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Architecture Portfolio University of Tennessee

Brandon Paul Staggs


Table of Contents Project

Location

Pages

1

Community Bathhouse

Knoxville, Tennessee

2-9

2

Modern Home

Chattanooga, Tennessee

10-11

Chattanooga, Tennessee

12-17

Reykjavik, Iceland

18-21

3 4

Children’s School of Art Veiled Hideaway(Nightclub & Day Spa)

5

Residential Tower

Knoxville, Tennessee

22-27

6

Collection of Models

Various

28-33

Europe Study Abroad

34-37

7

Photography

1


1 Community Bathhouse Knoxville, TN

Design for Integration

2

The central design concept for this project is to provide a public bath house that is integrated into the site in an functional and innovative way. The bottom level consists of a cafe that engages the street front, a large entry lobby or vestibule, two public bath halls with their accompanying programs such as locker rooms, laundry rooms, showers, and saunas. One for men and one for women. The project implements a purpose shared by other buildings in the location but also challenges to stand out and accomplish its own goals that the built environment

around it is unable to. The upper levels consist of office spaces, and a large social space or recreational lounge, providing a second occupancy for the building, adding a business component to a building with a mercantile street front presence. The project aims to incorporate green space up to a third or even a half of the site, bringing in a natural and sustainable element to the location that is absent elsewhere.


Design for Community The project attempts to engage with the community in the best way possible based on the site and location. The front and rear of the site grab the attention of the community in different yet quite effective strategies. The front is located in line with the adjacent structures, engaging the sidewalk and street, thus engaging the community of people that either walk or drive along that sidewalk and street. The rear of the project site has a series of parking spaces allowing those working in the building a place to park. Bus stops being nearby and allowing bike availablity on site provide

alternate methods of transportation. The green space both as part of the ground site helps to reduce transportation- related emissions, along with having a limited number of parking spots , encouraging the use of the local bus lines and bicycle use. The green space available to the community on the site grounds helps extend the bounds of the occupant group of the project to those who might not have normally had a reason to engage in the project if not being associated with the building program. www.autodesk.com/revit

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Project completed in collaboration with Reetesh Khaled

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Solar Panels

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

No.

Description

Date

Cafe/Atrium Entry Vestibule

Men’s Bathhouse

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Owner axon 2 12" = 1'-0"

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

1st Floor Framing Plan

Skylight

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Axon 2 Project Number Date Drawn By Checked By

Scale

Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

A116

12" = 1'-0"

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

2/3/2020 6:21:55 PM

1

No.

Rear Lobby/Exit Women’s Bathhouse 1

axon 1 12" = 1'-0"

Storage Lockers Community Balcony

3

1st F


Short Section

Section B 1/8” = 1’ 0”

Long Section

Conrad St.

N Broadway

Section A 1/8” = 1’ 0”

ve tA

W

N Broadway

W Depot Ave

4

Site Plan 1/32” = 1’ 0”

D

o ep


2nd Floor Program The second floor functions mainly functions as a gathering area for those desiring to be social and interact with others after partaking in the public baths or the dining hall. There is a recreational lounge with pool tables, couches and televisions, and even a computer lab area. There are two private bathing rooms, intended for parents with children. There is also a children’s play area where kids can play while their parents enjoy the baths.

Second Floor Plan 1/8” = 1’ 0”

1st Floor Program The first floor of the bathhouse consists of a series of programmatic elements all crucial in the function of the a public bathhouse as the primary building program. The primary program includes all these elments that are required to successfully run a bathhouse including, locker rooms, showers, restrooms, saunas, and steam rooms, toweling areas, laundry rooms, and of course the bathing halls themselves. The secondary program in the project is a dining hall. The dining hall will provide hot meals to the guests, many of whom will be in need, most likely through the help of the nearby Salvation Army.

First Floor Plan 1/8” = 1’ 0”

5


Reflected Ceiling Plan Lower Floor

6


Design Systems The bathhouse has a diverse program that encompasses a variety of tasks and atmospheres that require unique lighting strategies to maximize daylighting and provide the most efficient and functional light to each space. The building is going to employ 2 different ceiling types: the large open areas of the bath halls, entry vestibule and cafe, and 2nd floor lounge space will have expansive ceilings with

exposed beams, joists, and HVAC ducts. The smaller rooms like the bathrooms, showers, saunas, steam rooms, kitchen, mechanical rooms, offices, and laundry will have a drop ceiling that obscures structural and mechanical elements. The different ceiling types heavily influenced our choice of lighting fixtures, as well as our aspirations for the atmosphere in both the ambient and functional spaces.

Reflected Ceiling Plan Upper Floor

7


Moisture barrier Steel flashing

Structure & Fixtures

2” x 12” Blocking

1. Parapet Assembly 1” = 1’-0”

The bathhouse has a diverse program that encompasses a variety of tasks and atmospheres that require unique lighting strategies to maximize daylighting and provide the most efficient and functional light to each space. The building is going to employ 2 different ceiling types: the large open areas of the bath halls, entry vestibule and cafe, and 2nd floor lounge space will have expansive ceilings with exposed beams, joists, and HVAC ducts. The smaller rooms like the bathrooms, showers, saunas, steam rooms, kitchen, mechanical rooms, offices, and laundry will have a drop ceiling that obscures structural and mechanical elements. The different ceiling types heavily influenced our choice of lighting fixtures, as well as our aspirations for the atmosphere in both the ambient and functional spaces.

1” Wood sheathing

Roofing membrane 2” x 12” stud behind 11” Rigid insulation 2” x 12” Blocking

2” x 6” x 6’ Tongue and groove decking

1/2” Plywood finish

6-3/4” x 11” Joist

12” x 12” Column

2. Column to Wall connection 1” = 1’-0”

Column fastener Steel coping

Steel drainage slope Non-continuous blocking 6” x 8” Wood Member

2” Blocking

HVAC Duct Fastener

Drainage Barrier

3. Foundation and Floor 1” = 1’-0”

Weather Barrier Grout Infill

1/4” Porcelain Tile 1/4” Tile Mortar Electric Heating Pad 1-1/4” Rigid Insulation

8

1/4” Grout

1-1/2” Compressible Joint Filler


6-3/4” x 11” Joist

Drainage membrane

Drainage Barrier 12” x 12” Column

2. Column to Wall connection 1” = 1’-0”

Column fastener

3. Foundation and Floor 1” = 1’-0”

4” Rigid insulation Weather Barrier

Grout Infill

Steel coping

Steel drainage slope

1/4” Porcelain Tile Steel lintel reinforcing

Non-continuous blocking

Frosted double pane glazing

1/4” Tile Mortar Electric Heating Pad

6” x 8” Wood Member

1-1/4” Rigid Insulation

Sloped drainage sill

1/4” Grout Precast capstone block

1-1/2” Compressible Joint Filler 2” Blocking

HVAC Duct Fastener

Steel reinforcing rod

10” Concrete Floor Slab

12” Gravel Fill

8” x 16” x 4” CMU block

8” x 16” x 8” CMU block

Moisture Barrier Grout infill

18” Concrete foundation wall

3

Drainage Barrier

3. Foundation and Floor 1” = 1’-0”

Weather Barrier Grout Infill

8” Drainage pipe

Gravel drainage bed

1/4” Porcelain Tile 1/4” Tile Mortar Electric Heating Pad 1-1/4” Rigid Insulation 1/4” Grout

1-1/2” Compressible Joint Filler 10” Concrete Floor Slab

12” Gravel Fill

Moisture Barrier

9


1920’s Home Case Study

2 Modern House Chattanooga, TN

10

For my first main project of the second semster of my third year, each student in my studio got to choose a 1920’s style home to study and analyze. we produced a full set of drawings for the 1920’s home and by the end got to understand the lay-

out and how different the homes are from what we trypically see today. Old homes usually being much tighter and having a floor plan that is more closed off than open. as we finished getting all the information on the 1920’s homes we were asked to take that design and transform it into a modern home in look and layout.


Modern Transformation As I began working to transform the old home into a modern one i initially thought to open it up. the older home had very tight hallways and overall felt too congested. In many ways I simply just added on to the old homes layout to give myself more spcae to work with. From there I removed some walls and reorganized some of the spaces. the old home was so small and felt far to grammed. I did my best to transfrom that old layout while still holding true to it. I then focused on the materiality of the home and how i could make it more modern in style but still blend well with the older homes around it. I worked with stone and concrete to still it give an older feeling, while incorporaing modern style composite paneling and wood detail to blend the old with the new.

11


3 Children’s School of Art Chattanooga, TN

Site The site of my building is located at the corner of 16th st. and Dodds ave. just east of downtown Chattanooga. The building site is in a part of the city that is more neglected and thought to be run down in certain areas. The task of this project was come up with a way to rejuvenate the area and provide a positive addition to a neighborhood and area of Chattanooga that

12

is looked upon in a relatively negative manor. I chose to design an art school for kids ages 4-12. This school is a good way for children in and around the area to come and learn about art, produce their own work and then put it on display for everyone to see, creating a positive aspect an in area where their isn’t much.


1st Floor Program The ground level of the school has three main entrances, and the two entrances in place where the old school building is located. The old school building is represented by the thicker walls around the central square in plan. I kept this school building as part of my own design, re-purposing it to fit my program. Two of the three main entrances are located of the front of Dodds ave. one engaging the sidewalk and the other the main parking lot. The third main entry is a part of the entry tower located in the rear of the building where those parking at the upper lot can go

straight up to any of the three exhibition spaces. The front entrances bring you into a large atrium. The classrooms are located where they would have been in the old school building in the center. The first floor also has a break room, one of two main offices that has an outdoor patio and a large studio/exhibit space where the kids create their works of art and then put them on display. There are also a number of storage areas around the first floor as an art school can never have enough space to store a wide range of supplies.

UPPER LOT ENTRY TOWER

LOWER LOT STUDIO/EXHIBIT STOR.

STOR. SKYLIGHT (ABOVE)

SERVICE BREAK ROOM

MECH.

REST.

REST. CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

CHURCH LIGHT WELL

E 16th St.

LIGHT WELL

FIRE STAIRS

MAIN LOT

ATRIUM (ENTRY) PATIO

OFFICE

Dodds Ave.

13


Process Models These are two models that i made at the beginning of the semester that assisted me in the design of my final project. For these models I made large changes to a 5x5x8 inch block, mainly subtracting rectangle portions out of the mass to create unique and differently formed space around the rectangle as a whole. This process of subtracting played a large role in how I reached the final building form for my final design project of the semester.

ENTRY TOWER

STUDIO/EXHIBIT PATIO STOR. SKYLIGHT

SERVICE COURTYARD

MECH.

REST.

REST. CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

LIGHT WELL

LIGHT WELL

FIRE STAIRS ATRIUM (BELOW)

14

OFFICE

PATIO

2nd Floor Program The second level of the school is almost identical to the layout of the first floor. The classrooms, offices, storage, and studio/exhibit space is close to the same. There is a courtyard on the second floor located above the break room and is open to theCHURCH space above. A large platform elevator is located in the center of the building and has the purpose of being able

to take a whole class of kids up or down a floor at the same time. There is a an extra patio just off of the studio space, where kids can get some air or have break from their work. The office and outdoor patio is actually reversed from where they are located on the ground level, adding to the element of subtracting to create different spaces.


ENTRY TOWER

3rd Floor Program OUTDOOR EXHIBIT STUDIO/EXHIBIT SKYLIGHT

SERVICE COURTYARD (BELOW)

MECH.

REST.

STUDIO/EXHIBIT

REST.

LIGHT WELL

LIGHT WELL

The third and top level of the school is mainly dedicated to displaying the artwork of the children. The kids would produce all kinds of art including Lego sculptures that would be on display all over the exhibition space on CHURCH the top floor. There is also an outdoor exhibit

space covered in turf so the kids are able to play and don’t have to be afraid of getting on the ground to work on their work and have fun. A mural wall is also located in the outdoor exhibit area where kids can draw and express themselves in many ways.

FIRE STAIRS ATRIUM (BELOW)

PATIO

15


Context The site around my building includes the existing church structure, an upper and lower lot in the back of the building, and a main lot to the left of my building. The site is on a street corner, a location both seen as part of the neighborhood behind the site and the commercial more busy area on Dodds ave. being the main street.

Materiality The building is mainly concrete and is covered with a few different types of paneling on the exterior. A brick panel system is on a portion of the building to help keep the character of the church and old school in the new building some what. Long gray panels line a portion of the building and white building block like panels make up the rest, giving a good neutral variety to the building as a whole.

16


Section Perspective A

Section Perspective B

17


4 Veiled Hideaway (Nightclub & Day Spa) Reykjavik, Iceland

18


F r e n z y 1st Floor Program The building functions as a spa during the day and as a dance club/bar at night. This dual program was decided upon when assesing the needs of the city. There is a real night life presence in downtown Reykjavik. Night life and having a place to relax during the day is a huge plus for tourists.

3rd Floor Program The third floor contains a secret program that is meant to be hidden to those using the club and spa. There is a series of labs used for testing local plants. There is a greenhouse used for caring or these plants and an open air viewing area for taking in the northern lights.

2nd Floor Program The second floor consists of the upper level of the club. Including a luxury bar and lounge as well as a catwalk overlooking the stage and dancefloor below. There are also two hanging pool bars at either end of the courtyard, one being services by a bar tower. The pools are just as important in the nightclub as in the day spa. There is also a designated smoking room that stacks all three levels and is open to the back alleyway.

The first floor houses the main club space, dancefloor, stage, and bar. It also inlcudes the main pools and has a small cafe and snack bar.

19


Programming In Reykjavik My first semester of my third year was focused on programming, where as students we were usually assigned a program from our professor; however in this case we got to develop our own program throughout the course of the first half of the semester. We started looking at the various ways people can immerse themselves in water and how there are many traditions and customs in terms of this across the world. After looking at this different ways of immersion with water we looked at Iceland and how we could incorporate that into the setting of our site. We then had free reign to develop our

own program as long as it included immersion with water in some form or another. My program ended up being quite complex. I had immersion with water incorporated in two ways, one through a day spa, and secondly through the night club. The night life in Reykjavik is bustling and I wanted to find a way to have immersion with water while catering to the popular night life scene in the city. The day spa and cafe are the other uses of the ground level. A plant research facility and greenhouse existing on the upper levels as ways of bringing nature into the urban setting.

Section Perspective

20


Envelope/Skin The night club entry side of the building is covered by an aluminum curtain acting as a veil to hide what is located behind from those outside. The skin on the day spa and cafe side building is designing to flow into the design of the curtain to provide a form of unity across the facades.

21


5 RESIDENTIAL TOWER Knoxville, TN

22


Mixed-Use Multi-Family Residential Development For this project I assumed the role of architect and developer. This made the project unique for me as I had never worked with numbers while designing a building until this point. The site is currently used as a parking lot for the adjacent businesses. The owner requested that a number of parking spots be maintained to accomadate the existing businesses. Thus, I incorporated enough parking not only for what was existiing but also for my retail employees and customers, and the residents of my building.

1

-3D-_7 12" = 1'-0"

The building program consists of two retail spaces on the ground floor as well as an office space. The second and third floors contain two of twodifferent unit types on each floor. The fourth and fifth floors have two luxury units on each floor. A goal for this design for me was to give each unit access to outdoor space, whether in the form of a balcony, shared central breezeway, courtyard, or roof garden open to all residents and employees within the building.

Site/Roof Plan

23


Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 7 74' - 0"

1

East 1/8" = 1'-0"

West Elevation

Level 6 65' - 0" www.autodesk.com/revit

Level 5 52' - 0"

North Elevation

Level 7 74' - 0"

Level 4 39' - 0"

Level 6 65' - 0" www.autodesk.com/revit

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Level 5 52' - 0" Level 3 26' - 0"

Level 2 13' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Level 3 26' - 0"

Level 2 13' - 0"

Level 4 39' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 5 52' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Level 4 39' - 0"

1

Level 7 74' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Level 6 65' - 0"

Level 3 26' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

North 1/8" = 1'-0"

Level 2 13' - 0"

Consultant Address Address Address Phone

Level 1 0' - 0"

No. 1

Description

Level 1 0' - 0"

Date

North 1/8" = 1'-0"

South Elevation

2

Level 7 74' - 0"

Level 7 West 74' - 0" 1/8" = 1'-0"

Level 6 65' - 0"

Level 6 65' - 0"

Level 5 52' - 0"

No.

Description

Date

Level 5 52' - 0"

Level 7 74' - 0"

Level 6 65' - 0"

Level 4 39' - 0"

Level 4 39' - 0"

Owner

Level 5 52' - 0"

Project Name

Level 3 26' - 0"

North/South Owner Elevations

Level 4 39' - 0"

Level 2 13' - 0"

Project Number

Project Number

Level 3 26' - 0"

Issue Date Project Name Author

Date Drawn By

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 2 13' - 0" South Elevation 2 1/8" = 1'-0"

1

North/South Checker

Checked By

2 Elevations East Elevation East 1/8" = 1'-0"

Scale

Project Number Date Drawn By

Level 1 0' - 0"

2

Checked By

Scale

South Elevation 1/8" = 1'-0"

1/8" = 1'-0" Project Number Issue Date Author Checker

2

1/8" = 1'-0"

9/26/2019 4:54:14 AM

Level 2 13' - 0"

9/26/2019 4:54:14 AM

Level 3 26' - 0"

Level 7 74' - 0"

Level 6 65' - 0"

Level 5 52' - 0"

Level 4 39' - 0"

Level 3 26' - 0"

Level 2 13' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

2

24

West 1/8" = 1'-0"


Costs & Totals

When designing this project I was tasked with compiling a pro forma. It was a challenge balancing cost and design, but throughout the process the design influenced the cost and vice versa. The cost of construction per unit helped me determine the sale cost I needed to make a profit on the development. Type A Units - 4 Total - 850 GSF - Construction Cost: $119,000 x 4 = $476,000 - Sale Cost: $244,800 x 4 = $979,200 Type B Units - 4 Total - 1,220 GSF - Construction Cost: $170,800 x 4 = $683,200 - Sale Cost: $329,400 x 4 = $1,317,600 Type C Units - 4 Total - 1,750 GSF - Construction Cost: $245,000 x 4 = $980,000 - Sale Cost: $441,000 x 4 = $1,764,000

Level 7 74' - 0"

UP

Level 6 65' - 0"

DN

Level 5 52' - 0"

Level 4 39' - 0"

1 7

1

Floors 2 + 3 Unit Layouts

Level 3 26' - 0"

Level 2 13' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Building Section

Section 1 1/8" = 1'-0"

Floors 4 + 5 Unit Layouts

UP UP

DN

DN

Type A Unit 1 7

Type B Unit Type C Unit

25


Pro Forma Inputs - Harvesting Site Area

Unit Type Type A Type B Type C

16500

Program Contents Quantity 1 bed / 1 bath 2 bed / 2 bath patio(S) 3 bed / 2.5 bath patio(L)

Totals

4 4 4 12

Retail A Retail B Soft Costs % of Tot. Dev. Cost

Legal Loan Orig. Fee Survey Geotechnical Architect Consultants General Cont. Developer Fee Totals

1.00% 1% 0.15% 0.15% 8.00% 1.00% 8.00% 3.00%

GSF

850 1,220 1,750

NSF

765 1098 1575

15,280

13752

2,500.00 2,000.00

2250 1800

Amount $ 26,567.00 $ 26,567.00 $ 3,985.05 $ 3,985.05 $212,536.00 $ 26,567.00 $212,536.00 $ 79,701.00

22.30% $592,444.10 ##########

Hard Costs % Cost Area(SF) $ / SF Total Site Acquisition 1% 16,500 $ 1.82 $ 30,000.00 Site Work 7% 16,500 $ 15.00 $ 247,500.00 Hard Costs Residential 63% 15,280 $ 140.00 $2,139,200.00 Hard Costs Commercial 8% 4,500.00 $ 60.00 $ 270,000.00 Soft Cost 17% $ 592,444.10 Contingency 5% $ 132,835.00 $3,412,009.10 Total Development Cost ###########

Unit Type A Unit Type B Unit Type C Retail A Retail B

Gross Sales Revenue Sales Price / SF $/Unit Total Units $320.00 $244,800.00 $979,200.00 $300.00 $329,400.00 $1,317,600.00 $280.00 $441,000.00 $1,764,000.00 $140.00 $315,000.00 $315,000.00 $140.00 $252,000.00 $252,000.00

Total Gross Revenue Surplus

$4,627,800.00 $1,215,820.90

Total Income

$1,508,057.90

Equity Principal Loan Principal Loan Interest Rate Loan Term

Debt Service % Total Development Cost 20% 80%

Design vs. Numbers When working on a project as both an architect and developer its hard to balance the design in away that the numbers work out the way you want them to. When producing a pro forma you need to take into account just about everything thats going to be going into the project and what that looks like from a numbers stand point. In other words how much is all this going to cost to obtain and the build. In my scenario I chose to harvest or sell the housing units to try and

26

make a profit. I took some time to get the numbers where I wanted them to where I was making even a decent profit gain. I had to work with the design to allow it to work. It was a lot of going back and forh between the design and then looking how the changes iI made nfluenced the numbers. It was a lengthy process but definately something Im glad I got to learn about and get some experience in.

Total $ 682,395.82 $2,729,583.28 5% 2

U T T T Y

G Le M M C C Y

In B S Lo

A A A


Pro Forma Outputs - Harvesting Stabilized Pro Forma Unit Type A Unit Type B Unit Type C Number of Units Constructed 4 4 4 Total Gross Area 3,400 4,880 7,000 Total Net Area 3,060 4,392 6,300.00 Total Parking Spaces Required 4 4 4 Development Budget Property Acquisition pro rata % $6,000.00 $7,500.00 $9,000.00 Site Work Costs $49,500.00 $61,875.00 $74,250.00 Hard Costs Residential $ 534,800.00 $ 641,760.00 $ 962,640.00 Hard Costs Commercial $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 Soft Costs $118,488.82 $148,111.03 $177,733.23 Contingency 5% $26,567.00 $33,208.75 $39,850.50 Total Development Costs $682,395.82 $852,994.78 $1,023,593.73 Gross Revenue Gross Sales Revenue $925,560.00 $1,156,950.00 $1,388,340.00 Realtor's Commissions $46,278.00 $57,847.50 $69,417.00 Closing Costs + Concessions $13,883.40 $17,354.25 $20,825.10 Effective Gross Income $865,398.60 $1,081,748.25 $1,298,097.90 Debt Service Debt Principal Repayment $556,602.09 $695,752.62 $834,903.14 Debt Interest Repayment $54,174.62 $67,718.28 $81,261.93 Equity Principal Repayment $139,150.52 $173,938.16 $208,725.79 Free and Clear Cash Flow $115,471.36 $144,339.20 $173,207.04 Profit Statement Return on Cost (Unlevered Return) 27% 29% 31% Return on Equity (Levered Return) 17% 19% 21%

Retail A 1 2,500 2,250 12

Retail B 1 2,000 1,800 9

Project Total 14 19,780 13,752 33

$4,500.00 $37,125.00 $0.00 $162,000.00 $88,866.62 $19,925.25 $511,796.87

$3,000.00 $24,750.00 $0.00 $108,000.00 $59,244.41 $13,283.50 $341,197.91

$ 30,000.00 $ 247,500.00 $2,139,200.00 $ 270,000.00 $ 592,444.10 $ 132,835.00 $3,411,979.10

$694,170.00 $462,780.00 $4,627,800.00 $34,708.50 $23,139.00 $ 231,390.00 $10,412.55 $6,941.70 $ 69,417.00 $649,048.95 $432,699.30 $4,326,993.00 $417,451.57 $40,630.97 $104,362.89 $86,603.52

$278,301.05 $27,087.31 $69,575.26 $57,735.68

25% 15%

23% 13%

$2,783,010.47 $ 270,873.10 $ 695,752.62 $ 577,356.81 27% 17%

Development Strategies In developing a complete pro forma for a project as large as a five-story mixeduse residential tower, there is quite a bit that goes into making it work and I had to remember q lot of different costs and percentages that influenced my overall stake in the project. In order for a development project of this size to be successful you have to have a lot of money. Very few developers would completely have the multi-millions needed to fund this project. That means that a loan has to be taken out and equity the rest of the

equity has to be raised or somehow else accounted for. Upon the completion of the project those loans and debts have to be included in the overall pro forma and factored into the profit statement. The gross revenue looks great until you remember about what you still owe. Even then I think I made out pretty well for my first time running a project acting as both architect and developer. My return on cost was pretty solid but my return on equity needs some work still but shouldnt have an issue getting funded.

27


6 Collection of Models Various Projects & Locations Researcher’s Lodge - Cades Cove The final project of my second semester represents the first truly in depth architectural project that i designed from the ground up. The site of this project was in Cades cove, located in the great smoky mountains national park in eastern Tennessee. I was challenged with designing a lodge for a number of scientists that would be in Cades cove for an extended period of time to study the environment in the area. The lodge includes four identical living quarters on

28

the left and right side of the building located on the second story. A central courtyard is at the end of the ramps that lead up from the four garages located underneath the living quarters. This project represents my first true architectural design as an architecture student and future architect. It is also the most detailed physical model i have completed to date and is the only project i completed fully by hand drafting.


Pavilion I was tasked with designing a pavilion using my diagrammatic studies from earlier in the semester. I came up with three iterations of a basic pavilion based off of those, which is why the general shape and style stays relatively consistent from iteration to iteration.

Cafe & Broadcast Studio - Oak Park The physical model i built for this project is made of white museum board that is very similar to chipboard in materiality. The small scale of the model allowed for our studio to place the models in a site model that was not overly large, and gave important context to the oak park area the building is located in.

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Bookshelf Designed for Viewing Double-Sided Prints

30

Step 1: view in mirror

Step 2: pull

Step 3: flip down

Step 4: flip up

Bookshelf Materiality

Bookshelf Functionality

I built this bookshelf with basic MDF sheets. I then used a white primer to cover the MDF and give it a more sleek and clean look. I used a nailgun to assemble the MDF panels I cut in the woodshop. There are two mirrors put into place and held in place by a strip of mdf at the top and bottom of the middle compartment. The sliding drawer in the center is also framed with mdf and contains a double-sided print.

This bookshelf was designed to hold a double-sided print and provide a unique way to view both sides of that said print. The print is located in a frame in the center of the middle compartment. there are two angled mirrors meant for being able to view both sides of the print at the same time. If you pull the print out and fold it down you see the top side upright and the back side through the upper mirror. The same goes for folding it up but just the opposite in how you see the prints.


Cantilever Made from Flexible Material

Tensile Structure / Grasshopper Generated

Bridge - Vector Active Structures 31


Side Bench The small portion of the bench only has room for one to sit on it. But it does include the largest cabinet storage in the entire bench design.

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Main Bench

Corner Shelving

The large portion of the bench has enough room for around three or four people to sit comfortably. The main bench aslos has two smaller cabinet spaces built in the add additional outdoor storage for the owner, who will hopefully use their large front porch often.

The corner shelf portion of the bench offers a unique way to utilize the corner of the porch. Having two rows of shelves, the larger of the two on the bottom and the smaller on top. The shelving grants the opportuntiy to store and place regular outdoor items.


Complete Built-In Porch Bench I was required to fabricate a design that could be invested as sweat equity in a development project. I chose to build a built-in porch bench that was part of a fourplex development project of mine. This bench would add extra value to the property as I would be constructing it myself as the developer of the project

because its more than just a standard bench. The “L� shaped design allows it to fit neatly in the corner of the main porch. There are three cabinets included in the bench as well as a shelving portion in the corner all intended to give the owner some adequate outdoor storage options.

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London, England

Berlin, Germany

7 Photography Study Abroad Spring 2019

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Dublin, Ireland

I had the amazing opportunity to study abroad in Krakow, Poland during the spring 2019 semester. While in Europe I visited 12 counties all over the continent. I saw some stunning places and met some incedible people. I photographed my travels and I’ve compiled some of favorite shots during my time abroad. The many pictures I took during my time away help me remember the great time I had, and remind me that I most definately want to go back one day.

Krakow, Poland

Oliwa, Poland


Budapest, Hungary

Dresden, Germany

Berlin, Germany

Gdansk, Poland

Ujazd, Poland

Lodz, Poland

Poznan, Poland

Gdansk, Poland 35


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Santorini, Greece

Athens, Greece

Zamosc, Poland

Venice, Italy

Berlin, Germany

Vienna, Austria


London, England

Gdansk, Poland

Niagara Falls, USA/Canada 37


Hometown: Nashville, Tennessee


Thank You

Profile for bstaggs4

Architecture Portfolio - Brandon Staggs  

Some of my work over the last 5 years as an undergrad in architecture at the University of Tennessee.

Architecture Portfolio - Brandon Staggs  

Some of my work over the last 5 years as an undergrad in architecture at the University of Tennessee.

Profile for bstaggs4
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