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ixt BSN curriculum

International Baccalaureate Diploma and Career-related Programmes

2017 | 2019 Internationally British


International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) Group 1 English Dutch

Group 2 Modern Foreign Languages Note for native speakers

Group 3 Economics Geography History Psychology

Sixt

International Baccalaureate Diploma and Careerrelated Programmes

Group 4 Biology Chemistry Computer Science Design Technology Physics

Group 5 Mathematics Maths Studies

Group 6 Music Visual Arts

International Baccalaureate Career-related Programme (IBCP) The IB Career-related Programme BTEC National Level 3 Diploma in Business


IB Group 1  2017 | 2019

English A Higher and Standard level For the English A course (both levels), students are usually expected to have gained at least a grade 6 in GCSE English and either English Literature or Drama Students coming from different systems of education will be expected to demonstrate a level of proficiency in English deemed as equivalent to GCSE by the school, and to show evidence of having studied set texts in depth. Students studying English A will be expected to be keen independent readers.

Skills developed in the course The focus of this course is to allow candidates to study up to fifteen works of literature in English, varied by place, period, genre, style and context; these works of literature include five works which were originally not written in English. These works of literature are to be regarded as works of art, and their writers, as craftsmen and craftswomen. The intention is to tailor the works chosen to particular needs and interests of candidates. All the works studied offer opportunities to enrich candidates‘ international awareness and help them develop attitudes of tolerance, empathy and respect for different perspectives. The World Literature works in particular will help to broaden candidates‘ perspective on cultures and languages other than their own. The aim is to help candidates to a personal appreciation and enjoyment of literature; students will engage in independent literary criticism. Candidates will be introduced to ways of approaching and analysing literature which will help them to make connections and articulate relationships between different literary works. Through close and detailed study of these texts and the techniques their writers

Literature

have used, candidates will also develop and practise their powers of expression, both written and oral; they will learn to structure their ideas and arguments in a logical, sustained and persuasive way.

IB syllabus The English A course is based on the study of literature texts including prose, poetry and drama from past to present. The texts are a combination of English and World Literature which has been translated into English. The course is based upon the study of four units over two years, in which 13 texts are studied at Higher Level and 10 at Standard Level. Students will be expected to read these predominately in their own time so that lessons can be devoted to analysis, discussion and debate. The units covered include: ● Part 1: Literature in Translation ● Part 2: a detailed study of chosen texts from a group linked by genre ● Part 3: study of a group of works ● Part 4: a detailed study of a particular genre.


IB Group 1  2017 | 2019

Literature

Assessment

Relevant school excursions

Internal assessment: 30%. This is comprised of two compulsory oral assessments, each worth 15%:

The English and Drama Faculty organise regular visits to the theatre and to hear writers speak at festivals such as ‘Crossing Borders.’

● One presentation based on a chosen text from Part 4 ● An individual oral commentary based on a single text (SL) or two texts (HL) from Part 2. External assessment: 70%. This is comprised of external examinations and coursework: ● For Higher Level, one written coursework assignment (20%). ● For Standard Level, one written coursework assignment (20%). ● Two written papers in examination conditions. The examination tasks are a written commentary on an unseen text and an essay (25% each).

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? English Literature can be studied as a single subject in higher education or can be combined with a wide variety of other subjects. It forms a good basis for study in any arts-based subject in combination with, for example, History, Media Studies, Philosophy, Law, Politics and languages.

IB English students are also invited to attend both Theatre Appreciation in The Hague and the London Theatre Trip in December. These help considerably with the study of play texts.

Further information Please contact Mrs Bradley Head of the English Faculty anna.bradley@britishschool.nl


IB Group 1  2017 | 2019

Dutch A Higher and Standard level For the Dutch language A courses; Literature, or Language and Literature (Higher Level and Standard Level), students are expected to be native speakers. They also need to be keen independent readers with close reading skills. The Dutch department offers both language A options at Higher as well as at Standard level. With either of those, provided the student has also opted for English A, a bi-lingual diploma can be obtained.

Language A: literature Skills developed in the course The focus of this course is to allow candidates to study up to fifteen works of literature in Dutch, varied by place, period, genre, style and context; these works of literature include three works which were originally not written in Dutch. Candidates will be introduced to ways of approaching and analysing literature which will help them to make connections and articulate relationships between different literary works. Through close and detailed study of these texts and the techniques their writers have used, candidates will also develop and practise their powers of expression, both written and oral; they will learn to structure their ideas and arguments in a logical, sustained and persuasive way.

Literature

IB syllabus The Dutch A course is based on the study of literature texts including prose, poetry and drama from past to present. The texts are a combination of Dutch and World Literature which has been translated into Dutch. The course is based upon the study of four units over two years, in which 13 texts are studied at Higher Level and 10 at Standard Level. Students will be expected to read these predominately in their own time so that lessons can be devoted to analysis, discussion and debate.

The units covered include ● Part 1: World Literature (SL 2, HL 3) ● Part 2: a detailed study of chosen texts from a group linked by genre (SL 2, HL 3) ● Part 3: study of a group of works (SL 3, HL 4) ● Part 4: a detailed study of a particular genre. (SL 3, HL 3)

Assessment Internal assessment: 30%. This is comprised of two compulsory oral assessments, each worth 15%: ● One presentation based on a chosen text from Part 4 ● An individual oral commentary based on one text chosen from Part 2. External assessment: 70%. This is comprised of external examinations and coursework: ● For Higher Level, two written coursework assignments (10% each). ● For Standard Level, one written coursework assignment (20%). ● Two written papers in examination conditions. The examination tasks are a written commentary on an unseen text and an essay (25% each).


IB Group 1  2017 | 2019 Language A: language and literature Skills developed in the course Candidates will be introduced to ways of approaching and analysing fictional and non-fictional texts which will help them to make connections and articulate relationships between different literary works. Through close and detailed study of these texts and the techniques their writers have used, candidates will also develop and practise their powers of expression, both written and oral; they will learn to structure their ideas and arguments in a logical, sustained and persuasive way.

IB syllabus The Dutch A course is based on the study of fictional and non-fictional texts. The fictional texts are a combination of Dutch and World Literature which has been translated into Dutch. The course is based upon the study of four units over two years, in which 13 texts are studied at Higher Level and 10 at Standard Level. Students will be expected to read these predominately in their own time so that lessons can be devoted to analysis, discussion and debate. The units covered include: ● Part 1: language in cultural context ● Part 2: Language and mass communication ● Part 3: study of a group of literary texts in a particular context (SL 2, HL 3) ● Part 4: a detailed study of a group of works (SL 2, HL 3)

Literature Assessment Internal assessment: 30%. This is comprised of two compulsory oral assessments, each worth 15%: ● An individual oral commentary based on one of the literary texts ● Group or class oral. External assessment: 70%. This is comprised of external examinations and coursework: ● For Higher Level, two written coursework assignments (10% each). ● For Standard Level, one written coursework assignment (20%). ● Two written papers in examination conditions. The examination tasks are a written commentary on an unseen text and an essay (25% each).

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? The level of Dutch studied for language A will enable you to enter Dutch Universities without any reservation. At the same time, the different tasks related to language A will be an excellent preparation for the set tasks at University level. Research and analysis skills are tested at the highest level.

Relevant school excursions Dutch Theatre and Film productions in relation to studied texts. Visit to the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in Den haag

Further information Please contact Mr De Koning Head of the Dutch Department bill.dekoning@britishschool.nl


IB Group 2  2017 | 2019

Modern Foreign Languages Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required Your chosen language to GCSE Grade B or its equivalent in other systems. If you do not have one of these qualifications but would still like to enrol on the course because, for example, you have lived abroad please consult the relevant Head of Department.

This course could lead to Proficiency in at least one foreign language is always a boost on any UCAS or university application form. It is also helpful for success in many career paths and an invaluable skill for life. Knowledge of a foreign language strengthens your application to encompass a wider perspective of the world particularly in Business, Law, Management, History, English and even Science and Engineering. Many potential employers look at ability in a language as a valuable skill which will set you apart from others. Ab Initio – Standard Level Italian Is for a beginner who has little or no previous knowledge of learning this language.This would suit students who have not enjoyed great success with their existing language study or those who are keen to explore new linguistic experiences.

Language Acquisition

Language B – Standard Level Dutch, French, German and Spanish This course is for the student who is good at their chosen language with 2 to 5 years’ experience but does not wish to continue study of the language beyond the IB diploma. Language B – Higher Level Dutch, French, German and Spanish This course is for the student who has a high level of proficiency at their chosen language and intends to study the language for a future career or as a valuable skill for their future studies. Previous study of the language for 4 to 5 years is an advantage at Higher Level.

What will I be studying? The Italian Ab Initio Standard Level course is organised into three themes: Individual and society, Leisure and Work and Urban and rural environment. Each theme has a list of topics that provide the student with opportunities to practise and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriateley in a defined range of everyday situations.


IB Group 2  2017 | 2019

Language Acquisition

The Higher and Standard Level course is based around three core themes; Communication and Media, Global Issues and Social Relationships with a further 2 options chosen from the following themes; Cultural Diversity, Customs and Traditions, Health, Leisure and Science and Technology.Students will continue to improve their ability to use and understand the language through the study and use of a range of written and spoken material. Such material will extend from everyday oral exchanges to literary texts and will be related to the cultures concerned in order to enable students to develop mastery of language skills and intercultural understanding. Alongside the quality of the language used, more importance is accorded to the style and content of communication.

How is it examined? External Assessment

70%

● Paper 1: (1 hour 30 minutes) which tests the 25% receptive skills with text-handling exercises on four written texts at Standard Level and 5 texts at Higher Level. ● Paper 2: (1 hour 30 minutes) which tests the 25% written productive skills through one writing exercise of 250–400 words from a choice of five questions at Standard and Higher Level, with an additional response of 150–250 words to a stimulus text for Higher Level students. ● Written Assignment (completed at home) 20% which tests written skills and the ability to analyze texts and literature. You will be required to produce a written exercise plus a rationale of the written text that you produce. At Standard Level you may choose the topic that you write about from the options, whilst at Higher Level it is based on one of the literary texts studied. Internal Assessment: Internally assessed by the teacher and moderated by the IB

30%

● Individual oral: (8–10 minutes) 20% 15 minutes preparation time and a 10 minute maximum presentation and discussion with the teacher. ● Interactive Oral Activity Three classroom activities over the course 10% of study assessed by the teacher.

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? The French, German and Spanish Departments all run Field Courses to the countries of the languages studied. The Dutch department will organise appropriate day trips or exchanges in the close community. It is recommended that you attend, as appropriate tasks designed to promote language skills and cultural understanding are set during the trips and will help to prepare elements of the exam (especially the oral).

How does the Higher Level differ to the Standard level? There is a common syllabus at Standard Level and Higher level (with literature as an additional component of the Higher Level course). Both courses give students the possibility of reaching a high degree of competence in the language while exploring the cultures where the language is spoken. The courses aim to develop the students’ linguistic competence and intercultural understanding. The differences are determined by a greater depth of study of the themes, different assessment criteria, literature coverage and longer teaching hours at Higher Level.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? General reading is encouraged in your chosen language, texts, journals and newspapers. An understanding of writing in different styles – formal letters, newspaper articles, diary entries and speeches. An understanding of grammar will also help with your written work as well as supporting your ability to discuss and offer opinions on a range of subjects.

Further information Please contact the Head of Department for the language you are interested in – Mr Coombes (Spanish) john.coombes@britishschool.nl Mrs Graves (French) tansy.graves@britishschool.nl Mr Stower (German) matthew.stower@britishschool.nl Miss Smith (Italian) annemarie.smith@britishschool.nl


IB Group 2  2017 | 2019

IB Languages Note for native speakers You may wish to opt to study your mother tongue as part of the IB programme. In this case we would very much encourage students to opt for the A (Language and Literature) option. Along with your A in English this would give you the possibility of gaining a bi-lingual certificate. We can offer this option in Dutch, French, German and Spanish and can also make arrangements for this to be offered in Italian and Chinese. In these languages you can opt for A Language and Literature at Higher or Standard Level. If your mother tongue is not on this list, we may still be able to help you through our Mother Tongue Enrichment Programme – although normally this is only available at Standard Level. If you are not interested in the bi-lingual certificate and decide to opt for Language B (which is not intended for native speakers) then the school policy follows the advice given from the Dutch and other Ministries of Education that this would only be allowed at Higher Level. If you wish to pursue studies of your mother tongue as part of the IB, please sign up for the Language B options on the on-line form and then please contact Miss Smith, annemarie.smith@britishschool.nl in which you outline your preferred course of study.

Further information Please contact Miss Smith annemarie.smith@britishschool.nl

Language Acquisition


IB Group 3  2017 | 2019

Economics Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required The BSN does not offer GCSE Economics and the course assumes that all students have not studied the subject at GCSE or MYP. From a maths perspective, it is important to feel comfortable in performing simple calculations often involving percentages. The IB, unlike the A Level, has a numerical paper designed to test the economic numeracy of HL students. Students should have secured a grade 6 in GCSE Maths and English.

This course could lead to There is a vast array of economics/business courses at university and often combined with other subjects such as languages present an ideal foundation for business careers.

What will I be studying? Standard Level: ● Microeconomics – resource allocation and scarcity, the market forces of supply and demand, price elasticity, market failure and government responses. ● Macroeconomics – economic activity, aggregate demand and supply, fiscal/monetary and supplyside policies.

Individuals and Societies

● International Economics – Trade, exchange rates, balance of payments, economic integration ● Development Economics – measuring development, foreign aid, international debt and the associated problems Higher Level: Each of the four areas is developed in more detail but there is a significant increase in the micro section examing the theory of the firm (monopolies, oligoplies, perfect competition).

How is it examined? Paper 1 is an essay paper. Duration 1 hr 30 minutes. Students must write 2 essays, one micro, one macro, each from a choice of 2. Paper 2 is data response. Duration 1 hr 30 minutes. Students answer 2 questions, one development, one international from a choice of 2 Paper 3 (Higher Level only) The numerical paper. Duration 1 hour.

Will I need to do coursework? Yes. This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different sections of the syllabus and on published extracts from the news media. Maximum 750 words each. This counts for 20% of the total marks for both Standard and Higher Level


IB Group 3  2017 | 2019

Individuals and Societies

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

There are visits from speakers and trips to local businesses. The Bank of England 2.0 is a ‘beat the chancellor’ competition.

The key skills are: developing an understanding of economic concepts and theories through a critical consideration of current economic issues, problems and institutions that affect everyday life; analysing and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the market economy and the role of the government within it.

Further information Please contact Miss Kay Head of the Economics Department rachel.kay@britishschool.nl


IB Group 3  2017 | 2019

Geography Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required Whilst it is advantageous to have studied the subject at GCSE or IGCSE, in which case you are required to have a grade B, it is also possible to study Geography at either Higher or Standard level with no previous experience of the subject.

This course could lead to As well as Geography itself and other related courses such as Environmental Science, Meteorology, Geology, Sociology, Urban Planning and Oceanography, past students have gone on to study areas as diverse as Law, Accounting, and a wide range of Management and Business subjects.

What will I be studying? Standard Level Core Theme : Geographic perspectives – global change ● Population distribution – change and possibilities ● Global climate – vulnerability and resilience ● Global change in resource consumption, security and stewardship Optional Themes (two of the following) ● Oceans and their coastal margins ● Extreme environments ● Geophysical hazards

Individuals and Societies

Fieldwork A written report based on a fieldwork question, information collection and analysis with evaluation. This is undertaken based on work carried out at a residential field course to the Jurassic Coast of South Dorset, UK, and a one day data collection day in Den Haag, both carried out in the first term of Year 12. Higher Level Students will cover everything that the Higher level students cover plus the following One additional Optional Theme (from the list above) Higher Level Extension – Global Interactions ● Places, power and networks ● Development and diversity ● Global risks and resilience

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? The study of Geography prepares the student for further studies in the subject and the many other related areas. It also develops very important transferable skills such as critical analysis, synthesis, decision making, investigation, fieldwork and report writing, and develops international understanding, fostering a keen awareness of, and concern for, key global issues. Students studying Geography will be well equipped to move into an extensive range of higher education courses.


IB Group 3  2017 | 2019 What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Students will be required to read widely, think broadly, and use a wide variety of sources to build up an in depth picture of a topic. They will learn to synthesise such information into a coherent whole, and be critical in their analysis and evaluation. They should also feel inspired by the world around them, and gain both enjoyment and satisfaction from their geographical studies, understanding their relevance to their own lives and the lives of others.

How does the Higher Level differ from the Standard Level? Higher level extends the study at standard level, introduces additional topics, and requires further critical evaluation and synthesis of key themes in the extension.

How is it examined? Each examination paper will provide students with a choice of questions. External assessment at Higher Level is through three papers consisting of: Paper 1: The Core theme. Short answer questions, including data response, and one extended response question (1 hour 30 minutes). Paper 2: Optional themes. Structured questions on three topics based on stimulus material (2 hours). Paper 3: Higher Level Extension topics. One of three essay questions. (1 hour). External assessment at Standard Level is through two papers consisting of: Paper 1: The Core theme. Short answer questions, including data response, and one extended response question (1 hour 30 minutes). Paper 2: Optional themes. Structured questions on two topics based on stimulus material (2 hours).

Individuals and Societies Will I need to do coursework? Yes. For internal assessment for both Higher and Standard level students will be required to produce a written report based on fieldwork up to a maximum of 2,500 words. This constitutes 20% of the marks for Higher level and 25% of the marks for Standard level.

Further information: Please contact Ms Burns Head of the Geography Department ruth.burns@britishschool.nl


IB Group 3  2017 | 2019

History Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required History GCSE or IGCSE grade B.

This course could lead to ‘How can you negotiate with, trade successfully with or report on a country if you know nothing of its history?’ Subjects such as History, at first might not appear to be as useful as more vocational subjects; it may be harder for you to identify a clear career path. There are of course specifically related history careers such as Museum work or Archaeology. However, it is the skills that history imparts which mean that it is really valued in many areas and can lead to range of university courses in areas such as the study of Literature, Media Studies, Marketing, Sociology, Law, Philosophy, Politics and Economics. A qualification in History is an excellent foundation for careers in Law, Journalism, Banking, the Civil Service, Diplomatic Service and accountancy because of specific skills honed from evaluating and analysing evidence and reaching supported judgements. History is also popular with students who wish to study Science and Engineering courses as a qualification in History allows these students to demonstrate a wider and attractive portfolio of skills and qualifications with which to enter university and employment later on. Plus a study of the History of the Americas ie USA, Canada, Central and Latin America.

Individuals and Societies

What will I be studying? Standard Level Paper 1: which is a source-based examination paper = Prescribed subject 3: The move to global war The focus is military expansion from 1931 to 1941. Two case studies are prescribed, from different regions of the world, and both of these case studies must be studied. The first case study explores Japanese expansionism from 1931 to 1941, and the second case study explores German and Italian expansionism from 1933 to 1940. The focus of this prescribed subject is on the causes of expansion, key events, and international responses to that expansion. Paper 2: Essays Causes of Effects of 20th Century Wars Possible wars to be considered: The First World War, Russian revolutions and Civil War, Chinese Civil War, Korean War, Vietnam War, Algerian War. The Cold War This includes: Origins, nature, the Arms Race, USChinese relations, Germany (especially Berlin (194561), Congo (1960-64), Afghanistan (1979-88), Korea , Cuba , Vietnam , Middle East. Higher Level The content covered is dependent on staff specialisms. In previous years the following options have been delivered: 1: Indigenous societies and cultures in the Americas (c750–1500) 2: European explorations and conquests in the Americas (c1492–c1600)


IB Group 3  2017 | 2019 5. Slavery and the New World (1500-1800) 6. Independence movements 1763-1830 8. United States Civil War – causes, course and effects 16. The Cold War and the Americas (1945-81) 17. Civil Rights and social movements in the Americas post 1945.

How is it examined? ● Paper 1 (1 hour) consists of source based questions. It forms 20% of the final assessment for HL, 30% for SL. ● Paper 2 (1½ hours) consists of two essays. It forms 25% of the final assessment for HL and 45% for SL. ● Paper 3 (2½ hours) HL ONLY. It consists of three essays on the Regional topic studied. It forms 35% of the final HL assessment.

Will I need to do coursework? Students also carry out an individual assignment – an historical investigation c.1500–2000 words. They have freedom to choose any Historical area. The IA accounts for 20% of the final assessment for HL and 25% of the final assessment for SL.

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? Students will have the opportunity to go on a field trip relevant to the syllabi we follow. In previous years we have organised a field trip to Russia (Moscow and St Petersburg) designed to support the study of Soviet Russia, particularly Stalinism. Such trips are highly successful because they enable students to appreciate and see for themselves the places where major events took place, as well as seeing primary evidence in the form of artefacts. Students complete work which will enhance their understanding of the nature of the Soviet State. In addition students will also gain an increased understanding of the contemporary nature of the country they visit.

Individuals and Societies What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Studying history improves the depth and range of your personal transferable skills and allows you to develop: ● critical reasoning and analytical skills, including the capacity for solving problems and thinking creatively, often through extensive reading; ● intellectual rigour and independence, including the ability to conduct research using different types of tools, such as information and communications technology, and sources; ● the ability to construct an argument by selecting and ordering relevant evidence and then to communicate findings in a structured, clear and persuasive manner, both orally and in writing; ● additional communication skills, such as negotiating, questioning and summarising; ● self-motivation and self-reliance with the ability to work without direct supervision and manage time and priorities effectively; ● the ability to discuss ideas in groups, accommodating different ideas and reaching agreement; ● the capacity to think objectively and approach problems and new situations with an open mind; ● an appreciation of the different factors that influence the activities of groups and individuals in society.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? An open mind and the ability to graft! Additionally a willingness to read widely, be in possession of a good standard of written English, engage with debates and work independently are also important.

Further information Please contact Ms Jackson Head of the History and Politics department anne.jackson@britishschool.nl


IB Group 3  2017 | 2019

Psychology Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required There is no prerequisite GCSE Psychology but you will be expected to have English (preferably language and literature) or foreign equivalents. A previous study of Biology and/or History will also be advantageous

This course could lead to

Individuals and Societies

Higher Level At this level you will study three different perspectives in psychology alongside the standard level students (see above). In addition to this you will study two option topics, conduct a simple experimental study (Internal Assessment) and study a unit on qualitative research methods.

How is it examined? Higher and Standard level Paper 1 (2 hours). Worth 50% of total mark for SL and 35% for HL

Psychology has links with lots of different university courses and careers. It is regarded as a humanities subject or a social science depending on the type of university course. Psychology has a huge variety of university programmes, including sport, business, theatre, politics, biology, medicine, education and, of course, Psychology itself.

Section A – three compulsory short answer questions, one on each level of analysis

What will I be studying?

Higher level – two essay questions from a choice of six

Standard Level

Higher level only

At this level you will study three different perspectives in psychology; the biological level of analysis, the cognitive level of analysis and the socio-cultural level of analysis. For each of these approaches relevant research will be reviewed and analysed and evidence supporting theories will be evaluated. You will also study one option topic and a conduct a simple experimental study (Internal Assessment)

Paper 3 (1 hour) – Qualitative research methods. Worth 20% of the total mark

Section B – one essay question from a choice of three Paper 2 (1 hour). Worth 25% of total mark Standard level – one essay question from a choice of three

Three compulsory extract based questions relating to qualitative methodology


IB Group 3  2017 | 2019 Will I need to do coursework? Yes. A simple experimental study, internally assessed and externally moderated, worth 25% of the total mark for standard level and 20% of the total mark for higher level

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Psychology is an extremely popular subject at degree level and as such university places can be highly competitive. As a fairly modern discipline its reputation as an academic subject is growing. Students can use their knowledge of psychology to help them understand human behaviour relevant for a wide range of university courses as well as the more general skills learned in psychology

Individuals and Societies What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Although you do not need to have previously studied Psychology, an interest in understanding human behaviour is essential. During the course, you will need to be able to communicate effectively and research information from a variety of sources. You should also be willing to engage in a wide range of reading on these matters. You will be expected to be able to construct and write essays, look at different arguments, evaluate evidence and come to logical conclusions. You should enjoy exploring issues dealing with how and why people behave in certain ways and want to find out more about the link between people‘s behaviour and their environment. You should enjoy planning and carrying out investigations to look for any patterns and explanation in to the behaviour of children and adults.

Further information Please contact Ms Davies Head of the Psychology Department julie.davies2@britishschool.nl


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019

Biology Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required The recommended level of entrance for the IB course is a minimum of a grade B in either Extension GCSE Biology or Additional Science, or any equivalent GCSE course from abroad and minimum Grade 5 in Maths.

This course could lead to Degree courses in biology, medicine, environmental science, nursing, food science, sports science, dietetics, dentistry, psychology, biotechnology and pharmacy. Check out the Society of Biology’s website (www.societyofbiology.org) for an excellent account of careers open to young people with biology qualifications at various levels.

What will I be studying? Biology is offered at both Standard Level (SL) and Higher Level (HL). It is a Group 4 (Experimental Science) subject in the Diploma Programme. All students cover the core material and relevant options, HL students also cover the Additional HL core material. Students will also have to study at least 1 of the options. Core (SL and HL) topics include: ● Cells ● Molecular Biology ● Genetics ● Ecology ● Evolution and Biodiversity ● Human Physiology

Sciences

Additional HL core topics include: ● Nucleic acids ● Metabolism, photosynthesis and respiration ● Plant Biology ● Genetics and Evolution ● Animal Physiology Options: At least 1 from: ● A: Neurobiology and behaviour ● B: Biotechnology and Bioinformatics ● C: Ecology and Conservation ● D: Human Physiology

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? There may be a trip in October of Year 13.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Biology is one of the ‘traditional’ sciences, highly regarded by universities as a subject providing a strong background in scientific theory and critical thinking as well as practical skills in designing, analysing and interpreting experimental data. There has been rapid development in the study of biology and we are set to enter the ‘biological revolution’ which affect us all. Following a course in biology will allow you to make informed and valid conclusions over many ethical, environmental and biotechnological issues which occur today.


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019 What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? IB biology students are required to extend and develop existing scientific knowledge and practical skills. Biology is the study of living things so an interest in humans, animals and plants is helpful. A sound mathematical background at GCSE is required as basic statistics will be learned.

How does the Higher Level differ from the Standard level? Higher level considers some topics in more depth (genetics, human health and physiology) as well as covering additional topics not studied at the standard level. The internal assessment is the same in both courses, but the number of practical hours is different.

How is it examined? SL Paper 1: Multiple choice questions covering the core topics (45 mins) 20% Paper 2: Written paper covering the core topics (1hr 15) 40% Paper 3: Written paper covering the option topic (1hr) 20% Internal Assessment (exploration) 20% HL Paper 1: Multiple choice questions covering the core topics (1hr) 20% Paper 2: Written paper covering the core topics (2hr 15) 36% Paper 3: Written paper covering the option topic (1hr15) 24% Internal Assessment (exploration) 20%

Experimental Sciences Will I need to do coursework? Students will need to complete one individual exploration during the course. In addition students are also assessed on the completion of the Group 4 project undertaken jointly with the other sciences.

Further information Please contact Mrs Welch Head of Biology Department nicola.welch@britishschool.nl


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019

Chemistry Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required The recommended level of entrance for the IB course is a minimum of grade B in Extension GCSE Chemistry or other equivalent GCSE course. Alternatively, a minimum of a grade B is required in Additional Science, or any other equivalent GCSE course.

This course could lead to At the end of the course students could follow courses such as: Chemistry, Environmental Science, Medicine, Pharmacy, Chemical Engineering.

The students will be studying Throughout the course students will acquire theoretical knowledge of chemical processes and practical skills that enable them to characterise and apply their knowledge, furthermore to analyse, evaluate and synthesize subject related information.

Sciences

Benefits of studying Chemistry for university entrance The course helps the students to become independent learners; to be able to solve problems through analytical thinking; to be confident in decision making. Along with the acquisition of subject knowledge, the students will develop an ability to work together with each other, to bring together different views and respect the work, ideas and knowledge of others. All these skills can be easily extended and applied in other subject areas of the students’ chosen University course.

Skills and learning approach needed for studying this subject Through studying IB Chemistry, students will use and extend their knowledge of theory and practical skills acquired at GCSE level. In addition to their knowledge of Chemistry, the students should be able to perform the basic arithmetic functions, plot and interpret graphs. Furthermore, student should have a curiosity for how things work.


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019

Sciences

Difference between Standard and Higher Level

IB Chemistry practical examination (course work)

The skills and activities of chemistry students are common to SL and HL, however at HL the students are required to study the topics in the specification to a greater depth. Topics covered include: Quantitative chemistry; Atomic structure; Bonding; Energetics; Kinetics; Equilibrium; Acid base; Reduction and oxidation; Organic chemistry; Measurement and data collection.

The students complete practical activities (HL 60 hours/SL 40 hours) throughout the two years. The final IB Chemistry grade will include assessed practical work, an individual investigation (10 hours), which is worth 20%. This part of the assessment includes a Group 4 project, an interdisciplinary science project, where the students’ personal skills are assessed.

In addition to the topics above students will study any one of the following options: ● A: Materials ● B: Biochemistry ● C: Energy ● D: Medicinal chemistry In each option the students can take SL or HL tier according to the level at which they study Chemistry.

IB Chemistry written examination The students sit three written papers: Paper 1 ● Multiple choice questions ● Overall Weighting: HL and SL 20%, ● Duration: HL 1 hour; SL 45 min Paper 2 ● Structured questions ● Overall Weighting: HL 36%, SL 40% ● Duration: HL 2 hour 15 min; SL 1 hour 15 min Paper 3 ● This paper will have questions on core, AHL (Additional Higher Level) and option material for HL students and core and SL option material for SL students. ● Overall Weighting: HL 24%, SL 20% ● Duration: HL 1 hour 15 min; SL 1 hour

Further information Please contact Mrs Bukovinszki Head of the Chemistry Department eniko.bukovinszki@britishschool.nl


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019

Computer Science Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required At least a grade 5 in GCSE Maths. A general interest and knowledge of Computing is advisable. For Standard Level, it would be advantageous to have taken the GCSE in Computer Science, but this is not an essential pre-requisite. For Higher Level, it is recommended that students have already taken the GCSE in Computer Science.

The course could lead to A wide range of university courses involving computing are open to you from Computer Science, to Electrical Engineering and numerous other technology courses. The material covered, such as computer systems, networks, and systems in organisations management, are widely used in most university degree courses and will be of great benefit to any student. There is currently a severe worldwide shortage of skilled Computer Science graduates, with up one million unfilled jobs in the USA alone by 2020. Graduates with the necessary programming, network and systems skills are in high demand and can can expect high starting salaries.

Sciences

What will I be studying? IB Computer Science will give you the foundations for any career related to computing. There are four core topics and one optional topic with Computational Thinking a key recurring concept lying at the heart. The four core topics are: System fundamentals, Computer organization, Networks and Computational thinking, problem-solving and programming. Students choose one optional topic from databases, Modelling and simulation, Web science and Object-oriented programming. There are three additional topics at Higher Level: Abstract Data Structures, Resource Management, and Control. The core topics will introduce a range of concepts from data representation and binary logic through to the design and implementation of large systems in organisations. The general approach is one of peeling back the layers of an onion to discover the layers of computing knowledge. Practical work is a key component and students will be expected to master basic programming techniques using Python. An important part of this is the ability to work with pseudocode algorithms to express solutions to problems. There is also an Internal Assessment (IA) project that accounts for 30% of the assessment where the student must plan, design and create a digital product using non-trivial programming techniques. This will be a major piece of work during Year 13 and allows the student to put into practice much of the theory of systems. The student can decide on the choice of topic for the project. There is also an Internal Assessment (IA) project that accounts for 30% of the assessment at SL and 20% at HL.


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019 How is it examined? Paper 1 is an examination paper consisting of two compulsory sections. (SL 45%, HL 40%) Paper 2 is an examination paper linked to the chosen option studied. (SL 25%, HL 20%) Paper 3 (HL only) is an examination paper based on a pre-released Case Study(20%) Internal Assessment project (SL 30%, HL 20%)

Will I need to do coursework? Yes. The Internal Assessment project (30% SL, 20% HL) is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. In addition students are also assessed on the completion of a Group 4 Project (30% SL, 20% HL).

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? There is the possibility of a residential trip to the UK to visit various Computing related institutions, such as Bletchley Park. This is presently in the planning stage.

Sciences What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Computational thinking skills are key: being able to decompose problems into smaller parts, recognising patterns in data, generalising a rule or pattern, abstracting any given problem to find a computational solution and designing algorithms to solve a problem. You will also need to work in groups on projects so collaborative skills are essential. Home access to a modern Windows or Macintosh computer with reliable Internet access is essential. Students are encouraged to bring a portable laptop to work on in the lessons.

Further information Please contact Mr Gordon calum.gordon@britishschool.nl


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019

Design Technology Higher and Standard Level GCSEs required Ideally grade B or above in GCSE Design Technology or a minimum of a grade B in Additional Science.

Sciences

The Higher Level The Higher Level course incorporates the Standard Level topics and looks at the wider impact of Design and Technology on User-Centred Design, Sustainability, Innovation and Markets and Commercial Production.

How is it examined? Standard Level

The course could lead to This course is suitable for those who wish to use their creativity to produce innovative products including aspiring designers, engineers and architects. Product Design is versatile course that can lead to a variety of creative and technical careers some of which include Industrial Designer, Furniture Designer, Quality Assurance, Engineering (Mechanical, Civil, Structural), Architecture, Computer Aided Designer, Computer Aided Manufacturing, Sustainable Technologies, Graphic Designer, Set Designer, Interior Designer.

What will I be studying? The Standard Level The Standard Level course includes Human Factors and Ergonomics, Resource Management and Sustainable Production, Modelling, Raw Material to Final Product, Innovation and Design and Classic Design.

Paper 1 examines the students on the content of the core theory work using multiple choice questions as a framework. (45 min) 30% Paper 2 examines the students on the content of the theory work using data-based questioning and several short-answer questions as well as an extendedresponse question, all questions are based on the core material. (90min) 30% Internal Assessment (Final design project) 40% Higher level Paper 1 examines students on the content of the core theory work using multiple choice questions as a framework. (60 min) 20% Paper 2 examines students on the content of the theory work using data-based questioning and several short-answer questions and one extended-response question, all questions are based on the core material. (90 min) 20% Paper 3 examines students on the content of the theory work by focusing on two structured questions on the Higher Level extension material and one structured question based upon on a case study. (90 min) 20% Internal Assessment (Final design project) 40%


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019 Will I need to do coursework? Students will need to complete a design project during the second year of the course. In addition students also take part in a non assessed group 4 project. Teacher directed activities will take place during the duration of the course to enable students to practise skills and gain underpinning knowledge.

Are there any trips or extracurricular activities linked to this course? No

What benefits does this subject have for University entrance? It focuses on analysis, design development, synthesis and evaluation. The creative tension between theory and practice is what characterizes design technology within the DP sciences subject group. DP design technology achieves a high level of design literacy by enabling students to develop criticalthinking and design skills, which they can apply in a practical context. While designing may take various forms, it will involve the selective application of knowledge within an ethical framework. The design project is a great piece of tangible work that can be used as a focal point during the University interview process.

Sciences What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Inquiry and problem-solving are at the heart of the subject. DP design technology requires the use of the DP design cycle as a tool, which provides the methodology used to structure the inquiry and analysis of problems, the development of feasible solutions, and the testing and evaluation of the solution. In Diploma Programme design technology, a solution can be defined as a model, prototype, product or system that students have developed independently.

Further information Please contact Mr McManners Head of the Design and Technology Department paul.mcmanners@britishschool.nl


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019

Physics

Sciences

Higher Level

Higher and Standard Level

Includes the SL material and the Additional Higher Level topics: Wave phenomena, Fields, Electromagnetic induction and Quantum physics.

GCSEs required

How is it examined?

Ideally grade B or above in Extension GCSE Physics or a minimum of a grade B in Additional Science and a minimum of a 6 grade at GCSE Mathematics.

Standard Level Paper 1: Multi-Choice (45 mins) 20% Paper 2: Structured Questions (1h 45 mins) 40%

This course could lead to

Paper 3: Structured Questions (1h) 20%

Physics leads on to a wide range of courses and careers. You could go on to use Physics to support other qualifications or progress onto further studies or employment. This could be:

Internal Assessment (exploration) 20%

● from a Higher National programme (HNC and HND) to degree level; ● courses ranging from Physics, the Sciences and Medicine to Engineering; ● employment in the area of radiography, and biotechnology

Paper 2: Structured Questions (2h 15 mins) 36%

What will I be studying? Standard Level The Standard Level course includes: Mechanics, Thermal Physics, Waves, Electricity and magnetism, Circular Motion and gravitation, Atomic, nuclear and particle physics, Energy production and Astrophysics.

Higher Level Paper 1: Multi-Choice (1h) 20%

Paper 3: Structured Questions (1h 15 mins) 24% Internal Assessment (exploration) 20%

Will I need to do coursework? Students will need to complete one individual exploration during the course. In addition students are also assessed on the completion of the Group 4 project.


IB Group 4  2017 | 2019

Sciences

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

No

SL Mathematics is essential for this course. HL Mathematics is recommended if a University course in Physics, Engineering, Mathematics or related subject is being considered.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Physics is a highly valued course and can be used to support a wide variety of University course due to the mathematical content and wide range of skills which it helps to develop.

Further information Please contact Mr Bradshaw Head of the Physics Department and Head of the Science Faculty benjamin.bradshaw@britishschool.nl


IB Group 5  2017 | 2019

Mathematics Standard and Higher Level

Maths Studies Standard Level GCSEs required Higher Level Mathematics The minimum entry level to the course is a grade 7 in the Higher Level GCSE examination. Standard Level Mathematics The minimum entry level to the course is a grade 6 in the Higher Level GCSE examination. Mathematical Studies The minimum entry level to the course is a grade 5 in the GCSE examination.

This course could lead to The development of skills necessary for a wide range of subjects including the Sciences, Engineering, Economics and Computer Science to name but a few. It is imperative that the students research the necessary IB level for their desired undergraduate needs.

Mathematics

What University course or Professions could this lead me to? ● Higher Level Mathematics: Courses involving a high degree of Mathematical content, including Mathematics, Engineering, Economics and certain Science courses.* ● Standard Level Mathematics: Courses involving a degree of Mathematical understanding.* ● Mathematical Studies: Develops the skills in a wide range of topics, useful in broad spectrum of undergraduate programmes.* *It is important that the students research the level of Math required for the particular courses and institutions that appeal to them.

What will I be studying? ● Higher Level Mathematics: Algebra, Functions, Equations, Trigonometry, 2d and 3d Vectors, Matrices, Statistics and Probability, Calculus and Differential Equations, Complex numbers, Induction. ● Standard Level Mathematics: Algebra, Functions, Equations, Trigonometry, 2d and 3d Vectors, Matrices, Statistics and Probability, Differential Calculus. ● Mathematical Studies: Number and Algebra; Sets, Logic and Probability, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, Statistics, Introductory Differential Calculus, Financial Mathematics.


IB Group 5  2017 | 2019

Mathematics

What benefit does this subject have How is it examined? for university entrance? ● Higher Level Mathematics: The students complete Mathematics is a requirement for many undergraduate courses; it is important that the students choose a level that they can both succeed in, and enable them to study in their desired field at undergraduate level.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? The necessary skills, learning approach and ability in Mathematics are dependent upon the course chosen. ● Higher Level Mathematics: A high level of Mathematical ability in all areas is a necessity for this challenging course. The ability to persevere with, and enjoy challenging questions of an investigative nature is required for success in this course. ● Standard Level Mathematics*: This standard level course requires a strong background in Mathematics. Many of the topics are similar to the work met in the Higher level course. Students need to be confident with algebraic manipulation and must be prepared to work hard to master the necessary skills. ● Mathematical Studies*: Studies is the most approachable of the 3 courses offered. It still requires that the students have a good level of ability in the subject and a strong work ethic. This course is a good choice for students who wish to follow Undergraduate courses that do not have a high proportion of Mathematical content. *It should be noted that both Standard Level Mathematics and Mathematical Studies carry equal weighting with regards to the IB Diploma. The Mathematics in the Studies programme is not as demanding and subsequently students may find that they are able to achieve more points in this course.

an Exploration (IA) during the duration of the course and then take 3 examinations at the end of the course, including an option paper of the teachers choosing. ● Standard Level Mathematics: The students complete an Exploration (IA) during the duration of the course and then take 2 examinations at the end of the course. ● Mathematical Studies: The students complete an individual Project during the duration of the course and then take 2 examinations at the end of the course.

Calculators A Graphing Calculator is required for IB Mathematics. The most popular model is the Texas TI-Nspire (Non-CAS); teachers in the Math Faculty will be happy to advise on suitable models.

Further information Please contact Mr McGee Head of the Maths Faculty david.mcgee@britishschool.nl


IB Group 6  2017 | 2019

Music Higher and Standard level Please note that an IB Music group will only run if there is sufficient interest.

Students are required to have ● A genuine interest in listening to a wide range of musical styles ● Basic keyboard ability ● A willingness to contribute to and perhaps even lead the extra-curricular ensembles of the school, e.g. choirs, orchestra, wind bands, recorder group, jazz band, string group, rock groups, flute choir, etc. ● A standard of instrumental performance equivalent to at least Grade 5* (students must take individual lessons in their main study) ● A Level of notational understanding (treble and bass clefs) equivalent to Grade 5* Theory or grade B Music GCSE or iGCSE Music (for explanation of terms marked * consult your Music teacher)

Skills developed in the course The aim of the IBO Music Programme is to give students the opportunity to explore the diversity of music throughout the world. It is to encourage students to develop perceptual skills through a breadth of musical experiences, where they learn to recognise, speculate, analyse, identify, discriminate and hypothesise in relation to music. Students are able to develop creativity through performance and composing and are developed as independent learners throughout the course and expected to take responsibility for much of their learning programme(s).

The Arts

● Through musical perception and analysis, students can be open to a wide range of genres and styles from around the world and will learn the socio-historical context as well as geographical regions. ● Musical investigation requires students to complete an independent investigation focusing on exploration, integration of skills and knowledge gained throughout the course, and an accurate description and analysis of differences and similarities between the musical features of two musical genres. ● Through performing, students gain experience performing in front of an audience. Performing skills are developed through solo and group music making. ● Through composing, they develop skills through exploration and investigation of musical elements.

Syllabus Higher Level Designed for the specialist with a background in musical performance and composition, who may pursue music at university or conservatoire level. Three compulsory components, with no choice of options. 1. Musical Perception and Analysis (listening paper and musical investigation) 2. Solo Performance: voice or instrument, with one or more recitals 3. Composition: three contrasting compositions Standard Level Choose from ONE of these options: Solo Performance – designed for students with a background in musical performance


IB Group 6  2017 | 2019 1. Musical Perception and Analysis (listening paper and musical investigation) 2. Solo Performance: voice or instrument, one or more recitals Group Performance Option – designed for students with a general interest in music, or with less experience, particularly members of ensembles 1. Musical Perception and Analysis (listening paper and musical investigation) 2. Group Performance: two or more public performances Composition Option – designed for students with a background in musical composition 1. Musical Perception and Analysis (listening paper and musical investigation) 2. Composition: two contrasting compositions This Musical Perception and Analysis part of the syllabus is common to all courses, and consists of: the study of prescribed work(s); the study of musical genres and styles and a personal musical investigation. For the musical perception and analysis, a wide range of genres and styles will be covered in both HL and SL, including modern genres (such as Rock, Pop, etc.), Western Classical Music, and music from different cultures.

Assessment The Musical Perception/Listening Paper and Musical Investigation are externally assessed. The Performances and Compositions are internally assessed. The breakdown in % is as follows: Higher Level Externally Assessment 50% 1. Listening Paper 30% 2 hours Listening/Written Paper. Five musical extracts and five compulsory questions based on the Musical Perception and Analysis part of the syllabus. 2. Musical Links Investigation 20% A written media script of 1200.1500 words investigating the relationships between two musical genres. Internal Assessment 50% 1. Solo Performance (25%) Presentation of one or more solo recitals (approximately 20 minutes). 2. Composition (25%) Three contrasting compositions (5 x 3-minutes. 15 minutes total when performed), with recordings and a written statement.

The Arts Standard Level External Assessment 50% 1. Listening Paper (30%) 2 hours Listening/Written Paper. Five musical extracts and five compulsory questions based on the Musical Perception and Analysis part of the syllabus. 2. Musical Links Investigation (20%) A written media script of 1200–1500 words investigating the relationships between two musical genres. Internal Assessment 50% ONE ONE of the following options. These components to be internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IBO at the end of the course. 1. Solo Performance Presentation of one or more solo recitals (approximately 15 minutes). 2. Group Performance Presentation of two public performances (15–30 minutes). 3. Composition Two contrasting compositions (5 x 3-minutes. 15 minutes total when performed), with recordings and a written statement. Students are encouraged to be regular concert-goers and experience as wide a range of different musical styles and settings. During the course, the Music Department will arrange workshops, concert visits and music-related visits, and students will be informed about these when they are planned to take place.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Further Education at University or Music College/ Conservatoire. There are a wide range of careers available to students who have studied music-based disciplines at IB and to a degree standard. These include work in all branches of the performing arts, ranging from performer or composer to music administration, music education at many levels, music journalism and the ever-expanding opportunities to work in music-based areas of multimedia technology.

Further information Please contact Mr Saunders Head of the Music Department john.saunders@britishschool.nl


IB Group 6  2017 | 2019

Visual Arts

The Arts

Ideally, we would expect students who want to take IB Visual Arts to have already followed a GCSE course and to have achieved a grade B or above. However, students who have not followed a GCSE course would need to bring in a portfolio of work, so that their suitability for the course could be assessed. This applies to students who have been educated in different systems, as well as to students who for whatever reason did not take GCSE. In these cases we would be looking at skills, approaches and apparent levels of interest and commitment, as demonstrated in the portfolio of work. We would also need to talk to the student to see how they saw their work developing.

faculties and informed aesthetic judgement and to be able to hold and communicate their ideas, opinions about the Visual Arts in visual, oral and written form. Half way through the first term, students will pursue their individual topics using as broad a range of influences, approaches and media as they see fit. The course will allow the student to value and experience the cultural heritage of their own and other societies, through contextual work, visits to galleries and museums and making use of their global citizenship. The learning environment will provide a balance of support and challenge; a framework will be put in place to guide students through their independent work, to help them to achieve their goals. The course lays an appropriate foundation for further study in the Visual Arts in Higher Education or for related subjects at University. In addition, it is suitable for the diverse range of students who wish to develop their interest in and enjoyment of the Visual Arts, fostering its value in lifelong learning.

Skills developed in the course

IB Syllabus for HL and SL

This course aims to encourage students to question and explore their creative response to the world around them, through the artistic process. Through independent research, investigative enquiry, experiment and analysis, students will have the opportunity to respond creatively and intellectually through the use of visual language to create a personal response in media of their choice. Initially the course will provide a broadly based foundation in the basic principles of visual expression and will encourage students to become familiar with a range of tools, materials and processes. Through study, practice, discussion, critical assessment and tutorial guidance, the student will be encouraged to develop an understanding of how to successfully meet the assessment criteria; to develop their own critical

For both HL and SL students, the first half of the Autumn term operate as a general introduction to the course, showing approaches that will teach the students how to be successful students of IB Visual Arts. At the end of this first part, in consultation with staff, students will decide on their own path for the rest of the course. They will have to develop a relationship between their Process portfolio, their Exhibition and their Comparative study.

Higher and Standard level

A process-portfolio needs to be produced along with a Journal, a comparative study and multiple pieces of Studio Work. They will have to work in a broad range of media covering art-making forms that is two-dimensional, three-dimensional and lens based, electronic and screen-based forms.


IB Group 6  2017 | 2019 In the Process portfolio the students will have to pursue their own interests, ideas and strengths, and the work that is eventually submitted for external marking should highlight the key milestones in this journey.

Assessment The Process Portfolio and the comparative study is externally assessed. The Exhibition of the studio work is internally assessed. When submitting their Process portfolio, the SL students are required to submit 9-18 screens which evidence their sustained experimentation, exploration, manipulation and refinement of a variety of artmaking forms. For SL students the submitted work must be in at least two art-making forms. For example two-dimensional and lens based, electronic and screen-based forms. HL students have to submit 13-25 screens from at least three art-making forms. The Process portfolio as explained above weighs 40% towards the final marks. In the Comparative Study, students are required to analyse and compare artworks, objects or artefacts by different artists. This independent critical investigation should come from different cultural contexts. It weighs 20% towards the final mark. The Exhibition is a selection of resolved artworks and it should evidence their technical accomplishment during the visual arts course and an understanding of the use of materials, ideas and practices realising their intentions. SL students submit 4-7 artworks. HL submit 8-11 artworks. The students will submit a selection of photos of their work. The Exhibition weighs 40% towards the final mark. The Journal is not assessed but it is at the core of their 2 year studies. It has a character of a diary where ideas, visits to Galleries, development and research is recorded.

The Arts What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Students who have studied the Visual Arts can go on to careers or courses in: fashion design, architecture, landscape architecture, graphics, advertising, film and television, theatre design, product design, industrial design, teaching, poster design, textile printing, display and exhibitions, gallery work, layout designer, computer-aided design, tailoring, restoration work, design/fashion marketing, printing, window display, photography, magazine layout. However it has also been well regarded by Universities looking for students studying many disciplines including Medicine and Law.

Relevant school excursions It is a requirement of the course for students to be familiar with and make connections to works of art from different time periods as well as cross-culturally. We will be taking a combined IB and AS field trip at an appropriate time in Year 12. All students in Year 12 would be encouraged to attend the field course. This course is a vital element, allowing students to resource first hand from works of art.

Further information Please contact Mr Rogerson Head of Art Department graham.rogerson@britishschool.nl


The IB Career-related Programme The IB Career-related Programme (IBCP) is an alternative academic pathway available for students in post-16 education. The aim of the IBCP is to provide students with an academic and practical foundation to support both their further studies and specialised training during higher education, thereby ensuring their success in the workforce. The IBCP enables students to: ● Develop a broad range of career-related competencies and to deepen their understanding in general areas of knowledge ● Prepare for effective participation in an everchanging world of work ● Foster the attributes of the learner profile allowing students to become true lifelong learners willing to consider new perspectives ● Engage in learning that makes a positive difference to future lives ● Become a self-confident person ready for life in the twenty-first century The IBCP combines the highly regarded and internationally recognized IB Diploma Programme courses with an approved career-related study. IBCP students engage with a challenging programme of study while gaining transferable and lifelong skills in applied knowledge, critical thinking, communication, and cross-cultural engagement. They are well prepared to succeed at institutions of higher education.

The IBCP qualification is well received by many universities and provides a strong foundation for an application into higher education. Depending on the grades achieved in each part of the programme (a combination of the BTEC, the Diploma subjects and the Reflective Project), students may achieve in the range of 300 – 400 UCAS points, which is broadly equivalent to three strong “A” level grades. Universities will consider applications by IBCP students on a case by case basis.

IB Career-related Programme details IBCP students will follow two Diploma Programme courses at Standard Level, a BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Business (equivalent to two A Levels) and a core consisting of Personal and Professional Skills, Language Development, Community and Service, and a Reflective Project, which will be related to their Career-related Study in Business.

Assessment The Diploma Programme courses are assessed in the same way as in the IBDP, by examination at the end of the two years of study. The Core will be mainly assessed within school, except for the Reflective Project which is graded by the IB. The BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Business is assessed by a series of assignments set throughout the course and marked internally. There are no external examinations for this Career-related Study.

Further information Please contact Mrs Cooke IBCP Co-ordinator michelle.cooke@britishschool.nl


BTEC National Level 3 Diploma in Business This course can only be taken as part of the IBCP to fulfil the requirements of the Career-related Study. It is not offered as a stand alone subject.

GCSEs required The BSN does not offer GCSE Business Studies and the course assumes that all students have not studied the subject at GCSE or MYP. From a Maths perspective, it is important to feel comfortable in calculating percentages: there are lots of small calculations to perform in some of the units.

This course could lead to It is an alternative to A Levels, and, in conjunction with the IBCP, is accepted as an entry requirement for universities and further education colleges. It is also highly valued by employers. BTECs are graded on a Fail, Pass, Merit, Distinction, Distinction * scale. A student who achieves the top grade of D*D* will have the same UK university points as a student who achieves two A* A Levels. There is a vast array of Business courses available at university and are often combined with other subjects, such as languages, presenting an ideal foundation for business careers. Alternatively, students may choose to follow a different career path such as a study in law, accountancy, hospitality or sports management.

What will I be studying? The BTEC National Business qualification is designed to provide a highly specialist, work-related qualification. It gives learners the knowledge, understanding and skills that they need to prepare for higher education and employment. During the two-year course, students will study a variety of business topics. There are 4 compulsory units that all students must study:

The business environment The aim of this unit is to give learners the fundamental knowledge of a range of business organisations, and the many factors that shape the nature of organizations operating in an increasingly complex business world. An example of an assignment for this topic would be a feasibility study of two different markets for a business. As part of this unit we visit the Amsterdam Stock Exchange.

Business resources The aim of this unit is to develop learner knowledge of the range of human, physical, technological and financial resources required in an organisation, and how the management of these resources can impact on business performance. For this unit, students will be presented with a real life business problem, involving the financial resources of the organisation, and will compete to identify the best solution.


Introduction to marketing

How is it examined?

The aim and purpose of this unit is to give learners an understanding of how marketing, research and planning and the marketing mix are used by all organisations.

Entirely through coursework.

Students will have the opportunity to work alongside an Advertising Agency to develop a creative marketing campaign for a product

Will I need to do coursework? Yes – the BTEC is 100% coursework and there are no exams.

What syllabus do you follow?

Business communication

Edexcel

The aim of this unit is to show learners that the collection and management of business information, and the successful communication of that information throughout a business, is critical for the future prosperity of the organisation.

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

An example of an assignment for this topic would be a formal presentation on ethical issues surrounding information. After studying the 4 core units, students will study 8 further units from a wide choice. These 8 will be chosen by the school to best suit the students and will come from the following areas: ● Accounting ● Marketing ● Business Law ● Retail ● Human Resources ● Management ● Business Administration ● Logistics

There are visits from speakers and trips to local businesses. Work experience is a key element to the BTEC.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? The key skills are: investigating and analysing situations from an objective position, recognising problems and proposing solutions, making and justifying decisions and developing clear communication and employability skills.

Further information Please contact Mrs Cooke IBCP Co-ordinator michelle.cooke@britishschool.nl

Last year students received university offers from: ● The Hague Univeristy of Applied Sciences ● Dublin Institute ● Manchester Metropolitan University ● Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences ● Leeds Becket ● Bournemouth University ● Cardiff Metroplitan University ● Swansea University ● Kent University ● Edinburgh Napier ● Univeristy College Northampton ● Globe College Munich

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