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BSOCSCI BIBLE

The Alternative Guide to your First Year 2010 - 2011 Hello! Welcome to the University of Manchester! Firstly, congratulations for securing your place on the BSocSci (Hons) Politics and International Relations course (yes, we know, what a mouthful!) You might be feeling swamped by all the different booklets you’ve been sent recently but give this one a chance! It’s been written and compiled by myself, Dominykas and the mentors on your course, as well as lots of help from both second and third years to bring together this essential guide. So keep reading and find out what being a student here is REALLY all about. Melanie Astbury An online copy can be found at: “http:// issuu.com/bsocsci/docs/bible”


Mentors Who, what and why?

So if you have any problems, come to us! We’ve gone through the same experience, know how things work around here and can point you in the right direction, whatever the problem. And we’re not just here for the big problems! If you need general tips on essays, exams or coursework in general, we’ve done those modules, or know someone who has, and know the tricks of the trade.

For all of us, arriving at Manchester was probably the most nerve-racking and exciting experience we’ve had in awhile! If you’re like most of us, you’ll be arriving here without knowing anyone else at all. So you might start worrying; what if you have nothing in common with your flatmates or coursemates? What if the course isn’t what you expected? What if, what if!? The first few weeks are always going to be full of ‘what ifs’ and that’s where we come in as mentors. Each of you will be allocated someone from the second year of the course who, if you let them, can become not

only a source of handy social and academic tips, but a great friend as well.

First year is all about fun, and the last thing you want is to be worrying all the time about work and whether you’re doing it right! We can help you get it out of the way smoothly, so you can pass as well as make the most of the first year social life. Come second year, all those exams and essays will start to count towards your degree, so first year is the time to do as much as you can on the social front! After all, there is nothing quite like being a Fresher at Manchester University!

As our course is a small one, we don’t have personal tutors; for each module you will have a seminar leader who can help you with that subject, but they’re not always easy to find! And while there are people in the department who are assigned to the pastoral care of the students: the Academic Advisor and the Programme Director; there may be times, especially at the beginning of the year, when you might not feel able to go to Now let’s introduce these people with a problem for ourselves... whatever reason.


The Mentors

Name: Dominykas Broga

Name: Daniel Jones

Name: Joanna Sykes

Email: dominykas.broga@ student.manchester.ac.uk

Email: Daniel.Jones-6@ student.manchester.ac.uk

Halls: Whitworth Park

Halls: Sheavyn House

Email: joanna.sykes@ student.manchester.ac.uk Or joanna_sykes_18@hotmail.com

Free Choice Modules: Media, Culture and Society I From Modernity to Post-modernity II

Free Choice Modules: Media Culture and Society 1 & 2

Why Manchester? A lively place, full of opportunities - why not give it a shot? Also my brother was very persuasive in convincing me that it was possible to live here in Manchester too. Top tip for the year: As I said, lots of opportunities and temptations, try to plan and balance your finance from the very first day you arrive.

Why Manchester? Well, I needed to experience another part of the UK apart from London and Manchester, being the dynamic city that it is, seemed a good change. Top tip for the year: Blink and 1st year’s gone so enjoy it from day one. Also attend lectures and make notes at lectures, eases the stress of January/June exam.

Halls: Sheavyn house Free choice modules : German Why Manchester ? Best British city for students, countless bars and clubs, lovely people, cheap booze, and above all.. THE BOP (or not?) Top tip for the year: Pasta, pesto, mushrooms, pepper and cheese. Easy and delicious. Diet for the year !


The Mentors

Name: Yolaina Vargas Pritchard (Yollie)

Name: Jonathan barber

Name: Dan Alani

Email: yolaina.vargaspritchard@student. manchester.ac.uk

Email: jonathan.barber@ student.manchester.ac.uk    

Email: alanidan@hotmail.com

Halls: Oak House

Halls: Oak House

Free choice modules: Economic History and Modernity and Post Modernity Sociology module

Free Choice Modules: Sociology form modernity to post modernity 1, sociology media culture and society 2.

Why Manchester? Well, why not?? Great city, loads of students, fantastic nightlife! It’s anything but boring with so many people and cultures! I must also say, because the uni is good.

Why Manchester? A culturally diverse and vibrant city, great food and more importantly lots of variety in places to party.                

Top tip for the year: Dont be afraid to do things on your own and try new things. Also, just enjoy the uni experience.

Top tip for the year: Don't take your bank card on nights out, put a doorstop in your door when you move in to halls for the first time, makes you apppear sociable and helps you make friends nice and early on.

Halls: Oak House Free Choice Modules: Introduction to Philosophy, Values and Morality (PHIL10021); Media, Culture & Society 2 (SOCY10452) Why Manchester? I wanted a big city, as well as knowing it was one of the biggest student populations so there would always be loads of different things to do. Top tip for the year: Don't be afraid to put yourself out there to find like-minded people. If you don't have much in common with people in your flat or halls, but there's always going to be people on your course or in societies who might just turn out to be your new bezzies!


The Mentors

Name: Polly Martin

Name: Julia Schvarcova

Email: Polly.Martin-2@ student.manchester.ac.uk

Email: julia.schvarcova@ student.manchester.ac.uk

Halls: Richmond Park

Halls: Oak House

Free Choice Modules: Social Anthropology: Culture and Power. Social Anthropology: Cultural Diversity. Sociology: Work, Organisations and Leisure

Free Choice Modules: Further French, Psychology, Criminoglogy and Justice

Why Manchester? I live on a farm in the middle of the rural South and a big vibrant city was the exact opposite. And everyone said Northerners were friendly. Top tip for the year: The whole of the first year is not like freshers week, the good and the bad, so enjoy it and remember it is only a week!

Why Manchester? The university is among the best in europe and the course is really great. Top tip for the year: Register for your seminars asap, so you dont end up having to wake up too early for a fresher. But most importantly, have fun! There's time to take it seriously in second year.

Name: Lottie Ireland    Email: charlotte.Ireland@student. manchester.ac.uk   Halls: Whitworth Park, LEAMINGTON HOUSE!!!!!   Free Choice Modules: Culture and Society, Culture and Power (I recommend this one because it works well with the politics modules) and Cultural Diversity in Global Perspective.   Why Manchester? It’s a huge city with something for everyone, whatever your taste in music it’s here, whatever your idea of fun, you’ll be able to find someone who agrees with you.   Top Tip for the Year: Go exploring off the Oxford Road, there’s so much more to Manchester…I challenge you to find the riverside Mark Addy, and The Kings Arms (you’ve found the right one if it has a jukebox and a knitting club!).


The Mentors

Name: Jana Palgutova

Name: Sarah Carew

Name: Lucia Pasqualino

Email: janapalgutova@hotmail.com

Email: xsarahx1989@hotmail.co.uk or sarah.carew@student.manchester. ac.uk

Email: Lucia.Pasqualino@student. manchester.ac.uk

Halls: Private accomodation in Salford Free Choice Modules: 1st sem.- Crime and society, 2nd sem.- Psychology, crime and criminal justice Why Manchester?  I wanted to go to an English speaking country and decided for England. Manchester is big enough to get lost in and to try a different bar virtually every day, but also small enough to get everywhere on foot. Top tip for the year: If you like having coffee outside on a sunny day, go to The Mark Addyit is pretty quiet, you can sit outside next to the river Irwell and you don't see any cars...it's just you, coffee, river, ducks...

Halls: Burkhardt House, Hulme hall, Victoria Park Free Choice modules: Crime and society (criminology) and transformation of the British economy (history) Why Manchester? It’s a great city that has all the benefits of a large city like London but on a smaller scale, it’s much easier to get around and doesn’t involve spending a fortune on taxis and night buses, the music scene is amazing. The Academy has really good gigs.

Halls: Whitworth Park Free choice modules: Transformation of the British Economy and LEAP Beginners Italian (never again!). Why Manchester? Because it’s Northern, small enough to feel homely, yet big enough to get lost in! Top tip for the year: From personal experience, don't waste part of freshers week being homesick in your room, get out there as it will get better!


The Mentors

Name: Radomir Dolejsi Email: radomir.dolejsi@gmail.com Halls: Dalton Ellis Halls: Private flat near city centre Free Choice Modules: Culture and Society and Culture and Power Why Manchester?: The greatest city for students in the world! Awesome UNI, amazing social life, great culutural and musical scene, constant entertaining events and incredible parties. It simply has everything you could ask for! To be honest I fell in love with this city the very first day I spent here:) Top Tip of the year: Be sure to checkout Deansgate locks for top quality fun and you guys NEVER miss out any PANGEA festival!

Name: Chloe McEvoy E-mail: chloe.mcevoy@student. manchester.ac.uk Halls: Sheavyn House Free Choice Modules: Culture and Power, Media Culture and Society, Introduction to Development. Why Manchester?: Amazing city, great social life, fantastic university and the exact course that I wanted to do. Top tip for the year: An overdraft is just that - an overdraft. You DO have to pay it back and it won’t miraculously jump back into positive figures just because you leave uni for summer. Try as hard to stay out of it as you possibly can or prepare to spend the entire summer working just to pay it off again. But still have fun in the process :)


The Mentors

Name: Andrei Constantin

Name: Abdo Hussein

Email: andrei.constantin@student. manchester.ac.uk

Email: abdo.hussein@student. manchester.ac.uk

Halls: Whitworth Park

Halls: Dalton Ellis

Free Choice Modules: German(full year) and Psychology, Crime & Criminal Justice(2nd sem)

Free Choice Modules: Modernity to Post Modernity 1 Media, Culture and Society 2

Why Manchester? Manchester reminds me of my city. It’s vibrant, always on the move and its heritage is world renown. It is the best place to be in if you want to balance your academic life with your social one.

Why Manchester? The great nightlife was enough to draw me in! The BSocSci course is one of the best in the UK which definitely attracted me to Manchester.

Top tip of the year: If you are hungry at 2 am and you’re on Oxford Road, go to Gemini's, it’s the best.

Top tip of the year: Sankeys!


Tips Free Choice Modules - You will have 40 credits free to study what you want... but there are so many options you might find it hard to choose! Confused? Here are some of the options we chose... Communities and States in Early-Modern Europe: This is a History module, and despite being interesting, it seemed to be a little less organised than the Politics modules are. Cultural Diversity in Global Perspective: This module has some really interesting material in it; lectures are two hours including a one hour documentary each week. It’s tough and a bit “out there” but relatively easy to get to grips with... Well, I got a first pretty easily so I won’t complain! Development Studies: If you hate economics, steer clear of this module! While it deals with potentially interesting topics; those without a grasp of economics will find this less stimulating as you will have to do a lot of background reading to catch up with the economics side to the course. Geographies of Globalisation: This is a Geography module, obviously, and it’s quite interesting to get an alternative to Politics modules. Also, it’s 100% exam which is good for anyone who performs well in exams and doesn’t have the time in second semester to read for yet another essay!

Introduction to Value and Morality: A Philosophy module, this is a fascinating subject and great help for Political Thought (one of your compulsory modules). Introducotry Maths: If you’ve enjoyed/been good at Maths in the past, this can be a healthy break from all the essay writing! Japanese: If you fancy taking something totally different and a bit challenging, choose an unusual language! This was extremely interesting and rewarding, even though it was very difficult! Law modules: These are an option for anyone interested. But a warning! These modules are NOT for the lazy! Only take them if you’re really interested and prepared to do the work. Macroeconomics: This is a really useful module as it applies to international politics; a grasp of economics is useful when studying politics and those who don’t understand it regret it! Saying that, if the idea of economics really puts you off, don’t force yourself! It’s not compulsory and you can choose modules that avoid economics completely!

Microeconomics: If you really want to understand economics and are interested in that aspect of politics, this module is a must. It can be a bit boring, however, so only take it if you really fancy being more of a political economist! Spanish: A language is really useful to have, and it’s best to do one in your first year, as if you do badly it doesn’t count towards your final degree! The University Language Centre offers languages from Beginners to Further and it’s a refreshing break from doing Politics all the time! Be warned, however, that it’s not all plain sailing; there is a lot of work to do and there are more hours of lessons than a standard politics module. State, Nation and Nationalism: This is a History module and the main bonus is there isn’t an exam! The essay is slightly longer than normal (2000 rather than 1500 words) and you have to hand in a 300 word reflection on your reading every week, but it’s worth it to avoid yet another exam!


More Tips Top tips from those who have been there, done that and probably got the “I <3 Bop” hoodie to prove it! Don’t buy a bus pass until you get here and find out which one your flatmates/coursemates have; there are several different companies and you don’t want to have to get on a different bus to everyone on a night out! Register wth a GP when you get here – don’t leave it until you’re ill! If you’re in one of the Fallowfield Halls you can register when you collect your keys for the Owens Park Surgery. This is really useful as it’s right there, no need to drag yourself miles to a doctor! If you’re thinking about getting a job whilst you’re here apply for them early! There are thousands of students in Manchester most in need of a part time job so you’ll need to get in there quick to secure a good one! Don’t bring too much stuff with you, especially when it comes to kitchen utensils! You may find there are already seven woks and five toasters in your flat, and there’s not that much space! Wait until you get here and see what everyone else has got! Do bring a few things to brighten up your room though! The bedrooms in halls can look very bare and the lighting can be way too bright, especially in Oak House, whose layout was apparently based on a prison! Fairy lights are one of the best ways to solve the problem.

Explore Manchester in your first month or two! It’s a fantastic city with loads of offer, whether you’re into clubbing, theatre, food, music or anything else you can think of! Check out facebook groups such as “I know this great little place...” for tips to start you off. TEXTBOOKS! Don’t buy these until you get here, as the second years will often have cheaper second-hand ones for you to buy! Check out www. manchesterpolitics.co.uk to see what bargains you can get. Alternatively, check out our facebook group for selling second-hand textbooks.


More Tips If everyone else is busy, going for a walk or doing some exploring on the bus is a good way of finding cool new places to eat and drink or even places to chill out. Budget your money to help you get through the year. You don’t have to be ridiculously strict, just be aware of when accommodation payments or anything else major is going out and when your loan installments are coming in and you’ll do fine. The money management website TellMeMoney - www. tellmemoney.com was started off by a recent Manchester graduate and has great tips for budgeting and managing your student loan. You’ll be amazed at the amount of different meals you can get out of using rice, pasta, noodles and a bag of mixed veg! Having a glass of water between a few drinks when you’re out really does work wonders. I know it doesn’t sound cool, but you’ll be laughing when you make it to the end of The Big One and everyone else is chundering everywhere!

Lots of club nights offer promo jobs which are great for that little bit of extra money without selling your soul to a proper job, so keep an eye out over Facebook Fresher groups if you’re after one. Speaking of facebook, if you’re not already a member of this social network, get on it! It’s a great way to stay in touch with people and most of our events will be advertised through it as well. We’ve also got a group up for first years so that you can meet and chat to second years or keep on top with the latest events and news. It’s called University of Manchester BSocSci Politics and International Relations 2010/11!


Even More Tips Hand picked places and events you just can’t miss... The Northern Quarter The Northern Quarter has long been known as the 'creative quarter' of Manchester -the home of many fashion designers, creative agencies, art galleries and quirky retailers; it forms a contemporary and inspirational extension to the core of the city centre of Manchester. With the flower market, fashion market and numerous exhibitions to explore you’ll never be short of fun things to do and see around here. Full Moon @ Sankeys. Sankeys is one of Manchester's most internationally known clubs. Consistently voted in the top club charts in DJ Magazine it is renowned for a weekend soundtrack of house and techno. A couple years back it introduced its monthly student night called “Full Moon Party”’; held every four weeks on a Thursday it mimicked the infamous Thai beach party in Koh Phangan complete with sand and alcoholic drinks in buckets. The night was so popular it has now become a weekly event and it is definitely one to tick off the list (as is a night at Warehouse Project that only runs from September to January). Spread neon paint on your cheeks, grab a couple of glow sticks and dance the night away!

The Cornerhouse Cornerhouse is Manchester's international centre for contemporary visual arts and film. Located in the heart of the city and open seven days a week, there are 3 floors of contemporary art galleries, 3 screens showing the best of independent cinema, a bar, café and a bookshop. Definitely one for those craving culture and art after too many Cheeky Vimto’s!

The Bop Nearly 30 years in the making, the BOP is almost a religion. The Bop has always about a filthy, drunken night out and whilst the rest of club land goes 'high class', the Bop remains true to its roots. It is reminiscent of your old school discos with weekly cheesy themes and is well known for cheap drinks (the infamous Green Monster!) and loss of memory. It is also known on a larger scale for being the venue of the Chemical Brothers' first gig

Salford From urban buzz to greenbelt tranquillity, Salford is building on the mixture of its waterfront, urban and countryside environments. With a number of Grade I and II listed buildings it’s a cultural delight and a walk along the river in this part of town really transports you away from the hustle and bustle of Manchester City Centre. It is also famous for the up and coming ‘Salford Quays’, The Lowry - with the largest free collection of L S Lowry's work - theatres, galleries, designer shopping, river cruises, museums, modern architecture, watersports, football and cricket! So if you end up getting sick of the Oxford Road, hop on a bus or tram and explore Salford for the day!


Politics Society Politics Society A Brief Guide Who we are: The Politics Society was started in 2006 by a group of first year Politics and International Relations students who felt that there wasn’t really a society that represented us and allowed us to get politically involved without aligning ourselves to a particular party! Over the past few years it has grown massively, having achieved far beyond our expectations, but we are still firmly committed to a policy of non-partisanship, so that anyone can get involved, regardless of political preferences! What we do: We cater for all those who are politically interested, or even just curious! This includes a range of events and Student Union news coverage.

So how can you get involved? As BSocSci Politics and IR students, there’s pretty much no other society that could benefit your degree to the same extent – so make the most of it! What’s more, if you’re interested in getting involved in Student Union politics our society can help you do just that. Not only this, but you will get to meet other students interested in politics from outside the Politics department!

There are many ways you can get involved, whether it be helping organise and run events such as Radio 4’s ‘Any Questions’ to covering Union news and interviewing top politicians. If you’ve got any ideas for something new that we can do, we’d be happy to hear them. You can get really involved and perhaps even try for a position on the committee next year, pioneering the development of the Society. Or if this isn’t your cup of tea,

there’s loads to do from advertising events to filming. As for the creative among you, if you’ve got an idea for an event, we’re always looking for new ways to expand, so let us know! Come visit our stall at the Freshers’ Fair during Welcome Week and sign up to the Politics Society! Any questions or queries email Chloe McEvoy at chloe. mcevoy@student.manchester. ac.uk


What’s on in the first few weeks! The first couple weeks at University are going to be so hectic you’ll hardly find time to stop and think! It’s a great time to meet people and have tons of fun before lectures start though, so make the most of it! The Politics Department will have sent you an official registration timetable for Fresher’s week, but there are also a few things we’re organising that you simply cannot miss! You’ll meet the mentors during the scheduled department days, which will include a virtual tour of the library – while this may sound a bit less interesting than everything else that’s going on in Welcome Week, these tours are casual and give you a chance to chat to your mentor and ask any questions you might have, as well as being really useful for when you actually need to start doing some work! We’ll all be meeting in the pub afterwards as well as having informal curry nights and pub crawls in the following weeks which will all be great opportunities to get to know your coursemates!

After Wednesday, we leave the rest of Welcome Week for you to take the time to get acquainted with your flatmates and go to all the university events that are being held; day AND night. But make sure to pop along to the Politics Society stall at the Freshers’ Fair! Remember to visit www. manchesterpolitics.co.uk, where you can look at mentor profiles and a bit more about the Politics Society, as well as taking a look at the Politics Blog! Don’t forget to join our Facebook Group too! BsocSci Politics and International Relations 2010/11 We look forward to meeting you all! Melanie Astbury (senior mentor coordinator) & the Politics & IR mentors.


Recipes for Hungry Politicians The beautiful third years, led by the culinary genius of Sophie Hulse, have compiled a couple of cheeky recipes to help you get started in your new independent life! If you ever fancy having a ‘Come Dine With Me’ cook-off, we’re always competitive and welcome a new challenge.

FOILPROOF ROAST CHICKEN Ingredients: Foil, 2 Chicken Breasts, Olive Oil, Salt, Pepper, Garlic chopped as small as poss (optional), Dried Thyme or mixed dried herbs (any will do most commonly found are ‘Mixed Herbs’ or ‘Italian seasoning’ ) Oven to 200’C This is for two chicken breasts, if you want more or less, halve or multiply Place the chicken on a piece of foil about the size of two A4 sheets. Sprinkle on top 2 tsp of dried herbs, chopped up garlic, pinch of salt, pinch of pepper, and three spoons/ good dollop of olive oil over the lot. Make a foil envelope for the chicken, double folding the edges so that they are as airtight as poss. Put the chicken package on an oven tray in the oven. The packet the chicken came in gives the amount of time for that amount of chicken, smaller pieces cook faster. I’d say cook for at least an hour and a quarter and then stab with a knife and see if the thickest part of the chicken is cream coloured rather than pink. NB- you can strip the chicken and use in salads/sandwiches


Goes well with..

OVEN WEDGES Ingredients: Largish potatoes (at least the size of your palm), Salt (big lumpy sea or rock salt best but not essential), Pepper, Garlic (chopped small as poss), Olive oil (a good half mug or so) Oven to 200'C Cut the potatoes in half longways, then cut each half into three, as angular as poss- square edges don't crisp up as well. Toss in olive oil- dribble it over, then stir or shake around in the oven tray, cook in oven for half an hour on 200'C Meanwhile, mix up the garlic, herbs, salt and pepper with a spoon or so of oil, after 45 mins take wedges out and cover as best you can in seasoning (make more if you want) out them back in for 10 or 15 mins, check like a hawk- when brown they are done.


GNOCCHI AND MASCARPONE (VEGGIE) Ingredients: 1 pack potato gnocchi (can use normal pasta when at end of loan), 1 tin chopped tomatoes, 1/3 tub of mascarpone, ½ veg stock cube, 1 onion I appreciate this looks pricey and faffy. But 1 pack potato gnocchi is £1.75, Marscarpone is £1.20 (at Sainsbury's in Fallowfield) and the rest can be made using basics. Its yummy. It really is. If you need persuading look at the prices of premade sauces. Put the kettle on to boil for pasta water Chop up onion, as chunky/fine as you like to have it. Fry in a little oil until they go soft and golden. Use a low heat, high heat means burnt, not faster. Then add the tin of toms, and half veg stock cube, allow to mulch for about 5-10 mins, then stir through mascarpone, don't worry it melts in keep stirring. Put gnocchi in hot water on different hob. Stir sauce while it cooks- gnocchi only takes 5 mins tops. NB can add fried/grilled bacon


LEEK AND BACON TURNOVERS Don't worry its premade pastry I promise!! These are amazing when its cold and dark outside. Makes three generous, four sensible sized. (Veggies replace bacon with cheese) Ingredients: 1 pack bacon (generosity depending), 1 big or 2 small leeks, 1 pack frozen pastry (big supermarkets DO sell it but I have known assistants to lie), 1 pot cream - 250ml should be okay Oven to 180'C Frozen 'Filo' pastry is best, but I would insist that whatever you get , get ready rolled. Don't get stuff you have to roll out yourself, it's a pain. Frozen pastry comes in sheets, leave it out to defrost a couple of hours before you make these, or microwave VERY CAREFULLY on defrost. Fry bacon with a little oil until crispy in biggest pan poss, preferably with lid, use foil for lid otherwiseuse high heat but beware burning Chop leeks into pound coin thickness rings, drain bacon fat out of pan Put leeks in the pan and turn heat right down. Add two spoons of water and a knob of butter, put on lid, or crimp on some foil. Then stir in cream. Cook for 15 mins while you put pastry on baking trays so that half the sheet is on, half off (the other half get folded over) Add hot filling onto pastry (in middle not edges) and fold pastry over to make a parcel. Press edges down with fork, take care not to tear pastry or you will get a leak. Cut a small (3cm) hole at the top for steam. Dribble a spoon of milk over each one, and spread over with finger/back of spoon. Bake in oven for about 40 mins, or until golden brown, and pastry looks puffy.



BSocSci Bible