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Sixth Form Prospectus for students joining in September 2017


Our Vision We are a Catholic family of aspiration, dedicated to all our students excelling spiritually and academically in our school and beyond. We change lives through our culture of high standards and expectations of everyone who learns and works in our school and a belief that achievement is for all.


“I joined Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College in the Sixth Form. I was immediately welcomed by both the staff and students. The school has encouraged me to make the most of every available opportunity and to be ambitious. I have been particularly impressed by the highly qualified and dedicated teachers, who are always willing to give their time to ensure that you reach your full potential. Lessons are always engaging and productive. At Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College Sixth Form every student receives excellent guidance and support. I know I will leave with lasting friendships, great memories and a strong academic foundation for the future� Ailish Hepburn, Sixth Form Student


What we do‌ Nurture the Catholic faith Achieve outstanding academic results Instil in each pupil the values of ambition, diligence and integrity


How we do it‌ High expectations of everything we do Excellent teaching Exemplary behaviour and personal standards Focus on numeracy and literacy Ensuring every child is known


“From the moment a student enters our Sixth Form we want them to feel a sense of achievement and belonging as this is very important to their future success and wellbeing as learners and as people�

Welcome to Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College Sixth Form When visitors come to our Sixth Form they always comment on the amazing building and excellent facilities. We are tremendously proud of our Sixth Form building, the futuristic design and striking exterior and interior, the fantastic ICT facilities and modern teaching and study spaces.

a strong system of pastoral support and careers guidance.

Of course we expect high standards from every student in their application to their studies, their dress and their contribution to our college community. Our aim is to provide every student with good qualifications, skills for employability and But we all know that the real heart of any the important personal qualities to lead school is the quality of teaching and the a happy and fulfilling life. support and guidance provided to every Please enjoy reading our prospectus and student. Our 2016 A Level results showed contact us if you need any further an exceptional 99% pass rate with a third information. If you are a student at of the grades at A*-A. We are delighted another school then visits to our Sixth 98% of our students gained places at Form are always welcome. university, including Liverpool, Manchester, Edinburgh and Glasgow. Yours sincerely, As you read this prospectus you will see J Cornally MBE our strong commitment to providing the Executive Headteacher very best for our students. We are able to offer a wide range of courses and excellent teaching as well as


Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College Sixth Form provides its students with a superb environment to develop and flourish academically and personally.

Rebecca Geoghegan Head of Sixth Form

The programme of events throughout both years provides students all the help and advice they need for the future they are aiming for. We have excellent links with a vast number of excellent universities and businesses affording our students with the latest information about the possibilities open to them so they can make informed decisions with the support of the Sixth Form pastoral team.

Having opened in September 2011 we have now said a fond farewell to four cohorts of students who are starting courses at universities right across the United Kingdom. Every student left the Sixth Form with pleasing A Level and BTEC results ensuring We hope that this they secured the places they prospectus, along with the wanted. Open Evening and our Over the past 5 years the website, should provide you Sixth Form community has with all the information you continued to go from need about our Sixth Form. strength to strength. We offer Our staff and students will be a wide range of 21 A Level delighted to offer you help and 3 BTEC subjects including and advice about all aspects all 10 facilitating subjects: of Sixth Form life here and we highly recommended for look forward to welcoming future academic study at you to Blessed Thomas Russell Group University. Holford Catholic College Sixth All subjects are taught by our Form in 2017. outstanding teachers within Yours sincerely, exceptional facilities. Alongside the academic life Rebecca Geoghegan of the Sixth Form, students Associate Headteacher are provided with Head of Sixth Form opportunities for enrichment to help them develop socially, emotionally and spiritually.


“Leadership of the Sixth Form is outstanding because both a strong work ethic among students and good pastoral support have been established. In the Sixth Form students' attendance is outstanding. Students are exceptionally positive about how the school has helped them to develop their knowledge and skills. Sixth Formers are good role models who take an active participation in mentoring and supporting younger students�

Ofsted Inspection Report: 19-20 June 2013


06 Sixth Form

18

Open Evening

Friday, 18th November 2016

6 p.m. Thursday, 6th October 2016

OCT

Year 11 Application Assembly

JAN FEB

For BTHCC applicants only

Applicant Taster Day Monday, 10th July 2017

Applicant Meetings with Head of Sixth Form January, February, March 2017

October 2016

10

Application Deadline

17

Sixth Form Enrolment into Year 12 10 a.m. - 12 p.m Thursday 17th August 2017


Dates for your diary Open Evening for 2017 entry will be All applications should be received held on Thursday 6th October 2016 at before 18th November 2016. Please go 6.00 p.m. to the Sixth Form website This is an excellent opportunity for www.bthcc.org.uk/sixthform to access parents and prospective students to the application form. find out what is on offer in our Sixth Our Sixth Form enrolment days will Form and discover the wide range of take place on the GCSE examinations post-16 courses available to study. results day Thursday 17th August from Applications for the 2017 entry are 10.00 a.m. - 12.00 p.m. in the Sixth Form. invited after the October Open Evening. An application form is available to download from the Sixth Form website.


Applying is simple When should I apply? Apply anytime after the October Sixth Form Open Evening and before the closing date of Friday 18th November 2016

How do I apply? Download the application form from our Sixth Form website www.bthcc.org.uk/sixthform and carefully complete the various sections on the form, giving as much detail as you can. Submit your application by hand, post or email: sixthform@bthcc.org

What happens once I’ve applied? A letter will be sent to the applicants home address to arrange a meeting between each applicant and the Head of Sixth Form to discuss your reason for applying and the course you have opted to study. Most meetings will take place between January and March 2017.

What do I do if I’ve made a mistake? Do not submit another application form as this can cause confusion. You should telephone or email sixthform@bthcc.org and explain the changes you wish to make.


Our Sixth Form is designed to serve the College community and to be as inclusive as possible. The maximum number for admission in each year will be 150 applicants. Priority will be given to the first 140 applicants from Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College who meet the entrance requirements and to the first 10 external applicants who meet the entrance requirements. In the event of undersubscription, places will be made available to applicants from any school who meet the entrance requirements. In the event of over-subscription, internal and external applicants meeting the entrance requirements will be placed on a waiting list and, should any further places become available, offers will be made on a firstcome first-served basis. An application form is available from the Sixth Form website and should normally be submitted by mid-November each year.

Entrance Requirements ■ Applicants are normally required to have at least five A*- C passes or grade 5 or above at GCSE, including at least grade 5 in English (Language or Literature) and Mathematics (equivalent to a grade C) ■ All applicants must meet the minimum requirements for the AS / A level / BTEC subjects which they wish to study. For the majority of subjects applicants are required to have achieved at least a grade B or grade 6 (equivalent to a grade B) at GCSE in that subject (or a related subject where the chosen subject is not offered at GCSE) and it is expected applicants will have obtained the higher tier of entry where applicable. ■ All applicants are required to have a strong work ethic and commitment to our ethos, standards and code of conduct. This will be determined from the

Late applications Late applications may still be considered, especially where there are unavoidable reasons for missing the deadline, such as a recent move into the area. However, late applications will possibly be subject to course restrictions where courses might already be full. Please contact the Sixth Form Reception, if you have any queries regarding your application.

application form, school reference and interview. ■ All applicants are required to support and adhere to the Catholic ethos of our Sixth Form and promote the Catholic life of the college with younger pupils in the main school. All applicants are required to attend compulsory Religious Education classes. They are also required to take part in the daily act of worship and attend assemblies and Masses. ■ Entry into Year 13 relies upon success in the Year 12 assessments. As a minimum all applicants are normally required to achieve a D grade (or the equivalent) in each of the subjects they continue to study in Year 13.


WHAT’S ON OFFER? Blessed Thomas Holford Sixth Form can cater for up to 300 students and provides the most up-to-date facilities to support students in their studies and to enhance the whole experience of post-16 learning.


A range of A level and BTEC National Level Three courses are on offer which will be delivered by outstanding teaching staff and aided by excellent resources.


CREATIVE MEDIA STUDIO


ART STUDIO There are 20 purpose-built classrooms, including an Art studio, Creative Media and ICT suites and Science Laboratories. These are all furnished to provide students with comfortable learning spaces and with all the necessary equipment to enhance their studies.


The well-equipped Study Centre will provide a quiet place for independent learning with a range of subject specific reference books, journals and multimedia resources as well as a large ICT area.


CAFE TWENTY ELEVEN

CafĂŠ Twenty Eleven located on the ground floor is an excellen read a book or have a discussion with tutors and fellow stud


nt facility for students to use their laptops, dents over a drink and a snack.


SPORTS FACILITIES Sixth Form students will also have access to excellent sporting facilities including a Third Generation football pitch and netball/tennis courts.


TUTORIAL PROGRAMME An exciting Tutorial Programme is in place, which will help prepare students for their future, whether that is in Higher Education or their chosen career path. There will also be a comprehensive Enrichment Programme which will allow students to continue their social development whilst pursuing an interest or learning a new skill.


"Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College Sixth Form is a wonderful environment for further education. From the fantastic state of the art building to the enthusiastic, friendly teaching staff; BTH Sixth Form is a college to be proud of. Student support is first rate. Introductions to various universities is comprehensive and extremely helpful. This, along with the unforgettable pilgrimage to Lourdes in the summer makes for an exceptional place of learning and developing." Parent of Student


A Typical Day Year 12 students will choose 4 Advanced Subsidiary (AS) Level courses or a combination of AS and BTEC National Level 3 courses equivalent to 4 AS Levels, depending on the pathway chosen by the student. In addition students will participate in the Enrichment Programmes including General Religious Education and the Tutorial Programme.

attendance and punctuality that includes remaining on site from 8.55 a.m. - 4.00 p.m. regardless of when Independent Study periods are planned into a student's timetable. Independent Study periods are timetabled to help each student with their studies; effective use of this time and the resources the Sixth Form has to offer are fundamental to becoming an Daily registration with the Sixth independent learner. Form Tutor is at 8.55 a.m. and lessons begin at 9.15 a.m. until 4.00 p.m. All students are expected to attend daily registration and maintain excellent records of


Pastoral System Blessed Thomas Holford has been commended for its outstanding pastoral care and guidance, something we continue in the Sixth Form. Maintaining a happy and safe environment where students learn and flourish is central to everything we do at Blessed Thomas Holford. The Sixth Form aims to provide an inclusive environment for all students who are qualified to undertake the programmes of study we offer. When students enrol in late August, after receiving their GCSE results, they will become part of a Sixth Form Tutor group with a Tutor who is responsible for their pastoral care and guidance. Each Sixth Form Tutor will help students to make a smooth transition into Year 12 and will

be able to provide advice, support and guidance throughout their time with us. Sixth Form Tutors help to look after students' welfare during their post-16 studies and are the students' first point of contact to discuss any issues they have regarding Sixth Form life. In addition to the pastoral care, Sixth Form Tutors will help students with their academic studies, helping to plan their revision timetable, inform them about future university courses and employment opportunities. Part of the Sixth Form Tutors - student partnership will involve regular individual reviews of progress and target setting to help ensure further progress is made.


Tutorial Time All Sixth Form Students will have one hour of Tutorial time with their Sixth Form Tutor each week. The purpose of this session is to help support the continual personal, social, emotional, moral and spiritual development of each student in our care. It is a time to reflect on the academic and pastoral side to Sixth Form life and to work with their Tutor to identify targets to make further progress. The tutorial programme will include sessions on a whole range of topics including study skills, careers, stress,

health, leadership skills, target setting, and applying for university. In addition, the tutorial programme includes a range of sessions led by various universities, businesses and apprenticeship providers. These established links have ensured we continue to provide all students with the most up to date relevant information, enabling them to have informed decisions about their future plans.


"When arriving at Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College Sixth Form, the first thing people comment on is our strong family ethos. The dedicated staff at BTHCC inspire and support us in achieving our best so we have a bright future ahead. The staff are willing to provide help both in lessons and outside of the classroom, ensuring we reach our full potential. The friendships you form are ones that last a lifetime. I know I will leave with memories of some of the best years of my student life." Megan Fearon - Head Girl


Attendance Maintaining an excellent attendance and punctuality record is crucial for academic success and future applications for university or work placements and is a priority for all our Sixth Form students. All students are required to be on site for registration at 8.55am until the end of the Sixth Form day at 4pm.

As excellent attendance is key to academic success we ask that students avoid making appointments during the Sixth Form day. If a student needs to request an absence for any reason we ask that an absence request form (available from the Sixth Form website) is completed and signed by a parent/carer. This During Independent Study periods should be given to both their Sixth students are expected to undertake Form Tutor and then the Head of their work in either CafĂŠ Twenty Sixth Form for approval. Eleven or the Study Centre. We If a student is going to be absent and expect our students to be self- it is not pre-arranged i.e. illness we managers when it comes to their own ask that their parent/carer contacts learning and use this time wisely. the Sixth Form Reception before Where students would benefit from 8:00a.m. to report the absence. We a more structured timetable with ask that if the absence will be more their Self Study time, Sixth Form than one day that you contact us on Tutors can assist them with their each morning to inform us. study plan.


INFORMATION, ADVICE & GUIDANCE The Information and Guidance Officer will be based in the Study Centre to help advise students about life beyond Sixth Form. In addition, the Careers section in the Study Centre has an up to date UCAS, University and Careers library to encourage students to conduct independent research.


"Being an ambassador has given me an opportunity to thrive outside of the classroom. It has helped me to rise to the challenge of being a role model within the Sixth Form and main school and to apply myself in different ways." Perry Vanden - Student Ambassador


Sixth Form Ambassadors Student activities will be organised by the Sixth Form Student Ambassadors, which will consist of appointed students as well as members of the Sixth Form staff. The Ambassadors will discuss key issues that concern students and seek to drive continual improvement within the Sixth Form. The Sixth Form Student Ambassadors will work to organise events, decide on and budget for the use of student funds, represent student views, promote good relations and initiatives within the Trafford area and support a range of charities, both global and local. The Sixth Form Student Ambassadors will give students a voice and make an important contribution to the running of the Sixth Form. We want students to be part of the decision making process for their Sixth Form as well as the main College. This will be an excellent opportunity to get involved and make an impact on Sixth Form life and gaining key leadership skills along the way. All students are given the opportunity to become an Ambassador before the end of Year 12. They will be interviewed for the position by members of the Sixth Form staff.


Female Dress code ●Black, grey or navy suit with the option of pinstripe including: qSingle-breasted jacket qFull length trousers fitted to the waist qTailored skirts fitted to the waist, just above or just below the knee ●A shirt or smart top of any subtle colour vest tops or tops revealing too much flesh are not permitted ●Black, dark navy or flesh coloured tights with skirts - patterned or fashion tights are not permitted ●For health and safety reasons we ask that heels are no higher than 3 inches. Dark shoes or dark ankle boots with trousers no pumps, trainers or walking boots such as 'UGG' boots are permitted ●Dark coat - no denim, 'hoodies' or jackets with large logos are permitted ●Discreet jewellery, which may include a necklace, bracelet, watch, rings and one pair of stud earrings through the ear lobe - excessive jewellery and any other visible piercings are not permitted ●Discreet use of make-up and appropriate hair styles and colour are expected ●No visible tattoos are permitted

Dress Code


Male Dress code ●Black, grey or navy suit with the option of pinstripe including: qSingle-breasted jacket qFull length trousers fitted to the waist ●A shirt of any subtle colour ●A tie of any subtle colour and or pattern ●Dark shoes or dark ankle boots with trousers - no pumps, trainers or walking boots such as 'UGG' boots are permitted ●Dark coat - no denim, 'hoodies' or jackets with large logos are permitted ●Discreet jewellery for male students, including necklace, bracelet, watch and rings. No piercings including earrings or the wearing of excessive jewellery are permitted ●Appropriate hair styles are expected which includes natural hair colour and hair length no shorter than a number 2

Part of Sixth Form life is preparing students for the world of work and a smart appearance is paramount for all students in our Sixth Form. As such we expect all our students to follow the dress code outlined below. The dress code is in place to ensure all our students are ready for the world of work. We

want our students to be proud of their professional appearance. If any student chooses not to adhere to this dress code they will face sanctions which will include missing valuable lesson time. We do not want this to happen and appreciate all students' cooperation with this policy.


“We very much wanted to send a huge and grateful thank you to the fantastic staff. So many happy memories and achievements to look back on - and indeed look forward to in the year ahead. We are always amazed and humbled by the dedication and commitment of the staff at Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College, a truly exceptional group of people. The guidance and support has been remarkable and we blessed that he is taking his A Levels in an environment that could not be bettered - anywhere� Parent of Student


Catering The Sixth Form Café Twenty Eleven offers fresh, healthy and appetising food for students, staff and visitors. We are committed to providing quality food and drinks, which includes, where possible, locally sourced produce.

choice of hot and cold meals. Throughout the day hot and cold beverages, homemade cakes and pastries, fresh fruit and yoghurts will be available.

The café will be a comfortable place to enjoy a meal or have a coffee whilst Café Twenty Eleven opens from 8.30 caching up with friends or having an a.m. onwards serving breakfast and informal meeting with a tutor. hot and cold drinks. At break and lunchtime the cafe will also serve a


The use of ICT can have a huge impact on the quality of teaching and learning at all levels and as such, we aim to provide the most up-to-date technology to support students in their learning.


ICT Facilities There are purpose built ICT and Creative Media suites dedicated to the use of Sixth Form students. This includes top of the range ICT resources and software packages suitable for all curriculum areas as well as for independent study time. In addition to the resources, students will have a personal Sixth Form email address, which will be regularly used to keep students up-to-date with relevant information about life at the Sixth Form as well as for subject tutors to get in touch with students about their studies. We believe this will enhance the communication between staff and students and enable learning to take place outside of usual Sixth Form hours. Students are expected to use this facility correctly and must endeavour to do so by following the Sixth Form internet policy.

SOFTWARE Adobe Dreamweaver, Fireworks, Flash, Illustrator, InDesign, Photoshop, Acrobat, Lightroom Google Apps (including your own @bthcc.org.uk email address and unlimited cloud document storage) Microsoft Office Cashless Catering & Fob access to your classrooms Apple Final Cut, Motion, Garageband, iMovie, Logic Studio Sanako Language Lab Tricaster Studio (Live Production & Green-screening), iCanAnimate (stop motion animation) & Comic Life 2D Design, MakerBot 3D Printing, Blender, Solidworks, Sketchup

DEVICES Windows PCs, iMacs, MacBooks, Digital stills cameras, SLR cameras, Flipcams, HD Portable video camera & tripod and audio recorders. Reprographics services: A4/A3 printing, A1 colour poster printing, scanning, laminating, & photocopying


"As parents we have been delighted with the encouragement given to the students so that they can achieve their potential. There is a mutual respect between the staff and students which is evident whenever you see them together; and listen to the students talking about their experiences with the college. The new facilities are excellent and provides a fantastic environment for the students to study." Parent of Student

Parental Contributions Students are expected to have all the necessary equipment and stationery for the subjects they have chosen to study. Textbooks and relevant equipment for each subject are loaned for the duration of the college courses. A financial contribution of ÂŁ65 is requested to cover two years of resources once a student has enrolled. A further contribution is asked for if a student is studying Fine Art and/or 3D Art to cover the cost of some specialist equipment. An additional ÂŁ25 is for a student taking 1 Art subject or ÂŁ35 if studying both Fine and 3D Art.

To ensure a smooth start to the term these financial contributions are requested at enrolment in August. Cheques can be payable to 'Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College'. On-line or cash payments will also be available on enrolment.


Communication with Parents We believe maintaining excellent communication with parents is crucial in supporting each student to achieve his or her potential. The Sixth Form website is a great way for parents to keep up to date with news and events going on in the Sixth Form. In addition, parents and students are encouraged to follow the Sixth Form on twitter @bthcc_sixthform

student and targets to help aid further progress. A parents' evening will take place twice a year to monitor progress and ensure parents are up to date with reports.

We endeavour to assist parents in helping their child to succeed and as such, the home-college communication is a two way process. If there are any circumstances, which might affect your child's learning, we Three times a year an academic would appreciate you contacting progress report will be sent home their Sixth Form Tutor so we can help outlining the current performance support your child. grades for each student. In addition, parents will receive an annual report that will contain a more detailed overview of the achievements of each


"We want all students to have a wide range of opportunities to enhance their studies over the course of the two years in our Sixth Form"


Enrichment The purposes of enrichment activities is to give students a chance to learn more about themselves and the type of people they are. With the pressures of the students' academic work, it is important to develop other interests as a form of relaxation. It is also an excellent opportunity to make new friends, work as a team and learn new skills. Universities and potential employers are very keen to find out what students spend their free time doing so having a range of activities and interests will be a real benefit when applying for universities or work placements. We want all students to have a wide range of opportunities to enhance their studies over the course of the two years in our Sixth Form. As part of the enrichment programme most subjects will offer a range of visits and residential trips that will help engage and enhance the progress of students taking that subject.

The enrichment programme will also include many opportunities to get involved with something completely new and not related to curriculum areas. The planned enrichment activities will include the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), Young Enterprise, languages classes, debating society, a range of sports, peer mentoring programmes, pilgrimage to Lourdes and voluntary/charity work. Many of these activities will be largely organised and led by the students themselves and take place outside of curriculum time. Another key element of the enrichment programme will be a General Religious Education course for students enhancing their religious, social, cultural, moral and personal development.


Pathway Options Constructing your own programme of study

your subject teachers can help you set realistic yet challenging targets to boost these grades.

Students are able to choose an individual combination of courses that meet their needs, interests and aspirations, offering the best opportunity for success.

We aim to provide the most accurate information about academic performance for all our students which might mean we recommend you look at other options for your post-16 studies. We will not advise any student to opt for a subject or pathway where we believe they would struggle. Therefore we might recommend another college or post-16 pathway for students who would benefit from this.

Final choices are not made until after the GCSE results have been released although provisional choices will be discussed at interview. It is crucial that students thoroughly research their choices and consider their grades which teachers are estimating they will achieve at GCSE so they are clear on what are their best options to make post-16.

Which course should I take? Before making any decisions about the subjects you wish to study we strongly advise students to read the course descriptions very carefully. We also recommend speaking to the course leaders for the subjects you are interested in and find out how suited to the course you might be. Using your most recent academic review or report will allow you to see your current performance grades and

We recommend the following subject combinations 笳終f a student wishes to study Physics that they seriously consider studying Mathematics too; 笳終f a student wishes to study Biology that the seriously consider studying Chemistry too; 笳終f a student wishes to study Chemistry that the seriously consider studying Mathematics too; 笳終f a student wishes to study Further Mathematics they must study Mathematics too.


Aiming for the very best At Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College Sixth Form we aim to provide a first class education for all our students. We see each and every one of our young people as individuals with their own path in life to pursue. As such, we want to provide the best information, advice and guidance right from the very start of their time with us, including the important stage of deciding A Level or BTEC Level 3 options and the opportunities these open for them. We have built our Sixth Form curriculum on academic and vocational excellence as well as student interest and success. You will see from the range of A Levels and BTEC National Level 3 courses at our Sixth Form that we are catering for a wide array of interests and expertise. We are particularly proud to offer all 10 ‘Facilitating Subjects’; these are considered to be the most appropriate qualifications for a student applying to a Russell Group University. These subjects are specified for certain degree courses at these universities, although these are not the only ones

accepted and it is important for students to research the entry requirements they are most interested in at www.ucas.com. We would advise any student who is considering applying to any of these institutions carefully considers a combination of at least two of these subjects as their curriculum pathway at our Sixth Form.

The facilitating subjects we offer: ●Biology ●Chemistry ●English Literature ●French ●Further Mathematics ●Geography ●History ●Mathematics ●Physics ●Spanish


Educating Tomorrow's Leaders Scholarship The Educating Tomorrow's Leaders (ETL) Scholarship is an initiative at Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College aimed at supporting students to attend some of the best universities in the country. Those selected, based on a number of factors, form a group of students who, in addition to their regular post-16 study, will be supported in attending the country, and the world's, most prestigious universities. These UK universities are known as 'The Russell Group'. such as The University of Oxford and The University of Cambridge; The University of Manchester, The University of Liverpool, London School of Economics and The University of Leeds, all form part of the group. This group of universities pride themselves on excellent results and student experience however; this means that entrance into these universities can be competitive. Russell Group universities demand excellent A Level grades and require students to perform exceptionally in their chosen

subject. The ETL Group and Fund is designed to support specific students, who are capable of achieving these grades, to gain a place at these universities, giving them the best possible opportunities for their careers and lives. Since introducing the ETL Programme our Russell Group University applications and admissions have already significantly increased so we are confident that the programme is working well. The ETL fund provides a range of support including: visits and residentials to Russell Group universities; academic coaching; financial support for an array of bespoke support; career support and much more. Support is available right up until the student's first year at university. Here at Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College we pride ourselves on supporting all students of all abilities to achieve the best possible outcomes in their AS and A Levels and the ETL programme is an important part of that.


“Being on the ETL has opened up many opportunities for me. I have been on university trips to Oxford and Cambridge, this allowed me to see what living and studying at University is really like. The ETL programme inspired me to apply for the Cambridge Summer School for History, which is something that I would never have had the opportunity or knowledge to apply for without ETL. I am excited to experience what studying History at university is really like. The ETL fund also gave me the opportunity to visit an American University fair, which helped me decide that I want to study abroad� Rachel Osborne - Studying History, English Literature, Classic Civilisations and Sociology


What is The Russell Group? Russell Group universities are committed to the highest levels of academic excellence in both teaching and research. Their universities are to be found in all four nations and in every major city of the UK.

●Over three quarters of first-degree entrants at Russell Group universities are from state schools and colleges. Around 1 in 5 of first-degree entrants are from lower socio-economic groups.

●The Russell Group represents 24 leading UK universities, which are committed to maintaining the very best research, an outstanding teaching and learning experience and unrivalled links with business and the public sector.

●Russell Group graduates are highly sought after by employers, with 11 of the top 30 universities in the world, as ranked by employers, in the Russell Group. Research by the Department for Business Innovation and Skills has identified that male graduates of Russell Group universities earn 16% more, and female Russell Group graduates 9% more, over their lifetime on average than graduates from other universities.

●Russell Group universities are recognised as world-leaders. Eleven Russell Group universities feature in the Times Higher top 100 world universities, nine feature in the top 100 in the Academic Ranking of World Universities, and 18 in the QS World University Rankings' Top 100.

For further information visit: ●Students can choose from a wide www.russellgroup.ac.uk range of internationally renowned courses - from medical, biological and physical sciences to business, social sciences and the humanities.


“The ETL programme enabled me to aim for the country's top universities and do so with confidence. Visiting Cambridge and Oxford allowed me to ask question to current students and recent graduates and so I was able to determine whether it would be the university for me. These trips also gave me the connections necessary to apply and be accepted on the Cambridge shadowing programme. This gave me an insight of what it would be like to be a Cambridge student for a week. Completing the EPQ as a part of ETL meant I had the funding required to purchase necessary books without hesitation. Overall through the ETL programme I have gained the self-esteem and knowledge to apply to top universities.� Katie Leach - Studying History, Geography, Government and Politics, Philosophy and Ethics


A Level Advanced Levels (A Levels) are the more traditional route in post-16 education. The assessments are taken over the two years.

Art (Fine Art)

Government & Politics

Art (3D Design)

History (Modern)

Biology

Mathematics

Business Studies

Music

Chemistry

Physical Education

Classical Civilisation

Physics

Computer Science

Psychology

English Literature French

Religion, Ethics & Philosophy

Sociology Further Mathematics

Spanish Geography 

Facilitating Subjects are considered to be the most appropriate qualifications for a student applying to a Russell Group University


BTEC The BTEC National Level Three can be studied as either an Extended Certificate (broadly equivalent to 1 A Level) or a Diploma (broadly equivalent to 2 A Levels). The BTEC qualification is particularly suitable for those who have strong inclinations towards a chosen vocational career.

Health & Social Care

Film & Television Production

Sport

Sport

Enrichment A key element of the enrichment programme will be a Religious Education course for students enhancing their religious, social, cultural, moral and personal development.

Religious Education


Fine Art A Level | AQA "A Level Fine Art has really allowed me to refine my skills and is an academic area that challenges my creative nature, teaches me a variety of techniques and allows me to express myself. I genuinely enjoy the content and the freedom the course gives me."

Miss L Harris missharris@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Fine Art? Being creative is the next big thing. This popular A Level is a practical course that allows you to be creative and get inspired. This course provides opportunities for working with a wide range of materials and disciplines in Fine Art with areas including painting, drawing, mixed-media, sculpture, installation, printmaking and photography. Extra-curricular aspects of the course Manchester Gallery visits, Life Drawing, Opportunities' to work with local artists, Regular exhibitions, UCAS “Design your future”, European trip available every academic year. Entry Requirements Students considering this course will need to present a broad portfolio of Art and Design work showing ability and commitment. A minimum grade B or above in Art GCSE is required for all students opting for this course. Higher Education and Careers This qualification provides students with an Art and Design portfolio to support an application to Higher education as well as the practical skills required for employment with further training. Interior Design, Advertising, Computer Design, Animation, Architect, Media & TV, Product Design, Fashion Design, Theatre Design, Jewellery Design, Photography, Teacher, Craft design, Graphic Design, Textile Design, Sign writer/Sign maker, Video Design , Web Design, Technical Illustrator, Sculptor, Special effects, Makeup Artist

Equipment required for the course Lessons take place in specialist workshops and studios, with some equipment and materials provided to enable students to complete project work. Students will be expected to provide their own basic kit including sketch books, an A1 Art folder, drawing and painting materials and a memory stick. Students will be expected to pay a small studio fee for equipment in September to cover their Ceramic, Metal, Paint, canvas costs etc. This equipment is heavily discounted as it is purchased by the department. Assessment At the end of each project, students will receive written feedback and suggestions for how to improve their work in the next assignment. During the Summer Term of Year 13, students will work on their end of year show which will be displayed in the end of year exhibition. *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

AS Assessment Units

A Level Assessment Units

Component 1: Portfolio

Component 1: Personal Investigation

60%

60%

96 marks

96 marks

A submission of work selected by the student that exemplifies work carried out during the AS course. At least Personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or one extended collection of work, or project, based on an theme. idea, concept, theme or issue, from initial starting point to a realisation. Practical unit with written material of a critical, analytical nature of no less than 1000 words and no more than 3000 words. Supporting written work needs to be linked to the practical work and support the chosen focus for study. Component 2: AS Externally Set Assignment

Component 2: Externally Set Assignment

10 hours of supervised time – emphasis on development of ideas

15 hours of supervised time

40%

40%

96 marks

96 marks

Separate question papers will be set with a choice of five inspiring starting points.

Separate question papers will be set with a choice of eight inspiring starting points.

Students may produce preparatory work and finished piece(s), or work of a developmental nature.

Assesses students’ ability to work independently in response to a chosen starting point. Students produce a clearly defined selection of work, which will lead to a finished piece or pieces.


 3D Design A Level | AQA

Miss L Harris missharris@bthcc.org.uk


Why study 3D Design? Studying A Level Three Dimensional Design allows students the opportunity to develop personal responses and ideas in relation to a variety of briefs focusing on functional 3D outcomes. Students will develop an awareness of the importance of consumers in Art and Design, as well as gain an understanding of the contribution of artists, craftspeople and designers to society and industry. Students will be encouraged to work in a variety of 3D media to create outcomes related to ceramics, jewellery design, set/theatre design, paper cutting, architecture and 3D book design. Extra-curricular aspects of the course Manchester Gallery visits, Life Drawing, Opportunities' to work with local artists, Regular exhibitions, UCAS "Design your future", European trip available every academic year. Entry Requirements Students considering this course will need to present a broad portfolio of Art and Design work showing ability and commitment. A minimum grade B or above in Art GCSE is required for all students opting for this course. Evidence of 3D work is desirable but not essential. Higher Education and Careers This qualification provides students with an Art and Design portfolio to support an application to Higher education as well as the practical skills required for employment with

further training. Interior Design, Advertising, Computer Design, Animation, Architect, Media & TV, Product Design, Fashion Design, Theatre Design, Jewellery Design, Photography, Teacher, Craft design, Graphic Design, Textile Design, Sign writer/Sign maker, Video Design , Web Design, Technical Illustrator, Sculptor, Special effects, Makeup Artist Equipment required for the course Lessons take place in specialist workshops and studios, with some equipment and materials provided to enable students to complete project work. Students will be expected to provide their own basic kit including sketch books, an A1 Art folder, drawing and painting materials and a memory stick. Students will be expected to pay a small studio fee for equipment in September to cover their Ceramic, Metal, plaster, casting slip, costs etc. This equipment is heavily discounted as it is purchased by the department. Assessment At the end of each project, students will receive written feedback and suggestions for how to improve their work in the next assignment. During the Summer Term of Year 13, students will work on their end of year show which will be displayed in the end of year exhibition. *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

AS Assessment Units

A Level Assessment Units

Component 1: Portfolio

Component 1: Personal Investigation

60%

60%

96 marks

96 marks

A submission of work selected by the student that exemplifies work carried out during the AS course. At least Personal investigation based on an idea, issue, concept or one extended collection of work, or project, based on an theme. idea, concept, theme or issue, from initial starting point to a realisation. Practical unit with written material of a critical, analytical nature of no less than 1000 words and no more than 3000 words. Supporting written work needs to be linked to the practical work and support the chosen focus for study. Component 2: AS Externally Set Assignment

Component 2: Externally Set Assignment

10 hours of supervised time – emphasis on development of ideas

15 hours of supervised time

40%

40%

96 marks

96 marks

Separate question papers will be set with a choice of five inspiring starting points.

Separate question papers will be set with a choice of eight inspiring starting points.

Students may produce preparatory work and finished piece(s), or work of a developmental nature.

Assesses students’ ability to work independently in response to a chosen starting point. Students produce a clearly defined selection of work, which will lead to a finished piece or pieces.


 Biology A Level | AQA “The reason I have chosen to study biology at sixth form is because I find it very interesting, as well as it being a very well respected subject. I really enjoyed studying science at GCSE level as I gained the support of excellent teachers and I hope to go on to study Science at university.” Ciaran, Year 13

Mrs G Wood mrsgwood@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Biology? Students with a qualification in biology are amongst the most sort after students thanks to their fantastic problem solving skills, their ability to work within a team and their capabilities in a laboratory setting. Biology includes the study of a wide range of exciting topics. In the AS Level year you will look closer at the workings of the human body and the ecological world around us. During your second year of study at A Level, you will develop your scientific knowledge of genetic technology and the control of cells and other organisms.

Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

Core Content Topics

Paper in which assessed

1. Biological Molecules

Paper 1 & 3

2. Cells

Paper 1 & 3

Advanced Level Biology is suitable for you if you have an interest in and enjoy Biology and want to find out about how things work in the biological world by the application of imaginative, logical thinking.

3. Organisms, exchange substances with their environment

Paper 1 & 3

Extra-curricular aspects of the course

4. Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms

Paper 1 & 3

5. Energy transfers in and between organisms

Paper 2 & 3

Visits and trips may take place during the course to venues such as Museums, discovery centres, sites of biological interest, nature reserves and other relevant institutions. Entry Requirements Students will be required to achieve either a grade B in GCSE Biology (Separate Science) or a minimum of two grade B's in the Core and Additional higher tier Biology papers. Students will also be required to achieve minimum of a Grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics to support the increasing mathematics content of the A Level Biology course. As an academically rigorous subject we strongly recommend taking Biology alongside another science (preferably Chemistry) or Mathematics.

6. Organisms respond to changes in their internal and Paper 2 & 3 external environments 7. Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems

Paper 2 & 3

8. The control of gene expression

Paper 2 & 3

Higher Education and Careers The course provides an opportunity for a broad base of Biological studies with many pupils choosing a wide range of courses and careers including an undergraduate degree in Life Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Physiotherapy, Dietetics, Environmental Science, Veterinary Science and Pharmacy. Careers that Biology naturally lends itself to include such areas as biotechnology, teaching, the health service, forestry, agriculture, horticulture, conservation and the food industry. Equipment required for the course Pupils will be required to take care of and organise their own notes. Pupils will also need a scientific calculator.

AS Level

Paper 1 (50% Paper 2 (50% of AS Level) of AS Level)

A Level

Paper 1 (35% Paper 2 (35% Paper 3 (30% of A Level) of A Level) of A Level)


Business Studies A Level | AQA “As an A* GCSE Business Studies pupil taking this subject further is something I have always aspired to do. I have enjoyed studying Business Studies as much, if not more than I did throughout my time in main school. Each area of the specification focuses on specific business areas; Operations, Human Resources, Marketing and Finance. Everything you learn has a large focus on the running of real life businesses, which I believe makes the subject much more insightful and useful. A great exam technique is essential for success, and this is something which becomes second nature to all students. As a result, you enter exams with a high level of confidence and the ability to succeed. Knowledge, application, analysis and evaluation skills are some of those required in studying Business Studies at A Level.” Francesca, Year 13

Mrs E Taylor mrstaylor@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Business Studies? Business is a contemporary subject, encouraging students to develop a critical understanding of organisations and their ability to meet society's needs and wants through recognising the interrelated nature of business activities and how they affect competitiveness. Students will assess how technology is changing the way decisions are made and how businesses operate and compete in addition to the impact on stakeholders of functional decisions and their response to such decisions. The course is ideal for students wanting to become proficient in handling data, presentations, problem solving, conducting research, challenging assumptions and critical analysis. Extra-curricular aspects of the course There is an expectation that students will bring real examples of the business world into the classroom environment. This could be through first-hand work experience and/or through the knowledge of current affairs in the media. A variety of trips are envisaged over the two year course where Business theory can be seen in practice. Entry Requirements Students who have studied GCSE Business are required to have achieved a grade B. However, there is not a prerequisite to have studied Business at GCSE level to consider studying A Level Business Studies. Where students have not studied GCSE Business, a grade 6 is desired in Mathematics and English.

Higher Education and Careers Business is a perfect stand-alone option at University but equally lends itself well to other subject areas including Languages and Economics. Whether your interest is going on to Higher Education, an Apprenticeship or straight in to the world of work, Business will certainly help you along the way. Number crunching may be of interest to you and so specialising in Accounting or Banking is recommended. You may be a creative student, wanting to apply your knowledge more to the Marketing and Advertising side of this qualification. Leadership may be your forte, in which case a Management qualification would be suitable. Equipment required for the course Students will create a combination of hand written and word processed documentation. As such, please ensure you have an A4 lever arch folder, lined paper, plastic wallets and page dividers. Students will be tested in text and numerical format and so in addition to have pens, please ensure you have a calculator, ruler and pencil. Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

AS Level Paper 1

Paper 2

Written Exam: 1 hour 30 minutes

Written Exam: 1 hour 30 minutes

80 marks in total

80 marks in total

50% of AS

50% of AS

Section A: 10 multiple choice questions

One compulsory case study consisting of seven questions

Section B: short answer questions Section C: data response questions A Level Paper 1

Paper 2

Paper 3

Written Exam: 2 hours

Written Exam: 2 hours

Written Exam: 2 hours

100 marks in total

100 marks in total

100 marks in total

33.3% of A Level

33.3% of A Level

33.3% of A Level

Section A: 15 multiple choice questions Three data response questions Section B: short answer questions Sections C & D: two essay questions

One compulsory case study consisting of six questions


 Chemistry A Level | AQA “Studying chemistry at A Level has allowed me to increase my understanding about the intricacies of the world around me and though being an undeniably hard subject, doing it has given me a sense of accomplishment.” Shona, Year 12

Mr J McGeever mrmcgeever@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Chemistry? Do you want to know:-

Equipment required for the course

● How could fuel cells be used in the future?

Pupils will need a scientific calculator.

● How can we identify banned substances?

Assessment

● How to carry out multi-stage experiments?

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

Then A Level Chemistry is for you! A Level Chemistry is suitable for you if you have an interest in, and enjoy Chemistry. It is also the subject to choose if you want to find out how things work in the real world and enjoy applying your mind to solving problems. Extra-curricular aspects of the course

Name of unit Level

% of the total GCE marks

Nature of assessment

Unit 1

35

Written exam

There will be a number of visits to laboratories in industry, universities and workshops at the museum of Science and Industry.

Physical Chemistry

Entry Requirements

Inorganic Chemistry

A minimum grade B is required on higher tier papers in Science, Additional Science and a grade 6 in Mathematics GCSEs for students considering studying AS/A2 level Chemistry. Chemistry is a very mathematical subject, so you should be confident in algebra and be able to rearrange equations. Higher Education and Careers Most job opportunities specifically using Chemistry require higher qualifications, however most laboratory-based jobs benefit from a Chemistry qualification such as dental or veterinary assistant. Many employers view success at Advanced Level Chemistry as a clear indication of sound academic ability. There are over 200 courses at UK Higher Education institutions where Chemistry is the primary subject. Examples include Medicinal Chemistry, Forensic Science and Toxicology, Pharmacology, Chemical Engineering, Dentistry and Veterinary Medicine. For more information visit the Royal Society of Chemistry website: www.rsc.org

A

(105 marks)

Relevant Practical Skills Unit 2

A

35

Physical Chemistry

Written exam (105 marks)

Organic Chemistry Relevant Practical Skills Unit 3

All content

Practical Skills

A

30

Written exam (90 marks including some multiple choice)


 Classical Civilisation A Level | OCR “Classics has so much to offer that is inspiring and eyeopening. The stories are exciting, terrifying and hilarious in equal measures, and the characters are the most memorable of all literature.” Stephanie, Year 12

Mrs F Wood mrsfwood@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Classical Civilisation? Classical Civilisation is an exciting and absorbing subject which focuses on the literature and culture of the Ancient Greek and Roman worlds. In the first year of the course you will study Homer's famous epic poem, The Odyssey, and read some of the best known tragic plays in world literature. In the second year you will extend your knowledge of Greek and Roman culture to include Homer's Iliad (the story of Troy), the Roman epic of Virgil's Aeneid and a selection of Greek art and sculpture. So what does that actually mean? Journey with the hero Odysseus as he struggles with ferocious gods and mythical monsters, battles against enemies, and finds out that falling in love is a dangerous business. Follow the story of Medea, a scorned wife with magical powers who gains revenge on her husband and his lover but at a terrible cost to her own family. Meet King Agamemnon as he returns home from the Trojan War to danger lurking in his own palace. And that's just in the AS level… In the A level we fight alongside the Trojan hero Hector, journey with prince Aeneas from Troy to Italy as he strives to found the Roman race, and unearth the magnificent art and architecture of the ancient world. Classics is a diverse, exciting and accessible subject which will mark you out as a sophisticated and cultured student. Extra-curricular aspects of the course You will experience the drama of Greek Tragedy in the theatre and visit examples of Greek art and architecture at the British Museum in London which are among the most famous of the ancient world. You will be encouraged to develop your own classical interests in areas such as mythology, history, art and culture. Entry Requirements No previous knowledge of Classical Civilisation is required for entry. However, a GCSE grade 6 is expected in English Literature if considering studying Classics.

Higher Education and Careers Classical Civilisation is a highly-rated subject. A range of universities offer lively, exciting Classics courses, many of which offer the chance to study abroad. Classics is excellent preparation for a range of degree subjects including archaeology, English, history, sociology, law, creative writing, politics, philosophy, drama and art. Classics combines well with a wide range of other A Level courses including arts and sciences. Classicists become solicitors, barristers, accountants, bankers, librarians, teachers and journalists, amongst many other things. The wide range of skills you develop including independent thinking, discussion and writing skills will make you highly desirable in the eyes of potential employers. Notable Classicists include: J. K. Rowling, Oscar Wilde, Mary Beard, Boris Johnson & Tom Hiddleston. Equipment required for the course Students will require their own copy of Homer's Odyssey [ISBN 978-0140449112] and a lever arch folder and dividers for each unit. Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. AS Unit 1: Homer’s Odyssey

A2 Unit 3 – Greek Art & Sculpture

Examination – 1 hour 30 minutes

Examination – 2 hours

Candidates answer two Candidates answer one source-based question and source-based questions and one extended essay. one extended essay.

AS Unit 2: Greek Tragedy

A2 Unit 4 – Homer’s Iliad & Virgil’s Aeneid

Examination – 1 hour 30 minutes

Examination – 2 hours

Candidates answer one Candidates answer two source-based question and source-based questions and one extended essay. one extended essay.


Computer Science A Level | AQA

Miss G Moloney missmoloney@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Computer Science? Computing and the field of Computer Science is one of the fastest moving, most exciting and challenging fields of human achievement that you will discover. This course is designed to introduce you to the principles of Computational Thinking and Software Engineering which will allow you the freedom to explore the possibilities of developing your own software at home and to prepare you for a career in the Digital Age. The first year will give you a general introduction to the subject. You will study such topics as how your computer stores and manipulates data within main memory using the Stored Program Concept. In the second year, you will delve deeper into the core theory of computational Science. You will study the key algorithms and principles which underpin modern computing. You will learn how to build programs using Python as well as how to design and program databases using SQL. Extra-curricular aspects of the course There is a high expectation that students will conduct some of their learning in a variety of businesses where there is a high dependency on Computer Science. It is envisaged that businesses visited will be in both the private and public sector, including many online UK businesses. From these work related experiences, learners will be expected to develop further their knowledge and skills of the Computer Science sector. Entry Requirements A GCSE numerical grade 5 is expected in Mathematics and English Language for students considering studying AS/A2 Computer Science. It is desirable to have studied EDCL (level 2) or Computer Science at GCSE level and have been awarded a C grade. Higher Education and Careers Computer Science is an extremely useful A Level leading into a wide variety of computer-based disciplines plus technologically rich subjects such as engineering or science. It combines well with Math's and Science. This new qualification was written in consultation with universities and industry to accelerate success at degree or foundation degree, whilst also ensuring a pathway into employment in industry involving computing or problem-solving skills. Equipment required for the course Students will require an A4 lever arch folder, lined paper, plastic wallets, section dividers and stationary.

Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. Paper 1 Paper 2 What's assessed: This paper tests a student's ability to program, as well as their theoretical knowledge of computer science from subject content 1–4 above.

What's assessed: This paper tests a student's ability to answer questions from subject content 5–9 above.

Assessed

Assessed

On-screen exam: 1 hour 30 Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes minutes 50% of AS

50% of AS

Questions: Students answer a series of short questions and write/adapt/extend programs in an electronic answer document provided Questions: by us. A series of short-answer and extended-answer We will issue preliminary questions. material, a skeleton program (available in each of the programming languages) and, where appropriate, test data, for use in the exam


English Literature A Level | AQA “I've enjoyed the opportunity to dip into different periods and time zones, from Shakespeare to Arthur Miller.” Sydney Gilbride, Year 13 “I have thoroughly enjoyed English Literature because I enjoy engaging with interesting texts and developing ideas as a group.” Mack Willetts, Year 13 “English Literature has opened me up to new texts which I might never have read. I have particularly enjoyed reading The Great Gatsby as it has expanded my knowledge of the effects of capitalism during the 1920s.” Savanna Ramos, Year 13 “I have enjoyed studying the tragedy of Othello, analysing the deception and manipulation within the play.” Ben Morehead, Year 13

Miss C Lennon misslennon@bthcc.org.uk


Why study English Literature? “Part of the beauty of all literature [is that you] discover that your longings are universal longings, that you're not lonely and isolated from anyone. You belong.” F. Scott Fitzgerald In many ways, English Literature is simply about stories: the way we tell them, the way we interpret them and the way they reflect and shape us as societies and individuals. On this course we are able to explore a wide range of these 'stories', developing our critical thinking and analytical skills along the way as we explore them at a much more academic depth than GCSE. If you love reading, exploring interpretations and discussing ideas about society and humanity, then this course has a lot to offer. Extra-curricular aspects of the course

Assessment At AS level, students complete a unit of study on Aspects of Tragedy which is assessed through two examinations at the end of Year 12. At A level, students complete two externally examined units: Aspects of Tragedy and Elements of Crime Writing. For each unit the students will sit one examination at the end of Year 13. Students also complete a Non-Examination Assessment which is worth 20% of the overall A level.

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes There are many opportunities to experience Literature being made nationally. Below is an example of how the beyond the classroom, including National Theatre Live assessments have typically been. screenings both on and off site. We also offer theatre visits and lectures throughout the academic year. AS English Literature Entry Requirements Students considering studying A Level English Literature are expected to achieve GCSE Grade 6 or above in either GCSE English Language or Literature. Students should also be enthusiastic about reading and be committed to studying independently.

Paper 1: Literary Genres: Drama

Paper 2: Prose and Poetry

Aspects of Tragedy

Aspects of Tragedy

Study of one Shakespeare play and Study of one prose text and one one further drama text poetry text · written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes

· written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes

·

Closed book

·

Open book

·

50 marks

·

50 marks

·

50% of AS level

·

50% of AS level

Higher Education and Careers

A level English Literature

The academic nature of this highly respected course is recognised by universities. The transferable skills you will develop, such as the ability to write coherently and critically and to use reason and logic, will be valued by employers and would complement the following courses well: Philosophy and Ethics, Classical Civilisation, History, Government and Politics and Sociology. This course will challenge you to push the boundaries of your critical and analytical thought, therefore a background in English Literature is useful in many high profile careers for example: Law, Journalism, Politics, Teaching, Academia, Business, Performing Arts, Broadcasting, Psychology and Sociology.

Paper 1: Literary Genres

Paper 2: Texts and Genres

Aspects of tragedy

Elements of crime writing

Study of three texts: one Shakespeare text; a second drama text and one further text, of which one must be written pre-1900

Study of three texts: one post-2000 prose text; one poetry and one further text, one of which must be written pre-1900. Examination will include an unseen passage.

· written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes

·

written exam: 3 hours

·

Closed book

·

open book

·

75 marks

·

75 marks

·

40% of A-level

·

40% of A-level

Equipment required for the course Folders for storing notes, highlighters, post-Its and a quality academic dictionary.

Non-exam assessment: Theory and independence Study of two texts: one poetry and one prose text, informed by study of the Critical Anthology Two essays of 1250 -1500 words, each responding to a different text and linking to a different aspect of the Critical Anthology One essay can be re-creative. The re-creative piece will be accompanied by a commentary. ·

50 marks

·

20% of A-level

·

assessed by teachers

·

moderated by AQA


 French A Level | AQA “Despite the fact that French A level is difficult (like the rest of A-levels!), the lessons are very relaxing and enjoyable. Being able to learn and understand another language is really fulfilling and the topics learnt are things which occur in everyday life and so everyone has an opinion on. Saying this, you are still made to think critically, which is something I have really enjoyed and found beneficial. Due to the fact that you go into depth with the language, any uncertainties at GCSE are sorted out and you become very confident. Before the course, I wasn't confident at all when it came to speaking but doing A-level French has really boosted my confidence. I would highly recommend taking this A-level if you enjoy, but of course also have talent in, learning French.â€? Rachel

Miss C Horrocks misshorrocks@bthcc.org.uk


Why study French? Did you know that French is the lingua franca of culture, including art, cuisine, dance, and fashion. France has won more Nobel Prizes for literature than any other country in the world and is one of the top producers of international films. French is the second most frequently used language on the internet and French is ranked the second most influential language in the world.

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

Extra-curricular aspects of the course

What is assessed:

We would anticipate that students would be visiting a French speaking country' and that they would be involved with watching French films, doing personal reading, watching television and writing correspondence to further their knowledge of the French language. This may include visits to the cinema in Manchester where they show a range of French films or working in collaboration with other schools in the area.

Aspects of French-speaking 1 hour 45 minutes society: current trends

What is assessed:

Written exam.

Entry Requirements

One film.

1 hour 30 minutes.

Translation into French

50 marks.

Grammar.

25% of AS.

French GCSE Grade B or above is required for students considering studying AS/A Level French.

AS Examination Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing Written exam.

Artistic culture in the French-speaking world

90 marks

Translation into French

45% of AS

Grammar Paper 2: Writing

Paper 3: Speaking

Higher Education and Careers

What is assessed:

Oral exam: 12 – 14 minutes.

The ever increasing importance of Modern Languages cannot be stressed enough and this is reflected in many courses offered at universities; it is possible to take a Modern Language with almost any other subject. Degree courses in French and Business Studies, Law and Management in particular are becoming increasingly popular and provide a valuable qualification. Due to globalisation, there is an ongoing greater need for modern linguists in industry and commerce, both in this country and abroad, in addition to job opportunities in the more traditional areas of teaching (including primary schools), the civil service and secretarial work.

One sub-theme from both themes studied.

60 marks

Equipment required for the course

Artistic culture in the French-speaking world

A4 Folders, pens, paper and highlighters. Mot à Mot (available on Amazon) Assessment

30% of AS A Level Examination Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing What is assessed:

Written exam.

All 4 themes:

2 hours 30 minutes

Aspects of French-speaking 100 marks society: current trends Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues

50% of A-level

Aspects of political life in the French-speaking world Translation into French

The AS course covers themes concerning social issues and trends and artistic culture in the French speaking world and grammar. The film Un Long Dimanche de Fiançailles will also be studied. Translation will also form a part of the final examination.

Translation into English

The A Level course builds on the themes studied at AS Level and also studies current issues in French-speaking society and aspects of political life in the French-speaking world. There will also be the study of a literary text, Un Sac de Billes by Jules Joffo. As with AS, translation will form part of the exam.

Grammar Paper 2: Writing What is assessed:

Written exam.

One film and one text.

2 hours

Grammar.

80 marks in total 20% of A-level

Paper 3: Speaking What is assessed:

Oral exam: 21 – 23 minutes

Individual research project

60 marks

One sub-theme from the four themes studied.

30% of A Level


Further Mathematics A Level | AQA “Further Mathematics gives you a deeper understanding so you can solve things that you may not be able to do in normal A level mathematics.” Ailish, Year 13 “I enjoyed studying Further Mathematics as it set me ahead of all the other students just taking normal Maths, it is challenging and not for the half-hearted but with work pays off” Adam, Year 12

Miss C Summers misssummers@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Further Mathematics? For someone who enjoys mathematics, it provides a chance to explore new and more sophisticated mathematical concepts. It is a challenging qualification, which both extends and deepens your knowledge and understanding beyond standard A level Mathematics. Universities endorse it as it makes the transition easier from A level to mathematical university courses.

Assessment AS Further Mathematics Component Content

Extra-curricular aspects of the course Paper 1 Students will be given the opportunity to attend problem solving sessions at the University of Manchester. Entry Requirements A Grade 7 is expected in GCSE Mathematics for students considering studying AS/A2 Further Mathematics. However, it is advised that students who achieve a grade 8 in GCSE Mathematics find the transition to AS Level Further Mathematics more manageable. Higher Education and Careers Further Mathematics qualifications are highly regarded and are warmly welcomed by universities. Students who take Further Mathematics are really demonstrating a strong commitment to their studies, as well as learning mathematics that is very useful for any mathematically rich degree. Some prestigious university courses require you to have a Further Mathematics qualification and others may adjust their grade requirements more favourably to students with Further Mathematics.

Paper 2

Mechanics and Statistics

1 hour 30 minutes written exam 80 marks

1 hour 30 50% of minutes written exam AS

A level Further Mathematics Component Content

Paper 1

Graduates with a mathematically rich degrees earn on average 5% to 10% higher salaries than the average for all graduates. Paper 2

Equipment required for the course Scientific calculator, although a graphical calculator can be beneficial.

Complex Numbers Further Algebra and Functions 50% of Further Calculus AS Further Vectors Polar Coordinates Hyperbolic Functions

80 marks

If you are not planning to study for mathematically rich degrees but are keen on mathematics you will find Further Mathematics a very enjoyable course and having a Further Mathematics qualification identifies you as having excellent analytical skills, whatever area you are considering for a career.

Careers that will benefit from an A level in Further Mathematics are; Accountant, Actuary, Statistician, Aeronautical engineer, Investment Analyst, Meteorologist and Investment Banker.

Weight Assessment ing

Paper 3

Weight Assessm ing ent

Proof Complex Numbers Matrices Further Algebra and functions Further Calculus 1/3 of A Further Vectors level Polar Coordinates Hyperbolic Functions Differential Equations Trigonometry Coordinate geometry Proof Complex Numbers Matrices Further Algebra and functions Further Calculus 1/3 of A Further Vectors level Polar Coordinates Hyperbolic Functions Differential Equations Trigonometry Coordinate geometry Mechanics and Statistics

2 hour written exam 100 marks

2 hour written exam 100 marks

2 hour 1/3 of A written Level exam

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Above is an example of how the assessments have typically been.


Geography A Level | Edexcel “I studied geography at GCSE; having a background knowledge of the subject I knew I wanted to further develop my understanding of the world around me. The AS Level is assessed through two papers. For paper one we studied rivers, coasts, energy and populations, all of which were extremely thought provoking. Paper 2 involved a field study in North Yorkshire and although the elements were against us I had a fab time! The geography teachers are all very supportive and are always happy to go the extra mile. The teaching and learning is very interactive and the nature of the subject allows us to frequently debate global matters. Geography has been thoroughly enjoyable and I would recommend the subject to anyone.� Katie, Year 12

Mrs T Williams mrswilliams@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Geography? Geography at A Level is a unique bridge between the social and earth sciences. It raises awareness of the environment and enhances your knowledge of the world around you. It opens doors to many careers, from becoming an architect to a business analyst, town planner to environmental officer, travel agent to teacher. During the course you will be able to develop your problem solving skills and learn to communicate effectively through written, verbal and ICT media. Extra-curricular aspects of the course The Course requires students to undertake a minimum of 4 days field study, two days as part of the AS course and a further 2 for the A2 Level component. The department would anticipate a number of field trips both locally and nationally to meet this prerequisite with the possibility of a trip abroad to enhance the students understanding and enjoyment of the course. Entry Requirements

Assessment AS Level: The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced Subsidiary GCE in Geography consists of two externally-examined papers. Students must complete all assessment in May/June in any single year. Paper 1: (*Paper code: 8GE0/01) Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes. 50% of the qualification. 90 marks. Content overview: Area of study 1, Topic 1: Tectonic Processes and Hazards Area of study 1, Topic 2: Landscape Systems, Processes and Change – one subtopic from either: 2A Glaciated Landscapes and Change or 2B Coastal Landscapes and Change. Paper 2: Dynamic Places (*Paper code: 8GE0/02) Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes. 50% of the qualification. 90 marks. Content overview: Area of study 2, Topic 3: Globalisation Area of study 2, Topic 4: Shaping Places – one sub-topic from either: 4A Regenerating Places or 4B Diverse Places.

A Level: The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Geography consists of three externally- examined papers and one coursework component. Students must complete all assessment in May/June in any single year. Paper 1 (Paper code: 9GE0/01)

A Grade B is preferred at Geography GCSE for students considering studying AS/A2 Level Geography. For those who have not studied Geography at GCSE level, a Grade 6 in GCSE English or grade B in Leisure & Tourism or Environmental Science is required. Higher Education and Careers A wide variety of universities offer Geography as a degree. There is a BSc in Geography, which is mainly physically based, however, both human and physical topics are studied in the first year. There is also BA Geography, which is mainly human based, but again the first year offers both physical and human topics. This allows flexibility to change between the two degrees at the end of the first year. Some universities also offer similar degrees under different titles such as environmental sustainability courses; such courses can have different entry requirements too. It is suggested students research universities fully to discover the wide range of courses available to students with Geography as one of their A Levels. Geography can lead to a range of careers including teaching, research work in environmental sectors, retail, marketing, advertising, accountancy, law, the travel industry and many more. Equipment required for the course Standard equipment is required similar to other courses including stationery and Maths utensils such as a calculator, protractor and compass which will be used mainly when completing the fieldwork element. For field trips, students will have to undertake most research on foot so suitable footwear such as walking boots, waterproof coat and trousers and a rucksack are advisable. If students have difficulty sourcing these items the department will endeavour to suggest alternative options.

Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes. 30% of the qualification. 105 marks. Content overview: Area of study 1, Topic 1: Tectonic Processes and Hazards Area of study 1, Topic 2: Landscape Systems, Processes and Change – including optional sub-topics from which students choose one from two: 2A: Glaciated Landscapes and Change or 2B: Coastal Landscapes and Change Area of study 3, Topic 5: The Watermay Cyclediffer and Water *Assessment arrangements due Insecurity to changes being made Area of study 3, Topic 6: The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security have typically nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments Paper 2 (Paper code: 9GE0/02) been. Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes. 30% of the qualification. 105 marks. Content overview: Area of study 2, Topic 3: Globalisation Area of study 2, Topic 4: Shaping Places – including optional sub-topics from which students choose one from two: 4A Regenerating Places or 4B Diverse Places Area of study 4, Topic 7: Superpowers Area of study 4, Topic 8: Global Development and Connections – including optional sub-topics from which students choose one from two: 8A Health, Human Rights and Intervention or 8B Migration, Identity and Sovereignty Paper 3 (*Paper code: 9GE0/03) Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes. 20% of the qualification. 70 marks. Content overview: The specification contains three synoptic themes within the compulsory content areas: Players, Attitudes and actions, Futures and uncertainties. The synoptic investigation will be based on a geographical issue within a placebased context that links to the three synoptic themes and is rooted in two or more of the compulsory content areas. Coursework: Independent Investigation (9GE0/04) Non-examined assessment. 20% of the qualification. 70 marks Content overview: The student defines a question or issue for investigation, relating to the compulsory or optional content. The topic may relate to any aspect of geography contained within the specification The student’s investigation will incorporate fieldwork data (collected individually or as part of a group) and own research and/or secondary data The fieldwork, which forms the focus and context of the individual investigation, may be either human, physical or integrated physical-human The investigation report will evidence independent analysis and evaluation of data, presentation of data findings and extended writing Students will be expected to show evidence that they have used both quantitative and qualitative data to support their independent investigation as appropriate to the particular environment and/or location. Assessment overview: The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated. The student will produce a written report of 3000–4000 words.


Government & Politics A Level | AQA “From Margaret Thatcher to Theresa May , Government and Politics is an extremely fascinating subject. It broadens our understanding of how our country is ran and how the UK Parliament functions. Government and Politics also makes us aware of key problems and issues to which parliament faces, and how our Prime Minister would deal with these problems. If you would like to understand how the country runs and how parliament works, Politics is the perfect subject for you.� Callum

Mr R McGuinness mrmcguinness@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Government & Politics? Government and Politics at Blessed Thomas Holford has a strong track record of academic success with lots of students going on to further study in Politics at university. The two year course is split equally between a study of British Politics in Year 12 and a study of American Politics in Year 13. How is Britain being governed in the 2015 - 2020 Parliament? Where does real power lie in British politics and does what you say and think really count for anything? Extra-curricular aspects of the course In order to strengthen and broaden understanding of some of the elements of the course there are visits by local MPs and guest lectures from university academics on both the British and American aspects of the course. In the 2015-16 academic year Graham Brady, MP for Altrincham and Sale West, spoke to the students about Parliament, the role of and MP and shared his thoughts on the nature of prime ministerial power. We were also fortunate enough to have Mike Kane, MP for Wythenshawe and Sale East, speak to our students about his role as an MP. Entry Requirements A GCSE Level 6 is expected in English Language for students considering studying AS/A2 Level Government and Politics. Higher Education and Careers Government and Politics is an established, widely recognised A-Level with universities, and provides an excellent base for careers in law, journalism and the media, business and management, civil service and local government . Equipment required for the course Basic stationary - files, pens and paper. A core text book will provided for each student.

Assessment Assessment for 2017-18 takes on a new shape for Government and Politics A and AS level. In Year 12, pupils will concentrate on aspects of British Politics. One of the examinations will focus on voting behaviour, electoral systems, political parties and the role of pressure groups. Another Year 12 area of study will focus on areas such as the power of the Prime Minister, the role of the Cabinet/Commons and House of Lords. The Year 12 course will of course look at the most recent political changes and current issues in British Politics such as the outcome of the 2015 General Election, calls for electoral reform and the nature of prime ministerial power. Students wishing to study Politics at AS only will sit 2 external examinations at the end of Year 12. In Year 13 both areas of study will focus on the United States. We will look at different political parties, the workings of Congress the Supreme Court and the role and powers of the president. Pupils will be encouraged to identify connections, similarities and differences between the areas studied. We are currently awaiting further direction from AQA in terms of specifics of assessment ( numbers of papers/ length of time etc for the papers that comprise AS and those comprising the full A level.)

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Above is an example of how the assessments have typically been.


History A Level | OCR “I really enjoyed History this year, it built upon what GCSE History established in terms of my analytical skills, essay writing, and understanding of cause and effect, incredibly good skills for higher education like university. The content is also really compelling. It's helped me understand how events of the recent past have significantly shaped the present. The depth you study in at A level is far deeper and the understanding you develop is amazing, you can talk comprehensively about incredibly relevant pieces of history. I'd recommend taking it if this sounds appealing, it's a great subject if you enjoy it, and are willing to work at it, and the skills you develop are the important skills you want for further education and academia� Alex, Year 13

Mrs V Kneen mrskneen@bthcc.org.uk


Why study History? If you are interested in the good and the bad that humanity is capable of; in understanding how the world we live in has developed the way that it has; in developing informed judgments on current and previous events and in developing skills attractive to all employers, such as reasoning, organising, evaluating and communicating then A Level History could be for you. Extra-curricular aspects of the course Students studying History will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the periods being studied through visits to museums and conferences. The department holds regular screenings of films to complement the curriculum content and in previous years History students have had the chance to visit London to attend lectures at the British Library. The department also participates in the Holocaust Education Trust 'Lessons from Auschwitz' programme. Students follow a curriculum which involves American History and as such are able to visit Washington to enhance their studies. Entry Requirements

Higher Education and Careers History will help students develop decision-making skills, evaluation skills and communication skills which will help them in everyday life. Literacy is integral to the study of History but numeracy and ICT skills are also developed. Many History students will continue the subject at university, although History A Level is also good training for teaching, law, journalism, politics and languages courses and careers as it is a facilitating subject highly sought after by the best universities. Equipment required for the course All students require individual lever arch folders for the units they study. They should also be equipped with plentiful supplies of lined paper, plastic wallets and file dividers. Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

A GCSE Grade B is expected in History. For those who have not studied History at GCSE level, a Grade B/6 in a comparable subject is required, for example Religious Studies or English Literature.

Module

Unit Britain 1900–1951

Y142

AS Level

Weighting

Assessment

50% of the AS

Written examination paper

Level; 25% of the A Level This unit focuses on the political and social history of Britain in the first half of the 20th Century, covering issues such as the death of Liberal England and the rise of the Labour Party. The American Revolution 1740–1796

Y242

50% of the AS

Written examination paper

Level; 15 % of the A Level This unit looks at the establishment of American colonies, the reasons for the War of Independence the events of the revolution. Topic Based Essay

Y100 A Level (A2)

Coursework – internally assessed

Students complete a 3000–4000 word essay on a topic of their choice, which will arise out of content studied elsewhere in the course. Civil Rights in the USA 1865 –1992

Y319

20% of the A Level

40 % of the A Level

Written examination paper

This unit looks the struggle of citizens in the United States to gain equality before the law focusing on African Americans, Native Americans and Women.


Mathematics A Level | AQA

"Maths makes you see the world in a new light" Nick Miss K Newman missnewman@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Mathematics? Extra-curricular aspects of the course There will be local visits to places of mathematical interest to enhance the learning of students Entry Requirements A grade 6 is expected in GCSE Mathematics for students considering students considering AS/A2 Mathematics. However, it is advised that students who achieve a grade 7 and above will find the transition to AS level more manageable.

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. AS Level

Paper 1

Paper 2

Time

1 hour 30 minutes

1 hour 30 minutes

Marks

80

80

(two unequal sections of 53 and 27 marks)

(two unequal sections of 53 and 27 marks)

Core Mathematics including;

Core Mathematics including;

Proof

Proof

Algebra and functions

Algebra and functions

Coordinate geometry

Coordinate geometry

Sequences and series

Sequences and series

Trigonometry

Trigonometry

Exponentials and logarithms

Exponentials and logarithms

Differentiation

Differentiation

Integration

Integration

Mechanics

Statistics

Vectors

Statistical Sampling

Quantities and units in mechanics

Data presentation and interpretation

Kinematics

Probability

Content

Higher Education and Careers An A level in Mathematics is highly regarded by the majority of employers and universities, because of the demands it makes and the skills it develops. A-level Mathematics is an entry requirement for the following Degree courses: Mathematics, Statistics, Physics, Computer Science, Accounting and Engineering. It is also extremely helpful for modules in numerous other Degree Courses such as Biology, Chemistry, Geography, Business Studies, Psychology, Sociology and Sport Science. A-Level and further qualifications in Mathematics opens up a wide range of employment opportunities. The types of careers that follow on from study in Mathematics are some of the most interesting and well paid. Occupations in the following fields are typical of those who have studied A-Level Maths: Finance: Actuarial work, Accounting, Investment Banking, Computing: Games Design, Internet Security, Telecommunications, Engineering: Aircraft Modelling, Acoustics, Fluid Flows, Quantity Surveyor, Teaching/Lecturing, Statistics: Medical Statistics, Government Research, Market Research, Business: Logistics, Project Management, Business Consultancy.

Forces and Newton’s laws Statistical distributions Statistical hypothesis testing A2 Level

Paper 1

Paper 2

Paper 3

Time

2 hours

2 hours

2 hours

Marks

100

100 (two sections 100 (two sections of 50 marks) of 50 marks)

Content

May assess any content from Assesses the following content paper 1. Will assess the only: following:

May assess any content from paper 1. Will assess the following:

Proof

Vectors

Statistical sampling

Algebra and functions

Quantities and units in mechanics

Data presentation and interpretation

The assessment is entirely exam based.

Coordinate geometry

Kinematics

Probability

AS Level Mathematics is a linear assessment and is assessed at the end of year 12, and A2 Mathematics is also a linear assessment and will be assessed at the end of year 13. AS Mathematics is assessed with two papers which are equally weighted (1/2 each).

Sequences and series

Forces and Newton’s law

Statistical distributions

Moments

Statistical hypothesis testing

Equipment required for the course Scientific Calculator however a graphical calculator will be beneficial. Assessment

A2 Mathematics will be assessed over 3 equally weighted papers (1/3 each).

Trigonometry Exponentials and logarithms Differentiation Integration Numerical Methods


Music A Level | AQA “Studying Music has been very enjoyable. The course is a good mixture of music theory and practical lessons and I have had to work independently on my instruments and also as a composer. Using the music software 'Sibelius' has been easy to learn and I have also enjoyed experimenting with live sounds on my guitar. I have also enjoyed going to concerts at The Bridgwater Hall which is something I might not often do. There is quite a bit of research to do so you need to be passionate about the subject so that you can read around it. Overall, I have thoroughly enjoyed studying music as it makes you meet like-minded friends and also has a relaxed feel.�

Miss S Lewis misslewis@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Music? Music is constantly evolving; inspiring creativity and expression in a way that no other subject can. That's why this is a relevant and contemporary A-level qualification that offers our students the chance to study a wider range of musical genres. Music A-level brings listening, performance and composition to life in new and engaging ways, and links to the world around us like never before. We know that every student has different learning styles and musical tastes, which is why Music A-level values all music styles, skills and instruments.

Higher Education and Careers Music is a respected academic choice and this course provides students with the knowledge and experience required for higher education. Besides the obvious routes into performing, composing or music teaching, music is also a highly desirable subject for those considering teaching at Primary level and is essential for Music Therapy. Other careers involving music include sound recording, arranging, music publishing and Arts promotion. Equipment required for the course

Extra-curricular aspects of the course Throughout the course students are encouraged to listen to as much music and attend as many concerts as possible. We can also arrange for students to coach younger pupils and encourage them to get involved with music making where appropriate. A variety of trips are envisaged over the two year course where music can be seen in practice. Entry Requirements There is a very strong practical element so it is essential that students considering this course are performing musicians. Minimum Grade 5 standard performance and theory skills are essential. If you have not passed Grade 5, you will be auditioned, for which you should prepare an appropriate piece, and you will sit a theory exam. You will also be expected to take a music extension studies course. A minimum grade C or above in GCSE Music or a BTEC First Award in Music is required for all students opting for this course.

Students are expected to bring their own musical instrument at least once a fortnight. The Harvard Music Dictionary would be preferable but any other music dictionary would suffice. All manuscript paper and books will be provided for composition and music theory lessons. Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

A Level Assessment Component 1: Appraising Music

Component 2: Performance

Component 3: Composition

What's assessed

What's assessed

What's assessed

• Listening

Music performance

Composition

How it's assessed

How it's assessed

How it's assessed

• Exam paper with listening and written questions using excerpts of music.

Solo and/or ensemble performing as an instrumentalist, or vocalist and/or music production (via technology).

• Composition 1: Composition to a brief (25 marks) • Composition 2: Free composition (25 marks)

Questions

Questions

Questions

• Section A: Listening (56 marks) • Section B: Analysis (34 marks) • Section C: Essay (30 marks)

A minimum of ten minutes of performance in total is required (no more than twelve minutes).

A minimum of four and a half minutes of music in total is required (no more than six minutes).

This component is 40% of A-level marks (120 marks in total).

This component is 35% of A-level marks (50 marks in total).

This component is worth 25% of Alevel marks (50 marks in total).

This component will be externally marked by AQA examiners.

This component will be externally marked by AQA examiners.

• Analysis • Contextual understanding


Physical Education A Level | OCR “From my very first A Level PE lesson I realised it wasn't going to be an easy ride! As a new student to Blessed Thomas Holford Sixth Form who had studied only a PE GCSE short course, the comparisons between these two syllabuses were worlds apart.” “PE at A Level demands full commitment to your chosen sport outside of Sixth Form plus, extensive theoretical work.” “A Level PE incorporates many other subjects into its studies, such as Human Biology, History and Psychology to name a few, making it an interesting and diverse subject to study.” Kate, Year 13

Mr S Goldrick mrgoldrick@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Physical Education? A Level Physical Education offers those with a genuine interest and ability in practical Physical Education to advance their studies in this area and to relate this study to current issues from the world of sport. It also allows students to combine a practical and theoretical A Level with a whole variety of other subjects that can then lead into a number of potential university degrees.

Assessment

Extra-curricular aspects of the course

Physiological factors affecting performance

Students will be offered the chance to become actively involved in the Blessed Thomas Holford Leadership Programme. We would also like students to actively seek opportunities for them to help the PE department and other community sports clubs. It is important that the students are regularly participating in their main sport for a club/team outside of Sixth Form to support the practical element of the course they are assessed in. Students will also have opportunities to take part in several sports at the Sixth Form outside of their curriculum time. Entry Requirements Students must achieve a GCSE grade B or above in their overall GCSE Physical Education grade and a grade B or above on the examination unit of the GCSE Physical Education course to study A-Level Physical Education. For those who have not studied GCSE Physical Education at GCSE level, a grade 6 or above is required in GCSE English and a grade B in Science. Students are also expected to be training/performing in their main sport for a club/team outside of Sixth Form to assist with this practical assessment. Higher Education and Careers Studying A Level Physical Education could lead to a whole range of sports related degrees or careers such as; sports science, sports management, sports development, teaching physical education, health promotion, coaching, physiotherapy and the armed services.

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. AS Level 35% of AS Level

1 hour 15 minute written exam (70 Marks)

Psychological and socio-cultural 35% of AS Level themes in physical education

1 hour 15 minute written exam (70 Marks)

Performance in 30% of AS level physical education

Non –exam assessment (60 marks)

A Level Physiological factors affecting performance

30% of A Level

2 hour written exam (90 Marks)

Psychological factors affecting performance

20% of A Level

1 hour written exam (60 Marks)

Socio-cultural issues in physical 20% of A Level activity and sport

1 hour written exam (60 Marks)

Performance in 30% of A Level physical education

Non –exam assessment (60 marks)


Physics A Level | AQA “Physics is a testing yet rewarding subject, one of the highest regarded A Levels that carries you to places other A Levels can’t” Lawrence, Year 13

Mr A Gorman mrgorman@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Physics? Do you want to know: Why Physics is important in spare part surgery? How do different musical instruments produce their sound? How are tall buildings protected from earthquakes? How can we learn from the stars to produce pollution-free energy supplies? Then A Level Physics is the course for you! Extra-curricular aspects of the course There will be a number of visits to institutions such as Daresbury Science Park, Sellafield, Heysham, University of Manchester and engineering career links. Entry Requirements Students will be required to achieve either a grade B in GCSE Physics (Separate Science) or a minimum of two grade B's in the Core and Additional higher tier Physics papers. Students will also be required to achieve minimum of a Grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics to support the increasing mathematics content of the A Level Physics course. It is strongly recommended that students taking Physics A level also take Mathematics A level.

Assessment Course Content: 1. Measurements and their errors 2. Particles and radiation 3. Waves 4. Mechanics and materials 5. Electricity 6. Further mechanics and thermal physics (A level only) 7. Fields and their consequences (A level only) 8. Nuclear physics (A level only) Course Options (A level only): 1. Astrophysics 2. Medical physics 3. Engineering physics

Higher Education and Careers

4. Turning points in physics [current taught Option]

Physics can lead to a wide range of courses and careers. You could use Physics to support other qualifications or move on to further studies or employment, including a BTEC Higher National (HNC or HND), a degree course (such as Engineering, Architecture, Medicine or Astronomy) or employment in areas such as structural engineering, renewable energy, particle research, building services engineering, radiography and acoustics.

5. Electronics

Equipment required for the course Pupils will need a scientific calculator.

Paper 1 (50% of AS AS Level (Units 1 to 5) Level)

A Level (All content including Option unit)

Paper 2 (50% of AS Level)

1.5 hours

1.5 hours

Paper 1 (34% of A Level)

Paper 2 (34% of A Level)

Paper 3 (32% of A Level)

2 hours

2 hours

2 hours

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Above is an example of how the assessments have typically been.


Psychology A Level | AQA “Psychology has taught me to look at particular aspects of life from a different perspective and it has helped me to understand more about why people behave differently in various situations. I have really enjoyed the topics within developmental psychology as they have given me an insight into child development, particularly the child-rearing of children within different cultures.�

Ms N Burton msburton@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Psychology? Psychology is the study of people: how they think, act, react and interact. It is an interesting, challenging and very useful subject, which helps students develop a wide range of skills such as research, analysis and evaluation. Psychology is a popular subject because it has a large impact on all areas of life; particularly in areas such as education, health, the economy, industry and crime. If you are interested in finding out why people behave the way they do or how the brain works then Psychology could be the subject for you. Extra-curricular aspects of the course We are highly exam focused throughout the course, and therefore we take advantage of external revision seminars in both Year 12 and Year 13 in order to consolidate our understanding and maximize our opportunities of success. Entry Requirements A grade 6 in GCSE English Language or Literature and Mathematics and a grade B in Science is required. Higher Education and Careers Psychology is a skills-based course, which helps to develop analytical, critical and evaluative skills along with the ability to present a logical and well-balanced argument. It is welcomed by many university faculties and provides the perfect skills base for a range of careers including: law, teaching, psychotherapy, child psychology, politics, social work, clinical and educational psychology and many science courses.

Equipment required for the course Students need to be equipped with adequate stationary for the equivalent of five hours teaching per week. Assessment Assessment in Psychology is now 'linear' which means you will sit three exams at the end of two years and this will determine your grade. However, there is the opportunity to study Psychology for just one year and achieve an AS level qualification; there is an overlap in the material that is studied for both Levels so both can be co taught at the same time allowing students the choice to carry on to A Level should they choose to. *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Above is an example of how the assessments have typically been.


 Religion, Ethics and Philosophy A Level | OCR “I enjoy studying Philosophy & Ethics as it allows me to look at the world with a deeper understanding. It has given me a greater knowledge of religion and different ethical issues and how they may be applied in society today.” Rebecca, Year 12 “If you're interested in other people perspectives on the universe and morality, with the opportunity to debate and express your thoughts, you should choose this subject!” Curtis, Year 12

Mrs M Acharya mrsacharya@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Religion, Ethics and Philosophy? The Ancient Greek Philosopher Socrates once said that, "the unexamined life is not worth living." 'Philosophy' literally means 'the love of wisdom'. Philosophy includes the study of traditional ideas about God and the world, providing students with the opportunity to unravel the Big Picture, to critically examine their own lives as well as the world in which they live. It explores such questions as these: What is the essence of a human being? What is the meaning of human life? Ethics is Moral Philosophy; it is the study of human behaviour and how we make decisions. In Developments in Christian thought, we get to apply these ideas to how Christianity has changed over the centuries. Extra-curricular aspects of the course Students taking this A-Level could expect to participate in various courses, debates and activity days, often with other schools, to explore certain aspects of the course in further detail. Entry Requirements A GCSE Grade B expected in GCSE Religious Education for students considering studying AS/A2 Level Religious Studies. For those who have not studied Religious Education at GCSE level, a grade 6 in GCSE English Language or Literature is required. Higher Education and Careers As with any subject in the area of Humanities, students acquire a great range of skills, such as analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and the ability to produce extended evaluative pieces of writing. These are skills that will prepare students well for a range of higher education courses and, beyond that, in employment generally. An A Level in Philosophy and Ethics can naturally lead to further studies at university, including philosophy, ethics, theology, anthropology, history, classics, medicine, law, psychology, social work and education. Those who have studied Ethics and Philosophy have often progressed onto careers in medicine, dentistry, law, advertising, the civil service, education, film and television, information technology, journalism, marketing, and management. Equipment required for the course Pens, pencils, lined paper. A4 File - one for Ethics and a separate one for Philosophy.

Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. AS Examination Developments in Christian Thought – consists of the study of human nature and purpose of life; the self and immortality; knowledge and revelation of God; the Bible; and the nature of Jesus 3 x 1.15 hour Christ. Philosophy of Religion - consists of examinations. studying influences on the Answer 2 open essayphilosophy of religion, such as style questions from a Plato and Aristotle; ideas about choice of 4 possible life after death; religious questions for each experience; and arguments for the paper existence of God. Religious Ethics – consists of the study of ethical theories; the application of these theories to issues of sex & sexuality and euthanasia; and ethical language. A level Examination Developments in Christian Thought – all of the AS content, and the challenge of secularism; pluralism in society; and gender in 3 x 2 hour society & theology. Philosophy of Religion – all of the examinations. AS content, and religious language; nature of God - the attributes of God & challenges of them; and twentieth-century perspectives. Religious Ethics – all of the AS content, and meta-ethics; free will and conscience; and development in ethical thought.

Answer 3 open essaystyle questions from a choice of 5 possible questions for each paper


Sociology A Level | OCR “I chose Sociology because of my intense interest in people around me. The subject fitted perfectly with my other options of Politics and Human Geography allowing me a more complete understanding of each of these topics. I thoroughly recommend it.” Charlie, Year 13 “I have really enjoyed studying Sociology this year. The topics we have covered such as identity and youth are really relevant to my age group and I feel the assessments have helped me develop my essay writing skills.” Grace, Year 12

Miss J Maguire missmaguire@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Sociology? If you are part of a family, have friends, support a football team or have ever sent a text message, then you know something about Sociology. In short, Sociology is a study of how individuals relate to the world around them. We build relationships with others in groups, organisations, cultures and the wider society. It also analyses how and why some people in society experience inequality and looks at how inequality affects on their development or 'life chances'. Extra-curricular aspects of the course Sociology reviews are available in the Sixth form Study centre for extra reading. A conference with a local grammar school will be arranged for March. Entry Requirements A GCSE grade 6 in GCSE English Language and grade B Religious Education is required for A-Level Sociology. If GCSE Religious Education has not been studied then a B grade must have been achieved in another Humanities subject. Higher Education and Careers Sociology is a great choice of subject for anyone who wants a career in working with others, such as social and youth work, nursing or medicine. The subject is also useful in a number of other careers, such as marketing, advertising, Public Relations, journalism, law and teaching. There are transferable skills, such as:● Analysis and the selection of evidence to support an argument ● Research and its use to inform decision making processes ● Applying theory to everyday life ● Verbal and debate skills ● Working in teams In order to progress in this subject, students will bring in everyday experience of the world and apply sociological methods to interpret and understand their relationships. As part of the research aspects of the course, students will also design and carry out small-scale research projects. Equipment required for the course You will require 2 A3 ring binders, highlighters, red pen, lined paper and file dividers. Assessment Assessment in Sociology is now 'linear' which means you will sit three exams at the end of two years and this will determine your grade. However, there is the opportunity to study Sociology for just one year and achieve an AS level qualification; as you will see below there is an overlap in the material that is studied for both specifications.

*Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. AS Level

Assessment

Section A: Investigating the following questions: What is culture? What is socialisation? What is identity?

1 hour 30 minutes written exam. 75 marks. Section B: Youth subcultures: 1. How and why youth subcultures are formed. 30% of total A level. 2. Why young people participate in deviant subcultures. Paper 2 - Researching and Understanding social inequalities. 1 hour 30 1. The relationship between theory and minutes written methods | 2. The main stages of the exam. research process | 3. Methods used in 75 marks sociological research | 4. Main patterns 35% of total A and trends in social inequality and level difference | 5. How patterns and trends in social inequality and difference A2 Level Paper 1 - Introducing socialization, culture and identity

1 hour 30 Section A: Investigating the following minutes written questions: 4. What is culture? | 5. What exam. is socialisation? | 6. What is identity? 75 marks Section B: Youth subcultures: 3. How 30% of total A and why youth subcultures are formed? level | Why young people participate in deviant subcultures. Paper 2 - Researching and Understanding social inequalities. 1. The relationship between theory and 2 hours 15 methods. | 2. The main stages of the minutes written research process | 3. Methods used in paper. sociological research | 4. Main patterns 35% of total A and trends in social inequality and Level difference | 5. How patterns and trends in social inequality and difference Paper 3 - Debates in contemporary society. Section A: Globalisation and the digital social world: 1. The relationship between globalisation and digital forms of communication | 2. The impact of digital forms of communication in a global context Section B: Crime and deviance 1. How crime and deviance are defined and measured. | 2. Patterns and trends in crime. | 3. How crime and deviance can be explained. | 4. How crime and deviance can be reduced.

2 hours 15 minutes written paper. 35% of total A Level


Spanish A Level | AQA

Miss C Horrocks misshorrocks@bthcc.org.uk

Ms G Blackwood missblackwood@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Spanish? With over 400 million speakers, Spanish is undoubtedly one of the most important world languages. From Pablo Picasso to Lionel Messi, Spanish speakers have made their mark on the world; the AS/A2 course seeks to equip students with the linguistic skills to experience the cultures that have given the world Don Quijote, the Tango and 'El ClĂĄsico' whilst developing their understanding of contemporary social issues affecting Spanish speaking communities. Extra-curricular aspects of the course It is hoped that students would visit a Spanish speaking country during the course to build up both linguistic and cultural knowledge. In addition, we would expect students to watch Spanish language films, watch television and read as much as possible in Spanish. We also recommend that students attend the annual Viva Spanish and Latin American film festival in Manchester as well as visit the Instituto Cervantes to broaden their knowledge of Spanish culture. Entry Requirements Spanish GCSE Grade B or above is required for students considering studying A Level. Higher Education and Careers The ever increasing importance of Modern Languages cannot be stressed enough and this is reflected in many courses offered at universities; it is possible to take a Modern Language with almost any other subject. Degree courses in Spanish and Business Studies, Law and Management in particular are becoming increasingly popular and provide a valuable qualification. Due to globalisation there is a greater need for modern linguists in industry and commerce, both in this country and abroad, in addition to job opportunities in the more traditional areas of teaching (including primary schools), the civil service and secretarial work. Equipment required for the course A4 binders, pens, paper, highlighters. We also recommend students purchase 'Palabra por Palabra' (available on Amazon).

Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. AS Examination Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing What is assessed:

Written exam.

Aspects of Hispanic society

1 hour 45 minutes

Artistic culture in the Hispanic world 90 marks Grammar

45 % of AS

Translation into Spanish Paper 2: Writing What is assessed:

Written exam.

One film.

1 hour 30 minutes.

Grammar.

50 marks 25% of AS.

Paper 3: Speaking What is assessed:

Oral exam: 12 – 14 minutes.

One sub-theme from both themes studied.

60 marks 30% of AS

A Level Examination Paper 1: Listening, Reading & Writing What is assessed:

2 hours 30 minutes

Aspects of Hispanic society

100 marks

Artistic culture in the Hispanic world 50% of A level Multiculturalism in Hispanic society Aspects of political life in Hispanic society Grammar. Translation into Spanish. Translation into English. Paper 2: Writing What is assessed:

Written exam

One film and one text.

2 hours

Grammar.

80 marks 20% of A level

Paper 3: Speaking What is assessed:

21-23 minutes

Individual research project.

60 marks

One sub-theme from the four themes studied.

30% of A level


Health & Social Care Extended Certificate BTEC Level 3 | Edexcel

Ms N Burton msburton@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Health & Social Care? The new BTEC Nationals in Health and Social Care use a combination of assessment styles to give students confidence that they can apply their knowledge to succeed in the workplace and also have the study skills to continue learning on higher education courses. This range of vocational assessments (both practical and written) mean students can showcase their learning and achievements to best effect when they take their next step, whether that's supporting applications to higher education courses or potential employers. Extra-curricular aspects of the course There will be opportunities for you to gather valuable work experience at the end of year 12 within health and social care settings. We will also be inviting health and social care professionals in to present students with information on their experience of a career in this sector. Entry Requirements A grade 5 in GCSE English Language or Literature and Mathematics and a grade C in Core Science is required. Higher Education and Careers The qualification supports access to a range of higher education courses. The qualification carries UCAS points and it contributes to meeting admission requirements for many courses such as Nursing, Primary Education and Sport Studies.

Equipment required for the course Students need to be equipped with adequate stationary for the equivalent of five hours teaching per week. Assessment Assessment for this qualification is a combination of internally and externally assessed units. There are four units to complete in total; three mandatory units and one optional units. External examinations will be sat at the end of each year and these make up 58% of the overall grade; coursework therefore contributes to 42% of the overall grade. The BTEC National Extended Certificate will be graded as a Distinction (equivalent to A grade), Merit (equivalent to C grade) or Pass (equivalent to E grade). *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Above is an example of how the assessments have typically been.


Film/TV Production Diploma BTEC | Edexcel

Mr D Lish mrlish@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Film/TV Production? The BTEC Diploma in Film and TV Production was written after consultation with over 5000 industry professionals and teachers, it provides learners with up to date skills to equip them to work in the Media industry or to go on to further study. Assessment of the course is through a range of practical assignments where students can showcase their skills, resulting in the awarding of the final qualification. TV and Film in the North West of England is a thriving sector of the Media industry with many new job opportunities in recent years. Units for this course include: - Digital Media Skills, Media Enterprise, Responding to a commission, Film Production (Fiction), Storyboarding, Single and Multiple Camera techniques. Extra-curricular aspects of the course During the course there will be opportunities to visit productions and shows and learn about how TV and films are put together. We also visit an advertising studio and see professional photography in action. Entry Requirements Students considering this course are required to have good GCSE's in English and Maths. This course would suit someone with an interest in the Media industries, ICT or Art. A willingness to invest time in developing software skills is essential.

Higher Education and Careers BTEC National qualification primarily give students the skills to meet the needs of employers and give access to higher education. This means you can be confident this highquality course will fit whatever progression route you want to follow be it work or further study. On successful completion of this course students may progress on to Degree courses such as: advertising, media, TV & film to name just a few. Possible career opportunities include: advertising, animation, media & TV, lighting technician, radio presenter/producer, stage/set designer, producer and video design. Assessment Assessment is via assessed tasks some of which are set and marked by the exam board after being completed in controlled conditions, others are internally set and marked (33% of this course is externally assessed by the exam board). *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Above is an example of how the assessments have typically been.


Sport Extended Certificate BTEC Level 3 | Edexcel

Mr C Jones mrjones@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Sport? Year on year the sport and active leisure sector outperforms the UK economy. The sector has more than 36,000 employers creating work for more than 600,000 full time and part-time employees. Despite the prevalence of this sector, a third of the workforce has no qualifications, and skills shortages are responsible for a large proportion of the vacancies in this sector. These factors highlight the importance of a recognised Level 3 qualification in this sector. Extra-curricular aspects of the course Students will be offered the chance to become actively involved in the Blessed Thomas Holford Leadership Programme. We would also like students to actively seek opportunities for them to help the PE department and other community sports clubs. It is important that the students are regularly participating in their main sport for a club/team outside of Sixth Form. Students will be set assignments and activities with a scenario that reflects tasks that sports employees would be undertaking in the workplace. Evidence for assessment can be generated through a range of activities including workplace assessment, role-play and presentations. Entry Requirements A GCSE grade C is expected in GCSE Physical Education.

Higher Education and Careers This qualification carries UCAS points and is recognised by higher education providers. The BTEC National in Sport provides an introduction to the sector for learners looking to build a career or go onto further education in sport, within one of its occupational areas. These areas include careers in exercise and fitness, coaching and leadership, sports development or a degree in a sport related subject. Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. Unit

Assessment

Unit 1: Anatomy & Physiology

1hr 30 minute external exam

Unit 2: Fitness Training and 2 hour controlled Programming for Health, assessment Sport and Well Being Unit 3: Professional Development in the Sports Industry

Internally assessed

Unit 7: Practical Sport Performance

Internally assessed

For those who have not studied any of the above courses, a grade 5 in GCSE English and Mathematics and a grade C in Science is required.

“Studying BTEC Sport over the past year has been very enjoyable, one of the main reasons for this has been because of the staff who have been working with us in the lessons. Other factors have been the good mix of practical and theory work as well as having the opportunity to watch many different sports within certain lessons. In addition I had to work independently with my coursework which was more challenging as we had to find out our own information however because of this it has deepened my interest within health and fitness. Overall BTEC Sport is an amazing subject which will definitely benefit anyone who wants to pursue a career around sport or health and fitness.� Niall, Year 13


Sport Diploma BTEC Level 3 | Edexcel

Mr C Jones mrjones@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Sport? Year on year the sport and active leisure sector outperforms the UK economy. The sector has more than 36,000 employers creating work for more than 600,000 full time and part-time employees. Despite the prevalence of this sector, a third of the workforce has no qualifications, and skills shortages are responsible for a large proportion of the vacancies in this sector. These factors highlight the importance of a recognised Level 3 qualification in this sector. Extra-curricular aspects of the course Students will be offered the chance to become actively involved in the Blessed Thomas Holford Leadership Programme. We would also like students to actively seek opportunities for them to help the PE department and other community sports clubs. It is important that the students are regularly participating in their main sport for a club/team outside of Sixth Form. Students will be set assignments and activities with a scenario that reflects tasks that sports employees would be undertaking in the workplace. Evidence for assessment can be generated through a range of activities including workplace assessment, role-play and presentations. Entry Requirements A GCSE grade C is expected in GCSE Physical Education. For those who have not studied any of the above courses, a grade 5 in GCSE English and Mathematics and a grade C in Science is required.

Higher Education and Careers This qualification carries UCAS points and is recognised by higher education providers. The BTEC National in Sport provides an introduction to the sector for learners looking to build a career or go onto further education in sport, within one of its occupational areas. These areas include careers in exercise and fitness, coaching and leadership, sports development or a degree in a sport related subject. Assessment *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Below is an example of how the assessments have typically been. Unit

Assessment

Unit 1: Anatomy & Physiology

1hr 30minute external exam

Unit 2: Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Well Being

2 hour controlled assessment

Unit 3: Professional Development in the Sports Industry

Internally assessed

Unit 5: Application of Fitness Internally assessed Testing Unit 6: Sports Psychology

Internally assessed

Unit 7: Practical Sport Performance

Internally assessed

Unit 8: Coaching for Performance

Internally assessed

Unit 26: Technical and Tactical Internally assessed Demands of Sport Unit 27: The Athlete’s Lifestyle Internally assessed Unit 28: Sports Performance Analysis

Internally assessed

“Studying BTEC Sport over the past year has been very enjoyable, one of the main reasons for this has been because of the staff who have been working with us in the lessons. Other factors have been the good mix of practical and theory work as well as having the opportunity to watch many different sports within certain lessons. In addition I had to work independently with my coursework which was more challenging as we had to find out our own information however because of this it has deepened my interest within health and fitness. Overall BTEC Sport is an amazing subject which will definitely benefit anyone who wants to pursue a career around sport or health and fitness.” Niall, Year 13


Religious Education Mrs C Ramsay mrsramsaynasir@bthcc.org.uk


Why study Religious Education? Core RE is a compulsory part of the Sixth Form curriculum; all Sixth Forms nationally have a legal obligation to provide Religious Education. The Core RE programme at BTHCC is a rigorous curriculum of study which is intended to challenge and develop students as whole persons. It includes diverse topics, such as Eastern Philosophy, Social Justice, Medical Ethics, Sex and Relationships and Crime and Punishment. The flexibility of the programme is also a strength; staff and students have the time and freedom to explore topics which interest you because you are not restricted by an examination syllabus. The programme provides students with skills and experiences which are transferable. Core RE lessons are essential to the holistic development of you as people; spiritually, morally and intellectually. Extra-curricular aspects of the course The programme of study includes opportunities to hear interesting speakers on a wide variety of topics. You will also participate in prayer and meditation sessions led by the Chaplain, particularly at important times in the liturgical year. Higher Education and Careers Students acquire a great range of skills, such as analysis, interpretation, critical thinking and evaluation. The high level of debate and conversation builds oracy skills. These are skills that will prepare students well for a range of higher education courses and, beyond that, in employment generally. Engagement with current affairs and religious and philosophical issues prepares students well for both university interviews and moving from school out into the wider world. Assessment Students will be assessed through written work, verbal contributions and presentations. *Assessment arrangements may differ due to changes being made nationally. Above is an example of how the assessments have typically been.

“The most important things I have learnt from the course is to respect others' beliefs and treat others how you want to be treated.”

“I like that Core RE is non-exam based; you get to engage with controversial, relevant topics in a more relaxed way.”

“I have learnt how to articulate myself in debates and also the importance of being able to step back and consider the opposite side of the argument.”


The icons used throughout this prospectus were from: Font Awesome by Dave Gandy http://fontawesome.io


Blessed Thomas Holford Catholic College Sixth Form Urban Road, Altrincham, Cheshire, WA15 8HT Tel: 0161 911 8090 Fax: 0161 911 8094 Email: sixthform@bthcc.org Online: www.bthcc.org.uk/sixthform : @bthcc_sixthform

Sixth Form Prospectus 2017  

For students joining in September 2017

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