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ixt BSN curriculum

AS and A Level

2017 | 2019 Internationally British


Sixt

AS and A Level Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

Languages Faculty

Art and Design BTEC Hospitality 3D Product Design Music Music Technology

Dutch NT2 II Modern Foreign Languages Note for native speakers

English Faculty Drama and Theatre Studies English Literature

Mathematics Faculty Mathematics Further Mathematics

Physical Education Faculty

Humanities Faculty

Physical Education

Business BTEC National Level 3 Diploma in Business Economics Geography Government and Politics History Psychology

Sciences Faculty Biology Chemistry Physics


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Art and Design Ideally we would expect students to have achieved a grade B or above in Art GCSE. However, students who have not followed a GCSE course would need to bring in a portfolio of work, so that their suitability for the course could be assessed. We would be looking at skills, approaches and apparent levels of interest and commitment.

Skills developed in the course

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

The non-exam component has a focus on observation Level and developing creative responses to stimulus. Ideas are challenged through a rigorous exploration of artistic concepts linking to the History of Art, adding an intellectual process to the practical aspect of the course. Each student is encouraged to use a variety of media, explore and refine skills and technique, and incorporates the use of photography to research and collect. References to artists’ work support this process. The final outcome is a refined response to preparatory work and is an area of strength for the individual, be it Drawing and Painting, ThreeDimensional work, Textiles, and Graphics/Illustration.

The course is devised to lay an appropriate foundation for students to move successfully on to further study in Art and Design and other related subjects at a higher level. The course is also suitable for students who wish to develop their interest in the subject and to compliment other studies at A Level. Students are provided with opportunities to develop personal responses expressing ideas from observations of the world in which we live, relating their experiences through a wide range of media. At A Level, students develop a high degree of independence and individuality

This runs from February until the end of the course. The student selects from a variety of starting points provided by the AQA exam board and produce an extensive project exploring and developing ideas towards an outcome that is produced in a ten hour examination.

Syllabus for AS Level

Unit 1: Personal Investigation

Unit 1: Portfolio In this component students have an opportunity to explore ideas, materials, techniques and processes aiding the development of skills, and knowledge of the subject. This is done through a number of workshops that allow students to build an extensive and varied practical understanding. This is to prepare them for the externally set component of the AS year and for the expectations of the full A Level.

Unit 2: Externally Set Assignment

A journal is produced for each of the units.

Syllabus for A Level The portfolio becomes a personal investigation of the students’ own choice leading to some very innovative and creative responses. It builds upon the exploration of ideas, materials, techniques and processes from the first year and asks for a more intellectual rigour from the student. This is supported by a piece of academic writing of between 1000 and 3000 words, responding in depth to a relevant aspect of historical/ critical/contextual enquiry, the focus of which is also chosen by the student.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

Unit 2: Externally Set Assignment

Relevant school excursions

The student chooses from a number of starting points provided by AQA. Preparation work is undertaken between February and May, culminating in a 15 hour examination where they are expected to fully realise their ideas.

All students in Year 12 are encouraged to attend the field course. This field course is a vital element, as the AS and A2 courses require students to resource first hand from works of art; it also offers the opportunity to gather stimuli for further modules. This also gives students intending to follow the A2 specification a chance to decide on the focus of topics for their personal study.

A journal is produced for each of the Units.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? This course would be of value to students wishing to demonstrate creative thinking and application whatever their plans for future direction. Students who have studied Art and Design, and wish to focus their career in this direction, can go on to degree courses in: fashion design, architecture, landscape architecture, graphics, advertising, film and television, theatre design, product design, industrial design, teaching, poster design, textile printing, display and exhibitions, gallery work, layout designer, computer-aided design, tailoring, restoration work, design/fashion marketing, printing, window display, photography, magazine layout.

How will I be assessed? AS Unit 1 Unit One is worth 60% of the total AS marks. It is set and marked by the centre, and moderated by AQA. Unit 2 Unit Two is worth 40% of the total AS marks. This is set by the exam board, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA A Level Unit 1 Unit One is worth 60% of the total A Level marks. It is set and marked by the centre, and moderated by AQA. Unit 2 Unit Two is worth 40% of the total A Level marks. This is set by the exam board, marked by the centre and moderated by AQA

Further information Please contact Graham Rogerson Head of the Art Department graham.rogerson@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Modular)  2017 | 2019

BTEC Hospitality GCSEs required It would be beneficial for any student undertaking this BTEC to have studied GCSE Food Technology. A sound understanding of ingredients and an interest in practical food preparation is important. In order to take the Subsidiary Diploma [ Year 13 course] students must first study the Certificate level in Year 12.The student entry level for this course will be made on an individual basis following the advice of the Head of Department.

This course could lead to This qualification can lead to further studies in both the Hospitality and Catering Industry and Food Science and Nutrition. A Food Science degree can lead to careers in food marketing or as a food technologist teacher, dietician or journalist. BSC and BA Food based courses are available in a selection of UK universities. BTEC is recognised as an entry qualification for a very wide range of higher education courses at universities and employment. Students planning to complete practical/ coursework based subjects will find this course of great value. The use of ICT is an extensive part of completing the assignment work.

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

What will I be studying? Level BTEC Hospitality at this level provides an opportunity to study the wide and varied aspects of the hospitality and food industry. Practical experience enables the study of equipment, commodities and methods used in different food preparation techniques. Study of the hospitality industry provides students with the opportunity to explore the different organisations that support the business. BTEC Hospitality enables learners to develop a range of skills and techniques essential for successful performance in working life. Principles of food safety and healthy nutrition are a composite part of this study. Year 12 units of study Units for the course in Year 12 include the Hospitality Industry and Food and Nutrition. Practical work assignments study of European and Asian Food. Year 13 units of study Units of study for A2 include work on Planning and Managing an Hospitality Event. An Advanced Skills/Techniques unit in Food preparation and Food and nutrition.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 How is it examined? The BTEC course is based on continuous assessment rather than the traditional external examination style of assessment. As with A Levels BTEC can be completed in: ● Year 12 Level 3 certificate level, which is equivalent to AS. [ Up to 28 UCAS Tariff points] ● Year 13 Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma, which is equivalent to A2. [ Up to 56 UCAS Tariff points] Students are assessed continuously via written and practical assignments and obtain a summative grade of Pass, Merit, or Distinction per assignment. This grading is then transferred into an overall grade for that subject at the end of the course.

Further information Please contact Mrs Cooke IBCP Co-ordinator michelle.cooke@britishschool.nl

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty


AS and A Level (Modular)  2017 | 2019

3D Product Design GCSEs required The course is suited to students that have some prior knowledge of the subject however it is not essential. Those students that have taken a GCSE in Design and Technology must have obtained at least a grade B. Students that have no experience will be expected to sit an entrance exam to test their suitability for the course.

The course could lead to Product Design is a versatile course that can lead to a variety of creative and technical careers some of which include Industrial Designer, Furniture Designer, Quality Assurance, Engineering (Mechanical, Civil, Structural), Architecture, Computer Aided Designer, Computer Aided Manufacturing, Sustainable technologies, Graphic Designer, Set Designer and Interior Designer.

What will I be studying? The Product Design course has been designed to encourage students to take a broad view of design and technology and to develop their ability to design and make products to a commercial level. Students will learn to appreciate the complex relations between design, manufacture and marketing as well as how technology both old and new impacts on our society.

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

Below are examples of some of the areas of Level

knowledge that will be addressed during the course:-

● Identify a design need and respond effectively and creatively. ● Investigate current solutions to problems and develop improvements based upon the existing products flaws. ● Research and analyse effectively information that can be used in the development of a solution. ● Knowledge of particular technological concepts and the ability to apply them. ● The ability to develop ideas based upon a design criteria. ● Selection of suitable materials and techniques for given purposes. ● Knowledge of human needs including ergonomics, design for inclusion and for a sustainable environment. ● Develop a critical understanding of the influences of the processes and products of design and technological activities from a contemporary and historical perspective. ● How the use of ICT can be used to enhance both in design and manufacture. ● Understand the properties of materials and methods of manipulating them both in a school environment and commercially.

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? Where possible we seek to observe design and manufacture in action, this is carried out by visiting several commercial sites.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Product Design prepares students to take part in the development of tomorrow’s rapidly changing world. Creative thinking encourages them to make positive changes to their quality of life. The course encourages young people to become autonomous and creative problem-solvers, both as individuals and as part of a team.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Imagination, creative problem solving, enthusiasm and a willingness to work hard will be essential for a successful completion of the course. Recognise and overcome challenges and constraints when working towards a final solution. Understand how to draw on a range of skills and knowledge from other subject areas.

How is it examined? Year 12 AS Unit 1: Materials, Components and Application

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty Year 13 A2 Unit 3: Design and Manufacture A written theory paper of 2 hours will test the candidates‘ understanding of the connections between the different elements of the subject. This takes the format of 3 extended essay type responses. The exam is 25% of the total A Level marks Year 13 A2 Unit 4: Design and Making Practice (60 hours) A larger more demanding electronic portfolio that records the evidence of a single design and make activity. The coursework 25% of the total A Level marks

Will I need to do coursework? You will be required to produce a portfolio of work over the 2 years. See the above description for more detail.

What syllabus do you follow? AQA www.aqa.org.uk

Examination method

A written theory paper of 2 hours that is a combination of compulsory limited response questions and design based questions based upon particular design problems/needs.

Written exam x 1 for AS Written exam x 1 for A2

50% of the total AS marks and is 25% of the total A Level marks.

Coursework

Year 12 AS Unit 2: Learning Through Designing and Making (50 hours) An electronic design portfolio that is made up of between two and three projects which will have at least two practical outcomes. The coursework is 50% of the total AS marks and 25% of the total A Level marks.

Yes

Further information Please contact Mr McManners Head of the Technology and Design Department paul.mcmanners@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Music GCSEs required Students applying are expected to have Grade B at Music GCSE as one of their qualifying exams for entry into the sixth form. Students wishing to undertake A Level Music who do not have this must be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of composition, performing, music history and music theory/analysis to a reasonable standard, and sit some short tests where needed. A basic working knowledge of a computer music sequencing program, such as Logic Pro X or Cubase would be helpful.

This course could lead to Further Education at University or Music College/ Conservatoire. There are a wide range of careers available to students who have studied music disciplines at A Level and to degree level. These include work in all branches of the performing arts, ranging from performer or composer to music administration, music education at many levels, music journalism and the ever-expanding opportunities to work in music-based areas of multimedia technology.

What will I be studying? AS Examinations Component 1: Performing Music Performing one or more solo or ensemble pieces, as a Recital, lasting a minimum of 6 minutes. This can be vocal or instrumental, reading from notation(s) or improvising, or realising a piece of music using Music Technology.

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

This unit contributes 30% of the AS Grade. Level Component 2: Composing Creation of TWO compositions, each a minimum 2-minutes long. The first will be in response to a set exam-board brief. The second will either be a ‘free’ composition, or candidates may opt to work to another set brief, contrasting with the first one chosen. You will submit fully-notated scores and/ or detailed performance guidance instructions appropriate to the style, or a written account of each the compositions, describing the musical aspects and intentions of the composition. This unit contributes 30% of the AS Grade Component 3: Appraising Study of 3 Prescribed Set Works in each of the following 6 groups: Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, Music for Film, Popular Music & Jazz, Fusions, and New Directions. You will listen to additional music related to these. There is a Set Works listening/ written paper with 2 sections: ● Three questions related to the Set Works, with CD audio track(s) and Skeleton Score(s) provided. One short rhythmic and melodic completion exercise. ● Two essay questions: The first – linking knowledge learned in Set Works study, relating this to an unfamiliar piece of music. The second, relating directly to three core musical elements of a particular Set Work (choice of 3 here). This unit contributes 40% of the AS Grade A Level Examinations Component 1: Performance Presentation of an 8-minute minimum length public recital of a balanced programme of solo and/or ensemble music. This can be vocal or instrumental,


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

reading from notation(s) or improvising, or realising a piece of music using Music Technology. This unit contributes 30% of the A Level Grade

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

Component 2: Composition and Technical Study

Visits will be arranged throughout the course, as well as opportunities to involve with a range of music workshops and involvement with professional musicians.

Total of two compositions, one to a brief set by the exam board, and one either free composition, or another also set to a (different) brief. One must be from either a list of briefs related to the Areas of Study, or a free Composition, and the other, from a list of briefs assessing Compositional Technique. This unit contributes 30% of the A Level Grade Component 3: Appraising Study of 2 Prescribed Set Works in each of the following 6 groups: Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, Music for Film, Popular Music & Jazz, Fusions, and New Directions. You will listen to additional music related to these. There is a Set Works listening/ written paper with 2 sections: ● Identifying musical features heard and commenting on extracts of music on a CD; questions relating to identification of musical features and their social/ historical context; rhythmic and melodic dictation. ● Two essay questions: Essay one asks students to draw links from their study of the set works to the music heard as an unfamiliar extract. Essay two gives a choice of three questions that ask students to evaluate the musical elements, context and language of one set work. Each option will be from a different area of study. This unit contributes 40% of the A Level Grade

How is it examined? A mixture of internal assessment with external moderation for Performing/Composing. Musical Understanding is assessed through formal papers which include a listening element.

Will I need to do coursework? Yes. Performing is assessed coursework, as a final recital. Composition is coursework with external assessment.

What syllabus do you follow? Edexcel Music AS and ALevel

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Universities look favourably on students who have studied Music as one of their A Levels. The self-discipline needed to undertake systematic, regular practice, the developing of creative skills in composing and arranging, along with the academic skills related to studying music history and cultural relevance/context, complemented by the whole social and interactive aspects of being involved in ensembles, makes a Music student’s skills set highly desirable to Universities looking to recruit students onto a wide range of subject courses.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? You need a genuine interest in listening to a wide range of musical styles. You need some basic keyboard-playing ability. We would you to involve in as much music making as is possible. You should have a standard of instrumental performance equivalent around Grade 5 and above, and students must take individual lessons in their main performance study instrument/voice. Your level of notational understanding (treble and bass clefs) needs to be equivalent to ABRSM Grade 5 Theory. Ideally, at least a B grade at GCSE. The best grades are always achieved by students who maintain enthusiasm for and commitment towards both the practical and academic work required.

Further information Please contact Mr Saunders Director of Music & Music Technology john.saunders@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Modular)  2017 | 2019

Music Technology GCSEs required

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

What will I be studying? Level AS Examinations Component 1: Multitrack Recording (Practical coursework)

Students applying are ideally expected to have Music GCSE as one of their qualifying exams for entry into the sixth form. Students wishing to undertake who do not have this must be able to demonstrate the following:

● Produce one recording, chosen from a list of 10 songs set by the examination board, consisting of a minimum of 3 compulsory instruments and 2 additional ones. 2–2½ minutes long. ● Submit logbook and authentication form.

● a genuine interest in listening to a wide range of musical styles, but particularly pop, rock and jazz ● a keen interest in learning practically about a range of Music Technologies ● a reasonable standard of basic keyboard skills (i.e.: can play tunes & some chords, etc.) ● a secure level of notational understanding (treble and bass clefs) equivalent to Grade V ABRSM* Theory. (*Please see ABRSM website for more information regarding this)

This unit contributes 20% of the AS Grade

This course could lead to

This unit contributes 20% of the AS Grade

Further Education at University or Music College/ Further Education at University or Music College/ Conservatoire. Careers related to Music Technology generally cover the areas of: Recording Studio, Live Performing & Live Sound, Composing, Film Audio & Video Music Production, Television, Radio, ICT Media, Music Education, Music Services and Audio Design/Electronics.

Component 2: Technology-based Composition (Practical coursework) ● Create, edit, manipulate & structure sounds to produce a technology-based composition based on a brief set by the examination board. 2½ minutes long. ● Synthesis, Sampling, Audio Manipulation and Creative FX must be used. ● Submit logbook and authentication form.

Component 3: Listening & Analysing (Written examination: 1hr 15mins) ● Knowledge and understanding of recording and production techniques, to be applied to unheard music set in the examination. ● Knowledge of the principles/theory of sound and audio technology. ● Knowledge of the development of recording and production technology. ● Observations and written responses to a variety of unfamiliar tracks heard in the examination, set by the examination board. This unit contributes 25% of the AS Grade


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty

Component 4: Producing & Analysing (Written/Practical examination: 1hr 45mins)

Component 4: Producing & Analysing (Written/Practical examination: 2hr 15mins)

● Knowledge and understanding of editing, mixing and production techniques, to be applied again to unheard music set in the examination. ● Knowledge and understanding of the principles of sound and audio technology. ● Produce a practical ‘mix’ and apply processes to supplied audio and MIDI tracks. ● Written essay, testing knowledge of specific signal processors/FX/hardware units.

● Knowledge and understanding of editing, mixing and production techniques, to be applied again to unheard music set in the examination. ● Knowledge and understanding of the principles of sound and audio technology. ● Practical knowledge of how to create/synthesise new sounds. ● Produce a practical ‘mix’ and apply processes to supplied audio and MIDI tracks. ● Written essay, testing knowledge of specific signal processors/FX/hardware units.

This unit contributes 35% of the AS Grade A Level Examinations Component 1: Multitrack Recording (Practical coursework) ● Produce one recording, chosen from a list of 10 songs set by the examination board, consisting of a minimum of 5 compulsory instruments and 2 additional ones. Longer than AS – now 3 to 3½ minutes. ● Submit logbook and authentication form. This unit contributes 20% of the A Level Grade

This unit contributes 35% of the A Level Grade

How is it examined? All assessed coursework and exams are marked externally.

Will I need to do coursework? Yes. 40% of AS and 40% of A Level is coursework.

Component 2: Technology-based Composition (Practical coursework)

What syllabus do you follow?

● Create, edit, manipulate & structure sounds to produce a technology-based composition based on a brief set by the examination board. ● Synthesis, Sampling, Audio Manipulation and Creative FX must be used. ● Longer than AS – now 3 minutes. ● Submit logbook and authentication form.

Edexcel Music Technology AS and A Level.

This unit contributes 20% of the A Level Grade Component 3: Listening & Analysing (Written examination: 1hr 30mins) ● Knowledge and understanding of recording and production techniques, to be applied to unheard music set in the examination. ● Knowledge of the principles/theory of sound and audio technology. ● Knowledge of the development of recording and production technology. ● Observations and written responses to a variety of unfamiliar tracks heard in the examination, set by the examination board. This unit contributes 25% of the A Level Grade

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? Visits will be arranged throughout the course, as well as opportunities to involve with Music Technology workshops and work with professionals in the field.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Universities look favourably on students who have studied Music courses as one of their A Levels. The self-discipline needed to undertake systematic personal musical skills practice, the developing of creative skills in composing and arranging, along with knowledge of how to use industry-standard hardware and software, makes a Music student’s skills set highly desirable to Universities looking to recruit students onto a wide range of subject courses.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? ● You need a genuine interest in listening to a wide range of musical styles, and computer skills to a reasonable level of fluency. ● You need some basic music keyboard-playing ability, ● We would still like you to involve in as much music making as is possible. ● You need to be willing to undertake personal research and much background reading to support and expand your practical skills-base ● Your level of notational understanding (treble and bass clefs) needs to be equivalent to ABRSM Grade 5 Theory. If you no not understand what this is, please come and talk to us in the Music Department, or look at the ABRSM website. The best grades are always achieved by students who maintain ENTHUSIASM FOR, and COMMITMENT TOWARDS both the practical and academic work required.

Further information Please contact Mr Saunders Director of Music & Music Technology john.saunders@britishschool.nl britishschool.nl

Digital and Creative Arts Faculty


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Drama and Theatre Studies GCSEs required A grade B in GCSE Drama and a grade 6 in GCSE English.

English and Drama Faculty

A Level Level Component 1: Theatre Workshop Learners participate in the creation, development and performance of: ● A reinterpretation of an extract from a text using the working methods and techniques of a theatre practitioner or theatre company. Component 2: Text in Action

This course could lead to Courses in Drama and Theatre as a single subject or can be combined with a wide variety of other subjects. It forms a good basis for study in any arts-based subject in combination with, for example, History, Media Studies, Philosophy, Law, Politics and languages.

What will I be studying? AS Level Component 1: Performance Workshop Learners participate in the creation, development and performance of: ● An extract from a text. ● A reinterpretation of an extract from a second text using the working methods and techniques of a theatre practitioner or theatre company. Unit Component 2: Text in Context Learners explore one complete performance text.

Learners participate in the creation, development and performance of: ● A devised piece using the working methods and techniques of a second theatre practitioner or theatre company. ● An extract from a text in a contrasting style to the devised performance. Component 3: Text in Performance Learners explore two complete performance texts from different historical periods and one extract from a third contracting text.

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? Learners are expected to be members of the Theatre Appreciation Society where a variety of performances can be seen in The Hague. There is also the annual London Theatre Trip that learners are encouraged to join.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

English and Drama Faculty What syllabus do you follow? Eduqas www.eduqas.co.uk

Learners should want to perform and learn about how to direct and design theatre too. Enthusiasm, energy and commitment are a must. Learners will also need to be comfortable working both in groups and on their own extended research taks.

Written and practical assessment.

How is it examined?

Coursework

AS Level

Yes – practical performances, creative logs and an evaluation of the performance process.

Component 1: Performance Workshop 60% of qualification This consists of internally assessed and externally moderated performance. Component 2: Text in Context 40% of qualification This consists of 1 written paper of 1 hour 30 minutes and is externally marked. A Level Component 1: Theatre Workshop 20% of qualification This consists of internally assessed and externally moderated performance. Component 2: Text in Action: 40% of qualification This consists of externally assessed performance by a visiting examiner. Component 3: Text in Performance: 40% of qualification This consists of 1 written paper of 2 hours 30 minutes and is externally marked.

Examination method

Further information Please contact Ms Ball Head of the Drama Department hazel.ball@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

English Literature GCSEs required Students are expected to have a grade 6 in GCSE English Literature and a 5 in English Language (6 in English Language preferred). Students coming from different systems of education will be expected to demonstrate a level of proficiency in English deemed as equivalent to GCSE by the school, and to show evidence of having studied set texts in depth.

English and Drama Faculty

Component Two Level This component encourages learners to develop their ability to read widely and engage critically with a range of poetry and drama whilst developing further techniques of analysis and evaluation. ● Poetry One poetry text selected from a prescribed list ● Drama One play from a prescribed list All texts but one are also used in the A Level course. A Level

This course could lead to

Component One

English Literature can be studied as a single subject in higher education or can be combined with a wide variety of other subjects. It forms a good basis for study in any arts-based subject in combination with, for example, History, Media Studies, Philosophy, Law, Politics, Psychology and languages. Increasingly, Business and Marketing employers are also looking for evidence of advanced literacy, which can be suggested through success in English Literature.

This component encourages learners to develop their ability to read widely and engage critically with a range of poetry from different times whilst developing further techniques of analysis and evaluation.

What will I be studying?

Component Two

AS Level Component One This component encourages learners to engage with prose fiction written in different times. ● Prose fiction pre-1900 One text selected from prescribed list ● Prose fiction post-1900 One text selected from prescribed list. This text does not crossover to the linear A Level course.

● Pre-1900 Poetry One poetry text selected from a prescribed list ● Post-1900 Poetry Two poetry text selected from a prescribed list

This component encourages learners to explore the changing traditions of drama over time. ● Shakespeare One Shakespeare play from a prescribed list. ● Drama Two plays (one pre-, and one post-1900) from a prescribed list.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

English and Drama Faculty

Component Three – Unseen Texts

Will I need to do coursework?

This component gives learners the opportunity to synthesise and reflect upon knowledge they have gained from the course as a whole and to apply their skills of literary analysis to the examination of unseen prose and unseen poetry text.

Yes.

● Unseen Prose Analysis of an unseen passage of prose, taken from one of two prescribed periods of study (1880–1910 and 1918–1939). ● Unseen Poetry Analysis of an unseen poem or poetry extract. Component Four This component is internally assessed and externally moderated. ● Prose Study Two prose texts from different periods, one pre-2000 and one post-2000. One author is nominated by the student.

How is it examined? AS Level Component One – Prose (closed-book) Written Examination: 2hrs 50% of qualification Component Two– Poetry and Drama Written Examination: 2hrs 50% of qualification A Level Component One-Poetry (open-book, clean copy) Written Examination: 2hrs 30% of qualification Component Two-Drama (closed-book) Written Examination: 2hrs 30% of qualification Component Three-Unseen Texts Written Examination: 2hrs 20% of qualification Component Four Non-exam assessment: 2500-3500 words 20% of qualification

What syllabus do you follow? Eduqas www.eduqas.co.uk

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? The faculty strongly recommends that students take the opportunity to participate in various theatre trips on offer, including a residential trip to London that takes place annually at the end of the autumn term. We also recommend seeing various visiting authors who come to the Netherlands.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? English Literature at A Level develops the following skills that make you an attractive potential university student: ● Excellent communication skills-both written and oral. ● The ability to express your own ideas and opinions. ● The ability to analyse and construct a persuasive argument. The study of English Literature will complement any future studies in the Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences and Law faculties at University.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? You need to have a good standard of reading and enjoy reading a wide range of literary texts from different periods and genres. The coursework element of the course requires students to be independent learners and self-motivated in their approach. You need to enjoy writing and exploring alternative interpretations and context.

Further information Please contact Mrs Bradley Head of the English Faculty anna.bradley@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Business GCSEs required The BSN does not offer GCSE Business and the course assumes that all students have not studied the subject at GCSE or IBMYP. From a Maths perspective, It is important to feel comfortable in calculating percentages: there are lots of small calculations to perform, so students should ideally have at least a grade 5 in Maths GCSE. The exams also contain essays so students must feel comfortable writing longer analytical pieces of work of the type they have experienced in History or English Literature GCSEs.

This course could lead to There is a vast array of Business courses at University and often combined with other subjects such as languages. Although many specialise in their preferred field such as IT, Marketing or Finance.

What will I be studying? AS Level – Units 1 to 6 inclusive (examined end Year 12) A Level – Units 1 to 10 inclusive (examined end Year 13) 1. What is business? 2. Managers, leadership and decision making 3. Decision making to improve marketing performance 4. Decision making to improve operational performance 5. Decision making to improve financial performance

Humanities Faculty

6. Decision making to improve human resource Level

performance 7. Analysing the strategic position of a business 8. Choosing strategic direction 9. Strategic methods: how to pursue strategies 10. Managing strategic change

How is it examined? AS Level Business 1 is 50% of the AS. It is 1 hour and 30 minutes and worth 80 marks. There are 10 multiple choice questions worth 1 mark each, short answer questions worth 20 marks, 2 data response questions each in 2 parts worth 25 marks each. Business 2 is 50% of the AS. It is 1 hour and 30 minutes and worth 80 marks. There is 1 case study consisting of 7 questions. A Level There are three assessments. All three papers examine the whole specification, are 2 hours long, 100 marks in total and 33.3% of A Level weighting. Paper 1: Three compulsory sections: Section A: 15 MCQs worth 15 marks; Section B: short answer questions worth 35 marks; Section C: two essays (choice of one from two and one from two) each 25 marks Paper 2: Three data response compulsory questions worth approximately 33 marks each and made up of three or four part questions. Paper 3: One compulsory case study followed by approximately six questions.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 Will I need to do coursework? No

What syllabus do you follow? AQA

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? There are visits from speakers and trips to local businesses. A stock market game open to all runs through the year. In Year 13, we hope to run an overseas trip each year.

Humanities Faculty What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? The key skills are: prioritising issues and analysing situations from an objective position, recognising problems and proposing solutions, making and justifying decisions. Students need to open their eyes to the world around them and recognise why businesses behave in the way they do. It is therefore vital that students read, watch and understand the business news and what is happening in the real world.

Further information Please contact Mr Hare Head of the Business Studies Department timothy.hare@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

BTEC National Level 3 Diploma in Business The BTEC National Level 3 in Business is offered as a core part of the IBCP qualification. Additionally, we offer the possibility of studying this programme with A Levels. However, this can only be chosen in consultation with the Sixth Form Office and departments concerned. The programme of study will be individually negotiated but not all A Level/ BTEC combinations will be available.

GCSEs required The BSN does not offer GCSE Business Studies and the course assumes that all students have not studied the subject at GCSE or MYP. From a Maths perspective, it is important to feel comfortable in calculating percentages: there are lots of small calculations to perform in some of the units.

This course could lead to It is an alternative to A Levels, and, in conjunction with the IBCP, is accepted as an entry requirement for universities and further education colleges. It is also highly valued by employers. BTECs are graded on a Fail, Pass, Merit, Distinction, Distinction * scale. A student who achieves the top grade of D*D* will have the same UK university points as a student who achieves two A* A Levels. There is a vast array of Business courses available at university and are often combined with other subjects, such as languages,

Humanities Faculty

presenting an ideal foundation for business careers. Level Alternatively, students may choose to follow a different career path such as a study in law, accountancy, hospitality or sports management.

What will I be studying? The BTEC National Business qualification is designed to provide a highly specialist, work-related qualification. It gives learners the knowledge, understanding and skills that they need to prepare for higher education and employment. During the two-year course, students will study a variety of business topics. There are 4 compulsory units that all students must study:

The Business Environment The aim of this unit is to give learners the fundamental knowledge of a range of business organisations, and the many factors that shape the nature of organizations operating in an increasingly complex business world. An example of an assignment for this topic would be a feasibility study of two different markets for a business. As part of this unit we visit the Amsterdam Stock Exchange.

Business Resources The aim of this unit is to develop learner knowledge of the range of human, physical, technological and financial resources required in an organisation, and how the management of these resources can impact on business performance.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Humanities Faculty

For this unit, students will be presented with a real life business problem, involving the financial resources of the organisation, and will compete to identify the best solution.

How is it examined?

Introduction to Marketing

Yes – the BTEC is 100% coursework and there are no exams.

The aim and purpose of this unit is to give learners an understanding of how marketing, research and planning and the marketing mix are used by all organisations. Students will have the opportunity to work alongside an Advertising Agency to develop a creative marketing campaign for a product

Business Communication The aim of this unit is to show learners that the collection and management of business information, and the successful communication of that information throughout a business, is critical for the future prosperity of the organisation. An example of an assignment for this topic would be a formal presentation on ethical issues surrounding information. After studying the 4 core units, students will study 8 further units from a wide choice. These 8 will be chosen by the school to best suit the students and will come from the following areas: ● Accounting ● Marketing ● Business Law ● Retail ● Human Resources ● Management ● Business Administration ● Logistics

Entirely through coursework.

Will I need to do coursework?

What syllabus do you follow? Pearson BTEC

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? There are visits from speakers and trips to local businesses. Work placements, organised independently by the student, are an important element of the programme.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? The key skills are: investigating and analysing situations from an objective position, recognising problems and proposing solutions, making and justifying decisions and developing clear communication and employability skills.

Further information Please contact Mrs Cooke IBCP Co-ordinator michelle.cooke@britishschool.nl

Last year students received univeristy offers from: ● The Hague Univeristy of Applied Sciences ● Dublin Institute ● Manchester Metropolitan University ● Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences ● Leeds Becket ● Bournemouth University ● Cardiff Metroplitan University ● Swansea University ● Kent University ● Edinburgh Napier ● Univeristy College Northampton ● Globe College Munich


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Economics GCSEs required The BSN does not offer GCSE Economics and the course assumes that all students have not studied the subject at GCSE or MYP. From a maths perspective, it is important to feel comfortable in calculating, using and understanding ratios; fractions and percentages. Students will also need to be able to construct and interpret graphs and tables. Students should have secured a grade 6 in GCSE English and a grade 5 in GCSE Maths.

This course could lead to There is a vast array of economics/business courses at university and often combined with other subjects such as languages present an ideal foundation for business careers.

What will I be studying? AS Level – Themes 1 and 2 inclusive (examined end Year 12)

Humanities Faculty

Theme 2: The UK economy – performance Level and policies.

Known as macroeconomics. This theme introduces the key measures of economic performance and the main objectives and instruments of economic policy. Aggregate demand and supply are studied looking at basic principles of economic growth, inflation, unemployment and the balance of payments. Students should be able to argue there are different ways of dealing with an economic problem and put forward alternative points of view before drawing a conclusion. Theme 3: Business behaviour and the labour market. This theme builds on the knowledge and skills gained in Theme 1 and students will consider the reasons why some firms grow (and why others stay small) and investigate the different objectives of firms. Students will also look at government intervention, focusing on different types of intervention aimed at promoting competitive markets. This theme will provide a coherent coverage of the microeconomic content, drawing on local, national and global contexts. Students will need to be able to apply quantitative skills during this theme. Theme 4: A global perspective.

A Level – Themes 1 to 4 inclusive (examined end Year 13)

This builds on the knowledge and skills gained in Theme 2 and applies them to a global context.

Theme 1: Introduction to markets and market failure.

Students will apply their knowledge and understanding to both familiar and unfamiliar contexts and demonstrate and awareness of current economic events and policies. Issues studied will include globalisation; international trade; exchange rates and the balance of payments. Students will also consider the factors influencing the growth and development of emerging and developing economies. Students should develop an awareness of trends in

Better known as microeconomics, candidates are introduced to the concept of scarcity and resource allocation that creates a pricing mechanism. Students learn how to apply supply and demand to a variety of markets and understand why markets might not allocate resources efficiently and how government can respond. Classic topics are price elasticity, effects of taxation, and the negative externalities of production.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 the global economy over the past 25 years through wider reading. As with Theme 3, students will need to be able to apply quantitative skills during this theme.

How is it examined? AS Level Unit 1 starts with a range of multiple choice questions, along with some short answer questions.

Humanities Faculty ● Section A comprises one data response question broken down into a number of parts (including a choice of extended open-response questions from which students choose one from a choice of two) ● Section B also comprises one data response question broken down into a number of parts (including a choice of extended open-response questions from which students choose one from a choice of two) The exam is two hours and represents 30% of the A Level.

Students then answer a series of questions based on a case study which require longer written responses including diagrams and the ability to evaluate an argument. There is also a choice of extended openresponse questions (students must answer one from a choice of two). The exam is 90 minutes and represents 50% of the AS.

Will I need to do coursework?

Unit 2 follows the same format as unit 1, with questions based on the UK economy. The exam is also 90 minutes and represents 50% of the AS.

Edexcel

A Level Paper 1 will test students’ knowledge of Themes 1 and 3 (microeconomics) and is made up of 3 sections (students answer all questions from section A and B and one question from section C:● Section A comprises a range of multiple-choice and short-answer questions.
● Section B comprises one data response question broken down into a number of parts. ● Section C comprises a choice of extended openresponse questions; students select one from a choice of two. The exam is two hours and represents 35% of the A Level. Paper 2 tests students’ knowledge of themes 2 and 4 (macroeconomics) and follows the same format as Paper 1:● Section A comprises a range of multiple-choice and short-answer questions. ● Section B comprises one data response question broken down into a number of parts. ● Section C comprises a choice of extended openresponse questions; students select one from a choice of two. The exam is two hours and represents 35% of the A Level. Paper 3 tests students’ knowledge of all four themes. Students are required to apply their knowledge and understanding, make connections and transfer higherorder skills across all four themes. Paper 3 comprises two sections:-

No

What syllabus do you follow? Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? There are visits from speakers and trips to local businesses. The Bank of England 2.0 is a ‘beat the chancellor’ competition and students also have the opportunity to participate in a competition run by the European Central Bank.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? The key skills are: developing an understanding of economic concepts and theories through a critical consideration of current economic issues, problems and institutions that affect everyday life; analysing and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the market economy and the role of the government within it.

Further information Please contact Miss Kay Head of the Economics Department rachel.kay@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Geography AS and A Level GCSEs required GCSE Geography at grade B or higher is desirable. It is also recommended that candidates have an equivalent to GCSE English Language at grade 5.

This course could lead to Geography can be studied as a Science, Arts or Humanities discipline at degree level, either as a pure subject or in conjunction with others, or as specific sub-areas of study such as Geomorphology, Geology, Development Studies, Urban Studies or any number of other specific geographical areas of study. An unusually wide range of courses are offered at University level connected with this subject, and past students have gone on to study areas as diverse as Law, Accounting, and a wide range of Management and Business subjects.

What will I be studying? Geography A Level is intellectually stimulating, demanding and keenly relevant. It aims to not only develop a set of important and transferable skills for the candidate, but is also designed to highlight the main issues and concepts that young adults are likely to encounter in their current and future lives. The syllabus is issue and concept based, with a clear bias towards relevance and application, and a balance between Physical and Human Geography and fieldwork.

Humanities Faculty

AS Level Level Students can still study and sit AS exams at the end of the first year and receive a free-standing qualification. However the AS results will not count towards the final A Level grade. Instead, all exams for the A Level qualification will be taken at the end of the course, covering the content from the whole two years. Component 1: Physical Geography and People and the Environment The Physical topics include: Section A: either Water and carbon cycles or Hot desert environments and their margins or Coastal systems and landscapes Section B: either Hazards or Contemporary urban environments Component 2: Human Geography and Geography Fieldwork Investigation The Human topics include: Section A: either Global systems and global governance or Changing places Section B: Geography fieldwork investigation and geographical skills A Level In a change to the current setup, all exams for the A Level qualification will be taken at the end of the course, covering the content from the whole two years. Component 1: Physical Geography Section A: Water and carbon cycles Section B: either Hot desert environments and their margins or Coastal systems and landscapes Section C: either Hazards or Ecosystems under stress or Cold environments


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Humanities Faculty

Component 2: Human Geography

How is it examined?

Section A: Global systems and global governance Section B: Changing places Section C: either Contemporary urban environments or Population and the environment or Resource security

AS

Component 3: Geographical Investigation Students complete an individual fieldwork investigation that must include data collected in the field. The individual investigation will be approximately 3,500 words and based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content covered in component 1 or 2.

Component 1: Physical Geography and People and the Environment Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes 80 marks (question types: multiple-choice, short answer and levels of response) that contribute 50% of the AS Component 2: Human Geography and Geography Fieldwork Investigation Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes 80 marks (question types: multiple-choice, short answer and levels of response) that contribute 50% of the AS

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

A Level

Students are required to attend a five day residential field course in South Dorset, UK in the October of Year 12. Student will also be required to complete a single day of data collection in The Hague. This provides the field work experience and data collection required by the specification.

Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes 96 marks (question types: multiple-choice, short answer, levels of response and extended prose) that contributes 40% of A Level

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Students will be required to read widely, think broadly, and use a wide variety of sources to build up an in depth picture of a topic. They will learn to synthesise such information into a coherent whole, and be critical in their analysis and evaluation. They should also feel inspired by the world around them, and gain both enjoyment and satisfaction from their geographical studies, understanding their relevance to their own lives and the lives of others.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? The study of Geography prepares the student for further studies in the subject and the many other related areas. It also develops very important transferable skills such as critical analysis, synthesis, decision making, investigation, fieldwork and report writing, and develops international understanding, fostering a keen awareness of, and concern for, key global issues. Students studying Geography will be well equipped to move into an extensive range of higher education courses. Geography is seen as one of the “facilitating subjects” by British Universities, and most also accept it as a science for application purposes.

Component1: Physical Geography

Component 2: Human Geography Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes 96 marks (question types: multiple-choice, short answer, levels of response and extended prose) that contributes 40% of A Level Component 3: Geographical Investigation An individual fieldwork investigation that is approximated 3,000-4,000 words and worth 35 marks (20% of A Level).

Will I need to do coursework? Yes as this forms 20% of the A Level. Students will produce a 3,000-4,000 word fieldwork investigation based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content covered in component 1 or 2.

Further information Please contact Ms Burns Head of the Geography Department ruth.burns@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Government and Politics GCSEs required You do not need to have studied Government and Politics, although an enthusiasm for the topic is essential. Students should have a 5 in either English Literature and Language or B in History.

This course could lead to Students of Government and Politics can take a wide variety of university courses which involve the ability to construct, substantiate and communicate an argument, for example, International Relations, History, Law, and, obviously, Politics. Government and Politics can be useful preparation for a range of careers including journalism and civil service.

What will I be studying? Please note that both exam boards offering A Level Politics (AQA and Pearson (Edexcel) ) are waiting for OfQual to accredit their specifications. Thus, the information below is for guidance and is not final.

AS Examinations Unit 1 – UK Politics Political Participation, students will study: ● democracy and participation, political parties, electoral systems, voting behaviour and the media. Core Political Ideas, students will study: ● conservatism, liberalism, socialism.

Humanities Faculty

Unit 2 – UK Government Level UK Government, students will study: ● the constitution, parliament, Prime Minister and executive, relationships between the branches. Optional Political Ideas, students will study: ● one idea from the following: anarchism, ecologism, feminism, multiculturalism, nationalism

A Level Examinations As with all Linear A Levels – Units 1 and 2 are consolidated. All 3 examinations will be equally weighted. Unit 3 – Comparative Politics AQA offers ONLY US Politics whereas Edexcel offer either US or Global. For USA (3A), students will study: ● the US Constitution and federalism, US congress, US presidency, US Supreme Court, democracy and participation, civil rights. OR For Global (3B) students will study: ● theories of Global Politics, sovereignty and globalisation, global governance: political and economic, global governance: human rights and environmental, power and developments, regionalism and the European Union.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 How is it examined? All AS Units are examined. AS exams are each 1 hour 30mins. All A Level examinations are 2 hours each. They require you to write essay style answers like other A Level and IB Humanities subjects. The majority of questions can be selected.

Will I need to do coursework? No.

What syllabus do you follow? To be confirmed

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? The Government and Politics department has in the past organised trips to Westminster and Edinburgh to visit the British and Scottish Parliaments. These involve the opportunity to meet MPs and MSPs and discuss important topics, for example, the extent of accountability of the government and the impact of devolution on the politics of the UK. Plus students can also discuss the importance of political ideology in contemporary politics. Students talk to journalists to discuss the role of the media in presenting political developments to the electorate. Links are being made between the school and Edinburgh University and other academic institutions to explore the possibility of input from other observers who could give valuable insight into the British political system.

Humanities Faculty What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Studying Government and Politics helps you to develop ● A critical understanding of the concepts, institutions and processes which underpin political systems; ● An ability to communicate your ideas effectively, construct an argument by substantiating your analysis with a range of evidence, both verbally and on paper; ● The capacity to evaluate information and reach independent conclusions. ● Your critical reasoning and analytical skills, including the capacity for solving problems and thinking creatively. ● additional communication skills, such as negotiating, questioning and summarising; ● the ability to discuss ideas in groups, accommodating different ideas and reaching agreement; ● the capacity to think objectively and approach problems and new situations with an open mind; ● an appreciation of the different factors that influence the activities of groups and individuals in society.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Success in Government and Politics is dependent on the ability of students to write an argument based on analysis of different aspects of British politics, using the correct terminology, supported by reference to contemporary British political developments. Students must be prepared to share, defend and, perhaps, change their opinions. You must have an interest in current affairs and bring your up to date knowledge to the classroom.

Further information Please contact Ms Jackson Head of the History and Politics Department anne.jackson@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

History GCSEs required Normally students will need to have completed either GCSE or IGCSE History and obtained a grade B. Occasionally we will accept students who have not studied History before or who have not attained a grade B at GCSE. It is important to have an enquiring mind, an interest in the past and an appreciation of the value of history to establish an understanding of the modern world. If you enjoy investigation, debate and putting forward a well-argued case this is a subject for you.

This course could lead to There are of course specifically related history careers such as Museum work or Archaeology, but, it is the skills that history imparts which ensure it is valued and can lead to a range of university courses in areas including the study of Literature, Media Studies, Marketing, Sociology, Law, Philosophy, Politics and Economics. A qualification in History is an excellent foundation for careers in Law, Journalism, Banking, the Civil Service, Diplomatic Service and accountancy because of skills honed from evaluating and analysing evidence and reaching supported judgements. History is popular with students studying Science and Engineering as a qualification in History demonstrates a wider and attractive portfolio of skills and qualifications with which to enter university and employment.

Humanities Faculty

What will I be studying? Level Route E Unit 1: Russia 1917-91 – From Lenin to Yeltsin. This Unit covers the whole history of communist rule in Russia and the Soviet Union, from the Bolshevik seizure of power in November 1917 to the collapse of communist system and the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991. Unit 2: E1: Mao’s China 1949-76. This option covers the period of Mao Zedong’s rule in China, from the proclamation of the People’s Republic in October 1949 until Mao’s death in 1976. Unit 3: Option 30: Lancastrians, Yorkists and Henry VII, 1399–1509. Together, the breadth and depth topics explore the dramatic developments in late medieval England that centred around the personalities and political skills of a series of kings, queens and their powerful subjects, and the impact of these developments on the kingdom. Coursework: An extended essay. Students to analyse why and how 3 historians have disagreed about a particular issue. (3000 to 4000 words.) The issue we will be examining will be the conduct of the US Civil War (1861-65).

How is it examined? For AS there are 2 exams: Unit 1: (60% of AS) Students answer 3 questions. One from each section. ● Sections A and B comprise of a choice of essays which assess understanding of the period in breadth e.g. a question covers a minimum of 10 years. ● Section C comprises one compulsory question that assesses the ability to analyse and evaluate historical evidence. ● The exam is marked out of a total of 60marks. Time – 2 hours 15mins long.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 Unit 2: (40% of AS) Students answer 2 questions. One from each section. ● Section A – A compulsory 2 part question which requires analysis of sources. ● Section B comprises of a choice of 3 essays which assess understanding of the period in depth i.e. a question may be focused upon one event. ● The exam is marked out of a total of 40marks. Time – 1 hour 30mins long. For A Level there are 3 exams: Units 1 and 2 are the same topics studied for the AS course, the structure, timings and marks are the same as AS, the difference here is that the exam for each unit at A Level is designed to stretch candidates further so they can demonstrate more understanding via the depth of their analysis and sophistication of written style. ● Unit 1 – 30% of A Level. ● Unit 2 – 20% of A Level ● Unit 3 – 30% of A Level. Students answer 3 questions one from each section. ● Section A – Analysis of source material. ● Section B – a depth essay from a choice of two. ● Section C – an essay from a choice of two which focuses on the nature of change over a period of 100 years. ● The exam is marked out of a total of 60. Time 2 hours 15mins.

Will I need to do coursework? Yes in Year 13. This is 20% of the A Level. An extended essay of 3000–4000 words, arising from independent study and research, on a topic of the learner’s choice. Considering the scope of History … you have lots of choice! This is internally marked and moderated and then externally moderated by the exam board.

What syllabus do you follow? Edexcel

Humanities Faculty Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? Students will have the opportunity to go on a field trip relevant to the syllabi we follow. We organise a field trip to Russia (Moscow and St Petersburg) designed to support the AS/A Level study of Soviet Russia and A Level study of the Crimean War. Such trips are highly successful because they enable students to appreciate and see for themselves the places where major events took place, as well as seeing primary evidence in the form of artefacts. Students complete work which will enhance their understanding of the nature of the Soviet State. In addition students will also gain an increased understanding of the contemporary nature of the country they visit.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Studying history allows you to develop: critical reasoning and analytical skills, including problem solving and creative thinking, often through extensive reading; intellectual rigour and independence, including the ability to conduct research using ICT and sources; the ability to construct an argument by ordering relevant evidence and communicating findings in a structured, clear and persuasive manner; additional skills, such as negotiating, questioning and summarising; self-motivation and self-reliance with the ability to work without direct supervision and manage time and priorities effectively; the ability to discuss ideas in groups, accommodating different ideas and reaching agreement; the capacity to think objectively and approach problems and new situations with an open mind; an appreciation of the different factors that influence the activities of groups and individuals in society.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? An open mind and the ability to graft! Additionally a willingness to read widely, engage with debates, work independently and be able to write effectively are also important.

Further information Please contact Ms Jackson Head the History and Politics Department anne.jackson@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Psychology GCSEs required There is no prerequisite GCSE Psychology but you will be required to have English Literature grade 6 and English Language grade 5 or above and Mathematics grade 5 or above. A previous study of Biology and/or History is desirable.

This course could lead to Psychology has links with lots of different university courses and careers. It is regarded as a humanities subject or a social science depending on the type of university course. Psychology has a huge variety of university programmes, including sport, business, theatre, politics, biology, medicine, education and, of course, Psychology itself.

What will I be studying? AS Level – Unit 1 and 2 inclusive (examined end Year 12) A Level – Units 1 to 3 inclusive (examined end Year 13) Unit 1: introductory Topics in Psychology You will study 3 topic areas, Social Influence, Memory and Attachment. This unit contributes 50% of the total AS marks, 33.3% of the total Alevel marks. Unit 2: Psychology in Context You will study 3 further topic areas, namely Approaches in Psychology, Psychopathology and Research methods. This unit contributes 50% of the total AS marks, 33.3% of the total ALevel marks.

Humanities Faculty

A Level Level If you wish to study Psychology at A Level you will be required to study additional content in Units 1 and 2 (as detailed below). Unit 1: Introductory Topics in Psychology You are required to learn additional material in Psychopathology. Unit 2: Psychology in Context You are required to learn the additional topic of Biopsychology ALevel students also study an additional paper Unit 3: Issues and Options in Psychology Topics in Psychology You will be expected to develop knowledge, understanding and skills of analysis and evaluation in relation to three topics selected from: Issues and Debates in Psychology including Gender and Culture Bias; Free will versus Determinism; Nature versus Nurture; Reductionism versus Holism; Idiographic versus Nomothetic and Ethical implications in research, including reference to socially sensitive research. The Options content requires you to study three topic selected from: Relationships, Gender, Cognition and Development, Schizophrenia, Eating behaviour, Stress, Aggression, Forensic Psychology and Addiction. This unit contributes 33.3% of the total A Level marks.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 How is it examined? There are two AS examination papers each of which is 1 hr 30 mins duration. They will consist of structured compulsory questions based on Social Influence, Memory and Attachment, Approaches in Psychology,Psychopathology and Research methods. Questions include multiple choice, short answer and extended writing questions. At A Level, there are three examination papers each of which is 2 hrs duration. They will consist of structured questions based on Social Influence, Memory, Attachment and Psychopathology, Approaches in Psychology, Biopsychology, Research methods and Issues and Options in Psychology

Will I need to do coursework? The coursework component has been removed from all AS/A Level Psychology specifications, however, you will be required to complete all set work throughout the course to deadline as well as full end of unit internal exams throughout the year.

Humanities Faculty What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Although you do not need to have previously studied Psychology, an interest in understanding human behaviour is essential. During the course, you will need to be able to communicate effectively and research information from a variety of sources. You should also be willing to engage in a wide range of reading on these matters. You will be expected to be able to construct and write extended written pieces as well as tailor your knowledge to short answer questions as appropriate. An ability to look at different arguments, evaluate evidence and come to logical conclusions. You should enjoy exploring issues dealing with how and why people behave in certain ways and want to find out more about the link between people‘s behaviour and their environment. You should enjoy planning and carrying out investigations to look for any patterns and explanation in to the behaviour of children and adults.

What syllabus do you follow?

Further information

AQA specification A (see AQA website for full details).

Please contact Ms Davies Head of the Psychology Department julie.davies2@britishschool.nl

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Psychology is an extremely popular subject at degree level and as such university places can be highly competitive. As a fairly modern discipline its reputation as an academic subject is growing. Students can use their knowledge of psychology to help them understand human behaviour relevant for a wide range of university courses as well as the more general skills learned in psychology.


AS and A Level (Modular)  2017 | 2019

Dutch NT2 II GCSEs required GCSE Dutch at least at B-level or equivalent level of language tuition. An entry test may be taken in order to establish the required level.

This course could lead to Entrance to Dutch courses with Dutch as the taught language at ● higher vocational training leading to a Bachelor grade so called HBO-education ● Dutch Universities.

What will I be studying? The course topics are very much geared towards the Dutch society with a main focus on Dutch education and work.

Which skills are examined? The exam consists of the four language skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing. Each of them are examined in a different exam and need to be passed in order to get an overall passed.

Languages Faculty

When is the exam? Level The exam can be sat at different times during each year, but can only be resat 3 times. It is possible to resit parts of the exam. (if you have passed your writing, listening and reading and failed your speaking, you will only have to resit your speaking) As the exam is available at several moments during the year, the school will in conference with the student and parents pick a week of relative low work pressure. The head of Dutch will advise according to the level of the student about the preferred moment.

Where can I sit the exam? The exam can be taken at the so called centres in The Netherlands of which one is situated in Rijswijk. (it can not be taken at the BSN)

Who can register for the exam? Parents and students can only register for the exam themselves. This is done through the government website www.duo.nl where all the information about cost etc. can be found.

Further information Please contact Mr De Koning Head of Dutch bill.dekoning@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Modern Foreign Languages French, German and Spanish GCSEs required
your chosen language to GCSE Grade B or equivalent. If you do not have one of these qualifications but would like to enrol because, for example, you have lived abroad please contact the relevant Head of Department.

This course could lead to Proficiency in at least one foreign language is always a boost on a university application form. It is also helpful for success in many career paths and an invaluable skill for life. Knowledge of a foreign language strengthens your application to encompass a wider perspective of the world particularly in Business, Law, Management, History, English and even Science and Engineering. Many employers look at ability in a language as a valuable skill which will set you apart from others. Taking a language to A Level will give you the skills to acquire further foreign languages far more easily, should the need arise.

What will I be studying? At both AS and A Levels, the specifications cover a number of topics from the themes below: ● AS Theme1. Social issues and trends: Evolving society in France/Germany/Spain. ● AS Theme 2. Political, intellectual and artistic culture in the French/German/Spanish speaking world.

Languages Faculty

● A Level Theme 3. Social issues and trends: Level

Immigration and the French/German/Spanish multicultural society. ● A Level Theme 4. Aspects of politics and history in France/Germany/Spain.

There will be Literature and Film studies, as well as an opportunity to look at case studies from France Germany and Spain and the cultures of other countries where these languages are spoken. Paper 1: This paper will examine your understanding of the language across a range of topic areas. There will be a listening comprehension exercise, a reading comprehension exercise and also a translation into English. The paper will test direct comprehension as well as look at your ability to paraphrase and summarise the main points of a text. You will also show the ability to understand texts written in a wide variety of styles and dealing with a wide range of topics. Paper 2: Will test your ability to understand the culture of the language that you are studying and your ability to write about it. There will be an essay based on Literature or film and also a translation into the target language. This paper will test the ability of the student to analyse the culture of the country in writing in an appropriate style. The translation will test your control of grammar. Paper 3: Will be an oral exam that will examine your ability to talk about at least two aspects of the culture that you have studied. You will be expected to defend your point of view, justify your opinions and use the language of debate in your answers.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Languages Faculty

How is it examined?

Will I need to do coursework?

There are three papers for both AS and A2 students, and the weighting is the same at both levels.

No but the A Level oral (see paper 3 above) will involve you in a large amount of preparation of a topic that you will present in the oral.

Paper 1: Understanding the language – 40% of total mark – 1 hour 45 minutes The listening examination requires you to listen to five extracts and answer questions at your own pace within a 45 minute window of time. The reading section requires you to answer four texts covering different themes and styles of writing. The translation will test your ability to convey the meaning of a short text in the target language into English whilst staying close to the original. Paper 2: Writing about the culture of the language – 30% of the total mark – 1 hour 40 minutes (AS level) or 2 hours 40 minutes (A2 level) The paper starts with a brief translation from English into the target language (at AS level part of this will be just isolated sentences to translate) which will test your control of grammar. There will then be a 300 word essay about a film you have seen or a book that you have read in the target language that will test your ability to write coherently and show that you have understood the main themes in the work. A Level students will then have to write a second essay about a book that they have read. Students are not allowed to take books into the exam with them. Paper 3: Oral – 30% of final mark – approx. 15 minutes plus preparation time At AS level the oral will start with you preparing a short text about one of themes that you have covered in class. There will be four questions on the text and some follow up opinion questions. This will last about 7-9 minutes Both AS and A Level students will be given a card with a short statement expressing a point of view about one of the topics covered. You then decide if you agree or disagree with the point of view and have a short debate with the examiner (your teacher) about the topic. This lasts 5 minutes. If you are an A Level student you will then give a presentation about a theme that you have chosen in advance and that you have prepared before the examination. This be on a theme related to the culture of the language that you have chosen and will be personal to you. The presentation and subsequent discussion with the examiner will last just over 10 minutes.

What syllabus do you follow? Edexcel

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? French, German and Spanish run residential trips once a year to various cities in respective countries. These are an excellent opportunity to put language into practice and to become familiar with the target language culture.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Languages are regarded by universities as traditional and demanding subjects at A Level. Languages are frequently studied in combination with another subject as a joint honours degree course (for example, Law, Engineering, Business Studies/Economics). The UK is suffering from an acute shortage of linguists due to languages becoming non-compulsory in schools. Many universities, wishing to maintain their language departments, look favourably on applications to study single or joint honours MFL.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Regular exposure to the media and literature of your chosen language is important. An understanding of grammar will also help with your written work as well as supporting your ability to discuss and offer opinions on a range of subjects.

Further information Please contact Head of Department for the language you are interested in – Mr Coombes (Spanish) john.coombes@britishschool.nl Mrs Graves (French) tansy.graves@britishschool.nl Mr Stower (German) matthew.stower@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Modern Foreign Languages Note for native speakers If you wish to sit an AS or A Level exam in your native language, we would normally expect this to be in addition to your four AS choices that you take in Year 12. Please let us know that you wish to do this by sending us a letter written in the mother tongue stating the reasons why you wish to study the language and the exam grades and courses of study that you have already followed. This should be handed to Mme Rieutort-Louis. Someone in the Faculty will then get back to you detailing the programme we can offer. In Dutch, French, Spanish and German we have curriculum timetabled lessons and help from native speaker assistants. You would normally be given a timetable that would involve one or both of these options depending upon your level of experience and (written) competence. In Chinese, Russian and Italian we can arrange for help from our native speaker assistants. It is sometimes possible for us to make arrangements for you to sit an AS or A Level in another language and in these cases you should contact Miss A Smith, annemarie.smith@britishschool.nl to see what possibilities are available at the BSN.

Languages Faculty Level


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Mathematics

Mathematics Faculty

Are there any trips or activities Level associated with this course?

GCSEs required

A small group of students are selected to take part in the ISMTF Senior Mathematics competition.

The minimum entry level to the course is grade 6 in the Higher Level GCSE examination. Mathematics A Level can be a challenging subject for some. Please be aware that even students who gain an 8 or 9 at GCSE may find the subject difficult. Ask your Math teacher for advice.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

This course could lead to A Level Mathematics is a prerequisite for entry to many University courses, especially in the Sciences, Engineering and Economics related degrees and advantageous for many more.

What will I be studying? The course covers a wide range of Mathematical topics, including: functions, calculus, trigonometry, sequences and series, geometry and numerical methods. Alongside the topics in Pure Mathematics, the students also study Mechanics and Statistics.

Mathematics is essentially a skills based subject requiring consistent practice of techniques and frequent reflection on concepts explored. Successful students strive to not only be able to answer questions posed, but to understand where the methods are derived from and why they actually work. It is important that students choosing Mathematics enjoy the subject sufficiently and are motivated to persevere when the material becomes challenging.

What benefit does this subject have for university entrance? Mathematics is an important and popular subject which develops reasoning and problem solving skills. As well as being a respected discipline in its own rights, it is also the backbone for many Science, Engineering and Economics related degrees. There are a wide range of University courses that contain a mathematical element.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 How is it examined? The students sit 3 examinations at the end of Year 13. Two of the papers examine the Pure content, whilst the third tests the Mechanics and Statistics components of the course.

What syllabus is followed? Edexcel

Further information Please contact Mr McGee Head of the Maths Faculty david.mcgee@britishschool.nl

Mathematics Faculty


AS and A Level (Modular)  2017 | 2019

Further Mathematics GCSEs required The minimum entry level to the course is a grade 7 in the Higher Level GCSE examination. It is vital that the students have a natural feeling for, and thoroughly enjoy Mathematics if they opt to study this course. The students study for 2 separate A Levels, an A Level in Mathematics and an A Level in Further Mathematics.

This course could lead to The majority of these students will be expecting to include Mathematics as a major component of their University studies, either as a subject in its own right or within courses such as Physics, Engineering, Natural Sciences, Economics or Computer Science.

What will I be studying? The full curriculum for both A Level Mathematics and A Level Further Mathematics. The courses include a wide range of Pure and Applied topics, including: Mechanics, Statistics, Calculus, Complex Numbers, Numerical Methods, Trigonometry, Conics Sections and Probability. A Level The course is usually offered at only the A Level, although on occasion students have chosen to follow to AS Level.

Mathematics Faculty

Are there any trips or activities Level associated with this course? A small group of students are selected to take part in the ISMTF Senior Mathematics competition.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? Students need to have a strong interest in, and passion for Mathematics. The course is academically challenging and requires not only ability, but also dedication and a rigorous approach to study.

What benefit does this subject have for university entrance? Further Mathematics is held in high regard by Universities and deals with topics that students will often meet during the first year of many undergraduate courses that contain a strong mathematical element. The qualification can be advantageous to students wishing to apply to top ranking universities in a range of subjects.

How is it examined? Students sit 3 examinations for the A Level Mathematics qualification and a further 4 papers for the Further Mathematics qualification. The examination board is Edexcel. There is externally assessed coursework.

Further information Please contact Mr McGee Head of the Maths Faculty david.mcgee@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Modular)  2017 | 2019

Physical Education A Level Physical Education is an Advanced Level Sports course. The qualification builds on the knowledge, understanding and analysis skills that you have developed in GCSE PE. You will need to have obtained at least a B grade at GCSE. Useful background skills include: ● The ability to analyse and respond to performances; ● The ability to synthesise information from a variety of sources; ● The ability to use appropriate equipment confidently, safely and towards a specific goal; ● A good standard of performance in one practical activity area. ● A sound knowledge of the rules and regulations governing the activity of your choice, with a view to being able to perform the role of an official eg, umpire/referee ● A good understanding of how to perform the role of coach/trainer.

Which skills will I develop? You will develop: ● your enjoyment + personal interest in the wider area of sport ● recognition of developments in sport ● greater understanding of your body and its response to training ● understanding of how your body learns new skills ● knowledge of how psychological and physiological factors affect your training and achievements ● the place of sport in society

Physical Education Faculty

What will I be studying? Level AS Level (examined at the end of Year 12) Unit 1: Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport: applied physiology, skill acquisition and sport psychology, sport and society, technology in sport. Unit 2: Practical performance in physical activity and sport: students can be assessed in one of two roles, either as a performer or coach in one activity. Written or verbal analysis and evaluation of performance A Level (examined at the end of Year 13) The subject specification is divided into 2 Units: Unit 1: Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport: applied anatomy and physiology, skill acquisition, sport and society. Unit 2: Factors affecting optimal performance in physical activity and sport: Exercise physiology and biomechanics, sport psychology, sport and society and technology in sport Unit 3: Practical performance in physical activity and sport: Students are assessed in one or two roles, either as a performer or coach in one activity. Written or verbal analysis and evaluation of performance.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Physical Education Faculty

How will it be examined

Relevant school excursions

AS

To be advised

Unit 1

Possible practical options

2 hour written paper. Total 84 marks available. 70% of the final AS mark. Unit 2 Internal assessment External moderation. Total 90 marks available 30% of the AS mark. A Level Unit 1 2 hour written paper. Total 105 marks available. 35% of the final A Level mark. Unit 2 2 hour written paper Total 105 marks available. 35% of the final A Level mark

Amateur Boxing, Association Football, Athletics, Badminton, Basketball, Camogie, Canoeing (flat and white water), Cricket, Cycling, Dance, Diving, Gaelic Football, Golf, Gymnastics, Handball, Field Hockey, Equestrian, Hurling, Kayaking (Flat and white water), Lacrosse, Netball, Rock Climbing, Rowing, Rugby (League and Union), Sculling, Skiing, Snowboarding, Squash, Swimming, Table Tennis, Tennis, Trampolining, Volleyball.

Will I need to do coursework? Yes. Students may be required to provide video evidence of their practical performance.

What syllabus do you follow? AQA www.AQA.org.uk

Unit 3

Further information

Internal assessment External moderation. Total 90 marks available 30% of the A Level mark.

Please contact Shilo Dormehl PE Faculty shilo.dormehl@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Biology GCSEs required The recommended level of entrance for the A Level course is of a minimum of a grade B in either Extension GCSE Biology or Additional Science, or any GCSE equivalent course from abroad.

This course could lead to Degree courses in biology, medicine, environmental science, nursing, food science, sports science, dietetics, dentistry, psychology, biotechnology and pharmacy. Check out the Society of Biology’s website (www.societyofbiology.org) for an excellent account of careers open to young people with biology qualifications at various levels.

What will I be studying? AS Level – Units 1 to 2 inclusive (examined end Year 12) A Level – Units 1 to 4 inclusive (examined end Year 13) Unit 1: Lifestyle, Transport, Genes and Health ● Topic 1: Lifestyle, health and risk (biochemistry, structure and function of the cardiovascular system) ● Topic 2: Genes and health (cell membranes, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, inheritance, gene therapy and genetic screening)

Sciences Faculty

Unit 2: Development, Plants and the Environment Level ● Topic 3: The voice of the genome (cell ultrastructure, cell division, cell differentiation) ● Topic 4: Biodiversity and natural resources (structural plant tissues, biodiversity and conservation) Unit 3 ● Topic 5:On the wild side (ecology, photosynthesis) ● Topic 6: Infection, immunity and forensics Unit 4 ● Topic 7: Run for your life (muscle structure and function, respiration, homeostasis and ethics issues of performance-enhancing substances) ● Topic 8: Grey matter (nervous system, plant responses and GMOs)

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course? There may be a trip in October of Year 13. Students can elect to participate in a Science enrichment programme in activities week.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019 What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Biology is one of the ‘traditional’ sciences, highly regarded by universities as a subject providing a strong background in scientific theory and critical thinking as well as practical skills in designing, analysing and interpreting experimental data. There has been rapid development in the study of biology and we are set to enter the ‘biological revolution’ which affect us all. Following a course in biology will allow you to make informed and valid conclusions over many ethical, environmental and biotechnological issues which occur today.

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject? A Level Biology students are required to extend and develop existing scientific knowledge and practical skills. Biology is the study of living things so an interest in humans, animals and plants is helpful. A sound mathematical background at GCSE is required as basic statistics will be learned.

How is it examined? AS ● Paper 1: Written Paper covering topics 1 and 2 plus questions on the corresponding core practicals (1 hr 30 mins) 50% ● Paper 2: Written Paper covering topics 3 and 4 plus questions on the corresponding core practicals (1 hr 30 mins) 50% A Level ● Paper 1: Written Paper covering topics 1–6 plus questions on the corresponding core practicals (2 hr) 33% ● Paper 2: Written Paper covering topics 1–4, 7 and 8 plus questions on the corresponding core practicals (2hr) 33% ● Paper 3 Written paper covering topics 1–8 plus synoptic questions relating to a pre-released scientific article.

Sciences Faculty Will I need to do coursework? No. Students will need to complete a series of core practicals which will lead to a science practical endorsement. This will not form part of the grade but will be recorded on the exam certificate.

What syllabus do you follow? Edexcel www.edexcel.com

Further information Please contact Mrs Welch, Head of the Biology Department nicola.welch@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Chemistry GCSE required The recommended level of entrance for the AS course is as a minimum of grade B in Extension GCSE Chemistry or other equivalent GCSE course. Alternatively, a minimum of a grade B is required in Additional Science, or any other GCSE equivalent course.

This course could lead to At the end of the course students could follow courses such as: Chemistry, Environmental Science, Medicine, Pharmacy, Chemical Engineering.

The students will be studying AS Level – Year 1, Papers 1 and 2 inclusive (examined end Year 12) A Level – Year 1 and 2, Paper 1, 2 and 3 (examined end Year 13) Throughout the course students will acquire theoretical knowledge of chemical processes and practical skills that enable them to characterise and apply their knowledge, furthermore to analyse, evaluate and synthesize subject related information.

Sciences Faculty

Topic 1: Atomic structure and the Periodic Table Level

Topic 2: Bonding and Structure Topic 3: Redox 1 Topic 4: Inorganic Chemistry and the Periodic Table Topic 5: Formulae, Equations and Amounts of Substance. Topic 6: Organic Chemistry I Topic 7: Modern Analytical Techniques I Topic 8: Energetics I Topic 9: Kinetics I Topic 10: Equilibrium I Topic 11: Equilibrium II, Topic 12: Acid-Base Equilibria Topic 13: Energetics II, Topic 14: Redox II Topic 15: Transition Metals Topic 16: Kinetics II Topic 17: Organic Chemistry II Topic 18: Organic Chemistry III Topic 19: Modern Analytical Techniques II

Benefits of studying Chemistry for university entrance: The AS/A2 course will enable students to show the inter-relationship between the development of the subject and its application (social, economic, environmental and technological) and recognise the value of chemistry to society and how it may be used responsibly.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Sciences Faculty

Skills and learning approach needed for studying this subject

include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions.

The qualification integrates theory and relevant practical work for the topics studied in the course. The students will need to be able to communicate effectively, research and think critically about chemical problems. This qualification is suitable for students who have an interest in, and enjoyment of chemistry; enjoy carrying out investigations by the application of imaginative, logical and critical thinking.

AS and A Level Specification

How will I be assessed? AS Chemistry written examination Paper 1: Core Inorganic and Physical Chemistry (50% of the total qualification) The examination will be 1 hour 30 minutes and have 80 marks. The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. Paper 2: Core Organic and Physical Chemistry (50% of the total qualification) The examination will be 1 hour 30 minutes and have 80 marks. The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. A Level Chemistry written examination Paper 1: Advanced Inorganic and Physical Chemistry (30% of the total qualification) The examination will be 1 hour 45 minutes and have 90 marks. The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. Paper 2: Advanced Organic and Physical Chemistry (30% of the total qualification) The examination will be 1 hour 45 minutes and have 90 marks. The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Chemistry (40% of the total qualification) This paper will include questions that assess conceptual and theoretical understanding of experimental methods (indirect practical skills) that will draw on students’ experience of the core practicals. The examination will be 2 hours and 30 minutes and will consist of 120 marks. The paper may

Edexcel More information about the AS and A2 Edexcel course can be found on www.edexcel.com

Further information Please contact Ms Bukovinszki Head of the Chemistry Department eniko.bukovinszki@britishschool.nl


AS and A Level (Linear)  2017 | 2019

Physics GCSEs required Ideally grade B or above in Extension GCSE Physics or a minimum of a grade B in Additional and a minimum of grade 6 in GCSE Mathematics.

This course could lead to Physics leads on to a wide range of courses and careers. You could go on to use Physics to support other qualifications or progress onto further studies or employment; examples include: courses ranging from Physics, the Sciences and Medicine to Engineering, Radiography and Biotechnology.

What will I be studying? AS Level – Topics 1 to 4 inclusive (examined end Year 12) A Level – Topics 1 to 12 inclusive (examined end Year 13) ● Topic 1 – Working as a Physicist ● Topic 2 – Mechanics ● Topic 3 – Electrical Circuits ● Topic 4 – Materials ● Topic 5 – Waves and the particle nature of light ● Topic 6 – Further Mechanics ● Topic 7 – Electric and magnetic fields ● Topic 8 – Nuclear and particle physics ● Topic 9 – Thermodynamics ● Topic 10 – Space ● Topic 11 – Nuclear Radiation ● Topic 12 – Gravitational fields ● Topic 13 – Oscillations

Sciences Faculty

How is it examined? Level AS Paper 1: Written Paper (1h 30 mins) 50% Paper 2: Written Paper (1h 30 mins) 50% A Level Paper 1: Written Paper (1h 45 mins) 30% Paper 2: Written Paper (1h 45 mins) 30% Paper 3: Written Paper (2h 30 mins) 40%

Will I need to do coursework? No. Students will need to complete a series of core practicals which will lead to a science practical endorsement. This will not form part of the grade but will be recorded on the exam certificate.


AS and A Level  2017 | 2019

Sciences Faculty

Are there any trips or activities associated with this course?

What skills or learning approach do I need for this subject?

Students can elect to participate in a Science enrichment programme in activities week.

The study of A Level Mathematics and Mechanics is not compulsory but is strongly advised. Those considering a University course in Physics, Engineering or related subject will find Mathematics is required.

What benefits does this subject have for university entrance? Physics is a highly valued course and can be used to support a wide variety of University course due to the mathematical content and wide range of skills, which it helps to develop.

Further information Please contact Mr Kettle Head of the Physics Department and Head of the Science Faculty steven.kettle@britishschool.nl

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