Jersey’s Art & Antiques Capital / By Frank Quattrone Lambertville is known for its antiques, art, dining and a history that influenced not only the War For Independence, but also the California Gold Rush.

A

lthough most Americans have heard of the California Gold Rush, I’ll bet that very few know who accidentally discovered gold at Sutter’s Mill in January of 1848. It was carpenter and sawmill operator James Wilson Marshall, a onetime resident of Lambertville, New Jersey. Marshall’s discovery, ironically, did nothing to improve his meager personal fortune, but it precipitated a worldwide migration to “The Golden State” in hopes of striking it rich.

1

42

B U C K S C O U NTY M A G . C O M

Today, Lambertville honors Marshall by preserving his boyhood home at 60 Bridge Street, on the National and New Jersey Registers of Historic Places, with meticulous room re-creations filled with period furniture and exhibits celebrating Lambertville’s history. Fittingly, the Marshall home is now the headquarters of the Lambertville Historical Society. For a small town whose population lies just shy of 4,000, Lambertville has a pretty rich history, which includes our country’s first president. Well, at the time he


was only the general leading America’s fledgling forces against the British Empire. His army once encamped along Bridge Street. He slept at Holcombe Farmstead on North Main Street. And he crossed the ice-clogged Delaware River just below the town on Christmas Day 1776. The farmstead is now the Holcombe-Jimison Farmstead Museum, dedicated to the agricultural heritage of Hunterdon County from the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. But Lambertville owes its renown and magical lure mostly to its lovingly preserved Federal townhouses and Victorian homes, its charming mom-andpop shops, its thriving arts and antiques scene, its delightful river views, more than forty diverse restaurants, cafes, and coffee shops, its friendly people, and its strong sense of community.

Opposite, al fresco dining at The Lambertville Station along the railroad track on Bridge Street. Top left, Highland Art Gallery.Top right, Amano Contemporary Craft Gallery. Bottom left, a poster of Maryilyn Monroe has her looking out of a window. Bottom right, Panopy Books.

2

F A L L 2 0 2 0 43


In various articles, Travel & Leisure has named Lambertville “one of America’s favorite [and quirkiest] towns.” USA Today dubbed it one of the most picturesque towns in New Jersey. Better yet, Forbes magazine recently declared it “one of America’s prettiest towns.” And since at least the 1980s, Lambertville has been celebrated—by The Travel Channel, by VisitNJ.org, and by collectors in the know—as “The Antiques Capital of New Jersey.” With countless highly regarded antiques shops—not to mention more than a dozen art galleries, many featuring working artists—it’s not hard to fathom why. erhaps best typifying the spirit of the local antiques scene is the People’s Store Antiques Center, located at 28 North Union Street. Established in 1839 but moving into high gear about sixty years ago, People’s Store hosts forty dealers on four floors, featuring mid-century modern, vintage industrial, antique bronzes, garden statuary, primitives, estate jewelry, vintage clothing and textiles, architectural objects, art, paintings, stemware, barware, fine antiques, painted and upholstered furniture, and European antiques, as

P 3

44

B U C K S C O U NTY M A G . C O M

well as working artists’ studios. According to amiable James Castelli, the vice president of retail operations, the center’s cutting-edge pieces have lured many designers for movie sets and TV shows. “Our dealers are professional antique dealers, interior designers, professional artists, and offer almost everything needed for any environment or period setting. We have supplied many pieces for TV shows like Madam Secretary, Louie, and Gotham. In the past, we partnered with DIY network and HGTV, for Stone House Revival show, where Jeff Devlin and his team work with homeowners to help restore old stone homes and create modern living spaces inside them using pieces from our stores.” The featured designer for The People’s Store is David Teague of America Antiques & Design. For twenty years, Teague has provided antiques, art, and concept pieces for Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, J. Crew, Anthropologie, Donna Karan, Vera Wang, and Martha Stewart, and his design company has been a major provider of props for motion pictures, television studios, fashion photoshoots, and the music industry. Castelli provides another reason for shopping at


Opposite, a row of antiques and art shops on Lambert Street, near the New Hope, Lambertville Bridge. Top left, a sculpure of an elk is standing at a corner on Bridge Street. Top right, an antiques shop on North Union Street. Center right, The Birdhouse Center for the Arts. Bottom left, A touch of the Past Antiques. Bottom right, the corner of Bridge Street and North Main St.

4

F A L L 2 0 2 0 45


Jim Castelli,Vice President of retail operations at People’s Store. There are many levels of this antiques mall to discover one-of-a-kind treasures, ranging from investment quality European and American antiques, furnishings, lighting, art, MidCentury Modern, Primitive & Vintage Industrial, Farm House, period clothing, to eclectic chic.The People’s Store is the place to explore for interesting and exciting discoveries. A visit up to the Working Artist Studios on two separate 3rd floors is fascinating. You will discover everything from traditional fine art, creative drawing, fine modern art to obscure cutting edge art.

5

46

B U C K S C O U NTY M A G . C O M


The People’s Store. “Buying vintage is better for the environment. The People’s Store is the ‘One-Stop-Shop’ for all your home design needs. If you buy just what you love, and pick up pieces that scream to your soul, you'll end up with a room you love, even with one piece at a time. Unless you’re creating a period-style environment, we suggest not being afraid to mix the eras. If you love it, mix it in and it will work. The various colors, forms, shapes and textures will be a pleasure to see and will keep your room interesting and more personal. And, most importantly, you’re recycling and reusing something from the past.” Everyday people as well as aficionados and media types have been patronizing Lambertville and The People’s Store for years. Store Manager Evelyn Gordon, herself a dealer and manager of the center’s vendors, has been in the business since she first sold antiques at local flea markets at the age of twelve. Her parents, also in the

business, tried to discourage her, but to no avail. She says, “I just love the town and the treasures you’ll find here from day to day. I feel a connection to the architecture, the arts scene, the friendly, supportive people. I lived here thirty years ago and I’m in the process of moving back.” Gordon describes The People’s Store as “a pleasant step back into the past, a bit of the olden times. There’s such a comfort level here.” She says that many people have been shopping here for much of her continued on page 14

Eleanor Voorhees, artist in her studio on the top floor of People’s Store creating another masterpiece. Her artwork recycles thrown away items she finds in the street and other places. They could be buttons, a piece of a screen, a doll and other found items to create a 3D look in her paintings.

6

F A L L 2 0 2 0 47


Art & Antiques PATRICIA HUTTON GALLERIES FEATURES LANDSCAPES IN FALL

T

here’s something about September that always brings promise. I guess we never outgrow that first day of school feeling and all the excitement associated with it. When the gallery reopens its doors in autumn, it will feel just like that—a fresh beginning. Owner, Patricia Hutton offers,“We love to feature landscape in the fall. Artists have so much to work with this time of year: rich color, appealing subject matter, the beauty of the season.” This stunning seasonal oil, Tinicum Creek, Autumn, is by award-winning artist Dean Thomas. Dean is a Bucks County artist who loves to explore the forests, creeks, hills and meadows of our area. “My strong and deeply rooted connection to the natural world is what drives me to paint,” says the artist. His paintings are realistic in their defined edges and detail, but also express a very personal vision which at times seems otherworldly and spiritual. Dean has exhibited widely including at The Michener Museum, and the Salmagundi Club in New York. Patricia Hutton Galleries offers a large selection of his paintings. The gallery is located at 47 West State Street in Doylestown. For more information, call 215-348-1728 or visit www.patriciahuttongalleries.com.

Tinicum Creek, Autumn - a 24” x 18” oil by Dean Thomas

RICH TIMMONS ART CONSULTANT

R

ich Timmons has created a new approach to buying art. Instead of the usual coming to shows and browsing a gallery, Rich uses what he likes to call the "matchmaker" approach. Rich is an art consultant, specializing in large, original art ranging from 30"x40" and larger. There are plenty of original paintings in his gallery, but those paintings do not exhaust his resources because the artists he works with will do commissions, and he has literally hundreds of artists that he has worked with in the past. To consult with Rich, you need to make an appointment. Rich realizes that people want art in a particular space and his job is to find the exact painting his client is looking for. “Our clients often come in with sizes, colors, patterns, and samples of paintings they found on the internet. I help figure out what they are looking for and guide and direct them to that special piece of art.” To learn more about Rich Timmons, his background, the painters he works with and his matchmaker approach to art, visit www.buckscountymag.com/arts-antiques/the-matchmaker. The Rich Timmons Art Gallery is located at 3795 Route 202, Doylestown, PA. The gallery can be reached by phone at 267-247-5867; by email at rt@3795gallery.com; and on the web at www.3795gallery.com.

92 7

B U C K S C O U NTY M A G . C O M


SMALL WORKS SHOW

The Annual Small Works Show at Canal Frame-Crafts Gallery will take on a new look this year. “Farbotnik Farm”, an egg tempera by Jeff Gola is just one of the many new pieces on display through November and December. Images and videos will also be presented virtually. Visit www.CanalFrame.com or on Facebook for the evolving details. Canal Frame-Crafts Gallery is located at 1093 General Greene Rd. in Washington Crossing, PA 18977. Or call 215-493-3660 for updated information, hours, or framing questions.

JERRY CABLE

Jerry has studied the late 19th-century European painters, particularly the work of PIzzaro and Monet. Like American Impressionists before him Jerry paints local landscapes of Pennsylvania and New Jersey as well as the Maine Coast and Monhegan Island where he has held workshops. His subjects include farms, animal husbandry, boats, vintage toy still lifes and portraits. His formal art training includes a BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY. His art can be seen at Canal FrameCrafts Gallery in Washington Crossing, PA. Visit Jerry Cable’s Website at www.jerrycablestudio.com.

“Pumpkin Study” 6.5” x 6.5” oil paper and “Long Term Parking” “8 x 10” oil on mounted canvas – vintage 1947 chevy Truck F A L L 2 0 2 0 93 8


Art & Antiques ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS AND ARTIFACTS

A

rtefact was established in 1987 by three architects seeking to create an environment where architectural elements and artifacts from the past could be uniquely displayed and purchased. Their store is open to the public and situated in an eighteenth century stone barn with half an acre of formal gardens. The majority of the inventory is antique and includes fireplace mantels, stained and beveled glass windows, doors and entryways, interior and exterior lighting, decorative objects, furniture, and garden appointments. In the formal gardens, you will find antique and reproduction garden pieces in bronze, iron, marble, stone, terracotta and wood. Artefact carries one of the largest selections of antique fireplace mantels on the east coast. Their collection of mantels range from the late eighteenth century to the early twentieth century and are available in wood, marble, slate, and stone. Artefact strives to carry a diverse array of decorative objects to accent your home or business. Whether it be a Coney Island Derby Horse for the family room or a carved stone Bacchus head for the garden, Artefact will fulfill your vision for the extraordinary. If you do not see what you need on our website, we invite you to visit our showroom in Bucks County, PA. Artefact is located at 790 Edison Furlong Road, Furlong PA. for more information, call 215-794-8790 or visit www.artefactantiques.com.

PEOPLE’S STORE ANTIQUES CE ENTER 28 N Union St, Lambertville, NJ 08530 0 www.PeoplesStore.net NTER STONE HOUSE ANTIQUES CEN 3292 Durham Road (Rt. 413) Doylestow wn, PA 18902) www.StoneHouse1814.com m Painted Furniture • French Antiques • Industrial

9 94

B U C K S C O U NTY M A G . C O M

Industrial • Mid Century Modern • Vinta age Clothing • French Antiques

Antiques • Primitives • Mid Ce entury Modern • Vintag ge T Te extiles • Rugs

Art • Fine Antiques • Primitives • Lighting

Transform Your World... Your Destination for Top Quality Local Art & Framing

Check website or Facebook For Evolving Fall Events

Serving Bucks County For Over 30 Years!

Tuesday thru Saturday: 10am-5pm Thursday by appointment. 1093 General Greene Road Washington Crossing, PA 18977 215.493.3660 • www.canalframe.com


AL LACHMAN 200 YEARS OF BUCKS COUNTY

“LANDSCAPES OF THE MIND AND SOUL”

T

he Mercer Museum, operated by the Bucks County Historical Society, is pleased to announce the opening of its new major exhibit 200 Years of Bucks County Art in the Martin & Warwick Foundation Galleries. This exhibit opens to the public on Monday, July 20, 2020 and will run through December 31, 2020. Since its founding in 1880, the Bucks County Historical Society has collected works of art–fine and folk paintings, portraits and landscapes, genre and decorative works. Never before displayed together, this collection is the centerpiece of the Mercer Museum’s new exhibit 200 Years of Bucks County Art. “Our audiences are often astonished by the extraordinary depth and breadth of the museum's collections. I believe 200 Years of Bucks County Art will surprise once again as visitors discover the many remarkable paintings, drawings and watercolors featured, and encounter the artists—both prominent and obscure - who produced them,” said Vice President of Collections and Interpretation Cory Amsler. The exhibit features over one hundred works, including paintings by Charles Willson Peale, Edward Hicks, Martin Johnson Heade, Thomas Hicks, Thomas Otter, William Lathrop and Daniel Garber, as well as Jonathan and William Trego, Edward Trego, Samuel DuBois, Robert Street, Samuel Moon, and many others. Notable works on display include “The Peaceable Kingdom” by Edward Hicks, “October” by Daniel Garber, an early self

LACHMAN GALLERY 66th ANNUAL SHOW Nov. 14 – Dec. 27, 2020 Peddler’s Village | 215.794.5500 | www.allachman.com lachmanstudios@msn.com

“Hydrangea Reflections 16” x 20” Oil on Canvas

“Still Life with an Inner Glow”Exquisite Textural Classics by

JUNE L. MAXWELL, PSA, Master Pastelist Original Paintings in Pastel and Oil

MAXWELL STUDIO/GALLERY Tues-Sat by Appointment

215-884-2401 email: jbmaxwell1450@gmail.com www.junelmaxwell.com F A L L 2 0 2 0 10 95


Art & Antiques

O

ver 20 years ago Lighthouse Gallery opened its doors in a small retail space within scenic Peddler’s Village. At that time the gallery only showcased the works of Thomas Kinkade. Since then, they have moved to a larger location and grown to be the largest Thomas Kinkade Signature Gallery on the East Coast. Throughout the years they have also added several artists, namely Robert Finale, Mark Keathley, Rod Chase, and Abraham Hunter, all of whom paint using the same luminous style that Kinkade made famous. They have added to the beauty found within the gallery, as well as allowing Lighthouse Gallery the opportunity to continue to have artist events throughout the year where you can come to get a chance to meet a trained highlighter or the artist themselves. More than a typical art gallery, Lighthouse Gallery carries everything from paintings, to metal art, prints, scarves, umbrellas, candles, puzzles and more. Their friendly owners and staff will always leave a lasting impression, so please don’t hesitate to stop in and see what we have to offer. Lighthouse Gallery is located at 60 Peddlers Village, Lahaska, PA. For more information, call 215-794-3447 or visit 215-794-3447.

96 11

B U C K S C O U NTY M A G . C O M

THOMAS KINKADE & MORE

"Passage to New Hope" by Robert Finale


ANTIQUES CENTER AT PEOPLE’S STORE 28 N. Union Street, Lambertville, NJ 609-397-9808 www.peoplesstore.com The legendary antiques center dating to 1839, anchoring “antiques row” in the center of beautiful Lambertville, just across the bridge from New Hope. Housing fifty dealers plus working artists, The People’s Store features antiques of all periods, including furniture, art, silver, jewelry, vintage clothing, books, lighting, mid-century, primitive, architectural & industrial. 7 days, 10 AM to 6PM. ARTEFACT ARCHITECTURAL ANTIQUES Rt. 263, The Village Barn Furlong, PA 215-794-8790 www.artefactantiques.com Our store is open to the public and situated in an eighteenth century stone barn with half an acre of formal gardens. The majority of our inventory is antique and includes fireplace mantels, stained and beveled glass windows, doors and entryways, interior and exterior lighting, decorative objects, furniture, and garden appointments. In the formal gardens, you will find antique and reproduction garden pieces in bronze, iron, marble, stone, terra cotta, and wood.

ARTEFACT architectural antiques

CANAL FRAME-CRAFTS GALLERY 1093 General Greene Rd. Washington Crossing, PA 215-493-3660 www.CanalFrame.com We are not just another frame shop, but a fullservice gallery. Featuring both originals and prints, we represent many fine local artists. We have also received awards for our custom framing. Check our our website for scheduled events and holiday hours. FALLSINGTON ANTIQUE & CRAFT SHOP 4 Yardley Avenue Fallsington, PA 215-295-0251 The Antique & Craft Shop provides a charming selection of collectibles and antiques appropriate to Fallsington. You’ll find candles, vintage dressers, linens, pottery, stenciled slates, primitive cupboards, antique country tables & chairs and antique lighting. GRATZ GALLERY 5230 Silo Hill Road Doylestown, PA 215-348-2500 Full service fine art gallery and conservation studio specializing in American artists. Our clients include museums, universities, churches, historical societies, and private collectors.

HEART OF THE HOME 28 S. Main St., New Hope, PA 215-862-1880 www.heartofhome.com Handmade American crafts and functional, well designed pieces for the home and garden. We strive to find the unusual and one-of-akind piece. Handling glass, jewelry, wood, pottery, paper products and more. LACHMAN GALLERY Peddlers Village, Rt. 202, Lahaska, PA 215-794-5500 www.lachmanstudios.com Renowned for his pastels as well as his oil paintings, Al Lachman is a Master colorist. He is recognized for his expressive painterly style and luminous paintings of barns and landscapes of Bucks County and beyond. LIGHTHOUSE GALLERY 21-794-3447 Peddlers Village, Lahaska PA www.lighthousegalleries.com Featuring the artwork of Thomas Kinkade, Robert Finale, Rod Chase, Mark Keathley, Abraham Hunter and Disney Fine Art. MAXWELL STUDIO/GALLERY 215-884-2401 www.junemaxwell.com Her work is described at “Still Life with an

home decor • garden decor architectural elements

33RD YEAR ANNIVERSARY SALE October 1, 2 and 3rd The Village Barn, Rt. 263 & Edison Furlong Road., Furlong, PA. 215-794-8790 • www.ArtefactAntiques.com

F A L L 2 0 2 0 12 00


Art & Antiques Inner Glow.” June Maxwell creates textural classics in pastel and oil from her studio and gallery. MERCER MUSEUM 84 S. Pine Street Doylestown, PA 215-345-0212 The Mercer Museum is a six-story reinforced concrete castle designed by Henry Mercer (1856-1930) and completed in 1916. Today, it is one of Bucks County’s premier cultural attractions and a Smithsonian affiliate. The museum complex features local and national traveling exhibits, as well as a core museum collection of over 50,000 preIndustrial tools. This permanent collection offers visitors a unique window into preIndustrial America through sixty different crafts and trades, and is one of the world’s most comprehensive portraits of pre-Industrial American material culture. The museum also features a research library that is a center for local history related to Bucks County and the surrounding region, with its roots dating back to the founding of the Bucks County Historical Society in 1880.

MICHENER ART MUSEUM 138 S. Pine St, Doylestown, PA 215-340-9800 www.michenermuseum.org The Doylestown-based museum has 35,400 square feet of space, with a landscaped courtyard, an outdoor sculpture garden and terrace built in the original prison yard, seminar and conference facilities, a museum shop and café, and the George Nakashima Reading Room. As a regional art museum whose principal focus is Bucks County, Pennsylvania, the Michener Art Museum collects both historic and contemporary American works, with a focus on the art of Bucks County. SILVERMAN GALLERY 4920 York Road, Route 202 Holicong, PA 215-794-4300 www.silvermangallerybuckscounty.com The Silverman Gallery of Bucks County Impressionistic Art is committed to promoting the next generation of fine artists painting in the Impressionistic style. These proven, award-winning artists carry on the tradition of such eminent painters as Edward Redfield, Fern Coppedge, Daniel Garber and the other

fine artists that produced a legacy of creative expression reflecting the beauty of Bucks County. It offers affordable, investment quality original art for collection and investment. STONE HOUSE ANTIQUES CENTER 3292 Durham Road (Rt. 413) Doylestown, PA 267-544-0574 www.stonehouse1814.com A historic 19th century manor, now home to dealers in great American, English, European, mid-century, and industrial antiques, plus art, jewelry, and vintage collectibles. Conveniently located a few minutes from Peddler’s VillageLahaska, New Hope and Doylestown, and across from the Mechanicsville Post Office on Rt 413. 7 Days 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. RICH TIMMONS FINE ART GALLERY 795 Route 202, Doylestown, PA 267-247-5867 www.3795gallery.com Helping find that perfect original painting for our clients. Specializing in large paintings. BY APPOINTMENT ONLY.

Advertise in our

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE published right before Thanksgiving

Contact us at 215-766-2694

Bill@buckscountymag.com

Bucks County Impressionist Oil Painter Jim Lukens MAIN STREET GALLERY 1236 W. Broad Street • Quakertown, PA 18951 Open noon - 5pm, Friday - Sunday

610.442.4112 • JIMLUKENSART.COM

13 98

B U C K S C O U NTY M A G . C O M


thirty-five-year tenure at the store. “People come to Lambertville for lunch and then come here or come here and then stay for dinner. Our store has such interesting flavors.” Speaking of flavors, here lies another major attraction of Lambertville: its robust dining scene. If you can’t find it here, it’s not likely you will anyplace else. Where else in a town this size—and we’re not talking about the great restaurants that draw visitors to neighboring New Hope, just across the charming steel truss bridge spanning the Delaware—can you find, within little more than one square mile, the following? Among many others, contemporary American restaurants like Brian’s, Anton’s at the Swan, and Lambertville House Restaurant; French/European-flavored D’Floret; Aztlan Mexican Grill;; Mexican-Peruvian restaurant El Thule; More Than Q Barbeque; Ota-ya Japanese Restaurant; Marhaba, serving Middle Eastern fare; Italian Cucina; The Dubliners Irish bar and pub; Homestead Farm Market: cocktail bar the Boat House; Jess’s Juice Bar; refreshing stops like Owowcow Creamery, for handcrafted organic ice cream treats, and Lambertville Trading Company, the family-owned coffee bar where you can even get a coffee ice cube (!); plus three of the finest restaurants in the region—Hamilton’s Grill Room (steakhouse/seafood); and my two personal favorites, Lambertville Station Restaurant, the historic, popular resort offering guests everything from standard and deluxe accommodations overlooking the river to diverse dining options, both alfresco and indoors; and the Broadmoor Restaurant, where acclaimed Chef Alex Cormier plies his culinary legerdemain to European/Mediterranean standouts. And on a steamy August afternoon, my wife and I happened upon the twoyear-old family-owned upstart Liv & Charlie’s … Real Food, offering some of the tastiest breakfast and lunch items you’ll find anywhere. Dining outdoors, we

watched wide-eyed visitors enjoying Lambertville as locals walked their dogs or rode their bicycles along the bustling yet leisurely Union Street vibe. That vibe includes other antiques havens, including A Touch of the Past; Funk & Junk; Mill House Antiques; Bridge Street Antiques; Peter Wallace Antiques; Klines Court Antiques; James Curran Antiques & Restoration; and Golden Nugget Antique Flea Market, open three days a week, where guests hope to find some unexpected if modest treasure. When asked why Lambertville has become such a magnet for practitioners and aficionados of the scene, working artist/designer Johanna Furst, an Allentown native who now lives in the town, said: “It all begins with how beautiful Lambertville is to visit. Artists and antiques dealers are naturally attracted to beauty. Personally, I’m attracted to the architecture.” Working on the third floor of The People’s Store for the past year, Furst finds her studio “one of the dreamiest settings I’ve ever seen.” The walls are bursting with the vivid colors of her portraits, flowers, and animal studies. Although she also teaches art classes twice a week, offers periodic art workshops, loves working with typography, and designs lamps, T-shirts, and an amazing type of non-rip gift wrap called “Forever Wrap,” Furst’s passion is painting. Several of her original works, some celebrating the beauty of zebras, including “Nightfall,” “The Ceremony,” and “Zebras,” are now, or will soon be, in private homes and galleries in Germany, France, and Switzerland. “The internet [where many of her artworks can be found on www.johannafurst.com]is bringing people together. It’s truly exciting to be shown in international circles.” The artist, whose sincere passion for the natural world is clearly reflected in her works, is philosophical about the importance of art in today’s fragmented world. “So many people are so out of touch. We’ve forgotten that we need the earth;

but does the earth need us? We’re so intuitive. I think intuition is another sense. We’re almost sculpting as we speak to others. We need beauty. We need balance. And art helps to get us there.” Lambertville has been home to or has attracted artists of every type, including popular 1920s-1930s bandleader/composer Paul Whiteman; Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist James Gould Cozzens (Guard of Honor, 1949); New Jersey Poet Laureate Gerald Stern (2000-2002); and celebrated musician/writer James McBride, winner of the 2013 National Book Award for fiction for his novel The Good Lord Bird. It’s also home to contemporary ballet company Roxey Ballet, founded in 1995, and Riverside Symphonia, a professional orchestra now conducted by Mariusz Smolij, which has served the region since 1990. The town also offers guided walking tours (from April through October), and has hiking trails featuring terrific views of Lambertville, New Hope, and the river. Swan Creek Rowing Club teaches and promotes rowing and water safety. Howell Living History Farm introduces families to live animals and the history of farming. And, behind the Inn at Lambertville Station, Splash Floating Steamboat (with operations temporarily suspended) provides educational and environmental adventures for both school groups and adults. A visit to Lambertville is to strike gold for visitors hungry for a charming destination, whether it’s to seek out homely or fine antiques or art, to enjoy casual or upscale culinary treats, or just to walk about and enjoy the architecture, unique shopping opportunities, and the smiling faces of a truly contented community.O Frank D. Quattrone is an author, newspaper editor, teacher and freelance writer from Montgomery County who writes about local history, food, art and people.

14


y ears Point Pleasant, PA

waltersnurseryinc.com

215. 297. 5860

Contractor #PA003567

Profile for BCM Media

Bucks County's 2020 Arts and Antique Guide  

Bucks County and its surrounding areas have been known for the fine antiques shops, art studios, small boutiques, galleries, artists and cra...

Bucks County's 2020 Arts and Antique Guide  

Bucks County and its surrounding areas have been known for the fine antiques shops, art studios, small boutiques, galleries, artists and cra...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded