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A M AO VAMBOLVAE B WL EO RWL DO R L D by

BRANDON HODGES


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction

7

The Essentials

9

Understanding Movement Applied v. Adapted

41

Research Conclusion THE LIFE AHEAD

25

50

52

Resources & References

60


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A M O VA B L E W O R L D


In an ever changing world where money and resources grow scarce, many find themselves in search of new opportunities; ultimately changing the notion of a permanent homestead. In order to fulfill our needs of a transportable lifestyle we must reinterpret the essentials of life. Although these essentials are the only things we carry, it would only be wise that we adapt our movement to a more logical and sustainable nature.

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THE ESSENTIALS 9


es•sen•tials (uh-sen-shuh ls)

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For the sole purpose of my thesis, the following definition of essentials will be used from here on out

Essentials are Items that we rely on every day of our lives. These items are not limited to just survival, but also items that identify us as who we are.

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“Survival of the fittest” - Charles Darwin Charles Darwin may have thought that the strongest would be the first to find food and water. However, in today’s society we need a lot more than just that to survive. Over the last 100 years, the Western world has developed a greater focus on materiality. With the new economic downturn, it is time to rethink what we really need in order to survive in tomorrow’s world. What do I need? It’s something that we should ask ourselves as we reflect on the possessions we have accumulated over our lifetimes. Our constant accumulation of material goods has led to uncomfortable living spaces, “McMansions”, overflowing landfills, and an abundance of political problems. Media have built up the Western Civilization all over the world, leading to a high demand in lifestyle from remaining societies. Who are we to say that Western Lifestyle is best? If everyone lived like we do there wouldn’t be enough resources to go around. And eventually the human race would be extinct. Maybe this is an extreme view, but there is no doubt that our focus on the accumulation of material goods is profoundly changing the way we live. In order to move forward we must first look back and to find the essentials we need to live; let us compare the accumulation in extremes. Then we can limit our needs and wants, in order to achieve a suitable, movable lifestyle.

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A M O VA B L E W O R L D


Figure 1. Kรถnigssee, Germany (2009). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2009.

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Accumulation at its best. These one hundred public-housing apartments in Hong Kong, each 100 square-feet (Wolf,2007), show the role that accumulation plays in life there. Many of these apartments were most likely inspired by the “ideal” Western Life. Some of these apartments are sparse; others are filled to the brim. Does this mean that some people need less than others? Of course not. What it means is some people just don’t

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Figure 2. 100 x 100, Hong Kong (2007). Note: Copyright Michael Wolf, 2007.

realize what they can live without. Most likely the majority of these items have some value to the person, however the value of each object may or may not be enough to keep it, nor re-buy it in the future. Reassessing the necessities will eventually lead to more mobile lifestyle. With this we will be able to finally explore and see what is beyond our front door.

15


The extremes of accumulation Finding a Practical Medium

Figure 3. 100 x 100, Hong Kong (2007). Note: Copyright Michael Wolf, 2007.

There is a point we all reach that we no longer recall the items we have in our possession. Above is the inevitable result of a life of accumulation. This woman has surpassed this mark by a mile, and is on the brink of an unlivable state. What is the point of buying and accumulating when you can’t remember what you have? The items seen above appear to have little value to the women individually, only when collected together in a single mass do they have any meaning.

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Figure 4. 100 x 100, Hong Kong (2007). Note: Copyright Michael Wolf, 2007.

To some, it may seem like too little? But the living condition above is easy, organized, and holds a degree of merit. There is an understandable hierarchy of items owned, and the items are memorable and useful. For instance the clock is clearly a treasured item that is proudly mounted and valuable to the owner, much like the few shirts, which hang pressed and orderly against the aged cracked walls. These few adored items somehow represent a fulfilled life that can also be moved with ease.

Quality over quantity 17


Figure 5. Ernie Davis Hall, Syracuse (2009). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2009.

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A M O VA B L E W O R L D


From Hong Kong, to central new york, finding the essentials is important no matter where we live. 7860 miles across the world, people are still accumulating far past the essentials. In this case however they haven’t been living in these 128 square-foot rooms for years, but for only three months. How is it that upper classmen students living in Syracuse University’s Ernie Davis Hall can accumulate so much in a short period of time? Is it because the Western World no longer knows how to live without? The amazing thing is that upper classmen have been at college for a few years and should understand by now what they really need to bring in order to live comfortably: yet it seems like it is their first time in a dorm room. In the case of comparing dorm space to apartments in Hong Kong, one must consider that colleges already provided the essentials we use to sustain human life. Fresh water, food, and shelter are provided, so what are the essentials that college students feel they still need in their living environments?

19


20 singles in Syracuse University’s Ernie Davis Hall were observed in order to better understand how twenty-somethings live a mobile life. Each single measures roughly 128 square-feet and comes with a standard bed, desk, armoire, and bureau. These singles are only inhabited by students August through May: at this point, everyone must remove all of their belongings at the end of the academic year. In most cases these students also live hours away from the university and must transport all of their belongings in a single car. And yet when we observe these photos it seems as though these rooms are filled with unnecessary and trivial items. Besides the items provided by the school a student essentially needs clothing, hygienic products, a computer and books for homework, and possibly a TV for entertainment. This of course is living very comfortably. So why do we still find so many unnecessary items? Students tend to fill the spaces with frivolous objects so it feels more like home; however, this is done without thought. Everyone needs a space of their own, especially in the case of dorm life. We already fill our lives with the friends and family we love, why not the few items that really make us happy? Deciding on the items other than those we need to survive may be one of the most difficult things any of us must do in our lives. Hypothetically look at this is as if your home went up in flames and you only had a single Rubbermaid bin in which to fit your most beloved items. What would it be? In the dorm rooms observed, we can see items we love so much, we bring them wherever we go: photos, posters, pieces of childhood, and various memorabilia. The problem is that in Western Society, these items are now being overtaken by trivial junk that is brought into our homes on a daily basis. When it comes to budgeting we do our best to go back to our college days and live as frugally as possible. Why not think the same way for the items we own? Each person in a household should only have the amount of items that could fit in one of the dorm rooms shown.

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Syracuse University’s Ernie Davis Residence Rooms Figure 6. Ernie Davis Hall, Syracuse (2009). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2009.

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The essentials + Life should be meaningful, enjoyable, and unforgettable. Commercialism has taught us nothing more in the past decade than bad judgment and selfishness. No one should live their lives by “keeping up with the Joneses”. It is understandable that we work in order to live comfortably, but there is no point in life when we work day and night just to provide enough to sustain our accumulation habits. Live life. As we break down what is necessary, be crucial, edit what you need and want with the highest degree of scrutiny. Objects have no more value than what we give them. A life of minimalism does not have to be uncomfortable or bare. It is how we interpret and design the way we live that will make it enjoyable. Even so, it still is not the items that we bring into our homes that fulfill our lives. Kathleen Brandt said it best: “it is truly the people that are the essential things” (personal interview, October 29, 2009). Who, rather than what we surround ourselves with, changes the value we hold in our lives. When removing the items that are not essential remember that we are doing this to lead happier, more movable and sustainable lives. The items that we rid our selves of, may be essential to another; others might be able to be recycled or evolve into more valuable items. We still need to be cautious of how we remove the unnecessary. Levels of trash have already reached a plateau; so be wise with how you dispose, think out of the box. Once our essentials are in order we can begin to consider how we move them, where we move them, and of course how often we move them. A movable life is not feasible if we skip the object editing stage.

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Purge, Treasure, Explore. 23


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Understanding Movement 25


Move•Ment ( moov-muh nt )

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For the sole purpose of my thesis, the following definition of movement will be used from here on out

the act of picking up and moving all that you own to a new place. In this case a repeated event, which happens at least every 3 years

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Figure 7. Oregon Trail Park, Nebraska (2009). Note: Copyright Gering Convention and Visitors Bureau, 2009.

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A M O VA B L E W O R L D


For most, moving is a scary tedious task that we dread no matter our age. When movement becomes a repetitive act we find ourselves tired and frustrated, which inevitably leads to a lack of desire to explore our new home. From the space we live to the city around us, there is a constant disconnect when a move is difficult. The act of moving has changed drastically over time. When human life originated, our species was designed to be hunter-gatherers. Our lives involved us moving from place to place in order to survive. As time has passed we have settled into a dormant state. Due to recent events we have finally broken free from our stagnant lives and become mobile once again. So how do we move? How have we moved in the past? For me the first concept of moving that comes to mind is the memory of my times playing Oregon Trail in computer class. The old horse and carriage was one of the first forms of transporting life that man developed. When our nation found a new opportunity in the form of gold, families would pack their essentials into the wagon and head out into the unknown to start a new life. This would hopefully be a beautiful and amazing new place. Burdened by disease, death, and a mountain of problems, moving was an act that people would hope to do only once in their lifetime. However, the move was so important for them, as was the opportunity to start a new life, that they did it anyway.

The Early Stages 29


Since the great move West, the Western World has developed amazing technologies such as the steamboat, train, car, and finally the airplane. With new technologies came new products for travel. In high fashion, the steamer trunk was a form of packing our most desired objects in an organized and elegant manner. Mostly used by wealthy socialites, the steamer trunk maybe the most beautiful example of moving the essentials. The attention to detail that was used to make the trunks reflects how we valued the goods that are stored in them. Evolution of travel has transformed the steamer trunk into cheap suitcases that are light and compact. Suitcases don’t hold the same respect, but instead are tossed without thought from trolley to plane compartment. There is an overall pattern of disrespect that has occurred in the past century. Beginning with the essentials, quality has been overtaken by quantity, much like the devices we use to move them.

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Well Crafted

Compartments for Precious Items

Hangers for Most Important Items

Drawers for Essentials

Figure 8. Steamer Trunk, Chicago (2009). Note: Copyright Richard Norton, 2009.

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Figure 9. Restored Airstream, Arizona (2005). Note: Copyright Wesley Barchenger, 2005.

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Living on the Road

Moving goods come in a variety of forms. Since the mid-century, the mobile home has become an American icon of comfortable exploration. The mobile unit allows us to move the essentials as well as ourselves in an organized predetermined space. Like the steamer trunk, the mobile home is a series of compartments that store and move our essentials in a respectable form. While as a general item the mobile home has not held the same stature as the steamer trunk, there are fine quality examples of mobility, such as the Airstream. In 1932 Wally Byam launched Airstream, a silver bullet icon that hasn’t strayed in the 77 years that it’s been in production (Airstream, 2009). America at its finest, the Airstream brought the ability to travel to every family. With the mobile home, families could travel cross-country, leaving their stagnant lives behind for an adventure. Even though the Airstream encouraged exploration, it allowed people to do it with the comfort of their essentials. The most important parts of peoples’ lives were easily packed into these magnificent creations with thought and care. Once on the road the Airstream was your new home, surrounding you with your most valued items. Over time the mobile home somehow lost its spark in society (maybe in due part of rising gas prices), but travel continued, with the airplane as a major form of transportation. With the use of the plane, families neglected their essentials, and packed the bare minimum. In the end, all of this is to blame on airline restrictions. The airplane made travel easier and quicker, but took away so many important aspects. To begin, trips were cut down in time, despite having to arrive unnecessarily early to airports. Road games and story telling were ignored, as journeys to the destination only lasted a few hours rather than a few days. In the last 50 years, the journey, the story, and the respect of the essentials were forgotten, and travel and movement were neglected.

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Today moving is a treacherous task we take on, something most of us like to avoid as much as possible. From the packing to the physical movement, there are not many aspects that are fun anymore. Possibly, the only enjoyment we still have is that the moment when we walk into our new home; and that usually occurs only if we’re upgrading to a better space. Moving is all about boxes and trucks today. We throw all of our items in cardboard boxes and generally label them based on the room they came out of. If we are somewhat concerned that an object will break, we graciously wrap it in old newspapers and throw them into the box with the rest of our “beloved” property. Once packed, we hire strangers who care even less about our possessions, who nonchalantly throw them in the back of a bare truck, with little protection from the bumping and bashing that is involved with the move. Boxes on top of boxes fill the trucks to the brim, with no one thinking about what’s on top of what. Once at the new destination the items are either unloaded into our new homes or left in storage until that fateful day of moving in. Finally, movers bring the beat-up, sometimes damaged boxes into the new space, with no order or system. Often we find a box or two missing, and many of the items are broken. We play a giant game of chance when we move, packing our earthly possessions and leaving it up to fate that we get them back in one piece. However, despite the ease of use, modern transportation then has primarily been used for leisure and not for movement. For over a century, society has fallen into a permanent state of settling. It was not until this past decade that we have seen a new form of movement. With recent events we find ourselves once again on the “horse and carriage” moving for new opportunities. This rapidly falling economy has given us new exploration. Usually considered negative, the fact that we must move for our next job brings a sense of exploration and chance back into our lives. Excitement, curiosity, and adventure are some of the emotions that should be evoked on our journey forward. From here on, life should be about exploration, movement, and excitement. Possibly the best words for a life of exploration, Robert Frost describes it best:

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Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
 And sorry I could not travel both
 And be one traveler, long I stood And looked down one as far as I could 
 To where it bent in the undergrowth; 

 Then took the other, as just as fair, 
 And having perhaps the better claim, 
 Because it was grassy and wanted wear; 
 Though as for that the passing there 
 Had worn them really about the same, 

 And both that morning equally lay 
 In leaves no step had trodden black. 
 Oh, I kept the first for another day! 
 Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. 

 I shall be telling this with a sigh Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-- 
 I took the one less traveled by, 
 And that has made all the difference

- Robert Frost (1916, p. 9)

So let us get break free from our stagnant lives, and begin our journey once again in the form of a nomadic lifestyle.

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So how many are moving and why?

•A

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The data below was taken from the 2000 Census. However, with the decline of the stock market and the loss of jobs around the world, people have had to uproot their families and lives to move to new locations to find employment, which will be noticeable in the 2010 Census.

•B

Other reasons 6%

•B

Job-related reasons 16.2%

•B

Family-related reasons 27.3%

•B

Housing-related reasons 51.6%

(US Census Bureau, 2000) 37


Predicting the future is not the easiest task. And who knows if we will be correct? What we can do is have a positive outlook on what is to come, in hope that our attitude will influence the decisions to come. As we begin to shape future movement, let us consider the good and the bad of movement in the past. Organized, conscious, and respected, the act of moving should be done with care and consideration. Not only do we need to act for the sake of our essentials, but also for our own enjoyment and peace of mind. If moving became a game, an exciting life moment, we would do it as often as possible. Our state of permanent settling would be broken by exploration and a knowledge building adventure. What is out there? What is the rest of the world like? Yes, we see it on TV, read it in books, and hear news about it on a daily basis, but why haven’t we experienced the world on a first hand basis? If the current economic state is already causing society to chase our opportunities around the world, then why not make this journey of movement beneficial to our life goals. Seeing and understanding different cultures is completely different when it is hands on. Visualizing cultures from different forms of media does not even come close to real life experience. Still today, we often meet someone that has never left the state that they live in. We are now stuck in a secluded rut that can be broken by a future of movement. This future movement will also forces us to reflect on what we consider essential. By experiencing different cultures our interpretation of value will change. Hopefully the movement will change our perception of what Western Society considers important. Survival, family, friends, and the emotion of enjoyment can be the strongest elements of our lives. Of course family and friends are important, but they should not hold us back from seeing the world. Relationships are better and stronger when both parties are happy.

This will lessen the need to fill our insecurities and inadequacies with Inanimate objects.

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Of course this will not bring world peace, but I believe as a society we would lead much more meaningful lives. By not filling our emotional holes with objects we will eventually begin to solve the environmental and political issues that we are currently faced with. Think about the best times of your life. Most of us would say it was an incredible family vacation, or a moment when we experienced and enjoyed a culture for the first time. Even consider our essentials, which are commonly the photos of the most precious moments of life. So why not fill our lives with these moments on a daily basis? How we successfully achieve this life is another issue. Life will have to be an equal ratio of exploration and productivity in order to keep life sustainable. Only time will tell of a realistic way to live a nomadic, comfortable, and enjoyable life.

(L-1+O) + MC = L+1+HE A Negative Life filled with Inanimate Objects + Movement and Cultural Exploration = An Enjoyable Life with only the Heightened Essentials

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Applied vs. Adapted 41


Figure 10. Victorinox Airstream (2009). Note: Copyright Truck Trend, 2009.

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There are two forms of living that we will take into account as we apply life to movement. First: Applied life. Applied life refers to the act of taking all of the essentials of our individual lives and bringing them into our living spaces. This form of life is a single occurrence for each space that we inhabit in a lifetime. Some of the best examples of applied life are mobile homes, dorm rooms, hotel rooms, and downsized homes. Currently some people already live in applied spaces without their knowledge. Then we have adapted lives. Adapted living refers to someone continually building their essentials and living spaces over a long period of time. The majority of western life uses the adapted method. Many are so set on the traditional life, getting a job, finding a partner, moving into a home, and finally building a family. However this form of life currently leads us to building a living space on things we want rather than things we need. In order to understand the benefits of applied living over adapted, we will study the mobile home as key to future life. Pre-organized spaces force us to only move the essentials in and nothing more. When we are given a blank space we move everything that we can fit into the space and then accumulate more and more. This reasoning has led to over accumulation. By treating a space like a mobile home or steamer trunk, with predetermined areas for our possessions, we will be less likely to accumulate past the essentials. Not only does the applied method prevent over accumulation, but it also allows us to create a coherent space that reflects our personality with thought.

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Living on the Road Mobile homes are designed to divide spaces based on function. As the diagrams shown, these Airstream mobiles were designed so that it is not only easy for the user to work in, but comfortable to live in. Primarily there is a clear division between public and private spaces. Mobile homes are set up for day and night uses. On one side of the mobile home we see the bed, bath, and storage for clothing, so going to bed and getting up in the morning is easy. On the opposing side of the mobile home you will find the kitchen, dining and lounging spaces. We must understand that although these spaces overlap to some degree, there still is a division between uses. The second diagram shows the different functions that are preformed within the mobile home on a daily basis. Even these overlap to some degree, but it has clearly been designed and defined in the most logical way. Throughout the mobile home, the user will find a compartment for all of their essentials. There is more than enough storage for normal living in most of these Airstreams. The mobile home does lack one very important option: personality. It is very difficult in the predetermined mobile home to show off your personality and most cherished essentials. Most mobile homes you will find are already designed, from the color of the textiles to the wood stain that is used throughout. The space in which we inhabit should reflect our personality. Although these mobile homes seem to solve the organization and function we need in a home, they lack personality. Even though we should strip the items we have down to a minimum, this does not mean we should ever lose our personality. Without our personality we are no one. The home is the place our personality needs to be reflected the most, a safe haven, a prized possession.

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Private

Am/PM

Public

Day

Shared

Lavatory 45


Figure 11. Ernie Davis Hall, Syracuse (2009). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2009.

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Much like the mobile home, the dorm room is another applied living space. However, here we begin to see the all important element of personality. Customized configuration and room to visibly display the essentials begin to make this place feel like home. Unfortunately the construction white walls and lack of organization detracts from what could be a home for this user. There is a clear attempt from the pictures on the wall to the bedding, but there is no visible hierarchy. The predetermined furniture is hardly functional for the user, and is far from reflective of the user’s personality. Although the dorm is an example of applied space, the lack of customization once again limits personality. The size of the space is ideal for a single person, considering that the essentials of food and hygienics are provided in separate spaces. For more practical application the space would have to be a bit larger for a family or even the typical city dweller. Organized correctly, a space such as this one could accommodate the essentials. When combined with personality, does the space finally fulfill the needs of the user? Ideally the perfect space would be a combination of the dorm room and the mobile home, with the possibilities of customization. Despite the dorm’s and the mobile home’s shortcomings, we are finally understanding the concept of applied living. The problem of these spaces being permanent still remains. Most of the applied spaces we see tend to be temporary residences. Now we need to begin to apply these concepts to a lifestyle post college graduation.

Dorms could potentially be the basis for the sustainable, movable home 47


Figure 12 - 19. Urbia Furniture System, New York (2007). Note: Copyright Castro and Lee, 2007.

URBIA Furniture System for Small Apartments in Big Cities - By OBra Architects

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Applied Living Finally Makes it Home

Applied living has finally reached the everyday home. The Urbia Furniture System is a customizable installment that is designed to convert typical small city apartments into an organized home. The system divides the space into specific spacial functions. According to the designer the system was designed for the Urban Nomad. The product description states: “Those addicted to this kind of urban lifestyle are nomads at heart who must constantly drift between plazas, boulevards and cafĂŠs often only returning home in an inevitable concession to sleep and clean laundry. For them, home does not need to be large, since the pleasures of the city are intrinsically incompatible with the commitments to tend to large property or manage an abundance of personal possessions.â€? (Castro & Lee, 2007) Clearly the Urbia Furniture System for Small Apartments in Big Cities is the closest we currently are to the ideal Urban Nomad home. Even though the system is a great leap in the right direction, it too has some flaws in the applied living goal. Urbia can be completely broken down into transportable pieces, but the system still seems quite large to move. Taking apart this furniture system would not be the quickest or easiest task for an individual to do alone. At the same time Urbia still lacks creativity for the user. Despite its effort to be customizable based on the needs of the owner, there is a lack of personality that can be brought into the aesthetics of the piece. With this as our first step forward and the help of both the dorm room and mobile home, we can begin to create the home the we need in order to fulfill out nomadic, personable lives.

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Research Conclusion 50

A M O VA B L E W O R L D


With every day that goes by, we to find ourselves getting more troubled about the future economy. When that fateful day comes for so many, and our current employment terminates, there is a new window of opportunity that opens. We are freed from our stagnant lives and have the chance to return to our original nomadic lifestyle. Editing our accumulated objects down to the essentials which we need to live comfortably, is the first crucial step forward into the new lifestyle. Understanding that we no longer need nearly as much as we own maybe the hardest step, but once accomplished we can begin the journey of a nomadic life. The things that we do choose should be cherished, while at the same time representing who we are as a person. Once the essentials have been chosen, the design of our movement is key. Making movement both feasible and enjoyable is difficult, but necessary in order the achieve a fulfilled, nomadic life. Our rich history of movement is paramount in discovering the next form of life transportation. This discovery will allow us to stop everything and leave at a moment’s notice. In return, this could potentially lead to a happier, more fulfilled life. Exploration and education combined with the people and items that we love most will reduce our desires for a material based life. Upon arrival the choice between applied and adapted space should be evident. Creating the applied space is tricky. The space does not necessarily need, nor should be independent from the form in which we move. What if the new form of movement could transform into our applied space? There are numerous forms the nomadic life could take. If this new lifestyle already is out of the box, then the movement and space itself could be as well. The journey ahead is exciting, explorative, and executable, with a little work and a bit of bravery.

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THE LIFE AHEAD 53


AN•y•WHERE ( en-ee-hwair )

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A M O VA B L E W O R L D


For the sole purpose of my thesis, the following definition of Anywhere will be used from here on out

a kit of pieces that are systematically able to produce a variety of home installments, while supporting a life of exploration.

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Sketching the future supported movement in the form of a kit

The kit needed to contain a certain number of base pieces that could be used to create multiple items in order to fulfill the needs of a home. In return the kit would create a habitat that felt like home no matter where you moved. At the same time whatever I created would have to be portable and easy for the most novice user to put together. I began with simple items that we need/use in our current items. Couches, chairs, beds, shelves, and some for of storage whether its a basket, bin or bag. Based off these fairly generic items I broke it down further into basic shapes the could potentially be shared between finished pieces. Developing each piece was difficult and is never really finalized. Anything can be approved upon. I did want to make sure though that the kit had the possibility to expand and change depending upon the user and style of the time. The kit would also need to fulfill the need to transport the essentials without the hassle of packing and repacking items for each move. In the end the kit would have to be portable, consistent form of storage, easy to use, and feel like home.

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Figure 20. Sketches, Syracuse (2010). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2010.

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Figure 21. Prototyping, Syracuse (2010). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2010.

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Prototyping the kit

Prototyping the kit was crucial to the process because in order to fully understand the potential outcomes as well as the general feeling the kit provokes. 1/8�, 1/4� and full scale models were produced for the basic pieces. In order to better understand how well they could be packed, a scaled car trailer was produced for the pieces to fit in. Each stage of prototying brought about slight changes as well as material choices for each object. The material choices varied on the use of the part and the stresses that would be applied to it. For the models simple high grade plywood would was chosen to be the most successful and could be varied for the user with stain or paint. The prototypes also allowed me to play with connections which seemed to be more responsive with the use of bolts and wing nuts, rather than traditional joinery. By choosing to use generic hardware, the kit would be easier to put together and take apart by the user. If the kit were to be formed solely on joints, it would be more difficult to take apart, and would eventually where at a quicker rate.

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On the go bookcase

One of the primary pieces created with the kit is the bookcase. The main plane has several negative slots that not only create opportunities for new connections, but also relieves some of the weight of a solid panel. The panel can be either attached to the wall or stand alone with the help of aluminum legs. Plastic white storage shelves attach with straps and hooks securing the essentials to the bookcase. When on the move the storage bins can be removed for the panel and sealed for transport. Multiple panels and bins can be combined to create a bookcase or shelving unit of any size.

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Figures 22-23. Plane/Bookcase Model, Syracuse (2010). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2010.

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Figure 24. Couch Model, Syracuse (2010). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2010.

The couch is created with use of the two base planes, four of the aluminum legs, and three additional pieces. A back panel is specifically designed for the couch, but can be used for a headboard as well. Simple cushions make the couch a comfortable place to relax after a long journey. The cushions can we used for other household items when not in use for the couch. Alternative couches can also be created with the items supplied in the kit.

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Figure 25. Chair Model, Syracuse (2010). Note: Copyright Brandon T Hodges, 2010.

A simple sling chair is created with the furniture side arms, two bars, and a leather sling. All the pieces can be attached with wing nuts and tightened by hand. A walnut stain was used for all the models, but could ultimately be offered in various finishes to meet the demand of the users.

Furniture does not have to be uncomfortable in order to be portable 63


The final pieces were altered some to better suit the kit and to create more possibilities of the user 64

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References Airstream, Inc :: International Intro. (n.d.). Airstream, Inc :: Home. Retrieved October 13, 2009, from http://www.airstream.com/products/travel-trailers/international.html Asslinger, W. (n.d.). LoftCube | design werner aisslinger. Studio Aisslinger. Retrieved October 17, 2009, from http://www.aisslinger.de/loftcube/main.html Car Loft – Lofts mit Garten und Garage auf jeder Etage in Berlin, Kreuzberg. (n.d.). CarLoft - Die neue Art zu Leben – Garten und Garage auf jeder Etage. Retrieved October 17, 2009, from http://www.carloft.de/v0/htdocs/index.php Castro, P., & Lee, J. (n.d.). OBRA ARCHITECTS URBIA Furniture System for Small Apts in Big Cities, New York NEW YORK. OBRA ARCHITECTS. Retrieved October 8, 2009, from http://www.obraarchitects.com/work/0601URBIAFurnitureSystem/0601URBIAFurniture System.html Conran, T. (2007). How to Live in Small Spaces: Design, Furnishing, Decoration and Detail for the Smaller Home. Toronto: Firefly Books. Corbusier, L. (2008). Towards a New Architecture. Nashville: Bn Publishing. Durham, N. (2008, November 19). CBC News - World - A new perch for unwanted subway cars. CBC.ca - Canadian News Sports Entertainment Kids Docs Radio TV. Retrieved October 8, 2009, from http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2008/11/11/f-rfa-durham.html Frost, R. (1916). Mountain Interval. New York: Henry Holt And Company. Gordan, A. (2005, December 1). Heavy Metal Jacket With a Luxe Lining. The New York Times. Retrieved October 16, 2009, from http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/01/ garden/01kalkin.html Reinhard, E. (1998). Nomadic Architecture: Human Practicality Serves Human Emotion: Exhibition Design by Edgar Reinhard (1 ed.). Baden, Switzerland: Lars Muller Verlag. Wolf, M. (n.d.). Michael Wolf | Photography | Hong Kong. Michael Wolf | Photography | Hong Kong. Retrieved October 28, 2009, from http://www.photomichaelwolf.com/100x100/ Wright, H. (2008). Instant Cities. Vancouver: Black Dog Publishing. (2002). Living in Motion: Design and Architecture for Flexible Dwelling. Weil am Rhein: Vitra Design Museum.

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Photo Resources Barchenger, Wesley. (2005). Restored Airstream, Arizona, [Figure 9]. Retrieved November 16, 2009 from Toozigoot. http://www.toozigoot.com/restoration.html Castro, Pablo and Lee, Jennifer. (2007). Urbia Furniture System, New York, [Figures 12 - 19]. Retrieved September 23, 2009 from Obra Architects. http://www.obraarchitects.com/ work/0601URBIAFurnitureSystem/0601URBIAFurnitureSystem.html Gering Convention and Visitors Bureau. (2009). Oregon Trail Park, Nebraska, [Figure 7]. Retrieved November 4, 2009 from Gering Convention and Visitors Bureau. http://www. geringtourism.com/Portals/0/SBNMEagleRck-wagon.jpg Hodges, Brandon. (2009). Kรถnigssee Woods, Germany, [Figure 1]. Personal Collection Hodges, Brandon. (2009). Ernie Davis Hall, Syracuse, [Figures 5,6,11]. Personal Collection Hodges, Brandon. (2010). Sketches, Syracuse, [Figure 20]. Personal Collection Hodges, Brandon. (2010). Prototyping, Syracuse, [Figure 21]. Personal Collection Hodges, Brandon. (2010). Plane/Bookcase Model, Syracuse, [Figure 22-23]. Personal Collection Hodges, Brandon. (2010). Couch Model, Syracuse, [Figure 24]. Personal Collection Hodges, Brandon. (2010). Chair Model, Syracuse, [Figure 25]. Personal Collection Norton, Richard. (2009). Steamer Trunk, Chicago, [Figure 8]. Retrieved November 12, 2009 from Richard Norton. http://richardnortoninc.1stdibs.com/itemdetails.php?id=263512 Truck Trend. (2009). Victorinox Airstream, [Figure 10]. Retrieved November 16, 2009 from Truck Trend. http://www.trucktrend.com/features/travel/163_news090519_victorinox_special_ edition_airstream_trailer/index.html Wolf, Michael. (2007). 100 x 100, [Figures 2,3,4]. Retrieved October 15, 2009 from Michael Wolf Photography. http://www.photomichaelwolf.com/100_x_100/

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