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2009-2010


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The mission of Boston University Academy is to educate talented students who are passionate about learning and who share the joy of inquiry. Engaging with dedicated teachers in a small and caring community, students first immerse themselves in a classically based curriculum and then continue their intellectual interests at Boston University, a major research institution.


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Diploma Requirements

FOR STUDENTS ENTERING IN GRADE 9

FOR STUDENTS ENTERING IN GRADE 10

English

Four years including EN25, EN45, and EN65

English

Three years including EN45 and EN65

History

Three years including HI25, HI45, and HI65

History

Two years including HI45 and HI65

Classical Language

Two years of either Latin or ancient Greek

Classical Language

One year of either Latin or ancient Greek

Mathematics

Three years and completion of MA80

Mathematics

Two years and completion of MA80

Science

Two years including PY25 and CH45*

Science

Arts

Two years

Two years including PY25 (or equivalent) and CH45*

Short Course

One semester in Grade 9 or 10

Arts

One year

Physical Education

Two years

Short Course

One semester

Senior Thesis

One year

Physical Education

One year

Community Service

20 hours per year (80 hours total)

Senior Thesis

One year

Community Service

20 hours per year (60 hours total)

FOR STUDENTS ENTERING IN GRADE 11 English

Two years including EN65

History

One year including HI65

Mathematics

One year and completion of MA80

Senior Thesis

One year

Community Service

20 hours per year (40 hours total)

* Students are strongly encouraged to take a semester of biological science at the University. Students may apply for admission to grades 9, 10, or 11.

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The Classically Based Curriculum at the Academy

Rooted in the Western canon, the Academy’s classically based core curriculum serves as a foundation for the critical thinking skills needed for an in-depth study of the humanities and sciences: how to question what they read; how to talk and write about primary texts; how to craft a well-reasoned argument; and how to appreciate the connections of literature, political theory, philosophy, religion, science, and history.Additionally, all students study two years of either Latin or ancient Greek to learn the foundations of language, as well as to read the primary texts that serve as the backbone of the Academy’s liberal arts curriculum.

ENGLISH The Academy’s English curriculum promotes critical reading and thinking, refines analytical writing skills, and develops appreciation for and comprehension of literary history.Academy English courses work in tandem with the history department, emphasizing the connection between literature and history. Students also learn to conduct effective research at Boston University’s Mugar Memorial Library, a skill that serves them well in upperlevel Academy and University courses.

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EN25: Classical Themes in Literature (Grade 9) Students read a selection of ancient texts from Greece and Rome, such as Homer’s Odyssey and Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex. These seminal works provide a foundation for the examination of thematically related texts from a wide ranging selection of authors, including Shakespeare, Dickens, Hansberry, Salinger, and Achebe. Students become familiar with key literary genres, such as the epic poem and tragedy, while exploring variants of these forms in the hands of later cultures.The centerpiece of the course’s writing component is the critical essay, through which students develop their rhetorical and analytical skills. In addition, fluency and voice are further developed through other kinds of assignments such as a travel essay, a satire, and a personal essay.


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EN45: English Literature and Composition (Grade 10) Students in this course read a wide selection of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon to the Modernist periods, achieving familiarity with the broad shape of the British literary canon, as well as applying intensely focused critical attention to key texts.Where possible, this approach is supplemented by wider exposure to the literature, art, and history of continental Europe. Students are asked to regularly challenge and critique the texts and each other in oral and written forms, developing a mastery of critical and rhetorical skills essential to essay writing.The backbone of the course is The Norton Anthology of English Literature: Major Authors, supplemented with works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, Shelley, and others. EN65: American Literature and Composition (Grade 11) The focus of eleventh-grade English is American literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The reading list includes Hawthorne,Whitman, Twain, Dickinson, James, Fitzgerald, Frost, Hurston, and Miller, as well as shorter works and a sampling of secondary literature.The course is writing-intensive, and students are asked to write in a variety of genres. While the emphasis is on the analytical essay, additional assignments include a research paper in conjunction with their American history course.

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES The study of classical languages ties together many strands of the Academy’s liberal arts curriculum. There is no better way to appreciate a culture than to learn its language; therefore students at the Academy come into contact with the ancients more intimately by learning ancient Greek or Latin. Courses focus on syntax and translation skills, so that students are able to read, in the original language, the texts upon which the Academy’s curriculum is based. Furthermore, the study of a classical language fosters an appreciation of detail. CL25: Latin I A rigorous introduction to classical Latin, the goals of this course are for students to build a working vocabulary base and to acquire a thorough knowledge of the principles of inflection that govern the syntax of the language. Students learn how to decline all the types of Latin nouns and adjectives, how to conjugate verbs in the indicative mood, and how to apply their knowledge of vocabulary and forms when translating. Even from the beginning, the focus is on exposing students to as many primary Latin texts as possible; historical and cultural context will be applied whenever appropriate and helpful.Text used: Wheelock’s Latin.

CL45: Latin II Students in the second-year Latin course solidify and increase their proficiency with Latin grammar through exposure to more complex syntactical structures. Participial phrases, indirect statements, the subjunctive mood, and subordinate clauses are studied. During the year, students are introduced to readings from classical authors including Cicero, Catullus, and Virgil, and they acquire an understanding of the fundamentals of Latin meter. By the end of the course, students will have gained the grammar skills and a familiarity with various genres of literature that will enable them to read Latin poetry and prose.

CL65: Latin III Having completed their grammatical training, third-year students read – exclusively in the original – from among the great works of Latin literature.Topics and authors vary from year to year; recent course offerings have included selections from Lucretius, Livy, Cicero,Virgil, Ovid,Apuleius, and Augustine.While reading the texts in the original Latin, students discuss points of grammar, structure, and meter as well as explore the literary and historical contexts of the works. Critical analysis of scholarly research on the texts is a frequent element of the course.

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CG25: Ancient Greek I Beginning students of Greek enjoy a rigorous introduction to ancient Greek vocabulary and grammar.The twin aims of the course are vocabulary acquisition and a mastery of word-forms. Students learn noun declensions and verb conjugations in the indicative, subjunctive and optative moods; they apply their knowledge of grammar to the translation of ancient Greek sentences and short passages.As the year progresses, students gain the ability to read increasingly complex sentences and continuous Greek prose. Historical and cultural context will be applied whenever appropriate and helpful.Text used: Hansen and Quinn’s Greek:An Intensive Course.

HISTORY CG45: Ancient Greek II Second-year Greek students continue to improve their vocabulary and grammar skills while exploring more complicated aspects of Greek sentence structure. Students explore athematic verbs, indirect statement, and a variety of subordinate clauses. As their mastery of Greek increases, students read passages drawn from such authors as Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Euripides, and Plato. Grammatical instruction is often strengthened by English-to-Greek prose composition.

The history curriculum helps students to attain a sense of the richness of human cultures, develop an informed appreciation of arts, religions and philosophies in their historical contexts, and examine major political and intellectual developments through a solid grounding in what has traditionally been called Western civilization. In the ninth grade, students begin a three-year concentration on Greco-Roman, European, and American civilizations, and the parallel evolution and influences of other cultures.

CG65: Ancient Greek III During their third year of study, Greek students read extensively from among the masterpieces of Greek literature.Topics and authors are selected based on student and teacher interest, but frequent choices have included Plato’s Apology and selections from Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey.At this advanced stage, students also discuss finer points of grammar and meter, and often read scholarly articles that foster critical discussion about the texts they are reading. NB:This course is not being offered during the 2009-2010 academic year; a student may pursue Greek at this level by enrolling in University coursework.

Students learn to interpret culture by concentrating on close reading, often of original texts, and expository writing.The scale of writing projects is graduated, beginning with shorter assignments with emphasis on sentence and paragraph structure and advancing to full-scale research papers by grade eleven.

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HI25: Ancient History (Grade 9) This course adopts a cross-disciplinary approach to the study of the ancient cultures of Greece, Rome, and early Christianity. Rather than rely primarily on a textbook, students spend a great deal of time learning to read and understand a variety of primary sources that supply the basic course material.The literature and art of these cultures are considered as expressions of individual genius, as reflections of culture, and as foundations for later developments in human civilization. Students read selections from Homer, Hesiod, and Greek lyric poetry. Readings from Herodotus accompany a treatment of the development of Athenian democracy and a comparison of Athens and Sparta and the causes and events of the Persian Wars.The drama, art, and architecture of fifthcentury Athens are covered, along with the philosophical teachings of Plato and Aristotle, and the life and death of Socrates. Students examine the origins and development of the Roman Republic and focus on the fall of the Republic and transition to Empire under Augustus. Readings from Livy, Horace, and Virgil express national pride in past achievements and Augustan aspirations for renewal. Life in the Roman Empire is revealed through selections from Tacitus, Suetonius, Pliny the Younger, Petronius, and a host of Roman poets, as well as by the enduring and influential works of Roman art, architecture and engineering.The beginnings of Christianity in the context of the Roman Empire and its decline are examined through selections from Augustine and the Old and New Testaments.


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HI45:The Development of Modern Europe (Grade 10) This course covers the major political, cultural, and intellectual developments of Western Europe from the early Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Students trace the development Christianity and Medieval Europe; the political and artistic innovations of the Renaissance; the Protestant Reformation and the Wars of Religion; the development of capitalism and colonialism; the scientific revolution; the monarchial revolution; the Enlightenment; and the French Revolution.The scope of the course is wide, concerned as much with literature, art, architecture, science, and philosophy as with political and military history. Students use primary sources whenever possible, reading large portions of such central authors as Augustine,Averroës, Dante, Machiavelli, Luther, Descartes, Locke, Newton,Voltaire, and Rousseau.

HI65: American History (Grade 11) This course focuses on the history of the United States within the larger context of the development of the modern West. It begins with the arrival of the first English colonists in 1607 and follows America’s emergence as the supreme Western power in the twentieth century. Students study America’s political, social, and religious beliefs, practices, and institutions, and compare these to those of Great Britain and Western Europe. Careful consideration is paid to the unique conditions that characterize American life: racial and ethnic diversity, geographic mobility, and bursts of large-scale immigration. Course materials include primary and secondary sources. Students develop their historical imaginations, improve their writing and research skills, and learn how historical arguments and interpretations are constructed.While the emphasis is on the analytical essay, additional assignments include a research paper in conjunction with the American literature course.

MATHEMATICS Mathematics at the Academy is more than numbers, symbols, and memorized formulae. In keeping with the Academy’s classically based curriculum, mathematics is placed in a historical context, and students explore its connections to history, science, English, language, art, and music. In addition to mathematical concepts and skills, there is a strong emphasis on problem solving and the effective written and oral communication of technical information. Academy teachers generate the kind of intellectual excitement that leads to discovery and progress. In doing so, students learn to see mathematics as a powerful tool for discovering and understanding the world around them and to relish the challenge difficult problems present.

MA25G: Geometry This course focuses on plane and solid Euclidean geometry, with a secondary emphasis on number theory and algebra.A balanced emphasis is placed on numerical and algebraic problems, informal proofs, and formal proofs. Students learn congruence; similarity; parallel and perpendicular lines and planes; triangles; quadrilaterals; polygons; polyhedra; the Pythagorean theorem; circles; area and volume; prime numbers; factoring; logic; and conics. Both deductive and inductive reasoning are stressed. Students begin to develop their technical writing skills and are frequently asked to write on topics relevant to the course.Text used: Elementary Geometry for College Students, Daniel and Geralyn, 4th edition. MA25A: Advanced Algebra This course is a rigorous study of algebra and trigonometry with an emphasis on variable manipulation, problem solving, equations and inequalities, sequences, functions, order of operations, exponents, and the use of tables and graphs. Both skills and concepts are stressed. Students learn concrete, informal, and formal methods of solving linear and quadratic equations. Students apply algebraic methods to solve a variety of both theoretical and real-world problems. Frequent group work enhances understanding of the math concepts and generates excitement during periods of discovery.Text used: Algebra, Form and Function, McCallum et al.

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MA70: Pre-Calculus This course broadens students’ earlier study of algebra to include complex numbers; a consideration of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational and trigonometric functions; conic sections; and an introduction to sequences and series and limits. Emphasis is placed on transformations of functions; their graphs; conversions from one form to another; domain and range; inverses; and composition of functions. Students use computers as well as graphing calculators to investigate and compare the behaviors of functions, to represent and analyze data, and to simulate experiments.Text used: Precalculus: Mathematics for Calculus, Stewart et al.

MA90: Calculus II (Fall Semester) This course begins with a brief review of differential calculus and the basics of definite and indefinite integrals. From there, the course covers improper integrals, applications of definite integrals, sequences and series, ordinary first-order and second-order differential equations, and systems of differential equations. Students who complete MA90 will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam. MA95: Multivariable Calculus (Spring Semester) This course extends the ideas covered in MA80 and MA90 to functions of two and three variables.After introducing functions of more than one variable, the course covers differentiation and integration of these functions, including optimization; parameterizations and vector fields; line and flux integrals; and calculus of vector fields.

SCIENCE

MA80: Calculus I Students in this course must have demonstrated a thorough knowledge of elementary and advanced algebra and trigonometry, and have completed pre-calculus.The course focuses on the fundamentals of both differential and integral calculus, with an equal emphasis on understanding the conceptual foundations of calculus, on procedural fluency, and on applications. Students who complete MA80 will be prepared for Calculus II (MA90 or CASMA124). It is expected that students will complete this course by the time they graduate from the Academy.Text used: Calculus: Single and Multivariable, Hughes-Hallett et al.

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The Academy science sequence takes students through physics, chemistry, and University biology. An inquiry-based approach to science allows students at all grade levels to make connections between concepts learned in class and the reality of the world around them. Students are exposed to real-life science through hands-on laboratory work, demonstrations, and discussions that encourage them to become actively involved in their own learning. Students are asked to predict, observe, explore, question, measure, and compare; to test theories and articulate beliefs with their peers and teachers; and to modify their thoughts and draw conclusions based on experience. Academy students may also arrange for research opportunities in University labs in the summer before senior year.

PY25: Physics This is a laboratory-based course in which students learn physics by the method of inquiry.All students keep an active lab notebook of daily experiments, such as observing collisions of dynamic carts, measuring the acceleration of gravity on falling toys, finding the specific heat of rubbing alcohol, determining the period of a spring, and calculating the charge to mass ratio of the electron.The topics covered include classical Newtonian mechanics, states of matter, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, optics, and modern physics.A knowledge of Algebra I is expected as a prerequisite. All freshmen and new sophomores who have not taken physics in ninth grade enroll in this course. Text used: Conceptual Physics. CH45: Chemistry This course is an intensive study of general chemistry. The course experimentally and theoretically investigates both the structure and properties of matter as well as how it changes. Both the historical and societal implications of chemistry are explored. Topics include stoichiometry, chemical bonding, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, nuclear and organic chemistry, and kinetics. All students keep an active lab notebook, write formal lab reports, and work through a mini-thesis paper and presentation.With continued emphasis on the scientific thought process and independent analysis, students are encouraged to test hypotheses through frequent experimentation. Homework problems and laboratory exercises allow students to experience how theories and principles can be used to explain their observations firsthand. Physics is a prerequisite for this course.Text used: Chemistry:The Molecular Science, Moore, Stanitski, and Jurs.


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VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS Students must enroll in visual or performing arts courses during grades nine and ten.Additionally, students may continue their study of visual and performing arts through coursework at the University as well as through participation in Short Courses,Art Club, Drama Club, Gallery Hoppers, and Jazz Band.

CAS107: Biology In the fall semester of the junior year,Academy students enroll in Biology 107 at the University.The focus of this course is on the evolution and diversity of life, principles of ecology, and behavioral biology. It requires three hours of lecture and three hours of lab each week. The course is taught for University credit. CAS105: Biology for Health Sciences In the spring semester, students may enroll in Biology 105: Biology for Health Sciences.This course provides students with an introduction to the theoretical and factual bases required for careers in the health and paramedical sciences.The focus of this course is on the principles of biology, with emphasis on cellular structure, heredity, reproduction, development, biochemistry, metabolism, and nutrition. It requires three hours of lecture and two hours of lab each week. The course is taught for University credit.

DR21: Performing Arts This course is an intensive year-long course for the student actor or singer that focuses on all aspects of theatrical performance including acting technique, theater studies, movement, character development, and improvisation. In the fall semester, students will prepare and perform monologues and scenes for an in-class performance. In the spring semester, drama students either perform in a play directed by an Academy senior or participate in a short play festival or an original ensemble piece to be presented to the entire school community.All performances take place at the Boston University College of Fine Arts. AR25:Visual Art Foundations I This course provides an introduction to traditional and contemporary art concepts and media. Drawing foundations are the central focus, encouraging the development of students’ perceptual, analytical, and technical skills. Students have the opportunity to explore the expressive language of line, form, color, and composition through a range of 2D and 3D media including pencil and charcoal drawing, Sumi, watercolor painting, and wire sculpture. Coursework emphasizes the elements and principles of art and design, providing a strong foundation for further study in the visual arts.

AR32:Visual Art Foundations II This course is a continuation of Visual Art Foundations I, emphasizing further development of drawing and studio skills and heightened understanding of the elements and principles of art. Students explore a range of materials and techniques including mixed media, printmaking, and acrylic painting. Coursework is geared for committed art students and requires rigorous class participation and occasional outside work as well. AR25 is the prerequisite for this course.

MU21: Chorus In this course, students will prepare for both the winter and spring performances. Students need not have experience with singing as the class will review techniques for all voice ranges.Although the ability to read music is helpful, it will not be required as part of the class will explore music theory and sight-singing. MU22: Chamber Ensemble In this course, students will prepare for both the winter and spring performances. Students should already have proficiency with an instrument.The pieces selected will depend upon the instruments played by the students enrolled. A portion of the class will focus on analysis and music theory.

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SHORT COURSES Academy Short Courses give students in grades nine and ten the opportunity to explore a subject of academic interest outside of the core curriculum. Short Courses meet twice weekly and do not require as much outside preparation as other academic classes. Students are required to take one semester of a Short Course in either ninth or tenth grade. Past Short Courses have included:Astronomy, Digital Photography, Computer Programming, Introduction to Logic, Introduction to Philosophy, Public Speaking, and Readings in Modern Literature. Offerings vary annually.

JUNIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR The Junior Research Seminar exposes students to research at the University, and allows juniors the opportunity to begin research on thesis work in the junior year.This elective course for eleventh-grade students meets two hours per week. History, Arts, and Letters (HAL) This year, the Academy is piloting a humanities section of the Junior Research Seminar. Students will learn how to start a research project—including the use of libraries, web-based resources, bibliographies, and other findings—and how to write a long paper. University professors will share their approach to research, and students will utilize the various libraries at the University for research. Students will develop a research plan and a bibliography for work in the summer for the senior thesis.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) From September through March, one hour is dedicated to touring laboratories at Boston University, and the other hour is spent in discussion of current science periodicals. From April onwards, the weekly tours are replaced with rotations through laboratories which will develop into a summer internship. Homework assignments consist of writing summaries and reflections of tours, reading current science periodicals, and giving oral presentations and leading discussions on those articles.Academy students are currently interning in the following labs: • Boston University Department of Biology with Professor Atema, Professor Eichenbaum, and Professor Kunz • Boston University Department of Chemistry with Professor Doerrer • Boston University Department of Cognitive Neuroscience with Professor Mingolla • Boston University Department of Manufacturing Engineering with Professor Gevelber • Boston University Department of Physics with Professor Goldberg and Professor Mohanty • Boston University Department of Space Sciences with Professor Fritz • Children’s Hospital with Dr. Moses • Harvard School of Public Health with Dr. Hunter • MIT’s Micro and Nano-Technology Lab with Professor Pappalardo

SENIOR SEMINARS Senior Seminars are semester-long elective courses taught by Academy faculty in a variety of disciplines. Offerings vary by semester. Current seniors may choose from courses titled Classic Texts in Chinese Literature and Greek and Roman Literature: On Human Nature and Living the Best Life; past seminars have included Statistics & Probability,The Literature of Nature, Creative Writing, and The History and Architecture of Boston.

SENIOR THESIS The Academy Senior Thesis is a year-long, independent research project, in any field of study, designed to allow each student to demonstrate the skills necessary to think, analyze, and write in a coherent and mature way.The senior thesis project provides students with the opportunity to follow an intellectual passion in depth with the guidance of a university professor. Popular thesis topics include research in history and politics; literature and music; linguistics and science.All seniors must complete the thesis project as a requirement for graduation. All students select a professor from Boston University or another area university to serve as a thesis advisor. Seniors meet individually with their thesis advisors to develop ideas, share information, and refine their research. Each student will also have a thesis advisor from the Academy with whom they are required to attend weekly meetings.Thesis papers are expected to be at least 8,000 words in length and written in accordance with generally accepted University standards.All students present their research to the Academy community prior to graduation.


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UNIVERSITY COURSE OFFERINGS

University Coursework

With the oversight and support of our close-knit community,Academy students have the opportunity to gain exposure to new disciplines and to follow their passions by taking courses at Boston University.The school’s mission is not to accelerate learning or adolescence, but to expand the secondary-level intellectual experience for highly capable students. Most Academy students begin studying courses at the University during their junior year, typically two semesters of biology and of a modern language. During senior year,Academy students may enroll in as many as four University courses a semester. Our students may transfer these credits at the discretion of the colleges to which they matriculate or apply to continue their undergraduate work at Boston University. The following lists common courses by discipline in which Academy juniors and seniors have recently enrolled: Humanities CASAH205 CASAR332 CASCL211 CASEN141 CASEN163 CASHI307 CASLL281 CASPH150 CASRN103 CASWS305 CFAMU111 PAG E

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Architecture:An Introduction Greek and Roman Cities Readings in Latin Prose Literary Types: Fiction Readings in Shakespeare History of War Holocaust Literature and Film Introduction to Ethics Religions of the World: Eastern Critical Issues in Women’s Studies Elements of Music Theory I

Math CASMA213 CASMA226 CASMA341

Basic Statistics and Probability Differential Equations Introduction to Number Theory

Natural Science CASBI114 CASBI117 CASES101 CASPY252

Human Infectious Diseases Global Ecology The Dynamic Earth Principles of Physics II

Romance and Modern Languages Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Modern Arabic, Russian, Spanish Students may choose from any language offered at the University. Many students choose to study a new language, while others may place into upper-level courses for languages they have previously studied. Social Science CASAN101 CASPS241 CASPO251 CASSO100 CASEC161

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Developmental Psychology Introduction to Comparative Politics Principles in Sociology Introduction to Microeconomic Analysis

A complete listing of University courses in which current Academy students are enrolled is available on the Academy’s website—www.buacademy.org.


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Student Life

ATHLETICS

COMPETITIVE ATHLETICS

In addition to using Sargent Gymnasium, which adjoins the Academy building, our students have access to many of Boston University’s facilities for physical education and athletics programs. From Nickerson Field, to the rock-climbing wall at the Fitness and Recreation Center, to the University boathouse on the Charles River, students can take full advantage of University facilities.

Our after-school sports programs feature a variety of teams that compete against other schools in the Boston area. The Academy belongs to the Massachusetts Bay Independent League, the New England Preparatory School Athletic Conference, and the Girls’ Independent League. While participation is not required, the Academy encourages all students to get involved – one does not need experience in a sport to participate. Our teams operate on an open-participation policy, yet do demand that students commit for the season to attend all practices and games. Competitive teams include: basketball, crew, fencing, sailing, soccer, tennis, and ultimate frisbee.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION The Academy offers a broadly based physical education curriculum that emphasizes movement, physical awareness, and health education.The program’s goal is to enable Academy students to find, master, and enjoy physical activities that they can pursue throughout their lives. Physical Education meets once a week and is required in ninth and tenth grade.

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COMMUNITY SERVICE

STUDENT ACTIVITIES

Teaching students to be thoughtful members of their community is an important part of an Academy education.As such,Academy students are required to complete 20 hours of service each year of enrollment. The Academy’s Community Service Program emphasizes civic responsibility, encourages lifelong civic engagement, and inspires personal growth. Through public service,Academy students develop as leaders who have a deeper understanding of themselves and a broader awareness of their communities.

Student activities meet either during the school day in activity block or after school. Offerings vary from year to year, and depend on student interest. Common offerings include:

Prior approval of all projects must be obtained from the Academy’s Community Service Coordinator.At the end of the project, students are asked to reflect on their community service experience through discussion and written observation.

Admission Ambassadors Art Club Academy Press Ballroom Dance Drama – Dramatic Play, Musical, Senior-Directed Production Gallery Hoppers Gay-Straight Alliance Environmental Club Jazz Band Literary Magazine Math Club Model United Nations Nerdly Hobbies Opera Club Outing Club Peer Advisors Peer Tutors Robotics Science Team Student Council Yearbook

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Advising at the Academy

FACULTY ADVISING

SCHOOL COUNSELOR

Every Academy student is assigned a faculty advisor. Advisors monitor the academic and social progress of their advisees and serve as the first point of contact for families and teachers in responding to students’ academic needs.

A full-time School Counselor is available to meet with students and families as needed to offer support for learning styles and other emotional needs. Providing proactive consultation, the School Counselor assists students as they transition to the demands and life of the Academy and ultimately to the University.The School Counselor also coordinates a health and wellness program, which includes topics such as sexuality, substance abuse, and nutrition.

The goal of the advising program in grades nine and ten is to help students successfully adjust to the academic rigors and community of the Academy.Whereas in eleventh and twelfth grades, advisors assist students in meeting the demands of the University while maintaining a connection to Academy. Ninth and tenth graders meet with their advisors weekly; juniors and seniors have individual check-ins with their advisors as well as group meetings with the College Counseling Office. Families typically meet once a semester with a student’s faculty advisor, and narrative comments and grades are sent home four times over the course of the year. Class advisors are also assigned to the freshmen and sophomore classes to help to create and maintain grade identity, and to assist with special grade-specific activities and events. Class meetings are held weekly; topics of discussion may include, but are not limited to: academic honesty, time management, note-taking, test-taking strategies, healthy eating and study habits, peer tutoring, stress management, friendships and social dynamics, appropriate use of email, leadership, and the transition to the University in sophomore year.

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COLLEGE COUNSELING As students progress through the Academy, our two college counselors help to advise them and their families in the college process.The College Counseling Office also assists with University course registration. Students participate in introductory college preparation sessions in tenth grade and continue with weekly group and individual meetings in grades eleven and twelve.


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Academy Faculty and Staff

James S. Berkman Head of School

Elizabeth Cellucci Visual and Performing Arts Department

Harvard College,A.B. in History & Literature Oxford University, M.Phil. in Early Modern European History Harvard Law School, J.D.

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, B.F.A. in Painting

Brett Abiga単a Visual and Performing Arts Department The Juilliard School, M.M. in Composition Boston University, Doctor of Musical Arts in Composition Paige Brewster Director of Admission and Financial Aid

James Davis History Department Beloit College, B.A. in Political Science State University of NewYork at Albany, M.A. in Philosophy Boston University, Ph.D. in Philosophy Nicholas Dent Mathematics Department; Director of Governance Oberlin College, B.A. in Physics

Bucknell University, B.S. in Business Administration Michelle M. Cannon Director of Studies Harvard College,A.B. in Classics William Castell Technology Coordinator Oberlin College, B.A. in Studio Art and Art History Harvard Graduate School of Education, Ed.M. in Technology and Education

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Srdjan Divac Mathematics Department Harvard College,A.B. in Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Tufts University, M.A. in Mathematics Boston University, Ph.D. candidate in Mathematics J. T. Duck Director of College Counseling Haverford College, B.A. in Comparative Literature Harvard Graduate School of Education, Ed.M. in Higher Education Administration


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David Earls Mathematics Department

Philip Gambone English Department

Brandeis University, B.A. in Mathematics and Computer Science Tufts University, M.S. in Mathematics

Harvard College,A.B. in English Episcopal Divinity School, M.A. in Theology Gary Garber Science Department; University Liaison

Ellen Evans Assistant Director of College Counseling Bates College, B.A. in Psychology Boston University, M.Ed. in Policy, Planning and Higher Education Administration

Haverford College, B.S. in Physics and Astronomy Boston University, M.A. in Physics with a concentration in the biological applications of optics Bill Gardiner Visual and Performing Arts Department

Karen Foy School Counselor College of Notre Dame of Maryland, B.A. in Psychology University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, M.A. in Psychology Boston University School of Education, Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in School Counseling John Friborg Director of Advancement Williams College, B.A. in History University of New Hampshire, M.A. in History Harvard Graduate School of Education, Ed.M. in Administration, Planning, and Social Policy

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Boston University, B.F.A. in Theatre Arts Boston University, M.F.A. candidate in Theatre Education Laurie Glenn Classics Department Boston University, B.A. with a major concentration in Classics and a minor in Italian Richard Horn History Department Harvard College,A.B. in History Dartmouth College, M.A.L.S. in Social Sciences Princeton University, M.A. and Ph.D. in History

Maureen Hurley Director of Summer Program; Coordinator of Student Life and Advising Boston University, B.A. in Journalism Boston University Metropolitan College, M.A. in Urban Affairs Rachel Hutchins Science Department Rochester Institute of Technology, B.S. in Chemistry and a minor in Psychology St. John Fisher College, M.S. in Educational Administration Kristin Jewell Classics Department College of the Holy Cross, B.A. in Classics University of Pennsylvania, M.A. and Ph.D. in Classical Studies Alexandra Lyons History Department Yale University, B.A. in Russian & East European Studies Harvard College, Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literatures Nyani-Iisha Martin Receptionist and Special Events Coordinator Harvard College, S.B. in Biology


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Yasmin McGinnis Assistant Director of Admission and Advancement College of the Holy Cross, B.A. in Sociology and Spanish Literature Boston College, M.A. in Spanish Language and Literature

David Stone Director of Alumni Relations and Athletics Ithaca College, B.S. in Physical Education Boston University, M.A. in Human Movement Katey Sullivan Financial Manager

Raeanne Napoleon Science Department University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, B.S. in Chemistry Boston University, Ph.D. candidate in Chemistry Lauren Proll English Department The College of New Jersey, B.A. in English Indiana University, M.A. and Ph.D. in English Jeff Small Administrative Manager Florida Atlantic University, B.A. in Communication

Boston College, B.A. in English Boston University Academy, Class of 2003 Jason Tandon English Department Middlebury College, B.A. and M.A. in English University of New Hampshire, M.F.A. in Creative Writing Nicole White Admission and Advancement Coordinator Bryant University, B.A. in Liberal Studies

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Taking Public Transportation:Take the MBTA Green Line “B� trolley to the Boston University Central stop. Keeping the Marsh Chapel on your right and Radio Shack on your left, walk one block west to University Road and the Academy entrance.

Directions to the Academy

From the West: Via Massachusetts Turnpike (I-90) Take the turnpike to Exit 18 (Allston/Cambridge).After the toll, follow the signs for Cambridge to the first set of lights. DO NOT CROSS OVER THE RIVER.Turn right at the lights; this is Soldiers Field Road/Storrow Drive eastbound. (The Doubletree Guest Suites Hotel is on the right.) Take the first exit for Boston University; this is University Road.

From I-93: Coming either north or south on I-93, take the exit for Storrow Drive. Continue on Storrow Drive to the Kenmore Square Exit.At the first set of lights, turn right onto Beacon Street.At this point, the road forks; bear right onto Bay State Road. Drive approximately a half mile to the end of Bay State Road, and turn left onto Granby Street. (You will avoid Kenmore Square and Commonwealth Avenue traffic/lights by going this way.) From Granby Street, turn right onto Commonwealth Avenue and follow it to the third light.Turn right onto University Road (just before the B.U. Bridge).

From the North or South: Via Route 128 (I-95) take the exit for Route 30 East (Newton/Boston).This is Commonwealth Avenue. Follow through Newton into Boston to the Boston University Campus.As you approach the traffic light for the B.U. Bridge (Route 2 west), get into the far right lane.The Academy is across Commonwealth Avenue at the intersection with University Road.

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* Parking is available at 808 Commonwealth Avenue, across the street from the Academy. PAG E

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2009-2010 BUA Course Listings