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PORTFOLIO BEN DANCE BDANCE14@GMAIL.COM


_UNDERGRADUATE WORK | UVA

_PROFESSIONAL WORK

_GRADUATE WORK | UT


//TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 \ ARCHITECTURE 201_THE KNOT_UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA UNDERGRADUATE WORK 2 \ ARCHITECTURE 202_CARR’S HILL_UVA UNDERGRADUATE WORK 3 \ ARCHITECTURE 301_NEW YORK CITY GYMNASIUM_UVA UNDERGRADUATE WORK 4 \ ARCHITECTURE 302_WASHINGTON DC_TENLEYTOWN IDEA STORE_UVA UNDERGRADUATE WORK 5 \ ARCHITECTURE 401_ECOMOD XS_UVA UNDERGRADUATE WORK 6 \ ARCHITECTURE 402_RECOVER_UVA UNDERGRADUATE WORK 7 \ CJMW ARCHITECTURE_PROFESSIONAL WORK 8 \ TABLE DESIGN 9 \ ARCHITECTURE 571_BROOKSIDE MILLS NODE AND STADIUM_UT GRADUATE WORK 10 \ ARCHITECTURE 556_AN ACADEMIC RETREAT_UT GRADUATE WORK 11 \ ARCHITECTURE 572_DUFF BREWERY_UT GRADUATE WORK 12 \ ARCHITECTURE 599_A MOUNTAINTOP SANCTUARY_UT GRADUATE WORK


1 \ ARCHITECTURE 201_THE KNOT

\KNOT PROJECT \INSTRUCTOR_ANSELMO CANFORA \DATE_MAY 2009 - JULY 2009 \SITE_CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA The goal: Gain an early understanding of spatial relationships by starting with a piece of rope, selecting a knot to tie, and developing that into a physical construct. The knot selected was the “Alpine Butterfly�. The support structure of the knot was complex, but this allowed for a very strong loop opening at the top, allowing a climber scaling a steep cliff face to quickly tie off on a protruding rock. I wanted to mimic this in my final design, where the complex structure at the rear of the design allowed for a large, and welcoming open space at the front, as a roof line extends outward to create a sheltered space below. Through a series of planar studies and a massing model, the design developed into a structure that could function a pavilion and a place for the public to congregate.


2 \ ARCHITECTURE 202_CARR’S HILL

\CARR’S HILL PROJECT \INSTRUCTOR_PETER WALDMAN \DATE_JULY 2009 - AUGUST 2009 \SITE_CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA The precedent: Corbusier’s La Tourette (hand drawn axon displayed below). The final goal: Create a pavilion for students of the Architecture, Drama, and Art Schools, with the location of the design on Carr’s Hill at the University of Virginia. The solution: I created a promenade of columns with increasingly exposed structure that framed the Blue Ridge Mountains to the West. A pavilion erected in the vein of scaffolding provides spaces for rest and relaxation, and brings students from all three schools together, encouraging interaction between the communities. An outdoor theater placed on the roof of the existing structure of the Architecture School encourages further interaction. Scaffolding bridges provide direct access to the third floor of the architecture school and the parking garage at the base of Carr’s Hill.


3 \ ARCHITECTURE 301_NEW YORK CITY GYMNASIUM

\NEW YORK CITY GYMNASIUM \INSTRUCTOR_JOSE ATIENZA \DATE_AUGUST 2009 - DECEMBER 2009 \SITE_SOHO, NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK The challenge: Design a gym on an extremely small footprint of 20’ x 100’. The solution: Create a series of floor plates that encourage viewing from one floor to the next, as many gym-goers view the gym as a place to “see” and “be seen”. This was accomplished through the framing of diagonal views through cut-outs in each of the floor plates. The program features 2 floors of free weights, a basketball court (half court), locker rooms, and a pool. A restaurant is located on the submerged floor below the lobby. Square footage was increased through the employment of a slight 5 foot cantilever beginning on the third floor, to increase the footprint of the floor plates to 25’x105’.


4 \ ARCHITECTURE 302_WASHINGTON DC_TENLEYTOWN IDEA STORE

\IDEA STORE \INSTRUCTOR_MAURICE COX \DATE_JANUARY 2010 - MAY 2010 \SITE_TENLEYTOWN, WASHINGTON DC The goal: design a space for an “Idea Store� that combines the traditional concept of a library with current advancements in technology. The necessity grew to create a space that was both educational and entertaining, and engaged all generations of the public. The solution: create a structure that ranges from 1 to 3 stories, centered around a courtyard space. The 2 buildings on the site meet around the courtyard, with the one that encompasses the front of the site housing a 3 story library, a double height lobby space, and a 2 story restaurant. A front entrance meets the corner diagonally and welcomes the public into the space. A dynamic facade creates transparency and broadcasts the activities contained within. The building at the rear of the site ranges from 1 to 2 stories. 3 theatres are contained within the first story, and book stacks and entertainment stacks encompass the rest of the structure. The roof of the theatre spaces runs flush with the land behind the site, creating an outdoor porch space that promotes public viewing of the outdoor theatre, and use of the restaurant/bar. These aspects work together to create a community space that is both entertaining and educational.


5 \ ARCHITECTURE 401_ECOMOD XS

\ECOMOD XS_THE WALL (STAGE 2) \INSTRUCTOR_JOHN QUALE \DATE_AUGUST 2010 - DECEMBER 2010 \SITE_MAJOR US CITIES The ecoMOD XS studio focused on the development of a small modular design that could be placed in the backyard of another house, to give one’s relatives the opportunity to “Age in Place”. Stage 2 of ecoMOD XS focused on the design of a concept that could be carried through the rest of the semester. The Wall: A 20’x20’x20’ cube features a “wet wall” that houses all of the electricity and running water in the house. While the shell of the house stays the same and creates a small 400sf footprint, different wall configurations on the interior accommodate different needs, and act as a partition to create different spaces. Appliances, handicapped lifts, and bathrooms are housed within the wall itself, which acts as a battery for the rest of the house. Steel, concrete, and glass comprise the construction materials of the shell, creating a transparent and elemental 700sf modular design that can fit into the backyard of almost any property. The dynamic spaces created by the Wall provided the opportunity for a system where potential homeowners could choose from a catalogue of a series of plans before the pre-fabricated home shipped to the site.


\THE CHAMELEON STAGE 1 \ECOMOD XS STAGE 3 \DATE_AUGUST 2010 - DECEMBER 2010 \SITE_MAJOR US CITIES Individual design turned into group design/collaborative design for the final stages of ecoMOD XS. I worked together with Elizabeth Farrell and DJ Hickman on the Chameleon design. We would eventually collaborate on the design with students from the Engineering School at UVA and CCDC, the Charlottesville Community Design Center. The Chameleon would ultimately be presented at CCDC’s office in downtown Charlottesville.

The design concept of the Wall created a need for facade options that were just as dynamic as the plan choices / wall configurations of the previous design. Enter Chameleon Stage 1. The Chameleon takes the 20’x20’ concept of the Wall and makes an effort to blend the design into the possible neighborhoods where it could be located, so the design would be suitable for sites across the United States. The 20’x20’x20’ cube was broken down into 4 10’x20’x10’ wood framed modules that would be placed together to form the cube. The wet wall concept from the previous design was turned into a wet module concept for the Chameleon design. A 4 module design would consist of 2 wet modules and 2 dry modules. The dry modules would house the stairs and the living space, while the wet modules

would house the “guts” of the house; bathrooms, handicapped lifts, electricity, and running water. The next step was to develop the facade options, which were split into 10’x10’ sections. The basic wall would consist of sip panels in wood frame construction. The exterior options would then consist of varying wood types, corrugated aluminum, and hardi plank siding. The roof had the option to be a green roof, or hold PV Panels for the house. Sips could also be removed from the exterior shell of the wet modules to create porch spaces. The first stage of the Chameleon’s development featured a recessed design that could fit into a sloped backyard, and an extruded 20’x20’x20’ design.


\THE CHAMELEON - FINAL CONCEPT \ECOMOD STAGE 4 \DATE_AUGUST 2010 - DECEMBER 2010 \SITE_MAJOR US CITIES The final stage of the Chameleon represented a refined design based on the initial developments from Stage 1. Rules were applied to facade options, and a recessed design, a 20’x20’x20’ design, and a new studio design that only utilized 2 modules (1 wet and 1 dry) were the final options for living space and module configuration. The southern facade featured a series of louvers that dissipated intense southern sunlight, and a double paned glass system with transoms that expelled the hot air in the summer, and let it into the house in the winter. The East facade featured 4 sliding wood screens that allowed for light to enter the house in dynamic ways, at the discretion of the owner.


6 \ ARCHITECTURE 402_RECOVER

\STUDIO RECOVER \INSTRUCTOR_ANSELMO CANFORA \DATE_JANUARY 2011 - MAY 2011 \SITE_CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA This was an individual design project, but collaboration with TJACH (Thomas Jefferson Area Coalition for the Homeless) and the Haven ensured that we were meeting the transitional housing needs of the homeless in Charlottesville, Virginia. The studio placed an emphasis on legitimate construction methods. The design: 2 private modules, preassembled and containing 2 beds, built in shelves and closets, and a wet bathroom module, are connected to a central wet kitchen module that acts as the central meeting space and community space. These modules are connected by decking and an overarching gable roof that stretches from one end to the next. The design was heavily influenced by dogtrot designs of the past, using natural air flows throughout the housing and encouraging use of the outdoor space and central community space. The gabled roof and dogtrot design represented an effort to blend the house in with the surrounding neighborhoods. The modules are wood frame construction, with sip panel walls. They allow for the option of wood siding or metal exterior panels.


7 \ CJMW ARCHITECTURE_PROFESSIONAL WORK

\CJMW ARCHITECTURE \EMMETT LIFSEY, MIKEL GRIFFIN, AMANDA ADAMS \EMPLOYMENT_JULY 2011 - PRESENT \LOCATION_LYNCHBURG, VA \JOB DESCRIPTION I began working at CJMW Architecture in Lynchburg, Virginia, in early July of 2011. Ever since I started working at CJMW, I have been given the opportunity to partake in marketing renderings, construction drawings, initial schematic designs, site visits, field measurements, meetings, and presentations. This has given me the ability to begin filling out my IDP to work towards meeting my 3 year intern requirements before becoming a licensed architect. In my time at the firm, I have also begun studying for the LEED exam in an attempt to become a LEED AP. CJMW Architecture is a regional firm. It is based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, with 3 other offices in Lynchburg, Virginia, Asheville, North Carolina, and Lexington, South Carolina. The firm has designed many large scale projects, such as the BB&T Ballpark in Winston-Salem, which was named the “2010 Ballpark of the Year” by BASEBALLPARKS.COM, putting it alongside the likes of Petco Park in San Diego, AT&T Park in San Francisco, and PNC Park in Pittsburgh. Other projects include the Boeing Company Delivery & Welcome Centers, Lowe’s Companies, Inc. Headquarters, and the Airborne & Special Operations Museum. The Lynchburg division of the firm specializes in adaptive reuse and historic preservation/restoration. This, combined with numerous new-construction designs, means that I have had the opportunity to partake in an incredible variety of projects and subsequent design strategies. Shown in this portfolio are just a few of the many projects that I have been able to work on in the time that I have been there. This includes facade renovations and interior remodeling of the Allied Arts Building (shown at right) in Lynchburg, Virginia, a series of apartments along Jefferson Avenue in Newport News, Virginia, an adaptive reuse apartment complex design in Martinsville Virginia, an auditorium in Roanoke, Virginia, and finally a restoration of the Academy of the Arts, a theater in downtown Lynchburg, Virginia. Everything that I have shown in this section of the portfolio, with the exception of on-site photographs, represents work that I have produced for CJMW.


\VWCC WHITMAN AUDITORIUM \CJMW ARCHITECTURE \TIMELINE_2008 - PRESENT \SITE_ROANOKE, VA Part of a large scale new construction project done for Virginia Western Community College in Roanoke, Virginia. My job with regards to this project was to create a series of renderings that show the auditorium space full of life and to also demonstrate the wide array of entertainment uses that the auditorium will employ. The goal was to also demonstrate the different age groups that would use the auditorium, hence the use of people rather than silhouettes. All renderings for this design have been done in Photoshop, combined with an initial cut from a Google Sketchup model.


7 \ CJMW ARCHITECTURE_PROFESSIONAL WORK

\MARTINSVILLE NOVELTY CORP \CJMW ARCHITECTURE \TIMELINE_2008 - PRESENT \SITE_MARTINSVILLE, VA The goal: Take an old furniture factory and turn it into a series of apartments. Utilize the quonset hut at the back of the property to create a series of loft apartments. This adaptive reuse design blends new construction with old, and each apartment takes on a unique quality based on the ample exposure to the pre-existing conditions of the factory. A series of townhouses, lofts, and flats make up the apartments in this design. The project has been finished and is now inhabited. It is now up for numerous design awards in the state of Virginia. My job was to create a series of renderings for marketing purposes, creating an accurate Sketchup Model and then taking cuts from it and modifying it in Photoshop. All renderings for this design have been done in Photoshop, combined with an initial cut from a Google Sketchup model.


7 \ CJMW ARCHITECTURE_PROFESSIONAL WORK

\LYNCHBURG ACADEMY OF THE ARTS RESTORATION \CJMW ARCHITECTURE \TIMELINE_2008 - PRESENT \SITE_LYNCHBURG, VA Goal: Restore the Academy to its original significance and make it a centerpiece for downtown Lynchburg. The fly tower height has been increased to allow for the rigging necessities of modern theater (this has already been constructed). The original seating arrangement has been changed to accompany increased occupancy. Gallery additions have been made to the East and West end. The idea is to create a design that calls attention to the past significance of the Academy, but also adds modern qualities, namely with the additions that will act as book ends to the front facade and provide a link to the pre-existing structure to the East of the Academy. All renderings for this design have been done in Photoshop, combined with an initial cut from a Google Sketchup model


\TABLE DESIGN \WORKED WITH MIKE GODDARD \DATE_JANUARY 2011 - MAY 2011 \SITE_CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA The Goal: Create a table with wood pallets and reclaimed steel. Use the steel for the base, and tear down the pallets and stack and laminate them for the table top. Use Autodesk Revit Architecture to create a table component that dictates the amount of materials we need for construction and also gain valuable experience with the program before entering the job world.

8 \ TABLE DESIGN

The Results: \We began this project with two goals in mind: construct a table and gain an in-depth understanding of Revit. Ultimately, we found that Revit was not necessarily the best tool for working with reclaimed materials. Although we were successful in creating a fully-detailed digital model in Revit that could be modified at any point (128 separate pieces) the entire process of creating the furniture component for our table was extremely arduous and time-consuming. \Table construction was also a time-consuming experience. We found that utilizing reclaimed materials, namely pallets, is not necessarily practical or economical with regards to time usage. We devoted somewhere between 12-16 hours alone to deconstructing the 8 pallets that would be used for the table top, and even then, some of the pieces that came off the pallet were unusable. Despite the inefficiency of the reclaimed material, the character of the ultimate product justified the labor involved, as we were able to acquire oak and ash without ever having to pay for it. These woods were very beneficial to the aesthetic of the table-top, not only because of the quality of the wood, but also because of the patina that the wood had developed over time. \The construction of the table base was a surprisingly beneficial experience for our independent study. We initially believed that we would be passing off construction drawings to Quality Welding for them to work with and construct our table base. Surprisingly, they informed us that we would be able construct the table ourselves. This proved to be critical to the design process, as we were able to make several important adjustments in the shop. Without these adjustments, the table base would not have turned out correctly, demonstrating that the digital design (the one we had in Revit) is not the end-all be-all of a design. We also gained valuable experience welding and cutting metal. This added the significance of the fact that we constructed the entire table ourselves. \We found it interesting that the Revit model (rendering on next page) so closely resembled the final table design. While the Revit model was somewhat of an inefficient process (the program is better suited for large-scale designs such as buildings rather than small components such as a table) it definitely gave us an early indication of what kind of look our table would have. \In conclusion, we learned that a large amount of man-hours were required to construct the table, between the tearing down of pallets, to the laminating of the planks into modules, and finally to the sanding and cutting of each module. Ultimately, though, the amount of work that went into the design and construction is evident in the look of the piece. It was a great experience to design and construct this table.


9 \ ARCHITECTURE 571_BROOKSIDE MILLS NODE AND STADIUM_UT GRADUATE WORK

\KNOXVILLE REDEVELOPMENT AND STADIUM \INSTRUCTOR_TED SHELTON \DATE_AUGUST 2012 - DECEMBER 2012 \SITE_KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE Current Conditions -Located 3/4 mile North of Downtown Knoxville. -I-75 (Now I-275 in this area) severs linkage between neighborhoods on upper and lower ridge-line. -Vacant areas of land to the North of Baxter Avenue offer opportunity for new development. -1939 Aerial Demonstrates that I-75 tore out a large amount of neighborhoods, but that East and West were still separated by ridge to begin with. -Baxter Avenue and E Woodland Avenue still connected lower and upper neighborhoods. -Topographically, site features an elevation change of over 120 feet. -In some areas, namely to the East of I-275, ridge-lines can reach upwards of 60 feet. -This naturally separated the neighborhoods along Central, and the neighborhoods to the West. -Ridge-line was once occupied by Brookside Mills, a textile manufacturing company. This was Knoxville’s largest employer in the 1900’s. The mill shut down in 1956.

-Area of Intervention_460 Acres -Current Population_ 4612 -Current Density_10 Persons Per Acre

_AERIAL OF EXISTING CONDITIONS

Proposed Conditions -Grid from 1939 will be re-extended to the edge of the Light Rail System, which now inhabits the area formerly occupied by the interstate. -Large scale Mixed-Use and Apartment complexes will be used to answer the problem of the ridge conditions. -Within the area of the largest topography change , a baseball stadium will be inserted, bringing the Tennessee Smokies, the Chicago Cubs AA Affiliate, back into Knoxville. This gives an anchor to the node, and will also help to reinvigorate N Central Street. Development can be seen along there as well. -Light rail line and Second Creek provide 2 greenway systems that run parallel through the node. Sitting at a 60 foot elevation difference, they provide easy access to greenway systems for both the upper and lower ridge. -Existing rail line that runs through the area will also be used for the High Speed Rail System that will run to the Central Node 1/2 mile to the South. -460 Acre Intervention -Current density of 10 PPA must be augmented. _C CUR URRE RENT CON ONDI DITI TION ONS S + INTE NTERS RSTA TATE TE_SCALE: 1” 1”=5 =500 00’ -This can be accomplished through a series of interventions involving Single Family Homes, Large Scale Apartments, Mixed-Use, and Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs). -Put zoning regulations in place that utilize the Transect, “a system of classification deploying the conceptual range rural-to-urban to arrange in useful order the typical elements of urbanism” (Duany) - T-6 Urban Core exists along light rail line, T-5 Urban Center 2 blocks out on either side, and then this filters out to T-4 General Urban in the surrounding neighborhoods. -66 Acres Along Light Rail Line at T-6 Urban Core will have a density of 30 PPA. At least 1980 people would reside in this area. -Zoning regulations would also be enacted to encourage implementation of ADU’s. These Accessory Dwelling Units would be constructed in the back yard of existing single family homes. If 25% of single family homes place an ADU in the back yard, around 575 ADU’s would exist in the area. This allows for 1150 new people to come into the area. -Throughout the rest of the T-4 General Urban, 112 single family homes have been added, with half featuring their own ADU’s. Allows for 350 people. Finally, 4 apartment complexes allowing for 30 units each will also be inserted, allowing for 240 more people. -Population increased by 3720. Total density of the node is now 18 PPA -Along the T-6 Urban Core, the Density is 30 PPA


_P PRO R PO P SE ED PLA LAN


_SITE SECTION PERSPECTIVE


_SECTION CONDITIONS ALONG SITE


_STADIUM LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD DOWNTOWN KNOXVVIL ILLE LE


_BROOKSIDE MILLS STADIUM RENDERINGS


_ACCESSORY DWELLINNG UNITS IN BACKYARDS OF EXISTING NEIGHBORHOOD CONTEXT


10 \ ARCHITECTURE 556_AN ACADEMIC RETREAT_UT GRADUATE WORK

\AN ACADEMIC RETREAT \INSTRUCTOR_HANSJOERG GOERITZ \DATE_AUGUST 2012 - DECEMBER 2012 \SITE_CADE’S COVE, TENNESSEE

EXHAUST CAP

4” STAINLESS FLUE PIPE DRIP EDGE 4” DOWNSPOUT

2’X1.5’ POPLAR SIDING BATT INSULATION

MOISTURE BARRIER

5/8” CHERRY WOOD PANELLING

WOOD STOVE CONCRETE RETAINING WALL GRAVEL RIGID INSULATION PERFORATED DRAINAGE PIPE

_SECTION AXONOMETRIC


_SECTION PERSPECTIVE


_SECTION DETAIL 1

_SECTION DETAIL 2

_SECTION DETAIL 3

EXHAUST CAP 4” STAINLESS FLUE PIPE DRIP EDGE

4” DOWNSPOUT

2’X1.5’ POPLAR SIDING BATT INSULATION 8”X8” STRUCTURAL OAK TIMBERS

BATT INSULATION

STAINLESS STEEL JOIST HANGER

MOISTURE BARRIER

5/8” CHERRY WOOD PANELLING WOOD STOVE CONCRETE RETAINING WALL GRAVEL RIGID INSULATION PERFORATED DRAINAGE PIPE

_S SEC ECTI T ON TI O LOO OOKI K NG NOR O TH TH

8”X8” STRUCTURAL OAK TIMBERS


_SECTION DETAIL 4

_SECTION DETAIL 5

AIR GAP VENT/BUG SCREEN AIR GAP BATT INSULATION 5/8” CHERRY WOOD PANELLING 2’X1.5’ POPLAR SIDING 1”X4” FURRING STRIPS MOISTURE BARRIER BATT INSULATION

OAK MULLION DOUBLE PANE INSULATED GLASS SLIDING DOOR

_S SEC ECTI TION ON N LOO OOKI K NG G SOU OUTH TH

_SECTION DETAIL 6


PROGRAM GOALS

\DESIGN INTEGRATIONS_DUFF BREWERY \INSTRUCTOR_JOHN SANDERS | BRANDON PACE \DATE_AUGUST 2013 - DECEMBER 2013 \SITE_KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE

BASED ON PRECEDENT STUDIES

MANUFACTURING - 55% 22,400 SF

11 \ ARCHITECTURE 572_DUFF BREWERY_UT GRADUATE WORK

_BREWERY DESIGN IN AN UP-AND-COMING NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT _SITUATED BETWEEN N CENTRAL AVENUE AND GAY STREET ON THE CORNER OF WEST DEPOT AVENUE AND OGDEN STREET _SITE OF INDUSTRIAL BUIDING THAT RECENTLY BURNED DOWN _WALKABLE TO FOURTH AND GIL AREA AS WELL AS MARKET SQUARE AREA DOWNTOWN

PUBLIC SPACE - 31%

_4 MAIN PROGRAMMATIC ELEMENTS: -MANUFACTURING -PUBLIC SPACE -RESEARCH -ADMINISTRATION

12,900 SF

_UTILIZE PUBLIC SPACE AT CORNER OF DEPOT AND OGDEN TO ENGAGE PEDESTRIANS _PUBLIC SPACE - BAR, TASTING ROOM, RESTAURANT, LOUNGE, AND ROOFTOP BEER GARDEN WHICH OPENS UP TO THE DOWNTOWN AREA TO THE SOUTH - FRAMING EXTENSIVE VIEWS _MANUFACTURING TAKES UP A MAJORITY OF THE BACK CORNER OF THE SITE _ADMINISTRATION IDEALLY CONNECTED TO MANUFACTURING - EASY COMMUNICATION BETWEEN PRODUCTION AND ADMIN

BASIC GOALS: -FRAME VIEWS TOWARDS DOWNTOWN -ENGAGE DOWNTOWN -ENGAGE NEIGHBORHOODS TO NORTH -SIGNAGE VIEWABLE FROM INTERSTATE 40 -SIGNAGE AT CORNER OF DEPOT AND OGDEN -CREATE A BREWERY THAT IS NOT ONLY COMMERCIALLY SUCCESSFUL, PRODUCING 40,000 BARRELS A YEAR, BUT IS ALSO SUCCESSFUL WITH THE GENERAL PUBLIC

ADMINISTRATIVE - 7%

2700 SF

RESEARCH - 7% FINAL PROGRAM 41,000 SF TOTAL

BOTTLING- 23%

-5100 SF

BREW ROOM - 22%

-4825 SF

MILLING, MASHING, BOILING, WHIRLPOOL, COOLING

MANUFACTURING - 55% PACKAGING/DISTRIBUTION - 35%

FERMENTATION | BRIGHT TANKS - 14% 12 200 BARREL FERMENTERS | 8 BRIGHT TANKS

_RESEARCH ELEMENT ENGAGES PUBLIC AS WELL - CLASSROOMS, PILOT HOUSE, ETC. - IDEALLY ENGAGE DEPOT AVENUE ALONG WITH PUBLIC SPACE

3000 SF

-4300 SF

-3200 SF

STORAGE | FREIGHT ELEVATOR - 12%

-2675 SF

COLD STORAGE - 5% PORCH | BREAK AREA - 4%

-1300 SF -1000 SF

KITCHEN - 10%

-1200 SF

BEER GARDEN - 35%

-9200 SF

BAR - 19%

PUBLIC SPACE - 31% 12,900 SF

RESTAURANT/LOUNGE - 35%

BAR SPACE, TASTING AREAS

22,400 SF TOTAL

-2500 SF

CONFERENCE ROOM - 22% RECEPTION - 14% OFFICES - 64% HOPS GARDEN - 50%

-600SF -400 SF -1700 SF -1500 SF

PILOT HOUSE | SYSTEM - 50%

-1500 SF

ADMINISTRATIVE - 7% RESEARCH - 7%


1. CAMPUS PLAN

1. CAMPUS MASSING

2. CAMPUS ‘L’ PLAN

2. ‘L’ MASSING

- PUBLIC BEGINS TO WRAP MANUFACTURING, HOLDING A STRONG PRESENCE ON THE CORNER - RESEARCH AND ADMINISTRATION ATTACH TO MANUFACTURING AS THE THREE HAVE A DIRECT RELATIONSHIP TO ONE ANOTHER

- RESEARCH AND ADMINISTRATION ELEVATED TO ALLOW EXTENSIVE AMOUNTS OF INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR PUBLIC SPACE - WRAPPING OF PUBLIC ALLOWS FOR MORE EXTENSIVE INTERACTION WITH MANUFACTURING

3. PROGRAMMATIC INTERSECTIONS

3. INTERSECTIONS MASSING

- PROGRAMMATIC DISTRIBUTION SPLIT INTO 4 SEPARATE BUILDINGS - IDEA OF FREE FLOW BETWEEN PROGRAM - RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HOLD DEPOT - MOST PUBLICLY ACCESSIBLE

- PUBLIC AND MANUFACTURING BECOME DIRECTLY LINKED WITH ONE ANOTHER, ALLOWING DIRECT INTERACTION AND VIEWS OF THE BREWING PROCESS

- PUBLIC SPACE HOLDS SIGNIFICANCE ON CORNER OF DEPOT AND OGDEN - MANUFACTURING ‘GUTS’ RELEGATED TO REAR OF SITE BUT MAINTAINS DOMINANT FOOTPRINT

- RESEARCH AND ADMINISTRATION ARE DROPPED TO HOLDING A GROUND LEVEL PRESENCE, ALLOWING PORCH SPACE ABOVE FOR A RESEARCH HOPS GARDEN AND PORCH SPACE FOR ADMIN AND MANUFACTURING - PUBLIC ELEVATED - BEER GARDEN AT BASE

_SITE PLAN

4. CENTRAL JEWEL BOX

- WITH INTERSECTION OF PUBLIC AND MANUFACTURING, A KEY PIECE WAS NEEDED TO LINK THE TWO ELEMENTS - FERMENTATION PROCESS, WITH NECESSARY 40 FOOT HEIGHT SPACE, LINKS THE TWO PROGRAMS

5. FINAL SCHEME

- ALL PROGRAMMATIC ELEMENTS BEGIN TO INTERSECT WITH ONE ANOTHER WHILE STILL MAINTAINING STRONG INDIVIDUAL FOOTPRINTS - PUBLIC AND MANUFACTURING CIRCULATE IN A RECIPROCAL FASHION AROUND FERMENTERS _ HOPS GARDEN AND BEER GARDEN LINKED - GRAND STAIR CONTAINED WITHIN SOUTHWEST CORE

4. CENTRAL MASSING

- ADMIN ELEVATED AGAIN TO ALLOW ROOM FOR LOADING DOCK IN THE REAR - PUBLIC DROPPED TO GRADE, ROOFTOP BEER GARDEN ALLOWS VIEWS TO FERMENTERS FROM STREET - JEWEL BOX ON FULL DISPLAY

5. FINAL MASSING

- FERMENTER KEY PIECE MAINTAINS THE DOMINANT HEIGHT - PUBLIC SPACE AND RESEARCH MAINTAIN PRESENCE ALONG DEPOT AND OGDEN, BUT THE VIEW TO MANUFACTURING AND FERMENTATION HOLDS UTMOST IMPORTANCE - HOPS GARDEN AND BEER GARDEN LINKED - SEAMLESS INTERACTION


_AERIAL PROPOSED


_SECOND FLOOR PLAN

_SECOND FLOOR RCP

_SECOND FLOOR STRUCTURE

_FIRST FLOOR PLAN

_FIRST FLOOR RCP

_FIRST FLOOR STRUCTURE

_BASEMENT PLAN

_BASEMENT RCP

_BASEMENT STRUCTURE


_SOUTH ELEVATION

_SECTION LOOKING NORTH


_EAST ELEVATION

_SECTION LOOKING WEST


_NORTH ELEVATION

_SECTION LOOKING SOUTH


With the site of Little Milligan situated on a relatively steep slope, I wrestled with several design concepts for the placement of a gymnasium. After looking back to the Acropolis, and the Parthenon itself, I decided to elevate the gymnasium, placing it up the hill from the school, looking out towards Old and New Butler, a sanctuary from the everyday. A series of terraces would create a procession up to its entrance. The procession up the terraces would be for the students, while the public (parents, general public, etc.) would enter at the top of the hill on the south entrance of the gymnasium. The idea was that this campus would create a community center for the city of Butler, one that would appeal to students and parents alike. What follows is the fully developed project. Campus plan complete. Gym fully designed. Various rituals established. The Mountaintop Sanctuary sits atop the campus, looking out over the landscape to the North. Old Butler sits in the distance, a reminder of the history of the city. Rituals of collective experience, ancestral cult, pride, procession, and performance are all highlighted on this campus The gymnasium is to be a center to the decentralized new Butler, for parents and children alike. The campus plan focuses on outdoor spaces as well as indoor. The lower precinct opens to the West, towards agriculture, while the upper precinct opens to the East and terraces down into Nature. A field is hidden in the woods beyond. Finally, the gym itself frames views to Old and New Butler, providing a dramatic backdrop for school dances, basketball games, voting, or working out in the weight room. The next few pages will graphically demonstrate the final project.

Two separate wall systems create two precincts that are joined by a threshold. Each precinct of the campus features different characteristics.

E R U T L U IC R AG

E R U NAT

First terraces, original classrooms, and new outdoor classrooms open to the West, towards farmland and agriculture. Top terrace faces East and open up towards nature. A series of smaller terraces lead down into the wooded area to the East and another field is hidden behind the trees.

R IVE

Y/R

CIT

12 \ ARCHITECTURE 599_A MOUNTAINTOP SANCTUARY_UT GRADUATE WORK

\A GYMNASIUM FOR LITTLE MILLIGAN \INSTRUCTOR_KATHERINE AMBROZIAK \DATE_JANUARY 2013 - APRIL 2013 \SITE_BUTLER, TENNESSEE

Gymnasium faces North towards the city and the river. In this case, transportation.


New Butler -3 Miles North -No exact city center, displacement led to spread out settlements.

Old Butler -1 Mile North -Original city, flooded by TVA.

_CLASSROOM PLAN

Little Milligan Elementary and Middle School -Site of design intervention. -Proposed community center.


The Wall Existing Structure Garden Terrace = Key Piece Threshold

Pathway

Gymnasium and Culmination of Wall

_OUTDOOR CLASSROOM PLAN


_1ST FLOOR GYMNASIUM PLAN


_2ND FLOOR GYMNASIUM PLAN


_1ST FLOOR GYMNASIUM PLAN | GYMNASIUM ELEVATIONS


_2ND FLOOR GYMNASIUM PLAN


ROOFTOP GARDEN _FULL CAMPUS SECTION LOOKING EAST

_GYMNASIUM SECTION LOOKING WEST

CLASSROOMS

FACULTY PARKING

OUTDOOR CLASSROOM


PUBLIC PARKING PUBLIC ENTRANCE GYMNASIUM GARDEN PORCH OPEN FIELD

_GYMNASIUM SECTION LOOKING EAST

STUDENT ENTRANCE


PERFORMANCE | COMMON GROUND

COLLECTIVE EXPERIENCE


TRANSITION | COMING OF AGE


CIVIC AND COMMUNITY PRIDE


AT RIGHT | INTRO GRAPHIC OF EARLY STUDIES OF TVA DAMS ALONG TENNESSEE RIVER | WHEELER DAM

BEN DANCE (434) 941-2971 BDANCE14@GMAIL.COM


KENTUCKY DAM

NORRIS DAM

COULTER SHOALS DAM C CALDERWOOD WATTS BAR DAM CHEOAH PICKWICK LANDING DAM

WHEELER DAM

CHICKAMAUGA DAM

FONTANA 1700 F

WILSON DAM

| WHEELER DAM | ELEVATION CHANGES REGIONAL SCALE AUGUST 16, 1939

FONTANA T DAM

HIWASSEE DAM

HALES BAR DAM

GUNTERSVILLE DAM

HIWASSEE 1525 F

1290 F

CHEOAH 1280 F

CALDERWOOD 1090 F

NORRIS DAM 1020 F

COULTER SHOALS DAM 805 F WATTS BAR DAM 745 F CHICKAMAUGA DAM 690 F HALES BAR DAM 625 F GUNTERSVILLE DAM 600 F

WHEELER DAM 550F

WILSON DAM 510 F

PICKWICK LANDING DAM 410 F KENTUCKY DAM 350 F CONNECTING TO OHIO RIVER 275 F



2014 Portfolio_Ben Dance