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BSN curriculum

AS and A Level

2013 | 2014 Internationally British


Contents

Arts faculty

Mathematics faculty

Art and Design 3 Music 5 Music Technology 7

Mathematics 29 Mathematics Further 31

English faculty

Physical Education faculty

Drama 9 English 11

Physical Education 33

Humanities faculty Business Studies 13 Economics 15 Geography 17 Government and Politics 19 History 21 Psychology 23

Languages faculty Dutch 25 Modern Foreign Languages 27

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Sciences faculty Biology 35 Chemistry 37 Physics 39

Technology faculty Food Technology 41 Product Design 43


AS and A2 Level

Art and Design Background Ideally, we would expect students who want to take AS Art and Design to have already followed a GCSE course and to have achieved a grade B or above. However, students who have not followed a GCSE course would need to bring in a portfolio of work, so that their suitability for the course could be assessed. This applies to students who have been educated in different systems, as well as to students who for whatever reason did not take GCSE. In these cases we would be looking at skills, approaches and apparent levels of interest and commitment, as demonstrated in the portfolio of work.

Skills developed in the course The course provides students with opportunities to develop personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures in practical, critical and contextual forms. The course lays an appropriate foundation for further study in Art and Design in Higher Education or for related subjects at University. In addition, it is suitable for the diverse range of students who wish to develop their interest in and enjoyment of Art and Design, fostering its value in lifelong learning.

Syllabus for AS Level Students have a weekly programme split between a portfolio element (1 hour) and the coursework plus examination units (4 hours). All work produced, whether in the studios or for homework is geared towards either the portfolio or the coursework unit up to the end of January, from February onwards 3 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Arts

all work is geared towards the portfolio and the examination unit. We teach the individual and, as such, encourage them to explore ideas in a variety of media – this is important for their artistic development; the Portfolio element of the course allows them to broaden their experience of media to feed into AS and A2 coursework and examination work, whilst also building up suitable work to use in University interview portfolios. The Coursework Portfolio is a collection of work produced to develop new skills and stretch existing ones. This is done alongside the coursework and examination elements and is assessed along with the Coursework Unit. A selection from the portfolio will be added to the student‘s end of course display. The Coursework Project runs from September to January and is based on a series of studies from life, to which each individual student is encouraged to respond in their own unique way. A variety of media should be explored with support from photography as the idea develops, and references to the works of artists should be evident. The final piece should be complex and in an area of strength of the individual, be it Painting; ThreeDimensional Work; Textiles or Printing. The Controlled Assignment runs from February until May. The student chooses from one of five starting points provided by AQA and produces resources from which a series of preparatory studies are created and the student‘s intentions are recorded. Five hours during the preparation process is official examination time. A completed final piece is produced after this, to show the full realisation of ideas. A workbook relating to all three areas and the study visit is kept throughout the course. There is a display of all students‘ AS work in the final term.


AS and A2 Level Assessment for AS Level

Arts

Unit 1

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

The Portfolio and Coursework is worth 50% of the total AS marks (25% of the total A Level marks). It is set and marked by the centre, moderated by AQA.

This course would be of value to students wishing to demonstrate creative thinking and application whatever their plans for future direction.

Unit 2

Students who have studied Art and Design, and wish to focus their career in this direction, can go on to degree courses in: fashion design, architecture, landscape architecture, graphics, advertising, film and television, theatre design, product design, industrial design, teaching, poster design, textile printing, display and exhibitions, gallery work, layout designer, computer-aided design, tailoring, restoration work, design/fashion marketing, printing, window display, photography, magazine layout.

The Controlled Assignment is also worth 50% of the total AS marks (50% of the total A Level marks). It is set and marked by the centre, moderated by AQA. Assessment is by criteria, rewarding the level of response across four assessment objectives.

Syllabus for A2 Level Unit 3 The Personal Investigation is a piece of practical coursework on a theme of the student’s choice which is supported by a piece of academic writing of between 1000 to 3000 words, responding in depth to a relevant aspect of historical/critical/ contextual enquiry, the focus of which is also chosen by the student. Unit 4 The Controlled Assignment. The student chooses from one of eight starting points provided by AQA. Preparation work is undertaken between February and May and culminates in 15 hours of supervised time in which they are expected to fully realise their ideas. A workbook relating to all AS and A2 units is kept throughout the course. There is a display of all students‘ A2 work in the final term.

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Relevant School Excursions All students in Year 12 are encouraged to attend the field course. This field course is a vital element, as the AS and A2 courses require students to resource first hand from works of art; it also offers the opportunity to gather stimuli for further modules. This also gives students intending to follow the A2 specification a chance to decide on the focus of topics for their personal study.

Further information Please contact Mr Cunliffe, the Head of the Art Department and Head of the Arts Faculty senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Music Please note that an A Level Music group will only run if there is sufficient interest.

GCSEs required Students applying are expected to have Music GCSE as one of their qualifying exams for entry into the sixth form. Students wishing to undertake who do not have this must be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of Composition, Performing, Music History and Music Theory/Analysis to a reasonable standard, and sit some short tests where needed.

This course could lead to Further Education at University or Music College/ Conservatoire. There are a wide range of careers available to students who have studied music disciplines at A-level and to degree level. These include work in all branches of the performing arts, ranging from performer or composer to music administration, music education at many levels, music journalism and the ever-expanding opportunities to work in music-based areas of multimedia technology.

What will I be studying? AS Examinations Unit 1: Performing Music Performing one or more solo or ensemble pieces lasting 5-6 minutes in total. This can be vocal or instrumental, or a combination of the two. This unit contributes 30% of the AS Grade

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Arts

Unit 2: Composing Creation of a 3-minute Composition in response to a set exam-board brief. CD-style written sleeve notes to describe aspects of the Composition and influences. An accompanying 3-question written paper outlining other aspects of the composition. This unit contributes 30% of the AS Grade Unit 3: Developing Musical Understanding Study of a number of prescribed set works/extracts in three groups (instrumental music; vocal music and applied music). A 2-hour written paper with 3 sections: listening to and commenting on extracts of music on a CD; questions relating to identification of musical features and their social/historical context; identifying harmonic and tonal features and complete a passage of 4-part SATB. This unit contributes 40% of the AS Grade A2 Examinations Unit 4: Extended Performance Presentation of a 12-15 minute Recital of a balanced programme of solo and/or ensemble music. This can be vocal or instrumental, or a combination of the two. This unit contributes 30% of the A2 Grade Unit 5: Composition and Technical Studies Creation of EITHER two 3-minute Compositions in response to a chosen brief OR two Technical Pastiche Studies OR two One 3-minute Composition and one Technical Pastiche Study. This unit contributes 30% of the A2 Grade


AS and A2 Level Unit 6: Further Musical Understanding Study of a number of prescribed set works, exploring important musical features, context and/or elements of continuity and change. 2-Hour Listening/Written Paper in 3 sections (Aural Analysis; Music in Context; Continuity and Change in Instrumental Music). This unit contributes 40% of the A2 Grade

How is it examined? A mixture of internal assessment with external moderation for Performing/Composing. Musical Understanding is assessed through formal papers which include a listening element.

Will I need to do coursework ? Yes. Performing is assessed coursework, as a final recital. Composition is coursework with external assessment.

What syllabus do you follow? Edexcel Music As and A2

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? Visits will be arranged throughout the course, as well as opportunities to involve with a range of music workshops and involvement with professional musicians.

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance? Universities look favourably on students who have studied Music as one of their A-levels. The self-discipline needed to undertake systematic, regular practice, the developing of creative skills in composing and arranging, along with the academic skills related to studying music history and cultural relevance/context, complemented by the whole social and interactive aspects of being involved in ensembles, makes a Music student’s skills set highly desirable to Universities looking to recruit students onto a wide range of subject courses.

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Arts What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? You need a genuine interest in listening to a wide range of musical styles. You need some basic keyboard-playing ability. We would you to involve in as much music making as is possible. You should have a standard of instrumental performance equivalent to at least Grade 5 and above, and students must take individual lessons in their main performance study instrument/voice. Your level of notational understanding (treble and bass clefs) needs to be equivalent to ABRSM Grade 5 Theory. Ideally, at least a B grade at GCSE. The best grades are always achieved by students who maintain enthusiasm for and commitment towards both the practical and academic work required.

Further information Please contact Mr Saunders, the Head of the Music Department senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Arts

Music Technology

What will I be studying?

Please note that an A Level Music Technology group will only run if there is sufficient interest.

Unit 1: Music Technology Portfolio I – 70% of AS Grade

GCSEs required Students applying are ideally expected to have Music GCSE as one of their qualifying exams for entry into the sixth form. Students wishing to undertake the course who do not have this must be able to demonstrate the following: a genuine interest in listening to a wide range of musical styles, but particularly pop, rock and jazz; a keen interest in learning practically about a range of Music Technologies; a reasonable standard of basic keyboard skills (i.e. can play tunes and some chords); a secure level of notational understanding (treble and bass clefs) equivalent to Grade 5 ABRSM Theory.

This course could lead to Further Education at University or Music College/ Conservatoire. Careers related to Music Technology generally cover the areas of: Recording Studio, Live Performing and Live Sound, Composing, Film Audio and Video Music Production, Television, Radio, ICT Media, Music Education, Music Services and Audio Design/ Electronics.

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AS Examinations

● Produce a MIDI-sequenced Realised Performance recording of a piece of music set by the exam board. ● Produce a 2-4 minute (max.12 tracks) Multi-Track Recording using a mixture of microphone and DI techniques ● Produce a Creative Sequenced Arrangement recording of an exam-board-prescribed song using MIDI, in one of two prescribed styles ● Submit a detailed logbook for all tasks and complete a set of assessed questions relating to the Creative Arrangement Unit 2: Listening and Analysing – 30% of AS Grade ● Study of the musical styles most common in popular music from 1910 to the present day ● Two Special Focus Styles, decided by the exam board, are studied in more depth, with an exploration of musical techniques employed and a knowledge and understanding of context


AS and A2 Level

Arts

A2 Examinations

What syllabus do you follow?

Unit 3: Music Technology Portfolio II – 70% of A2 Grade

Edexcel Music Technology AS and A2

● Produce a MIDI-sequenced backing track PLUS live audio Sequenced Integrated Performance Recording from a recording stimulus specified by the exam board, recreating the sound of the original recording as far as possible ● Produce a 3-5 minute Multi-track Audio Recording (12-24 tracks) based on one of the following two topics: recording at least 4 Acoustic and/ or Orchestral Instruments; recording at least 4 Percussion Instruments. These recordings may be combined with any other acoustic/electric/ amplified instruments or vocals ● Produce a 3-4 minute, six parts/tracks minimum, Composition using Music Technology based on a choice of brief supplied by the exam board. These may include: music for film or TV; electro-acoustic/ electronic soundscape music; popular song (with or without vocals, or possibly for the stage); and submit a detailed logbook for all tasks

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

Unit 4: Analysing and Producing – this unit contributes 30% of the A2 Grade (2 hour exam) ● Study of a wide range of skills relating to analysis, critical listening and music production techniques. This will involve developing and indepth a knowledge of notation(s), audio and MIDI manipulation, editing and postproduction work, in a wide variety of musical styles. ● Students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge of music and the principles of Music Technology through a series of written commentaries, manipulations and production tasks using material on an examination paper and recorded on an audio CD ● 2-hr End Examination.

How is it examined? All assessed coursework and exams are marked externally.

Will I need to do coursework? Yes. 70% of AS and 70% of A2 is coursework, and the majority of the work in each year consists of 60 hours Controlled Conditions coursework.

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Visits will be arranged throughout the course, as well as opportunities to involve with Music Technology workshops and work with professionals in the field.

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance? Universities look favourably on students who have studied Music courses as one of their A-levels. The self-discipline needed to undertake systematic personal musical skills practice, the developing of creative skills in composing and arranging, along with knowledge of how to use industry-standard hardware and software, makes a Music student’s skills set highly desirable to Universities looking to recruit students onto a wide range of subject courses.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? You need a genuine interest in listening to a wide range of musical styles, and computer skills to a reasonable level of fluency and some basic music keyboard-playing ability. We would still like you to involve in as much music making as is possible. You need to be willing to undertake personal research and much background reading to support and expand your practical skills-base. Your level of notational understanding (treble and bass clefs) needs to be equivalent to ABRSM Grade 5 Theory. If you not understand what this is, please come and talk to us in the Music Department. The best grades are always achieved by students who maintain enthusiasm for and commitment towards both the practical and academic work required.


AS and A2 Level

Drama and Theatre Studies GCSEs required A grade B in both GCSE Drama and GCSE English

This course could lead to Courses in Drama and Theatre Studies as a single subject or can be combined with a wide variety of other subjects. It forms a good basis for study in any arts-based subject in combination with, for example, History, Media Studies, Philosophy, Law, Politics and Languages.

What will I be studying? AS Level Unit 1- Performance Workshop: Students will either act in a group or contribute their chosen technical production skill to a performance from a set text and a devised piece. They will work on the ideas of two practitioners. Unit 2- Text in Performance: Students will study a wide range of texts for performance, analysing the role of the director and the actor and looking at elements of design and technical skills.

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English

A2 Level Unit 3 – Performance on a set theme: Students will be expected to work in response to a theme and prepare two performances; one using a published script and one devised by the group. Unit 4 – Text in Context: Students will be asked to discuss two set texts from a prescribed list: one pre-1900 and one post- 1900. Two essays will analyse a synoptic understanding of the texts. Students will also be expected to complete a directorial analysis of an unseen text.

Are there any trips or extracurricular activities linked to this course? Students are expected to be members of the Theatre Appreciation Society where a variety of performances can be seen in The Hague. There is also the annual London Theatre Trip that students are encouraged to join.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Students need to want to perform and learn about how to direct and design theatre too. Enthusiasm, energy and commitment are a must. Students will also need to be comfortable working both in groups and on their own extended research taks.


AS and A2 Level

English

How is it examined?

What syllabus do you follow?

AS Level

WJEC www.wjec.co.uk

Unit 1 – Performance Workshop: 40% of the total AS marks 20% of the total GCE marks

Examination method

This consists of an internally marked and externally moderated performance based on themes from a studied text and incorporating practitioner’s influences.

Written and practical assessment

Unit 2 – Text in Performance: 60% of the total AS marks 30% of the total GCE marks This consists of 1 written paper of two hours and is externally marked. Section A: One pre-1900 text from a prescribed list Section B: One post-1900 text from a prescribed list Section C: Live theatre review A2 Level Unit 3 – Performance on a Set Theme 60% of the total A2 marks 30% of the total GCE marks This consists of externally marked performances/ technical production skills. An evaluation of performance work for both pieces is also required. Unit 4 – Text in Context 40% of the total A2 marks 20% of the total GCE marks This consists of a two and a half hour written paper. The examination is “open text”. Students will answer on two set texts and complete a directorial analysis of an unseen excerpt from a play.

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Coursework Yes – practical performances.

Further information Please contact Ms. Ball, the Head of the Drama department senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

English

English Literature (WJEC)

Objectives: A01: argument; coherence; relevance A02: analysis of form A03: connections and comparisons and interpretations of different readers

GCSEs required

Unit 2: LT2: Coursework 40% of AS

Students are usually expected to have gained a grade B in GCSE English and English Literature. Students coming from different systems of education will be expected to demonstrate a level of proficiency in English deemed as equivalent to GCSE by the school, and to show evidence of having studied set texts in depth.

This course could lead to English Literature can be studied as a single subject in higher education or can be combined with a wide variety of other subjects. It forms a good basis for study in any arts-based subject in combination with, for example, History, Media Studies, Philosophy, Law, Politics, Psychology and languages. Increasingly, Business and Marketing employers are also looking for evidence of advanced literacy, which can be suggested through success in English Literature.

What will I be studying AS Examinations Unit 1: LT1: Poetry and Drama 60% of AS 2 ½ hrs. Open Text Examination ● Poetry [40marks]: Sample Core Text: Heaney Sample Partner Text: Owen Sheers. Assessment

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● Drama: [20 marks] Sample Text: Dancing at Lughnasa A01: as above A02: form as above A04: significance and influence of contexts

A. Prose study (20%) Prose text 1800-1945 + partner text: e.g.; text by same author or another illuminating text: 1500 words. Sample: Emma + Pride and Prejudice; B. Creative Reading: (20%) 2 x 750 words i) Personal creative writing response (written in style of a specific literary genre) ii) Commentary on creative writing response A2 Examinations Unit 3:LT3: Synoptic Period and Genre Study: Coursework (3000 words) 40% of A2 3 texts: 1 prose; 1 poetry; 1 drama/prose/ poetry. (All AOs) Coursework is grouped around themes such as: love, childhood; war or genre such as: satire; gothic; realism. Unit 4: LT4: Poetry and Drama – Synoptic: 2 ½ hrs exam. Closed text. [ALL A0s] 60% of A2 Section A: Poetry (Sample: Donne) 1 question answered out of 5 and compared to any one of 5 unseen poems printed on paper. Section B: Shakespeare and related drama: (Sample: King Lear + Sophocles)


AS and A2 Level How is it examined? The course is examined through a combination of coursework and examination.

Will I need to do coursework ? Yes.

What syllabus do you follow? WJEC www.wjec.co.uk

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? The faculty strongly recommends that students take the opportunity to participate in various theatre trips on offer, including a residential trip to London that takes place annually at the end of the autumn term. We also recommend seeing various visiting authors who come to the Netherlands.

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance? English Literature at A Level develops the following skills that make you an attractive potential university student: ● Excellent communication skills-both written and oral. ● The ability to express your own ideas and opinions. ● The ability to analyse and construct a persuasive argument. The study of English Literature will complement any future studies in the Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences and Law faculties at University.

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English What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? You need to have a good standard of reading and enjoy reading a wide range of literary texts from different periods and genres. The coursework element of the course requires students to be independent learners and self-motivated in their approach. You need to enjoy writing and exploring alternative interpretations and context.

Further information Please contact Mr Elliott, the Head of the English Faculty senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Business Studies

Humanities

This unit contributes 40% of the AS, and therefore 20% of the A level. Unit 2: Managing A Business

GCSEs required The BSN does not offer GCSE Business Studies and the course assumes that all students have not studied the subject at GCSE or MYP. The BSN does not offer GCSE Business Studies and the course assumes that all students have not studied the subject at GCSE or MYP. From a Maths perspective, It is important to feel comfortable in calculating percentages: there are lots of small calculations to perform, so students should have at least a B grade at Maths GCSE. At A2, one of the exams requires two essays of 45 minutes each so students must feel comfortable writing longer analytical pieces of work.

This course could lead to There is a vast array of Business courses at University and often combined with other subjects such as languages. Although many specialise in their preferred field such as IT, Marketing or Finance.

What will I be studying: Year 12 and AS Examinations Unit 1: Planning and Financing a Business Candidates are introduced to the concept of entrepreneurship and how to actually start a business: raising finance, protecting the idea, legal structures etc The second half introduces financial concepts such as preparing budgets and calculating break even points. The focus is therefore on small business startups.

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The core theme is improving the effectiveness of the business by looking at four key areas: 1. Finance – profit margins, break even, cash flow 2. People – motivation, training, organisational structures 3. Operations Management – technology, supply chain management, quality issues 4. Marketing – the marketing mix and the competitive environment This unit contributes 60% of the AS, and therefore 30% of the A level.

What will I be studying: Year 13 and A2 Examinations Unit 3: Strategies for Success Drawing on the key themes from Unit 2, candidates examine corporate objectives, assess performance and develop appropriate strategies. This element has a strong financial analysis element. This unit contributes 50% of the A2, and therefore 25% of the A level Unit 4: The Business Environment and Managing Change This is the most synoptic paper drawing on all areas and assessing business strategy in the light of external factors such as the economy. There are some key elements notably leadership, culture and how businesses adapt to change. We choose global, well known firms to put these ideas into context. This unit contributes 50% of the A2, and therefore 25% of the A level


AS and A2 Level How is it examined? AS Level Unit 1 is a data response paper to mini case study on a business start up. It is 75 minutes and questions vary from 2 to 14 marks. Unit 2 comprises two data response questions each of 45 minutes: there are less definitions and more of the longer questions. A2 Level Unit 3 uses a case study and has longer 10-16 mark questions on each topic area eg financial analysis of a balance sheet. There is an emphasis here on numerical skills, although the calculations are relatively straightforward. The final question is a 36 mark mini-report asking for a justified opinion on the firm’s future strategy. Unit 4 uses a pre-released theme eg the recent UK recession, then puts it into context in the exam eg the effect on the motor trade. Students argue ‘to what extent..?’ does a particular factor affect the business. This is a 40 mark essay. The second question is also a 40 mark essay on leadership, change etc

What syllabus do you follow? AQA

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Humanities Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? There are visits from speakers and trips to local businesses. A stock market game open to all runs through the year. In Year 13, we hope to run an overseas trip each year.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? The key skills are: prioritising issues and analysing situations from an objective position, recognising problems and proposing solutions, making and justifying decisions. Students need to open their eyes to the world around them and recognise why businesses behave in the way they do.

Further information: Please contact Mr Hare, the Head of the Business Studies department senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Economics GCSEs required The BSN does not offer GCSE Economics and the course assumes that all students have not studied the subject at GCSE or MYP. From a maths perspective, it is important to feel comfortable in calculating simple percentages, nothing more; the maths only really kicks in at University level. Students should have secured a B grade in both GCSE maths and English.

This course could lead to There is a vast array of economics/business courses at university and often combined with other subjects such as languages present an ideal foundation for business careers.

What will I be studying: Year 12 and AS Examinations Unit 1: Competitive Markets, how they work and why they fail Better known as microeconomics, candidates are introduced to the concept of scarcity and resource allocation that creates a pricing mechanism. Students learn how to apply supply and demand to a variety of markets and understand why markets might not allocate resources efficiently and how government can respond. Classic topics are price elasticity, effects of taxation, and the negative externalities of production. This unit contributes 50% of the AS, and therefore 25% of the A level.

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Humanities

Unit 2: Managing the Economy Known as macroeconomics. The unit introduces the key measures of economic performance and the main objectives and instruments of economic policy. Aggregate demand and supply are studied looking at basic principles of inflation, unemployment and interest rates. Students should be able to argue there are different ways of dealing with an economic problem and argue for different criteria of success. This unit contributes 50% of the AS, and therefore 25% of the A level.

What will I be studying: Year 13 and A2 Examinations Unit 3: Business Economics and Business Efficiency Drawing on the key themes from Unit 1, candidates examine the nature of competition hence much of the course involvesd examing the beahviour of monopolies and oligopolies from a theoretical perspective using demand and supply but then applying it to the real world. Eg Microsoft. This unit contributes 40% of the A2, and therefore 20% of the A level. Unit 4: The Global Economy Building on the Unit 2 Macro paper, Unit 4 examines issues on a global basis looking at international competitiveness and development issues. This unit contributes 60% of the A2, and therefore 30% of the A level.


AS and A2 Level How is it examined? AS Level Unit 1 starts with 8 multi-choice questions which require written explanation. Students then have a choice of two similar case studies which require longer written responses including diagrams and the ability to evaluate your argument. The exam is 90 minutes. Unit 2 comprises just one data response question and the answers therefore need greater depth and evaluation of economic priorities, and issues. The exam is also 90 minutes. A2 Level Unit 3 is similar to Unit 1 in that there are multi-choice and then a choice from two data response questions. But there is much greater emphasis on evaluation. Unit 4 is 2 hours. The first half is two essays worth 20 and 30 marks each. The second half is a choice between two data response questions that need shorter but analytical responses to the context given eg global recession, banking crisis

What syllabus do you follow? Edexcel

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Humanities Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? There are visits from speakers and trips to local businesses. The Bank of England 2.0 is a ‘beat the chancellor’ competition. In the past, the economics department has visited Washington but this trip is unlikely to run this coming year.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? The key skills are: developing an understanding of economic concepts and theories through a critical consideration of current economic issues, problems and institutions that affect everyday life; analysing and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the market economy and the role of the government within it.

Further information Please contact Miss Kay, the Head of the Economics department senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Geography GCSEs required GCSE Geography at grade B or higher is desirable. It is also recommended that candidates have an equivalent to GCSE English language at grade C.

This course could lead to Geography can be studied as a Science, Arts or Humanities discipline at degree level, either as a pure subject or in conjunction with others, or as specific sub-areas of study such as Geomorphology, Geology, Development Studies, Urban Studies or any number of other specific geographical areas of study. An unusually wide range of courses are offered at University level connected with this subject, and past students have gone on to study areas as diverse as Law, Accounting, and a wide range of Management and Business subjects.

What will I be studying? Geography A Level is intellectually stimulating, demanding and keenly relevant. It aims to not only develop a set of important and transferable skills for the candidate, but is also designed to highlight the main issues and concepts that young adults are likely to encounter in their current and future lives. The syllabus is issue and concept based, with a clear bias towards relevance and application, and a balance between Physical and Human Geography and fieldwork.

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Humanities

AS Level Unit 1: Physical and Human Geography. The Physical core topic is Rivers, Floods and Management, whilst an optional topic is chosen from Coastal Environments, Cold Environments, and Hot Desert Environments. The Human core topic is Population change, and the optional topic is chosen from Health Issues, Food Supply Issues and Energy Issues. Unit 2: Geographical Skills. This involves investigative, cartographic, graphical, ICT and statistical skills, as well as fieldwork, which is undertaken on the residential field course to the Jurassic Coast in South Dorset, UK. A2 Level Unit 3: Contemporary Geographical Issues. Students will study four topics, two from each of the Human and Physical options. These are Plate Tectonics and Associated Hazards, Weather, Climate and Associated Hazards, Ecosystems: Change and Challenge, World Cities, Development and Globalisation, and Contemporary Conflicts and Challenges. Unit 4: Geographical Fieldwork Investigation. This allows students the opportunity to extend an area of the subject content into a more detailed fieldwork study, and is catered for partly through the Dorset trip, plus a single day of data collection in an urban environment in Den Haag.


AS and A2 Level Are there any trips or extracurricular activities linked to this course? All students are required to attend a five day residential field course in South Dorset, UK, in the October of Year 12, followed by a single day of data collection in Den Haag later in that same term. This provides the field work experience and data collection necessary for Units 2 and 4.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Students will be required to read widely, think broadly, and use a wide variety of sources to build up an in depth picture of a topic. They will learn to synthesise such information into a coherent whole, and be critical in their analysis and evaluation. They should also feel inspired by the world around them, and gain both enjoyment and satisfaction from their geographical studies, understanding their relevance to their own lives and the lives of others.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? The study of Geography prepares the student for further studies in the subject and the many other related areas. It also develops very important transferable skills such as critical analysis, synthesis, decision making, investigation, fieldwork and report writing, and develops international understanding, fostering a keen awareness of, and concern for, key global issues. Students studying Geography will be well equipped to move into an extensive range of higher education courses.

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Humanities How is it examined? AS Unit 1 Physical and Human Geography (70% of AS, 35% of A Level) – structured short and extended questions (2 hours). Unit 2 Geographical Skills (30% of AS, 15% of A Level) – structured skills and generic fieldwork questions (1 hour). A2 Unit 3 Contemporary Geographical Issues (30% of A Level) – structured short and extended questions, plus an essay. (2 hours 30 minutes). Unit 4 Geography Fieldwork Investigation (20% of A Level) – structured short and extended questions based on candidates’ fieldwork investigation and fieldwork skills (1 hour 30 minutes).

Will I need to do coursework? No. Not as such. The fieldwork that the students undertake is assessed through a written examination with generic questions rather than a piece of coursework submitted to the board.

What syllabus do we follow? AQA GCE Geography (2030) 2011 onwards. www.aqa.org.uk

Further information: Mr Worster, the Head of the Geography Department and Head of the Humanities Faculty senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Government and Politics GCSEs required

Humanities

of key institutions, and of the relationships amongst them, in the context of multi-level governance. This unit contributes: 50% AS Level/25% A Level. A2 Examinations Unit 3b – Introducing Political Ideologies

You do not need to have studied Government and Politics, although an enthusiasm for the topic is essential. Students should have a B in either English Literature or History.

This unit introduces the major ideologies which have had a significant influence on Western government policy throughout the modern era. Students analyse the core values of each ideology and look at the different ways that the key ideas have been interpreted. This unit contributes 25% A2 Level.

This course could lead to

Unit 4b – Other Ideological Traditions

Students of Government and Politics can take a wide variety of university courses which involve the ability to construct, substantiate and communicate an argument, for example, History, Law, and, obviously, Politics. Government and Politics can be useful preparation for a range of careers including journalism and civil service.

This unit introduces students to ideologies which have developed in response to the mainstream ideologies of liberalism, social and conservatism, studied in Unit 3b. Again, students analyse the core values and the different interpretations of those values for each ideology; nationalism, feminism, ecologism and multiculturalism. This unit contributes 25% A2 Level.

What will I be studying

How is it examined?

AS Examinations

Both AS Units are examined. Each exam is 1hour 20mins. Unit 1 consists of wo structured questions from a choice of four. Unit 2 consists of one stimulus response question from a choice of two and one extended answer from a choice of two questions.

Unit 1 – People and Politics This unit introduces analysis of the key channels of communication between the government and the people. It encourages evaluation of the adequacy of the existing arrangements for ensuring representative democracy and political participation. This unit contributes: 50% AS Level/25% A Level. Unit 2 – Governing the UK This unit is an introduction to the major governmental processes within the UK. It encourages development of critical understanding of the role and effectiveness

19 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Both A2 Units are examined. Each exam is 1hour 30mins. In Unit 3 students must answer three short answers from a choice of five questions and one extended answer from a choice of three questions. In Unit 4, students must answer three short answers from a choice of five questions and one extended answer from a choice of three questions.


AS and A2 Level Will I need to do coursework ? No.

What syllabus do you follow? Edexcel

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? The Government and Politics department has in the past organised trips to Westminster and Edinburgh to visit the British and Scottish Parliaments. These involve the opportunity to meet MPs and MSPs and discuss important topics, for example, the extent of accountability of the government and the impact of devolution on the politics of the UK.

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance? Studying Government and Politics helps you to develop an ability to communicate your ideas effectively, construct an argument by substantiating your analysis with a range of evidence, both verbally and on paper; the capacity to evaluate information and reach independent conclusions; critical reasoning and analytical skills, including the capacity for solving problems and thinking creatively; the capacity to think objectively and approach problems and new situations with an open mind; and an appreciation of the different factors that influence the activities of groups and individuals in society.

20 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Humanities What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Success in Government and Politics is dependent on the ability of students to write an argument based on analysis of different aspects of British politics, using the correct terminology, supported by reference to contemporary British political developments. Students must be prepared to share, defend and, perhaps, change their opinions. You must have an interest in current affairs and bring your up to date knowledge to the classroom.

Further information Please contact Ms. Jackson, the Head of Department for History and Politics senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

History GCSEs required Normally a student starting AS will need to have completed a GCSE or IGCSE History and obtained a grade B. However, occasionally we will accept students who have not studied History before or who have not attained a grade B. It is important that a person has an enquiring mind, an interest in the past and an appreciation of the value of this subject for establishing an understanding of the modern world. If you enjoy investigation, debate and putting forward a well-argued case this is a subject for you.

This course could lead to ‘How can you negotiate with, trade successfully with or report on a country if you know nothing of its history?’ Subjects such as History, at first might not appear to be as useful as more vocational subjects; it may be harder for you to identify a clear career path. There are of course specifically related history careers such as Museum work or Archaeology. However, it is the skills that history imparts which mean that it is really valued in many areas and can lead to range of university courses in areas such as the study of Literature, Media Studies, Marketing, Sociology, Law, Philosophy, Politics and Economics. A qualification in History is an excellent foundation for careers in Law, Journalism, Banking, the Civil Service, Diplomatic Service and accountancy because of specific skills honed from evaluating and analysing evidence and reaching supported judgements. History is also popular with students who wish to study Science and Engineering courses as a qualification in History allows these students to demonstrate a wider and attractive portfolio of skills and qualifications with which to enter university and employment later on. 21 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Humanities

What will I be studying AS Examinations Unit 1: Historical themes in breadth – Option D4 Stalin’s Russia (1924-53) and D6 Ideology, Conflict and Retreat: the USA in Asia, 1950-73. This unit contributes 50% to AS/25% A Level. Unit 2: Depth Study – Option C1 The Experience of Warfare in Britain: The Crimean, Boer and First World Wars, 1854-1929. This unit contributes 50% to AS/25% A Level. A2 Examinations Unit 3: Depth study and Associated Historical Controversies – Option C – The United States: Challenged and Transformed, 1820-1877. This unit contributes A2 value 60%/30% of the total GCE value. Unit 4: Historical Enquiry – CW43 – The Middle East and the Arab-Israeli Conflict c. 1900-2001 This unit contributes A2 value 40%/20% of the total GCE value.

How is it examined? There are examinations at the end of Year 12 for both Units 1 and 2. Both are 1 hour 20mins. Unit 1: Candidates are required to answer 2 questions worth 30 marks each, one from each theme. Unit 2: Candidates are required to answer two source based questions. At the end of Year 13 only Unit 3 is examined. The exam is 2 hours. Unit 3: The paper will be divided into 2 sections. Candidates are required to answer one question from section A.


AS and A2 Level

Humanities

from a choice of and one question from section B out of a choice of two.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

Will I need to do coursework ?

An open mind and the ability to graft! Additionally a willingness to read widely, engage with debates, work independently and be able to write effectively are also important.

Yes in Year 13 – two extended essays, as part of the Unit 4: The Arab Israeli Conflict. These will be complete by the Easter of that year.

What syllabus do you follow?

Further information:

Edexcel.

Please contact Ms. Jackson, the Head of Department for History and Politics senior@britishschool.nl

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? Students will have the opportunity to go on a field trip relevant to the syllabi we follow. In previous years we have organised a field trip to Russia (Moscow and St Petersburg) designed to support the study of Soviet Russia, particularly Stalinism.

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance? Studying history improves the depth and range of your personal transferable skills and allows you to develop critical reasoning and analytical skills, including the capacity for solving problems and thinking creatively, often through extensive reading; intellectual rigour and independence, including the ability to conduct research using different types of tools, such as information and communications technology, and sources; the ability to construct an argument by selecting and ordering relevant evidence and then to communicate findings in a structured, clear and persuasive manner, both orally and in writing; additional communication skills, such as negotiating, questioning and summarising; selfmotivation and self-reliance with the ability to work without direct supervision and manage time and priorities effectively; the ability to discuss ideas in groups, accommodating different ideas and reaching agreement; the capacity to think objectively and approach problems and new situations with an open mind; an appreciation of the different factors that influence the activities of groups and individuals in society.

22 | Curriculum AS and A Level


AS and A2 Level

Psychology GCSEs required There is no prerequisite GCSE Psychology but you will be expected to have English (preferably language and literature) and Maths at B grade, or foreign equivalents. A previous study of Biology and/or History will also be advantageous

This course could lead to Psychology has links with lots of different university courses and careers. It is regarded as a humanities subject or a social science depending on the type of university course. Psychology has a huge variety of university programmes, including sport, business, theatre, politics, biology, medicine, education and, of course, Psychology itself.

What will I be studying? AS Examinations Unit 1: PSYA1: Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology and Research Methods You will study 3 topic areas, namely Memory, Attachment and Research Methodology. Each of these areas is divided into 2 subtopics that encourage greater understanding of how psychological research is carried out and how it is applicable to the real world. You will also study research methodology in a contextualised sense with an opportunity to try out some of the methods that psychologists use and plan their own investigations. This unit contributes 50% of the total AS marks, 25% of the total A2 marks

23 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Humanities

Unit 2: PSYA2: Biopsychology, Social Psychology and Individual Differences You will study 3 further topic areas, namely Stress, Social Influence and Dysfunctional Behaviour. Each of these areas is divided into 2 subtopics that encourage greater understanding of how psychological research is carried out in these areas and how it is applicable to the real world. This unit contributes 50% of the total AS marks, 25% of the total A2 marks A2 Examinations Unit 3: PSYA3 Topics in Psychology You will be expected to develop knowledge, understanding and skills of analysis and evaluation in relation to three topics selected from: Biological rhythms and sleep; Perception; Relationships Aggression; Eating behaviour; Gender; Intelligence and learning; Cognition and development. This unit contributes 25% of the total A Level marks Unit 4: PSYA4 Psychopathology, Psychology in Action and Research Methods You will be expected to develop skills of knowledge and understanding and be able to analyse and evaluate theories and studies relevant to the content for each area of psychology in this unit. They will also be required to undertake practical research activities involving collection, analysis and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data. The unit covers the study of mental disorders; media psychology; the psychology of addictive behaviour; anomalistic psychology; Psychological Research and Scientific Method. This unit contributes 25% of the total A Level marks


AS and A2 Level How is it examined? There are two AS examination papers each of which is 1 hr 30 mins duration. They will consist of structured compulsory questions based on Cognitive Psychology, Developmental, Psychology and Research Methods, Biological Psychology, Social Psychology and Individual Differences content. Questions include short answer, stimulus material and one 12-mark question requiring extended writing.

Will I need to do coursework? The coursework component has been removed from all AS/A level Psychology specifications, however, you will be required to complete all set work throughout the course to deadline as well as full end of unit internal exams throughout the year

What syllabus do you follow? AQA specification A (see AQA website for full details)

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance? Psychology is an extremely popular subject at degree level and as such university places can be highly competitive. As a fairly modern discipline its reputation as an academic subject is growing. Students can use their knowledge of psychology to help them understand human behaviour relevant for a wide range of university courses as well as the more general skills learned in psychology

24 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Humanities What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Although you do not need to have previously studied Psychology, an interest in understanding human behaviour is essential. During the course, you will need to be able to communicate effectively and research information from a variety of sources. You should also be willing to engage in a wide range of reading on these matters. You will be expected to be able to construct and write essays, look at different arguments, evaluate evidence and come to logical conclusions You should enjoy exploring issues dealing with how and why people behave in certain ways and want to find out more about the link between people‘s behaviour and their environment. You should enjoy planning and carrying out investigations to look for any patterns and explanation in to the behaviour of children and adults.

Further information: Please contact Ms. Davies, the Head of the Psychology Department senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Dutch GCSEs required: GCSE Dutch at least grade B (or equivalent level of language competency).

This course could lead to Entrance to British and Dutch universities.

What will I be studying? AS Examinations One exam covering four different topic areas: ● Aspects of daily life sub-topics – The family; Food, drink, health, obsessions and addictions; Transport ● Leisure and entertainment sub-topics – Sport; Tourism and related themes Leisure activities: aspects of cultural life, e.g. film, theatre; the arts as part of leisure time ● Communication and Media sub-topics – Communication technology; the Media ● Education and training sub-topics – School and school life; Work and training

25 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Languages

A2 Examinations One exam covering four different topic areas: ● Society sub-topics – Integration and exclusion; Law and order; Unemployment ● The Environment sub-topics – The individual and the environment; Energy management; Pollution; Conservation of the natural world ● Science and technology: impact and issues sub-topics – Medical progress; Scientific advances;Technological developments ● Culture sub-topics – Literature and the arts; Political issues; Heritage and history

How is it examined? There is one 2 ½ hour exam paper at AS level and one 2 ½ hour exam at A2 Level – both cover 3 skills: Listening, reading, writing.

Will I need to do coursework? Not as part of the examination.

What syllabus do you follow? OCR


AS and A2 Level

Languages

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

Non-residential outings will be organised ad-hoc.

We would like you to have a very open mind towards the language and use all the opportunities your environment gives you to improve. Getting involved socially in the Dutch community will give you a vehicle to make quick progression. In class only the target language is spoken. On this level accessing Dutch news is vital.

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance? Count towards UCAS points in England and Scotland. For Dutch University it is part of the entrance requirements.

Further information: Please contact the Head of Department for Dutch, Mr de Koning senior@britishschool.nl

26 | Curriculum AS and A Level


AS and A2 Level

Modern Foreign Languages French, German and Spanish GCSEs required Your chosen language to GCSE Grade B or its equivalent in other systems. If you do not have one of these qualifications but would still like to enrol on the course because, for example, you have lived abroad please consult the relevant Head of Department.

This course could lead to Proficiency in at least one foreign language is always a boost on any UCAS or university application form. It is also helpful for success in many career paths and an invaluable skill for life. Knowledge of a foreign language strengthens your application to encompass a wider perspective of the world particularly in Business, Law, Management, History, English and even Science and Engineering. Many potential employers look at ability in a language as a valuable skill which will set you apart from others. Taking a language to A level will give you the skills to acquire further foreign languages far more easily, should the need arise

27 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Languages

What will I be studying? AS Examinations Unit 1: Spoken Expression and Response in the target language This unit rewards students for their ability to converse in the language studied on a general topic area that they have chosen in advance. Students will need to demonstrate that they can engage in a discussion in the language studied that relates to a chosen general topic area and allied subtopics. Students will be expected to give relevant and appropriate information, convey opinions, interact and respond to a range of questions. This unit contributes 30 % of AS Marks, 15% of total GCE marks Unit 2: Understanding and Written Response in the target language This unit requires students to understand and convey their understanding of target language texts and recordings. In addition, students will need to produce an essay to demonstrate an ability to manipulate the target language in continuous writing. Students will be expected to recognise and use the target language in a variety of contexts and in relation to a prescribed range of general topic areas.


AS and A2 Level

Languages

A2 Examinations

Unit 2 Listening, Reading and Writing

Unit 3: Understanding and Spoken Response in target language

2 hour 30 minute paper in three sections. Section A requires students to listen to a range of authentic recorded target language material and to retrieve and convey information given in the recording by responding to a range of target-language questions. Section B requires students to read authentic targetlanguage printed materials and to retrieve and convey information by responding to a range of mainly target language text types. Section C requires students to write 200-220 words in the form of a letter, report or article in the target language based on a short printed target-language stimulus.

This unit requires students to demonstrate the effectiveness of their target-language skills by presenting and taking a clear stance on any issue of their choice. They will be expected to interact effectively with the teacher/examiner, defend their views and sustain discussion as the teacher/examiner moves the conversation away from their chosen issue. They will be expected to use the language of debate and argument to discuss the issue and will also be assessed for understanding as well as communication and quality of spoken language. This unit contributes 35% of A2 marks and 17.5% of total GCSE marks Unit 4: Research, Understanding and Written Response in the target language This unit requires students to demonstrate skills in advanced-level target language writing (discursive or creative essay) and translation from English into the target language. The unit also requires students to demonstrate evidence of independent, advancedlevel target language reading and research of a chosen text, play, film or topic area that links to the culture and/or society of a target language-speaking country, countries or community. This unit contributes 65% of A2 marks, 32.5% of total GCE marks

How is it examined? Unit 1 Oral AS 8-10 minute assessment in two sections. Section A requires students to respond to four Edexcel-set questions on a stimulus related to the student’s chosen general topic area. Section B requires the teacher/examiner to engage the student in a discussion that, although still relating to the same general topic area and its linked subtopics, moves away from the main focus of the stimulus. Centres will need to record the full assessment of all students on either cassette or CD.

Unit 3 A2 Speaking Assessment: 11-13 minute assessment Students first outline their chosen issue for about one minute, adopting a definite stance towards the issue. They should then defend and justify their opinions for up to four minutes. The teacher/examiner will then initiate a spontaneous discussion in which a minimum of two further unpredictable areas of discussion will be covered. These will be recorded on CD. Unit 4 A2 Research, Understanding and Written Response 2 hour 30 minute paper in three sections. Section A: A short written translation exercise to test students’ ability to transfer meaning from English into the target language effectively. Section B: A Targetlanguage essay in response to one from a choice of seven questions, linked to the prescribed general topic areas, that invite either discursive or creative writing. Section C: A research-based essay in target language (240-270 words) to reward students for targetlanguage research skills linked to an area of interest to the student that relates to the culture and/or society of a target-language country, countries or community. They have freedom to determine the content of their research (potentially in negotiation with their teacher) but it must relate to the four research-based essay topic areas for this unit. Students are not permitted to take any books, dictionaries or texts into the examination room.

Further information Please contact the Head of Department for the language you are interested in – Mrs Graves (French); Mr Stower (German) or Mr Coombes (Spanish) senior@britishschool.nl

28 | Curriculum AS and A Level


AS and A2 Level

Mathematics GCSEs required The minimum entry level to the course is grade B in the Higher Level GCSE examination. Mathematics A-level can be a challenging subject for some. Please be aware that even students who gained an A or A* at GCSE may find the subject difficult. Ask your Math’s teacher for advice.

This course could lead to A Level Mathematics is a prerequisite for entry to many University courses, especially in the Sciences, Engineering and Economics related degrees and advantageous for many more.

What will I be studying? The course covers a wide range of Mathematical topics, including: Functions, Calculus, Trigonometry, Sequences and Series, Geometry and Numerical Methods. Alongside the topics in Pure Mathematics, the students also choose whether to follow the Mechanics or the Statistics option. If in doubt as to which option to choose then please seek the advice from your Mathematics teacher. AS Level This is the first year of the 2 year A-level course. The students will take three public examinations at the end of Year 12; two examinations in Pure Mathematics and one examination in either Mechanics or Statistics.

29 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Mathematics

A2 Level After completion of the AS course, students can opt to continue Mathematics into Year 13. The course is again examined at the end of the year with two Pure Mathematics examinations and one Mechanics or Statistics paper*. AS Modules ● Pure Maths 1 (C1, Edexcel 6664) Algebra and Functions, Coordinate Geometry in the (x, y) plane, Sequences and Series, Basic Differential and Integral Calculus. ● Pure Maths 2 (C2, Edexcel 6665) Further Algebra, Functions and Coordinate Geometry of the (x,y) plane, Trigonometry, Exponentials and Logarithms, More Differential and Integral Calculus. ● Mechanics 1 (M1,Edexcel 6677)Mathematical Modeling, Vectors, Kinematics of a particle in a straight line, Dynamics of a particle moving in a line or plane, Friction, Statics of a particle, Moments. ● Statistics 1 (S1, Edexcel 6683)Mathematical models in probability, Presentation and summary of data, Probability, Correlation and Regression, Discrete random variables, The Normal distribution. A2 Modules ● Pure Maths 3 (C3, Edexcel 6665) Further Algebra and Functions; Trigonometry, Exponential and Logarithm Functions, Differentiation and Integration. Numerical Methods. ● Pure Maths 4 (C4, Edexcel 6666) Further Algebra and Functions, Sequences and Series, Coordinate Geometry of the (x,y) plane, more complex Differentiation and Integration, Vectors to include vector equations of lines and the scalar product.


AS and A2 Level ● Mechanics 2 (M2, Edexcel 6678)Further Kinematics of a particle moving in a straight line or plane, Centres of mass, Work and energy, Collisions, Statics of a rigid body. ● Statistics 2 (S2, Edexcel 6684) The Binomial and Poisson distributions, Continuous random variables, Continuous distributions, Hypothesis testing to include tests for the binomial parameter p and the mean of a Poisson distribution.

Mathematics What benefit does this subject have for University entrance? Mathematics is an important and popular subject which develops reasoning and problem solving skills. As well as being a respected discipline in its own rights, it is also the backbone for many Science, Engineering and Economics related degrees. There are a wide range of University courses that contain a mathematical element.

Are there any trips or extra activities linked to this course?

How is it examined?

A small group of students are selected to take part in the ISMTF Senior Mathematics competition.

Students sit six examinations of equal weighting for the A Level qualification.

What skills or learning approach do I Will I do coursework? No need for this subject? Mathematics is essentially a skills based subject requiring consistent practices of techniques and frequent reflection on concepts explored. Successful students strive to not only be able to answer questions posed, but to understand where the methods are derived from and why they actually work. It is important that students choosing Mathematics enjoy the subject sufficiently so that even when the going gets difficult, they are prepared to persevere.

30 | Curriculum AS and A Level

What syllabus is followed? Edexcel

Further information Please contact Mr McGee, the Head of the Maths Faculty senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Further Mathematics GCSEs required The minimum entry level to the course is a grade A in the Higher Level GCSE examination, an A* is preferable. We also recommend that the students have achieved a grade A, B or C in the OCR Additional Mathematics Qualification, or in cases where the course has not been offered, the ability to achieve at this level. It is vital that the students have a natural feeling for, and thoroughly enjoy Mathematics if they opt to study this course; the students will receive 10 periods of tuition per week.

This course could lead to The majority of these students will be expecting to include Mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as Physics, Engineering or Computer Science. The qualification can be an asset in preparing students for certain courses at top ranking Universities, courses including Mathematics, Physics, Natural Sciences, Engineering and Economics as well as a host of other undergraduate degree courses.

What will I be studying? In Year 12 the Full A Level Mathematics Course will be studied and examined (please refer to the relevant page.) In Year 13 the students will meet a wide variety of topics including Complex Numbers, Taylor Series, Differential Equations, Matrices, Vectors, Statistics, Advanced Mechanics, Conic Sections and Hyperbolic Functions

31 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Mathematics

A2 Level The course is usually offered at only the A2 level, although on occasion students have chosen to follow three out of the six available modules, resulting in an AS qualification. ● Further Pure Maths (FP1, Edexcel 6674) – Complex numbers, Numerical solutions to equations f(x) = 0, Coordinate systems, Matrix algebra, Series and Proof by Induction. ● Further Pure Maths (FP2, Edexcel 6675)Inequalities, Series, Further Complex Numbers, First and second order differential equations, Polar coordinates, MacLaurin and Taylor Series. ● Further Pure Maths (FP3, Edexcel 6676) – Hyperbolic functions, More complex Calculus using trigonometric and hyperbolic functions, Reduction formulae, Vector and triple scalar products, Conic Sections and Further Matrix algebra. ● Mechanics 2 (M2, Edexcel 6678) – Further Kinematics of a particle moving in a straight line or plane, Centres of mass, Work and energy, Collisions, Statics of a rigid body. ● Mechanics 3 (M3, Edexcel 6679) – Further Kinematics using calculus, Elastic springs and strings, Newton’s Laws of motion, Simple Harmonic motion, Motion in a Circle, Further statics of a rigid body to include equilibrium. ● Statistics 2 (S2, Edexcel 6684) – The Binomial and Poisson distributions, Continuous random variables, Continuous distributions, Hypothesis testing to include tests for the binomial parameter p and the mean of a Poisson distribution.


AS and A2 Level Are there any trips or extra activities linked to this course? A small group of students are selected to take part in the ISMTF Senior Mathematics competition.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Students need to have a strong interest in, and passion for Mathematics. The course is academically challenging and requires not only ability, but also dedication and a rigorous approach to study.

What benefit does this subject have for University entrance? Further Mathematics is held in high regard by Universities and deals with topics that students will often meet during the first year of many undergraduate programmes that contain a strong mathematical element. The qualification can be advantageous to students wishing to apply to top ranking universities in a range of subjects.

32 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Mathematics How is it examined? Students sit six examinations of equal weighting for the A Level qualification.

Will I do coursework? No

What syllabus is followed? Edexcel

Further information Please contact Mr McGee, the Head of the Maths Faculty senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Physical Education AS Physical Education is an Advanced Level Sports course. The AS qualification builds on the knowledge, understanding and analysis skills that you have developed in GCSE PE. You will need to have obtained at least a B grade at GCSE. Although desirable, it is not a requirement that you have studied GCSE PE in the past. Useful background skills include: ● The ability to analyse and respond to performances; ● The ability to synthesise information from a variety of sources; ● The ability to use appropriate equipment confidently, safely and towards a specific goal; ● A good standard of performance in one practical activity area. ● A sound knowledge of the rules and regulations governing the activity of your choice, with a view to being able to perform the role of an official eg, umpire/referee ● A good understanding of how to perform the role of coach/trainer. A2 PE is the second half of the A level course. It builds on the AS level modules exploring psychological, sociological and physiological aspects of sport in more detail.

Skills developed in the course In both the AS and A2 courses you will develop: ● your enjoyment + personal interest in the wider area of sport ● recognition of developments in sport ● greater understanding of your body and its response to training

33 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Physical Education

● understanding of how your body learns new skills ● knowledge of how psychological and physiological factors affect your training and achievements ● the place of sport in society Syllabus for AS Level The subject specification is divided into 2 Units: Unit 1: Opportunities for and the effects of leading a healthy and active lifestyle Students will look at more advanced physiology and the effect exercise has on the body and how to lead a healthy and active lifestyle. Unit 2: Analysis and evaluation of physical activity as performer and/or in adopted roles In this module students will be able to demonstrate their competence in two of three roles in one physical activity (see list attached for available sports). They will have the opportunity to demonstrate their practical ability in a chosen discipline and/or their ability to coach or officiate in their chosen sport/ activity. Assessment for AS Unit 1 2 hour written paper 60% of the AS mark 30% of A2 mark Unit 2 Practical demonstration of two of three roles (performer/coach/official) 40% of the AS mark 20% of the A2 mark Syllabus for A2 Level The subject specification is divided into 2 Units: Unit 3: Optimising performance and evaluating contemporary issues within sport In this unit, students study three separate areas in sport. The first two


AS and A2 Level sections deal with the optimisation of performance through applied physiology and the psychological aspects that influence sport. Unit 4: Optimising practical performance This module will enable students to perform one role (performer, coach or official) in their chosen sport as well as to analyse and reflect on how their knowledge can be used to improve their own performance. Assessment for A2 Level Unit 3 2 hour written paper 30% of the A level mark Unit 4 Demonstration as either a performer, coach or official in one sport (to include an analysis and evaluation of own performance in respective role) 20% of the A level mark

Relevant School Excursions To be advised

34 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Physical Education Possible practical options Artistic/Aesthetic Activities Dance Contemporary/ Creative/Ballet; Diving Trampolining; Gymnastics Athletic Activities Athletics; Cycling (Track, Road, Mountain) Swimming Activities Swimming Outdoor and Adventurous Activities Canoeing/Kayaking; Horse Riding; Sailing/Windsurfing/Kitesurfing; Climbing Mountain Activities; Skiing/Snowboarding Individual Activities Badminton; Fencing; Golf; Judo; Karate; Rowing and Sculling; Squash; Table Tennis; Tennis Boxing; Orienteering; Tae Kwon Do Olympic Weightlifting Team Games Basketball; Cricket; Gaelic Football; Goalball Handball; Hockey(Field/Roller/Ice); Lacrosse Netball; Rugby (Union or League); Soccer Softball/Baseball/Rounders; Volleyball Water Polo

Further information Please contact Dormehl – PE Faculty senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Biology GCSEs required The recommended level of entrance for the A level course is of a minimum of a grade B in either Extension GCSE Biology or Additional Science, or any GCSE equivalent course from abroad.

This course could lead to Degree courses in biology, medicine, environmental science, nursing, food science, sports science, dietetics, dentistry, psychology, biotechnology and pharmacy. Check out the Society of Biology’s website (www.societyofbiology.org) for an excellent account of careers open to young people with biology qualifications at various levels.

What will I be studying? AS Level

Science

Unit 3: ● Part 1: Practical Biology (internally assessed core practicals) ● Part 2: Visit or issue report (externally moderated coursework on a current biological problem) A2 Level Unit 4: ● Topic 5: On the wild side (ecology, photosynthesis) ● Topic 6: Infection, immunity and forensics Unit 5: ● Topic 7: Run for your life (muscle structure and function, respiration, homeostasis and ethics issues of performance-enhancing substances) ● Topic 8: Grey matter (nervous system, plant responses and GMOs) Unit 6: ● Part 1: Practical Biology (internally assessed core practicals) ● Part 2: An individual practical investigation/ practical examination

Unit 1: Lifestyle, Transport, Genes and Health ● Topic 1: Lifestyle, health and risk (biochemistry, structure and function of the cardiovascular system) ● Topic 2: Genes and health (cell membranes, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, inheritance, gene therapy and genetic screening) Unit 2: Development, Plants and the Environment ● Topic 3: The voice of the genome (cell ultrastructure, cell division, cell differentiation) ● Topic 4: Biodiversity and natural resources (structural plant tissues, biodiversity and conservation)

35 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Are there any trips or extracurricular activities linked to this course? Yes. All students attend a field trip in the first term of Year 13. This is part of the compulsory core practical in ecology.


AS and A2 Level

Science

What benefits does this subject have for University entrance? Biology is one of the ‘traditional’ sciences, highly regarded by universities as a subject providing a strong background in scientific theory and critical thinking as well as practical skills in designing, analysing and interpreting experimental data. There has been rapid development in the study of biology and we are set to enter the ‘biological revolution’ which affect us all. Following a course in biology will allow you to make informed and valid conclusions over many ethical, environmental and biotechnological issues which occur today.

Will I need to do coursework? Yes. Please see above.

What syllabus do you follow? Edexcel www.edexcel.com

Further information: Mr Kettle, the Head of the Science Department senior@britishschool.nl

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? A level Biology students are required to extend and develop existing scientific knowledge and practical skills. Biology is the study of living things so an interest in humans, animals and plants is helpful. A sound mathematical background at GCSE is required as basic statistics will be learned.

How is it examined? Unit

Duration (hours)

Weighting (%)

Format and syllabus coverage

1

20

Structured questions on topics 1 and 2 and corresponding core practicals

2

20

Structured questions on topics 3 and 4 and corresponding core practicals

3

n/a

10

Externally moderated coursework assignment

4

20

Structured questions on topics 8 and 7 and corresponding core practicals

5

20

Structured questions on topics 5 and 6 and corresponding core practicals

6

1

20

Externally moderated coursework assignment/written practical examination

36 | Curriculum AS and A Level


AS and A2 Level

AS/A2 Chemistry GCSE required The recommended level of entrance for the AS course is as a minimum of grade B in Extension GCSE Chemistry or other equivalent GCSE course. Alternatively, a minimum of a grade B is required in Additional Science, or any other GCSE equivalent course.

This course could lead to At the end of the course students could follow courses such as: Chemistry, Environmental Science, Medicine, Pharmacy, Chemical Engineering.

The students will be studying Throughout the course students will acquire theoretical knowledge of chemical processes and practical skills that enable them to characterise and apply their knowledge, furthermore to analyse, evaluate and synthesize subject related information. The AS course contains three units: Unit 1 The Core Principles of Chemistry: Formulae, equations and amounts of substance, Energetics, Atomic Structure and the periodic table, Bonding, Introductory Organic Chemistry. Unit 2 Applications of Core Principles of Chemistry: Shapes of molecules and ions, Intermolecular forces, Redox, The periodic table – groups 2 and 7, Kinetics, Chemical Equilibria, Organic Chemistry, Mass spectra and IR, Green chemistry.

37 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Science

Unit 3 Chemistry Laboratory Skills I: This unit contains practical assessment that covers the content of Units 1 and 2. The students will develop skills in qualitative observations, quantitative measurements and preparations. The A2 course contains three units: Unit 4 (General Principles of Chemistry I): How fast? (rate of reaction); How far? (entropy); Equilibria; Acid-base equilibria; Further organic chemistry; Spectroscopy and chromatography. Unit 5 (General Principles of Chemistry II): Redox and transition metals; Organic chemistry – arenes, Nitrogen compounds and synthesis. Unit 6: Chemistry Laboratory Skills II: This unit contains practical assessment that covers the content of Units 4 and 5. The students will develop skills in qualitative observations, quantitative measurements and preparations. Benefits of studying Chemistry for University entrance: The AS/A2 course will enable students to show the inter-relationship between the development of the subject and its application (social, economic, environmental and technological) and recognise the value of chemistry to society and how it may be used responsibly.


AS and A2 Level Skills and learning approach needed for studying this subject The qualification integrates theory and relevant practical work for the topics studied in the course. The students will need to be able to communicate effectively, research and think critically about chemical problems. This qualification is suitable for students who have an interest in, and enjoyment of chemistry; enjoy carrying out investigations by the application of imaginative, logical and critical thinking.

How will I be assessed? AS Chemistry written examination Paper 1 – Unit 1 (40% of the total AS marks) The examination will be 1 hour 30 minutes and have 80 marks. This paper contains a combination of multiple choice and structured questions. Paper 2 – Unit 2 (40% of the total AS marks) The examination will be 1 hour 30 minutes and have 80 marks. This paper contains a combination of multiple choice and structured questions. AS Practical assessment (course work) Unit 3 (20% of the total AS marks): Chemistry Laboratory Skills I This unit contains practical assessment that covers the content of Units 1 and 2. The students will complete a number of experiments designed by Edexcel and they will be assessed in three skill areas: qualitative observations, quantitative measurements and preparations. A2 Chemistry written examination Paper 4 – Unit 4 (40% of the total A2 marks) The examination will be 1 hour 40 minutes and have 90 marks. This paper contains a combination of multiple choice and structured questions. Paper 5 – Unit 5 (40% of the total A2 marks) The examination will be 1 hour 40 minutes and have 90 marks. This paper contains a combination of multiple choice and structured questions. A2 Practical assessment (course work) Unit 6: (20% of the total A2 marks): Chemistry Laboratory Skills II This unit contains practical assessment that covers the content of Units 4 and 5. The students will complete a number of experiments designed by 38 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Science Edexcel and they will be assessed in three skill areas: qualitative observations, quantitative measurements and preparations.

What syllabus do you follow? We follow the Edexcel GCE 2008 course, the AS unit code is 8CH01 and the A2 unit code is 9CH01. More information about the AS and A2 Edexcel course can be found on www.edexcel.com

Further information: Ms Bukovinszki, the Head of the Chemistry Department senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Physics GCSEs required Ideally grade B or above in Extension GCSE Physics or a minimum of a grade B in Additional Science. It will be very helpful to have at least a grade B in GCSE Mathematics.

This course could lead to Physics leads on to a wide range of courses and careers. You could go on to use Physics to support other qualifications or progress onto further studies or employment; examples include: courses ranging from Physics, the Sciences and Medicine to Engineering, Radiography and Biotechnology.

What will I be studying? AS ● Unit 1: Includes Mechanics (rectilinear motion, forces, energy and power) and Materials (flow of liquids, viscosity, Stokes’ Law, properties of materials, Young’s’ modulus and elastic strain energy, ● Unit 2: Comprises Waves (including refraction, polarization, diffraction and standing waves), Electricity (current, resistance, emf and internal resistance of cells and negative temperature coefficient thermistors) and the Wave/Particle nature of light. ● Unit 3: Practical aspects of the AS course including planning experiments, collecting data, analysing experimental results and making conclusions.

39 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Science

A2 ● Unit 4: This unit develops the study of mechanics begun in AS to include further mechanics (momentum and circular motion), the unit also involves the study of electric and magnetic fields, and particle physics. ● Unit 5: This unit includes thermal energy, nuclear decay, oscillations, astrophysics and cosmology. ● Unit 6: Practical aspects of the course including planning an experiment, carrying out an experiment and analyzing experimental results.

How is it examined? AS: 50% of A-level ● Unit 1: Written Paper (1 h 30 mins) 20% ● Unit 2: Written Paper (1 h 30 mins) 20% ● Unit 3: Alternative to Practical Written Paper (1 h 20 mins) 10% A2: 50% of A-level ● Unit 4: Written Paper (1 h 30 mins) 20% ● Unit 5: Written Paper (1 h 30 mins) 20% ● Unit 6: Alternative to Practical Written Paper (1 h 20 mins) 10%

Will I need to do coursework? Students sit the Alternative to Practical Written Paper instead of coursework. However, practical skills are developed throughout the course through experiments and reports written by students.


AS and A2 Level

Science

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

A trip to a local Science Museum is arranged during activities week of Year 12.

The study of A-level Mathematics and Mechanics is not compulsory but is strongly advised. Those considering a University course in Physics, Engineering or related subject will find Mathematics is required.

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance? Physics is a highly valued course and can be used to support a wide variety of University course due to the mathematical content and wide range of skills, which it helps to develop.

40 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Further information Please contact Mr Kettle, the Head of the Physics Department and Head of the Science Faculty senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

Food Technology

Technology

● Unit 1: Materials, Components and Application ● Unit 2: Learning Through Designing and Making. A2 Examinations

GCSEs required It would be beneficial for any student undertaking the AS course in Food Technology to have a GCSE in Food or Design Technology/Food Technology. A sound understanding of nutrition and an interest in food based practical skills would also be beneficial. In order to undertake Design and Technology – Food, A2 students must have followed the Design and Technology- Food AS course.

This course could lead to Food Science degree – Food Technologist, Teaching, Dietician, food marketing and journalism. BSC and BA Food based courses are available in a selection of UK universities. Design and Technology: Food is recognised as an entry qualification for a very wide range of Higher Education courses and employment.

What will I be studying? AS Level At AS, students study nutrition and design, and making food products. Knowledge of food science and the wide range of materials and components used in the making of food products are developed. Students are given the opportunity to develop and solve a problem relating to food design and making in the coursework, whilst the examination tests knowledge, understanding and design skills. They gain an understanding of industrial and commercial practices within the area of Food Technology. Students study for the following two modules:

41 | Curriculum AS and A Level

At A2, students build further upon the knowledge and practical skills gained at AS level. Students continue to develop design work, alongside an understanding of food science, processes and commercial food manufacture. The A2 course comprises two modules: ● Unit 3: Design and Manufacture ● Unit 4: Design and Making Practice

How is it examined? AS Level The Advanced Subsidiary (AS) award comprises of the following two compulsory assessment units. ● Unit 1: Written paper – Food and Nutrition 2 hours (50 % of the total AS) ● Unit 2: Coursework This is a coursework module and is based on the theme of “learning through designing and making”. This can take the form of a full design and make activity or a series of activities which form a portfolio. Students must complete practical work to design and make a food product adapted to meet the nutritional needs of a consumer group. This is an extensive piece of work as it accounts for 50% of the marks at AS level. A2 Level The Advanced level comprises of the following two compulsory assessment units. ● Unit 3:Written paper– Food and Nutrition 2 hours (50% of the total A2) ● Unit 4: Coursework (50% of the total A2)


AS and A2 Level

Technology

The theme of the coursework at A2 is Designing and Making in practice. Candidates identify a problem and investigate the issue and then develop a new and exciting marketable product. Industrial practice has to be considered at each stage of the work. Students will be involved in investigations and developing a final outcome.

What benefits does this subject have for University Entrance?

Will I need to do coursework?

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

As stated above this is a major part of both the AS/A2 course. Practical work is a major feature of this work. Coursework makes up 50% of the final marks.

What syllabus do you follow? AQA Design and Technology: Food.

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? Visit to Mondriaan Hotel School.

42 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Students planning to complete practical/coursework based subjects will find this course of great value. The use of ICT is an extensive part of completing the design portfolio of work.

An interest in Food and Nutrition, both theoretical and practical. ICT for the completion of coursework.

Further information Please contact Mrs Moore, the Head of Faculty for Technology senior@britishschool.nl


AS and A2 Level

3D Product Design GCSE’s required The course is suited to students that have some prior knowledge of the subject however it is not essential. Those students that have taken a GCSE in Design and Technology must have obtained at least a grade B. Students that have no experience will be expected to sit an entrance exam to test their suitability for the course.

The course could lead to Product Design is a versatile course that can lead to a variety of creative and technical careers some of which include Industrial Designer, Furniture Designer, Quality Assurance, Engineering (Mechanical, Civil, Structural), Architecture, Computer Aided Designer, Computer Aided Manufacturing, Sustainable technologies, Graphic Designer, Set Designer and Interior Designer.

What will I be studying? The Product Design course has been designed to encourage students to take a broad view of design and technology and to develop their ability to design and make products to a commercial level. Students will learn to appreciate the complex relations between design, manufacture and marketing as well as how technology both old and new impacts on our society.

43 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Technology

Below are examples of some of the areas of knowledge that will be addressed during the course:● Identify a design need and respond effectively and creatively. ● Investigate current solutions to problems and develop improvements based upon the existing products flaws. ● Research and analyse effectively information that can be used in the development of a solution. ● Knowledge of particular technological concepts and the ability to apply them. ● The ability to develop ideas based upon a design criteria. ● Selection of suitable materials and techniques for given purposes. ● Knowledge of human needs including ergonomics, design for inclusion and for a sustainable environment. ● Develop a critical understanding of the influences of the processes and products of design and technological activities from a contemporary and historical perspective. ● How the use of ICT can be used to enhance both in design and manufacture. ● Understand the properties of materials and methods of manipulating them both in a school environment and commercially.

Are there any trips or extracurricular activities linked to this course? Where possible we seek to observe design and manufacture in action, this is carried out by visiting several commercial sites.


AS and A2 Level What benefits does this subject have for University entrance? Product Design prepares students to take part in the development of tomorrow’s rapidly changing world. Creative thinking encourages them to make positive changes to their quality of life. The course encourages young people to become autonomous and creative problem-solvers, both as individuals and as part of a team.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Imagination, creative problem solving, enthusiasm and a willingness to work hard will be essential for a successful completion of the course. Recognise and overcome challenges and constraints when working towards a final solution. Understand how to draw on a range of skills and knowledge from other subject areas.

How is it examined? Year 12 AS Unit 1: Materials, Components and Application A written theory paper of 2 hours that is a combination of compulsory limited response questions and design based questions based upon particular design problems/needs. 50% of the total AS marks and is 25% of the total A Level marks.

Technology Year 13 A2 Unit 3: Design and Manufacture A written theory paper of 2 hours will test the candidates‘ understanding of the connections between the different elements of the subject. This takes the format of 3 extended essay type responses. The exam is 25% of the total A Level marks Year 13 A2 Unit 4: Design and Making Practice (60 hours) A larger more demanding electronic portfolio that records the evidence of a single design and make activity. The coursework 25% of the total A Level marks

Will I need to do coursework? You will be required to produce a portfolio of work over the 2 years. See the above description for more detail.

What syllabus do you follow? AQA www.aqa.org.uk

Examination method Written exam x 1 for AS Written exam x 1 for A2

Coursework Yes

Year 12 AS Unit 2: Learning Through Designing and Making (50 hours) An electronic design portfolio that is made up of three small projects which will have at least two practical outcomes. The coursework is 50% of the total AS marks and 25% of the total A Level marks.

44 | Curriculum AS and A Level

Further information Please contact Mr Windsor the Head of Department for Design and Technology senior@britishschool.nl


Curriculum AS & A level  

Curriculum information AS & A level

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