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JULY|AUGUST 2016

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J U L Y | A U GU ST 2 0 1 6

No. 1


PUBLISHER'S | LETTER

Kelly Laine Haney SHAWN MICHAEL HANEY KHANEY@H3-Media.com SHANEY@H3-Media.com

Well into summer, it’s a great time to be excited! The sun is out, the air is clear and the smiling faces and loud laughs of our children can BSCENE and heard down our neighborhood streets. But what about us grown ups? Does anyone know when the "grown-up summer schedule" is released? I am ready for summer break! While we may not get three months off during the summer, being bored or having fun is entirely up to us, now isn’t it! Shawn and I do like to think we get a summer here and there. You know those few hours we get in-between going to work and cooking dinner for the family. Did I say few? I meant one. Therefore, weekend events are crucial for us to find. And, well it’s summer so that means one thing … CATTLE BARONS!’ The annual Cattle Barons’ Gala is coming up and boy are we excited. We always look forward to seeing the decorations, the generosity of the community, the food, and, oh ... let’s not forget the entertainment! A certain, famous somebody named Vince Gill will be up on stage and I am ready to belt out some tunes I grew up hearing. But the best part will be seeing the faces of each attendee when they get their issue of BSCENE in their swag bags.

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Whether you will be there, (get your tickets early folks because those things sell out fast,) or you picked up an issue strolling around town, you are in for a treat. In this issue you will find some pretty dang good people to know. We have taken the time to search for all the folks that make East Texas a great place to call home, and given them their very own spotlight. From actors, authors and artists, to good-hearted individuals, you get to meet people who not only grew up in East Texas, but some who call it home today. And then we have our cover model, Jason Preston, who’s already in the spotlight, literally, under a lot of them, while risking his life in a cage, and making his dreams of being a professional fighter a reality. So don’t wait any longer and start scrolling through the pages to find them! While you do that, Shawn and I will be on the dance floor at the Gala, come find us and say hi! Oh, who am I kidding? One of us (and we won't say any names) has two left feet, so you might want to look for us in the casino instead!

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Every single medical discipline at UT Health Northeast Cancer Treatment & Prevention Center represents our determination to be leaders in cancer care. Our specialized team of medical and radiation oncologists, surgeons, diagnostic radiologists, pathologists, and other cancer experts all work together under one roof, advancing our dream of eliminating cancer. Backed by The University of Texas System’s resources, we are the only university medical center in the region situated within 600 acres of healing pines. If you or someone you love is looking for hope, give us a call for an appointment now at 1.855.506.HOPE. Healing just feels better here.

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uthealth.org

Varian Tours of Excellence Reference Site

J U L Y | A U GU ST 2 0 1 6

No. 3


I’M READY TO BE AN APACHE

THE MAGAZINE OF EAST TEXAS

903.509.4703 • info@h3-media.com bscenemag.com

BSCENE STAFF

Publisher/CEO - Shawn Michael Haney Editor/CFO - Kelly Laine Haney Distribution - Devin Hunter Editor-in-Chic - Veronica Terres Editorial/Production/Design - Poonam Patel Production - Tonya Boozer

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Batten Photography, Chelease Denson, Trey Dillon, Angela Duncan, Direct Energy, East Texas Food Bank, Bowen Hardy, Michael Hetrick, Devin Hunter, Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, Junior League of Tyler, Longview Chamber of Commerce, Poonam Patel, Ginger Saunders, Bryan Stewart, Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce, Tyler Area Senior Citizens Association, David White Photography

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Amanda Kosmer, Laura Krantz, Zoe Lawhorn, Addi McNeel, Poonam Patel, Amy Brocato Pearson, Dr. Aubrey Sharpe, Veronica Terres

STYLE FILE

Photography: Poonam Patel Styled & Written by: Editor-in-Chic, Veronica Terres

COVER

On The Cover: Jason Preston Cover Photo: Jason Berrier Location: APEC

YOU’RE READY FOR THIS. PUBLISHER H3 MEDIA, L.L.C. ©

Tyler Junior College is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. Complete information is available at www.tjc.edu.

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H3 Media, LLC 2016. All Rights Reserved.

BSCENE welcomes unsolicited submissions and photographs, but does not assume any responsibility for publication or return of materials. When any editorial or photography submission, whether in advertisements or editorial, is provided to BSCENE, by any means, whether electronically or otherwise, the person/business making the submission assumes all responsibility that the submission does not infringe on any third party’s rights and title, including all copyrights and/or releases.  No fees are due to anyone, including photographer or models, unless previously agreed upon by all parties involved.  The opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the representative writers and authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of this magazine.

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T N A ST IN E SU IS

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E D I T I O N

VISA® FAN checkcard as we celebrate the Summer Games!

Stop by any Texas Bank and Trust location and walk out with your VISA® FAN checkcard today!

Available exclusively July 1, 2016 through August 31, 2016. NO monthly Texas Bank and Trust checkcard fee with a Texas Bank and Trust Direct Value, Super Now Advantage, TBTmyWay, Preferred theST VISA is $1.50 BS CENEMAG. COM and Preferred Plus checking account. For all other applicable Texas Bank and Trust checking J U Laccounts, Y | A U GU 2 0checkcard 1 6 No. 5 per monthly statement cycle plus $1.00 for each additional card. There is a $5.00 fee if replacing an existing Texas Bank and Trust checkcard.


EDITORIAL | CONTENT 10 48

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IT'S NOT PERSONAL 10 | MEEGAN'S STORY 18 BEING EXCEPTIONAL AT AZALEA ACADEMY 28 ACTORS, AUTHORS & ARTISTS 34 MAN ABOUT TOWN 48 | DINING GUIDE 53 | STYLE FILE 60 WEIRD CLUBS YOU NEVER KNEW EXISTED 76

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16 94 38 65 ROSES GALA 16 BEE FOR LITERACY 2016/SUSAN G. KOMEN TYLER RACE FOR THE CURE 24 LONGVIEW BAH/HILTON GARDEN INN GRAND OPENING 32 LONGVIEW CATTLE BARONS' 38 | TRINITY SCHOOL OF TEXAS 2016 SPRING GALA 46 ROSE SUNDAY 58 | HEARTSWAY HOSPICE GOLF TOURNEY/DAKOTAS OPENING 68 CASA JUSTICE IS SERVED 2016/TASTE OF TYLER 72 TMA 45TH ANNIVERSARY GALA 74 | ALL HANDS ON DECK/TYLER BAH 82 TYLER BAH/2016 CATTLE BARONS' DRINK, DINE & DONATE 94 BS CENEMAG. COM

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No. 7


STREET | SCENE What is “STREET SCENE”: glimpses of glitter, photos of friends, a few lines of life and laughter. Like a school's yearbook, Street Scene chronicles life in East Texas. You'll find businesses and others commemorating anniversaries. Celebrations and charities gloss these pages, accompanied by faces you know. Music, theater and other cultural events also make the scene.

Denise Bardsley is the 2016 recipient of the Mahala Young Award given to an Active Member of the JLT each year, presented to her at Willow Brook Country Club, on May 9.

The 29th Children’s Miracle Network Celebration! Telethon raised $1,166,413.26 in support of the pediatric services, at CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances Health System, on June 5.

John and Jeff Crymes were awarded the President’s Award for excellence in customer service, at the Benjamin Franklin Plumbing National Convention in Orlando, FL., on April 1.

The Duck washing crew got the ducks all washed up, tagged and ready for racing at the Tyler Area Senior Citizens Association’s 2016 Rubber Duck Regatta, held at Jul’s, on June 11.

The Boys & Girls Clubs of East Texas raised $73,844.16 at the 2016 Club Classic Tournament, at Willow Brook Country Club, on May 9.

The Junior League of Tyler and East Texas Fo od Bank partnered to announce and distribute BackPack kits for the summer BackPack Program, at the City Park, on June 17.

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Tyson Foods, Inc. donated $100,000 and a truckload of chicken to the East Texas Food Bank, at their location in Tyler, on May 25.

LeTourneau University was formally welcomed as the first partner school in the Envoy Cadet Program with a signing ceremony, held at American Airlines’ DFW hangar, on June 7.

Sustainer Mary Ann Cozby was the recipient of the Junior League of Tyler’s 2016 Gertrude Windsor Award at the Sustainer/Provisional Tea, held at the home of Sustainer Connie Greenberg, on May 3.

UT Health Northeast announced that Tyler philanthropists Joseph Z. and Louise H. Ornelas will be the recipients of the 2016 Galaxy Award, at a dinner and ceremony held at Green Acres Baptist Church CrossWalk Conference Center, on September 13.

The Longview Chamber of Commerce named Encore Multimedia President Dean Waskowiak and his team 2016 Entrepreneur of the Year, at a special luncheon held at Maude Cobb, on May 3.

Lago del Pino hosted Platinum Recording Artist Mark Chesnutt as part of Randal Brooks’ 50th Birthday Celebration, at their location, on May 13.

John Soules Foods, Inc. partnered with Tyler Junior College to use a $73,584 Skills Development Fund grant, from the Texas Workforce Commission, for training of the 30 new workers, at TJC, on June 3.

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No. 9


IT'S NOT PERSONAL


#PREYDAY

Article By: Zoe Lawhorn Photos By: Jason Berrier

If you know Jason Preston, you probably either love him or hate him. He’s a big dude with an even bigger personality. He sports a Mohawk. He physically takes up space. He also drives a jacked up Ford Excursion that floats above an extreme lift kit, which is perched on top of four gigantic tires. Among the other “in-your-face” graphics, that appear on the bright red and black vehicle wrap, are several different photos of Preston himself, larger than life and mean mugging whatever tiny passenger car that dares approach.


Known as “The Predator,” Preston has years under his belt as a Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter. Largely made a household name by The Ultimate Fighting Championship, the combat sport in recent years has adopted rules and regulations that perhaps made these otherwise less predictable fighting events more palatable for mainstream audiences, some of whom might have dismissed the often violent and sometimes bloody fights that both attracted and revolted audiences in the sport’s earlier days. By this point, Preston has had a lengthy career in MMA. His amateur career lasted 16 years, and during that time he went 15 and 6. He is now at the professional career level, and currently sits at 2 and 0. Looking at him today, he seems like a perfect fit in the MMA world, a no-brainer, and meant to be destined fighter; but it wasn’t always that way for him. Born in Tyler, Texas, Preston was raised in Whitehouse, Texas and went to school there. “Pre K through 12th grade in Whitehouse ISD,” he says. “I’m one of the survivors.” With a slight smirk, Preston describes a roster of his classmates who found themselves in trouble’s path during their school years together and beyond. Early on in his life, Preston says he began to assume a role he describes as “protector.” He had no father around, and three sisters to take care of, but his height and bulk made him an intimidating presence. Even still, Preston was shy. He wasn’t involved in a lot of school activities other than football. He developed friendships with other kids who seemed to need a leader, a direction. One night, while Preston sat at home, he noticed smoke coming out of his neighbor’s house. He ran outside only to discover flames. Without thinking, he grabbed a water hose and ran towards the fire. “Here I was, 16 years old, and I run outside,” Preston recalls. “The flames were 20 feet tall, and I’m trying to spray it off with a water hose.” Preston knew that No. 12 BSC ENE

his next-door neighbor was still inside. “His room was completely engulfed. At the time, my adrenaline was going and I just wasn’t really thinking too clearly.” But he jumped in and did the only thing he knew to do. The fire trucks eventually arrived, and the fire was put out, but sadly his neighbor did not survive. Morning came, and it was a school day. “I didn’t go to school that day until about 1 p.m.; why I even went in, I don’t really know,” Preston shares. After the fire, he was physically exhausted and emotionally raw. He tried to focus on school work just to make it through the afternoon.

“IT’S NOT GOING TO END WELL FOR THEM.” “I was in the library finishing my report on Ponce de Leon, when this senior walks by and smashed me in the back of the head. I turned around, mad already from the the night before, and I just said, ‘Don’t touch me.’ He kept on walking,” Preston recalls. But the senior came back to attack, popping Preston on the back of the head again. This time, Preston offered no verbal warning. “Back then, I was a big kid. I stood up so fast, that my chair flew out from under me,” Preston says. The two boys began to argue, and the senior quickly warned Preston that their teacher was coming. “I turn around to look, and her back was turned to me. As I was turning back to face him, he punched me twice in the face. [He] broke my nose and blood was going everywhere. And I snapped. I went

straight to a football tackle. I picked him up, dropped him and the fight was on. He never got back up ‘til they pulled me off of him.” In some ways, although violent, this experience seemed to position Preston for other things. “Once I realized fighting didn’t hurt, well ... to me, fighting wasn’t this big thing. I wasn’t afraid of it anymore. I was a protector. I had three sisters growing up, I had a lot of friends who weren’t my size, and a lot of friends who were girls. [The] people who couldn’t always keep themselves out of trouble,” Preston recalls. He says that whatever they got into, he was there to do the clean up. But playing the role of amateur protector comes with its own set of consequences. “During that time, I got into my fair share of trouble,” Preston admits. His troubled days culminated in one altercation that forever changed Preston’s life. “I knocked a guy out in the parking lot of a gas station, and left him unconscious. His girlfriend called the cops, and I ended up going to jail for assault.” Preston says he earned some time in county, time that allowed him space to think. He knew he needed change in his life. He needed direction. Soon after he finished serving his time, Preston went to watch a fight at the Oil Palace. “I stood up the whole time. I couldn’t sit down. It was an experience,” Preston recalls. He realized at that moment what he wanted to do. “All the years I was growing up, people would ask me, ‘what are you going to do when you grow up?’ There were three things I wanted to be: a wrestler, a racecar driver or a monster truck driver.” Preston says his mother still keeps the certificate he filled out as a student nearing his high school graduation, where he described his dreams of big fights and extreme sports. “I had no idea how I was going to do it, but I had the utmost confidence it was going to happen. I watched a lot of wrestling growing up, and I wanted to have it. I wanted that lifestyle to happen,” he says. Preston threw himself into pursuing his B SC EN EM A G.COM


Jason Preston

Photo Courtesy: Jason Preston

MMA career, and he began to rise rapidly within the combat world. Regional fights led to opportunities in Las Vegas, and Preston found himself staring down the barrel of a professional fighting career. The dream was right there, but so was something else: a baby girl. “I was in Vegas. I had the whole thing going for me and I was self-promoting. I had my Excursion, [and] I had my Mohawk. I was ‘country.’ People ate it up. [Promoters] told me I’d be in the WWE in two years,” Preston recalls. The opportunity was there, but the sacrifice was too great. “I turned their offer down. I just couldn’t be on the road that much. You’re on the road 300 days a year,. You live in hotels.” After growing up with very little direction and with no father around, Preston knew that being a father to his baby girl was more important than anything else. The Predator needed to become her protector, so he left Vegas and headed back home. Home isn’t so bad for Preston. “Everyone around here, people treat me like family,” Preston shares. “I’m in touch with my

Photo By: Kelly Laine Haney


sponsors just about everyday. I get taken care of here, at home, better than I ever did in Vegas.” In fact, promoters like Legacy have taken notice of The Predator’s work, and his professional fighting career is back on track. Informed by years and experience, Preston is forging his career path with a renewed focus and strong standards. For one, he refuses to fight unless the event is televised. Although promoters are trying to sign him, he hesitates to saddle himself to one company. After having a major shoulder surgery, Preston is also poised to fight with far more comfort and stability. And although his physical ability is key, a completely different strength is pushing his professional career along. Obsessed with his own promotion, Preston handles a rigorous self-marketing campaign that often attracts compliments from industry professionals. In a field that is driven by private promotional outfits like Legacy, Preston

is carving out his own path as a guy who is not afraid to demand attention. The posts he makes on his Facebook page frequently attract thousands of impressions, and his larger than life persona draws in fans and followers. Not everyone is a fan though. In fact, Preston recently stood next to a woman who was disparaging his aggressive vehicle. But that doesn’t deter him from being true to himself, and focused on promoting his image. “The way I see it, it's not personal … it’s just business,” Preston says, reciting a slogan he frequently uses to describe his unique approach to his own career. “This is what you have to do: start now! I’ve had my first two pro fights. The first was in Dallas and I knocked him out in 45 seconds with a right hook. The second fight was in Fort Worth, and I knocked him out in 54 seconds, in the first round.” On July 23rd, Jason “The Predator” Preston will return to the facility that launched his commitment to the

fighting world. The Oil Palace will host the Rose City Showdown, and Preston will face Juan Torres in the octagon. “He’s a southpaw, a brawler; he likes to exchange,” Preston says. “Anyone who is confident enough to get in front of me and exchange, it’s not going to end well for them. I’ve got good hand movement, and a strong right hook. I’ve ended both my last two fights with a right hook.” It’s that brash confidence (cockiness?) that either draws people in or pushes them away, but Preston’s unwavering belief in his own ability has surely helped him succeed in a business as challenging as professional fighting. “It’s slow and steady that wins the race,” he claims. Time will tell the rest of the Predator’s story, but this father is sure to fight for every inch of success he can dream up. “As long as you have the grind and the work ethic, you can be anything you want to be,” Preston says.

Photo Courtesy: Jason Preston

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No. 15


SOCIAL | SCENE

NINA ARVINDER & HARSHI BAINS

JENNIFER DEEN, FRANCES JACKSON, MICHELLE DIAL

CHERYL THRELKELD, SHELBY BURKETT

ABBY & SAM DUTY, BRANDY & LANE MCDANIEL

LAURA & MATT CULVER

AMY & BRANDON JOHNSTON

SANDY GOODMAN, SANDRA EDWARDS

NINA HARRELSON, DAVID HUNYADI

ALLY RAYZOR, DIANE MEZAYEK

GINGER & FRED HABERLE, LORI KNIGHT

DEIRDRE & JOHNATHAN LEUNG

WENDY BRATTELI, DONNA BROOKS, GAYLE STEINER

BRANDY NEAL, MANDY FAUGHN

CONLEY CAVENDER, ASHTEN WHEELER

MELANIE WATTS, MELINDA FINDLAY, ALLISON HUDGENS, PAM GABRIEL

CICI & WILL SHELTON, PATRICK DEEN, ELIZABETH ISKANDER

65 ROSES GALA MAY 7 Northeast Texas Chapter of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation held their annual 65 Roses Gala to raise awareness and money for the foundation and its efforts, themed "Kentucky Derby" at Castello Sul Lago in Tyler, on May 7.

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HEALTH | FITNESS

MEEGAN'S STORY 18 | AZALEA ACADEMY 28 | ACTORS, AUTHORS & ARTISTS 34 BS CENEMAG. COM

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Meegan’s Story Our lives are stories, as though we are the author of them. Days go by and the pages fill up so quickly we forget how we arrived to the present. But that is life, and for some each page is filled exactly how it should be. When life is flowing nicely into place, how we envisioned our story to be, we blindly think we are in charge. But the unthinkable can happen and wreak havoc upon the story, such as unforeseen diseases and illnesses. Our eyes then become wide open and we see that, suddenly, our stories are not our own. So is the case of Meegan Warne. A story of hope, courage and inspiration, Meegan and those close to her take us on a journey they never expected to take. Article By: Amanda Thibodeaux Kosmer Courtesy Photos By: Meegan Warne, Sam Harrell

A diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in the fall of 2010 entered, uninvited, into a page of Meegan’s book. If you were to ask her of her future plans, she would tell you that her dreams did not include becoming ill. Bravely, she had to accept that she was now someone with MS, and thus became her story to tell. With her words and those who best know Meegan, perhaps this debilitating illness will gain awareness so that Meegan and others can receive the health opportunities they need. Meegan was once energetic and full of life, raising her daughter Alex and being adventurous with her husband Lance. Her hobbies included taking walks, going running through Rose Rudman Park and scrapbooking. “I used to workout really hard, lifting weights and such. But it was always about me. Like most people, I just wanted my body to look good. In all honesty, that was my goal,” Meegan recalled. “She (Meegan) had spent her time raising her No. 18 BSC ENE

daughter, involved in church activities and working at her job,” Meegan’s sister Aimee Stewart added. Meegan had also received a Bachelor’s Degree in Public Speaking. “God put in my heart, long ago, to be a speaker,” Meegan said. “It confirmed in my heart what I was meant to do,” Meegan felt after her classmates and professors complimented her public speaking abilities. But rather than being able to pursue a career for the long run, Meegan’s life did a full 360 when she was diagnosed with MS. In September of 2010, Meegan’s seemingly idyllic life took that unexpected turn. She recalled back to a trip taken to the Black Hills of South Dakota, hiking with Lance, who was then her boyfriend. “I remember having a few dizzy spells and some weakness in my legs, and he (Lance) would just pick me up and carry me on to the next hill, politely never questioning my weakness,”

Meegan remembered. She had an off balance feeling and increasing nausea that remained for weeks after their hiking trip. Meegan thus sought out medical help. Her primary care doctor first diagnosed her with a sinus infection and prescribed a round of antibiotics. But Meegan’s dizziness worsened. The weakness in her legs combined with the dizziness ultimately affected her driving, her work, and, eventually, her entire life. “Some would like to call it intuition, but looking back, God was leading me to my next step. He led me back to June of 2010, the month I had my deviated septum corrected. I requested another consultation with my surgeon, thinking maybe something was wrong from that surgery. After an MRI, the diagnosis finally came in as lesions on the brain and possible Multiple Sclerosis. With those simple words, typed up in black and white, my life would rapidly transition from a simple, but fun and uncomplicated life, into a very complex constant battle, physically, mentally and B SC EN EM A G.COM


“There is no auto pilot with MS in Meegan’s case. She doesn’t just travel through life blissfully unaware of each day’s meaning. She is heightened to everything, seeking truth in every situation, aware of things that before she might have taken for granted.”

even spiritually,” Meegan recounted of the diagnosis that sneaked its way into her life story. “Multiple Sclerosis is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). In MS, the immune system attacks the protective sheath (myelin) that covers nerve fibers and causes communication problems between your brain and the rest of your body. Eventually, the disease can cause the nerves themselves to deteriorate or become permanently damaged,” the Mayo Clinic website states. To Meegan’s friends and loved ones, MS is so much more. “The first thing I want people to know is that Multiple Sclersosis actually stands for multiple scars. I have lesions or scars on my brain, as well as on my spinal cord. It is important to know this because these BS CENEMAG. COM

lesions or scars are signs that damage has been done in those particular areas, which causes a disruption of information between the brain and the body,” Meegan explained. “It has caused me to lose function of the entire right side of my body. I can only walk around my apartment with my hemi walker on my left side, and I have to wear a brace on my right leg called an AFO for support to protect me from having foot-drop. I can only walk short distances, like 10 feet at most. My right leg works just enough to walk around my apartment. Most of the muscles in my right leg have quit working, including my hamstring. You wouldn’t think that not having use of your hamstring would affect you too much, but it prevents me from doing a lot of average things. The main function of the hamstring is to bend the knee. Because my right knee will J U L Y | A U GU ST 2 0 1 6

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not bend unless forced, I cannot run, jump, climb stairs, kick a ball, drive and much, much more.” “I can tell you stories from 10 years ago, but I often can’t remember what I did yesterday! I can no longer retain information I acquire for very long. I have to type anything of importance in my phone or have someone write it down for me, since I used to be right handed and now only my left hand works. I lost my speech completely … I had to learn to talk again through Speech Therapy. The scary thing about MS is that at any moment any of these things can occur again, at any time. My speech could disappear again at any moment,” Meegan shared.

process is actually very simple. Doctors inject anywhere from 80 to 100 million umbilical cord stem cells into my body through a good vein. These stem cells are adult stem cells, taken from live births, and the umbilical cords are donated by the mother. They are not embryonic stem cells. The cords undergo rigorous testing for all types of diseases and viruses before they are even considered for use. I am then given four parilymphatic injections because the  lymphatic system  is directly related to the immune system.”

MS has also taken away her clear vision, leaving Meegan’s sight blurry as if she were “looking through plastic.” “MS took my right arm from me. The muscles in that arm do not work, so I have dead weight hanging by my side. You can’t imagine how heavy an arm can be when none of the muscles are working. My right shoulder is subluxed now, which means there is an incomplete or partial dislocation of the shoulder. I have been through numerous physical therapy sessions and talked to numerous orthopedic surgeons.  The therapy sessions work temporarily, and I work out 2 to 3 times a week to maintain, but ultimately I have to live with it.  And because of the horrible pain, I keep my arm propped up constantly on a pillow. Today, I cannot fix my own hair, put on my own shoes, cook, clean, change the sheets on our bed or any of the things an average housewife does.  My husband works and picks up most of those duties. Currently, my parents are living with us Tuesday through Thursday to take me to my doctors’ appointments and such. They are a huge help to us.” Despite all the setbacks, Meegan feels blessed. “She has said it is like letting go of the life she had dreamed she would have.  But what I have witnessed from the outside looking in is that it seems to be more re-defining each day of what life truly is.  That is what I see in her journey now.  I see her intentionally looking at each day and asking what it means.  There is no auto pilot with MS in Meegan’s case. She doesn’t just travel through life blissfully unaware of each day’s meaning.  She is heightened to everything, seeking truth in every situation, aware of things that before she might have taken for granted,” Windy Gallagher, Meegan’s good friend, revealed. Along with this incredible outlook, Meegan also has a support system unlike any other. “Her husband has spent countless hours reading and researching treatments. Her parents have come out of retirement to assist her daily with everyday activities. She has several friends from her childhood that have stepped up and supported her in countless ways, as well as current friends that have contributed in amazing ways,” Aimee explained. What’s next for Meegan? The next chapter in her story involves stem cell research. “Doctors in Panama hope to completely stop the disease dead in its tracks. They have proven that it truly works on many people, and many people are walking around out there completely healed. Not cured, but healed!  Then once they get it stopped, remylanation of the nerves and cells can begin to take place hopefully,” Meegan said. “The No. 20 BSC ENE

Because of the many gracious donations and a “Go Fund Me” account set up by Meegan’s friend, Tia Clayton, Meegan was able to travel to Panama last month. Meegan first learned about this procedure through her friend and mentor Sam Harrell. Sam is a football coach well known for his diverse offense strategies. He, too, has MS and experienced the rapid decline that comes along with the disease. His symptoms became so severe that Sam had no option but to give up coaching. In 2010, Sam traveled to Panama to receive his first round of stem cell therapy. “My first two trips to Panama showed no lasting results or improvements. My third trip was the ‘game changer.’ I just continued to get better and better until I found myself coaching again - in the Texas heat no less,” Sam shared. Coach Harrell is back and coaching, and now wants to educate the public about stem cell research. “Since I have seen what it has done for me, I love telling others that there is hope … I want to do all I can to help her (Meegan).” With each trip costing around $25,000, Sam’s community rallied to raise the money needed to get him to Panama. Though Meegan raised enough to have her first trip covered, Sam encourages that she keep going. Meegan’s story now consists of spending time researching MS, B SC EN EM A G.COM


Kyle Lopez Knee replacement success story

“I was walking on my own in a week. No walker. No cane.” Years of athletics had taken a major toll on Kyle’s knees. He had one replaced in January of 2014. He had the second one replaced in October, with the knee replacement program at Longview Regional Medical Center. “The experience was amazing,” said Kyle. “The new pain medication allowed me to get up and walk just two hours after surgery without feeling groggy. They prepared me well, and taught my wife how to be my coach. People think they have to go to Dallas to get their surgeries done. But I’m telling them we have a great program right here in Longview. They did an excellent job!” For more information on The Center for Joint Restoration, visit LongviewRegional.com. Or, to register for our next free orthopedic seminar, call 903-233-4770.

Patient results may vary. Consult your physician about the benefits and risks of any surgical procedure or treatment.


and always looking for a cure or at least something to send it into remission. “I still enjoy working out at the gym, but now it’s at the Olympic Plaza gym at ETMC, and my goals are entirely different. My goals now are all about rehabilitation,” Meegan shared. “I still do that (the runs through Rose Rudman Park), only it involves my husband pushing me in my wheelchair through that park. But we both love taking in all the sights and sounds of God’s creation. As a matter of fact, just last weekend we took one of those walks; and we just sat and talked about God and how awesome He is to even give us all the beauty around us. The tall pines and weeping willows. The sweet smell of honeysuckle in the air. The sounds of water trickling ever so slightly and the birds singing their praises all around us. Just the brilliance of the sunlight is awe-inspiring.  Going for long 'rides' in the park and breathing in all of God’s glory really helps me cope with my disease. And it is one of the things that I love doing.” Although MS has taken control of activities Meegan once adored, she is acquiring new hobbies. Windy says that the two friends enjoy ordering ice cream and talking about all sorts of things. “Ice cream is our focus, friendship is our purpose; MS is just along for the ride in those moments,” Windy said. She also shared that in a way, Meegan is still very much her former self. “She is funny, smart and has this sweet innocence about her.  Although, I am positive that she would want to have her mobility back and to be able to be more independent in her care, pain free, etc..  I don’t think she would ever exchange the perspective she has now because of her diagnosis.” What gives Meegan hope? “(Jeremiah 29:11) gives me so much hope,” Meegan said. It is an uplifting and promising verse that reads, “For I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future," the Lord declares.

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Stem cell research is not currently an option in the United States. This can leave MS sufferers and their loved ones looking for much needed help and answers. “The symptoms of MS are so varied from patient to patient, and MS also seems to have parallel symptoms to some other illnesses which makes it difficult to pinpoint. Even the medical professionals seem to have some difficulty agreeing on diagnosis, treatment, etc.. MS patients need a clinic that treats the whole person, but unfortunately because MS is such a complicated disease, the MS patient gets shuffled from specialist to specialist, each treating their one specialty area of the body that is currently under attack,” Aimee shared. Since the prevailing answer lies in Panama at the time being, Sam Harrell’s words are encouraging: “When I see people who helped me get to Panama and to get well again, they are so amazed when they see me doing so well, and they feel good about helping me climb that mountain. We need to help Meegan climb that same mountain.” As we await word on Meegan’s journey to Panama, the pages of her story begin to fill like a novel. While family and friends gather around to support Meegan one thing is clear, a diagnosis of MS will not dictate who Meegan is, or where her plans will take her. “I have had a ton of time to reflect on my spiritual life and what God is doing in my life right now. He is teaching me to trust Him. And He is working on my fears and faith. That’s a big one, my faith.  To say you have faith is one thing, but to be forced to walk out your faith is another. And that’s where God has me. I am walking by faith, not by sight (II Cor 5:7).  I don’t know what the future holds for me. I just have to trust in Him,” Meegan said. MS is a diagnosis with devastating symptoms, but Meegan refuses to let it become her tale. Meegan’s story is her own and she will continue to tell it in her own uplifting voice.

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No. 23


SOCIAL | SCENE BEE FOR LITERACY 2016 JUNE 8

ALISA JONES, EMILY CONNER, ANGELA SCHIMMEL, DOROTHY MENDEZ

KILGORE COLLEGE TEAM

LANA HUTCHISON, RACHEL SHERMAN

ANIA CENTERS, ANISSA CENTERS

CATINA LOVE, LATITIA WILSON, DIONNE LAWSON, ADA ORTIZ, LATOYA LYSTER

DONNA PRUITT, DEBBIE LEITH

KERRI DAUGBJERG, LIZZETT ZAPATA

SUSAN G. KOMEN TYLER RACE FOR THE CURE MAY 7

LIL SWEENY, LINDA COTTRELL, MARY NORRIS TEISHA & CHRIS CLAY, TALINA CLAY, ELIJAH CLAY

KIM CHRISTOPHER, JORDAN CHRISTOPHER, ELIZABETH & THOMAS WILSON, AVA WILSON, EMMA WILSON

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AUDREY PONGETTI, MIREYA HICKS, MARILYN COVEY, COLLEEN MILLSLAGLE, TAMMY MICHAELSEN, ANNE ZEORLIN

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MACY MCGEE, NANCY KELLY, JENNIFER KELLY, KAY SPARKS, JULIA & LANDON EVANS

JAMMIE BEALL, HELEN GRAY, BRADI FAULKNER, JENNIFER HOOKS, LESLIE THOMAS

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ETMC fixed , and won, her heart Coretta Williams ETMC heart patient

“I found out I needed open heart surgery at age 33. All I could think was, ‘I have my whole life ahead of me.’” Coretta Williams was born with an atrial septal defect – a hole between the two upper chambers of her heart. Aside from a few incidents, the condition didn’t become serious until about a year ago. “I went to my cardiologist for what was supposed to be a routine visit and he said, ‘This is serious. When do you want to have surgery?’” Coretta, a local television producer, was understandably scared. She called two friends who are nurses in Dallas and Houston about traveling for a second opinion. “They had done internships in Tyler and both said, ‘Stay where you are. You have great cardiac care there.’” She took their advice – and soon her doctors and nurses at ETMC calmed Coretta’s fears with their expertise and compassion. “I’m really grateful for everybody who was involved, because without them, I wouldn’t be here.

Coretta thanks her team of caregivers at ETMC Her cardiothoracic surgeon:

“I really trusted him. He’s one of the top surgeons in Tyler.” Nurses in the OR, ICU and on 5 North:

“They were so caring. I know it’s their job, but they took it to the next level and you could tell they love what they do.” Physical therapists at the ETMC Rehabilitation Center:

“They’re so amazing – always very encouraging.”

“My experience with ETMC has been wonderful. If you need heart care, definitely stick with East Texas because the doctors here are very knowledgeable and they care for you like family.”

[

Visit etmc.org/coretta to view Coretta’s story. For information about the ETMC Cardiovascular Institute, visit etmc.org/cardiac or call 903-535-6496.

One with East Texas. A not-for-profit organization committed to improving the quality of life in East Texas communities.

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No. 27


l Being a n o i t p e c x at Azalea Academy E Article By: Amy Brocato Pearson Photos By: Poonam Patel & Ginger Saunders

Austin sat proudly in his wheelchair, a brilliant blue “Happy Birthday” crown perched jauntily on his head and a ribbon holding some birthday dollar bills pinned to his shirt, while his friends and the staff at the Azalea Academy for Exceptional Adults lavished birthday wishes on “everyone’s best friend.” But Austin wasn’t always sitting up so straight and proudly. “He kind of lost his luster there for a while,” Ginger Saunders, founder and Executive Director of Azalea Academy for Exceptional Adults, said. At 28 years old, Austin had graduated from Tyler Independent School District’s Wayne D. Boshears Center For Exceptional Programs School half a dozen years ago. After that, for Austin and many adults like him, there was nowhere to go. “He’s highly capable,” Saunders added. “But because of some of his issues, he experienced a decline in his skills. He couldn’t sit up correctly. No. 28 BSC ENE

He just lost ground.” But then Austin’s parents discovered Azalea Academy for Exceptional Adults and enrolled Austin with five other adults were are too old for school, but love to socialize, maintain and improve their skills, and have a good time with friends. Azalea Academy would soon be growing.

Azalea Academy a long time in the making: While Azalea Academy is just two years old, the concept for the center had been percolating in the minds of Saunders and her husband, Mark, for years and years. Their daughter, Montana, also

graduated from the Boshears Center. As Montana was non-verbal and nonambulatory, there was no place for her to go after graduation. “Graduation is a very frightening time when you have an adult child with special needs,” Saunders shared. “You put on a happy face and fight through it, but this time that should be joyous is extremely scary.” At age 21, students with profound disabilities age out of the school system, leaving their care in the hands of parents, relatives, guardians or any programs parents can find. “After these disabled students graduate from the Tyler public school system and become adults, we still have a responsibility to invest in their futures and help them grow and learn,” Saunders said. So they started researching alternatives for post-schooling options. “About five years before she (Montana) graduated, we started batting round the B SC EN EM A G.COM


idea of starting a program of our own,” Saunders revealed. “We started looking around at other programs to see how they worked.” During this time, Saunders got some great advice from a mentor who told her that she had to build what she needed. Saunders set out to do just that, not only for Montana, but for others like her. Saunders visited the East Texas Center for Nonprofits at the United Way of Smith County to learn about what she needed to do. She incorporated as a 501(c)3 tax exempt organization. She named her venture and installed a board, then she started looking for a location. First Presbyterian Church in downtown Tyler had space available in its basement, vacated by another nonprofit. The two rooms were perfect for what Saunders had in mind, located in the heart of the city she loves.

Day to day: Azalea Academy for Exceptional Adults serves six clients full-time, and their goal is to have nine clients on a daily basis. There are three fulltime employees for a ratio of three clients per staff individual. Saunders serves as the Executive Director, the Direct of Development and “sort of ” the program Development Director too. The Academy opens its doors at eight o'clock every morning, and serves its clients until two o'clock. “We cover a lot of ground in that time,” Saunders admitted, laughingly. “Our clientele has a great need. There are several in wheelchairs and several who have feeding needs.” When everyone assembles at eight o'clock, the group shares a devotional. After that, it’s time for an arts and crafts activity. “Sometimes it’s ceramics, sometimes it’s painting and coloring; it varies,” Saunders shared. After that, the group enjoys lunch together, where they work on skills like self-feeding and hygiene. Next up is their favorite time of the day: outside time. That could involve enjoying the garden a local Eagle Scout built, which has wheelchair accessible beds and raised beds that are easy for clients to enjoy. Some days, they help pull weeds or pluck produce from the plants. “If the weather is good, we take advantage.” Some days, the group strolls through the Azalea District and enjoys the gardens and well-kept houses of the nearby residents. “We go to the Children’s Park a lot, too,” Saunders added. “They love it there.”


In recent days, clients have enjoyed soaking up the sun in inflatable pools and enjoying sensory stimulation with water activities. Physical activity takes place after outdoor time. The Academy has a treadmill or the clients can work through stretching and position changes on floor mats. At two o'clock, clients go back home to their parents.

The cost of care: Azalea Academy aims to keep cost low for their clients. “The state will pay a portion if they are on a program that participates in Medicaid Waiver programs,” Saunders revealed. “But it’s up to the parent or guardian to enroll them and hope they get into one of them.” State funding covers between $25-$33 per day, per client, but that’s not enough for the care they need. So that’s when Saunders puts on her other hat: Development Director. An annual Dodgeball Tournament, held in the winter at nearby Marvin United Methodist Church, helps raise funds for client care. “All different age groups participate. It’s a lot of fun,” Saunders said. Then in the spring, a Women’s Tennis Social, in a round robin format, takes place at Willow Brook Country Club for 48 players who storm the courts for a good cause. “Of course, I write grants, too. And this year we are thrilled to partner with the Junior League of Tyler. That’s not only a grant, but a volunteer as well.”

Looking ahead: Right now, the six clients at Azalea Academy range in ages 22 to 28, but they could conceivably take clients up to age 55. “It’s really a dilemma for Tyler; there is no place for these adults,” Saunders said. “There was no community interaction for them and they fall through the cracks.” For Saunders, that’s just not acceptable. “I started this for me, but I get way more out of it than anything just for me. I love seeing them happy. I love seeing them fulfilled. Their parents are such an inspiration to me, too, so I keep the fundraising going to continue this program.” The goal is simple: To make the clients happy. “They’re so easy to make happy. They really just want a hug and a smile, and that matters in their day.” At the Academy, Saunders emphasizes peer interaction and providing a positive, safe environment. “Home is

a wonderful place to be, but if you’re home all the time, you might not be getting the stimulation you need. We try to maximize their potential,” Saunders added. Her daughter, Montana, now 25, is a client at the Academy alongside Austin. “He’s always sitting tall and strong, and he’s very willing to be part of his therapies and education.” Austin’s parents have a renewed energy, as well. “As parents, it’s hard to keep up. You need people to help you so you don’t have to do everything any more.” Saunders hopes to grow the program to nine clients in the near future. “I’d love to take every single one of them! Maybe one day we’ll have 30 of them at Azalea,” Saunders said. To ready herself and the facility for that day, she leans on her board, who she says keeps her accountable. “We will move conservatively into the future to make sure we are able to maintain and build upon what we have,” Saunders added. “We (the Academy) are here for the long term.”

Class of summer 2016

In the meantime, Saunders keeps overhead to a minimum. She herself does not draw a salary yet, but focuses on making sure the Academy is financially secure for the future. “I am constantly surprised and amazed at the generosity in this community,” Saunders praised. “That’s what makes Tyler beautiful. They’re giving throughout the year and that’s what makes us financially sound.”

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AMANDA ULLOM, KRISTAL CHILDS

KAYLA ROBERTS, CJ CLAYTON, BOBBY DYER

RICKY MARTINEZ, JUDGE TIM BRYAN

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MARGARET SMITH, PHYLLIS LOMAX, DENA JUSTICE, DEBRA MILLER, MELINDA WHITEHURST

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LONGVIEW BUSINESS AFTER HOURS/HILTON GARDEN INN GRAND OPENING APRIL 26 Businesses from all over Longview attended the Chamber of Commerce's Business After Hours held in accordance with the Hilton Garden Inn Grand Opening, at the hotel's location, on April 26.

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No. 33


Actor

Austin Saunders

Moving out to Los Angeles, California is in no way easy, especially if you are from a smaller city. But they say to be an entertainer, you need to go to LA. Many of the dreamers that move out to LA, go to become an actor and end up leaving when things don’t turn out as they’d hope. But then there are the determined ones that don’t give up. They know exactly what they want, and make it happen. Austin Saunders is one of them. Saunders grew up in Tyler, Texas, but she never thought her journey would lead her to Hollywood. “I actually grew up an athlete. I was a soccer player my whole life and then I ran track as well. I then went off to Princeton. I was a soccer player there,” Saunders revealed. While playing soccer at All Saints Episcopal School in Tyler, Saunders was on a state champion team for three seasons. She scored 124 goals during that time. She was also named East Texas Player of the Year, and was on the Dallas Texans club team. When at Princeton, Saunders played in over 35 games, scoring her first career goal her first year as a Princeton Tiger. With that much dedication to sports, you’d think Saunders would be a professional soccer player today. But Saunders felt that there may be another calling in her life and she decided to give acting a try. “My first year I took a theatre class … I was smitten. I had always grown up with acting. My biological mother was an actress and really talented as well. So it was always there, present. But I never considered it something I wanted to dedicate my life to. I continued to pursue it at Princeton and by my senior year I got the lead in a play. I told myself I couldn’t see myself doing anything else in life and made the leap to move out to Los Angeles,” Saunders remembered. Saunders immediately moved to LA upon graduation. She didn’t have an agent, but she had a car and a dream, and determination that she would live out her dream of becoming an actress. “I had absolutely nothing. It was really scary. But it was worth it. I think the most leaps of faith like that are worth it when you know what you want from life, and it is No. 34 BSC ENE

Article By: Poonam Patel Photos By: Dana Patrick & Poonam Patel

your decision. It’s scary because you don’t have an agent and getting an agent isn’t easy,” Saunders shared. Saunders first role came from an audition she booked on her own. It was the third audition she went on since moving to LA, and for the spinoff to “Criminal Minds,” in which she would appear in the first episode. “I actually had been doing casting workshops. It’s a workshop where you go in, meet casting directors and perform for them,” Saunders recalled. It’s from one of those workshops where Saunders caught the eye of someone working on "Criminal Minds," and snagged an audition. After callbacks, Saunders booked the part. “That was such a cool experience because I was on set for a full week. I’d never been on set before in my life.” The role helped Saunders get an agent, and thus Saunders began to book more roles. “We shot 'Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders' in July of 2015, and then it didn’t air till March of 2016. So it was almost a year. In that time, I booked 'American Horror Story.' It was cool because it was Lady Gaga’s season but she wasn’t on set. I was so mad! But it was fun … It was like go, go, go. I was in and out of shooting that in three hours,” Saunders shared. After “American Horror Story,” Saunders booked her first movie role. “It’s a slow process. I’ve probably been on 15 auditions in LA. I know actors who audition three times a week and I am not one of those actors,” Saunders claimed. “Unfortunately it is tough because there are a lot of girls that look like me in LA. It’s hard to get into a room because a lot of successful actors look similar to me and no one wants to take a chance on someone who hasn’t worked that much. It’s a slow process but it’s worth it.” And Saunders isn't letting anything discourage the path she has chosen. Saunders hopes to go on more auditions and land more parts. Whether it’s TV, film or theatre, she is open to taking on whatever she can get at the moment, to get the experience she needs to land more notable roles. “I get a lot of auditions for a southern accent, so thank you Tyler,” Saunders joked. B SC EN EM A G.COM


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Actor

David Sullivan Article By: Poonam Patel Photos By: Dustin Walker & Benjamin Cohen

reaching out to me. I had some bigger managers interested in taking meetings with me. For awhile after Sundance, I was flying back and forth to LA, and auditioning. I was meeting with representation,” Sullivan recalled. Sullivan’s manager advised him to move out to LA. “In my mind I was like ‘okay, I’m a movie star now, give me movies,’” Sullivan praised. “That’s not really how it works … the next week goes by, and then the next month, and so on and I’m like ‘I still don’t have a job.’ So I had to do what a lot of aspiring artists have to do when they come out here, and I started waiting tables to make a living. I [also] continued to get involved in classes,” Sullivan said.

Remember when very few people knew of Netflix, around the time when Blockbuster still existed, and those that had a Netflix subscription would have DVDs sent to their home? Netflix has become a world phenomenon since, and it can be set up right on your TV. The brand is so famous that there is most likely a button to access it from your TV remote. So is it safe to say that if you are an actor, and you’re on a Netflix series, you’ve made it? Most certainly yes! You've heard of the success behind Netflix shows such as "Orange Is the New Black," "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" and "Fuller House." Add another to that list, "Flaked," and you get a fairly new Netflix series with East Texan David Sullivan in a lead role. Born in Tyler, Texas, but raised in Longview, Texas, Sullivan never imagined having a career as an actor. He was sure to pursue sports in the long run. “I started playing football in 5th grade. I played basketball, and ran track and cross country. I even played tennis once I got into high school,” Sullivan recalled. He played football at Spring Hill High School in Longview, before continuing it at Baylor University in Waco. There he played football and soccer, before buckling down into something more promising and graduating with a business degree. That led him to a post-grad job in Dallas. After being laid-off from that job, Sullivan took some time to think about what it was that would make him happy. Around the same time, a little film called "Primer" was filming and Sullivan decided to audition. “I remembered in high school I was really happy when I did One-Act Play. So I was like ‘I’m gonna give acting a try.’ I saw a listing for an indie movie being shot in Dallas. Five of us ended up making this movie and it went to Sundance. It kind of launched me into this career,” Sullivan shared. When Sullivan went to Sundance to promote the film, his eyes opened to what the entertainment industry had to offer. “I didn’t know anything about the business. But when 'Primer' won, it kinda gave me a bigger audience. I had more people No. 36 BSC ENE

The classes paid off for Sullivan because he began to see that he was not only getting better at acting, but he was also getting better auditions and opportunities. With a little patience and lots of practice, Sullivan began to book movie roles and guest star roles. In the late 2000s, he was on popular TV shows such as "Big Love," "Criminal Minds" and "CSI." He then landed his second big movie role in the Academy Award winning movie “Argo.” “I just had a couple of lines in my audition and I did a pretty good job … Two weeks goes by and she (the casting director) goes ‘Ben saw your tape.’ ‘Oh Ben Affleck? He saw my tape? Great!’… That was a really great project and it was really cool to work with Batman,” Sullivan remembered. That was just the beginning of Sullivan’s career working with big name actors. Last year, "New Girl" fans spotted him on an episode, opposite Zooey Deschanel. This year, in one of his bigger roles of his career, Sullivan can be seen opposite Will Arnett in “Flaked.” He plays the role Dennis, who is best buds with Will Arnett's character. They both vie for the attention of British actress Ruth Kearney's character London. The show aired on Netflix in March, with eight episodes, and Sullivan hopes to see a season two happen in the future. Until then, he can BSCENE in various films to be released, one of which was directed by James Franco, and the upcoming TV mini-series “Lewis and Clark," according to IMDB.com. B SC EN EM A G.COM


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2016 LONGVIEW CATTLE BARONS' MAY 21 The Longview area American Cancer Society held their annual Cattle Barons' Ball with headliner Neal McCoy to fundraise for their organization, themed "Jeans and Jewels" at the Summit Club in Longview, on May 21.

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No. 39


Actor When you know, you just know, and that is what prompted Jenny Joslin to pursue her dreams of becoming an actor. “I knew from a young age I wanted to work in theatre or film,” Joslin recalled. Born in Tyler, Texas, but raised in Longview, Texas while also living in Flint, Texas for awhile, Joslin has been pursuing acting her whole life. You can even call her a triple threat, because not only does she act, but she sings and has dabbled in dance with her past performances. Joslin attended Pine Tree in Longview, where she was a member of the school’s choir, PT Express, as well as a Thespian. “I also did Longview Community Theatre for many years. Total nerd!” Joslin exclaimed. If you had the pleasure of seeing her perform, or catching her singing a tune, you would have taken a moment to think that Joslin would become something big some day. “It was just a natural progression to continue it in college,” Joslin shared, of her next step in her journey. After her high school graduation, Joslin moved down to San Marcos to attend Texas State University. “Lauren Lane, who played CC Babcock on 'The Nanny,' was one of my professors, and taught some of my favorite classes,” Joslin remembered. It was during her senior year that Joslin felt confirmation to keep pursuing acting. “TSU holds a BFA showcase in New York, and I ended up getting some interest from the industry on that trip. I moved up three months later.” Like many actors who move to make their dreams a reality, Joslin didn’t have it so easy. “I was living in my friend’s living room, working four jobs and having the time of my life. An essay I wrote was published in a book called My First New York a few months after moving to New York,” Joslin recalled. Lauren Michaels, Dan Rather and Liza Minnelli are a few of the notable names found in that very same book. And then there were the auditions. “I’m lucky to have a great group of supportive friends and colleagues who’ve helped me navigate the industry and find representation.” Joslin, then, decided to get deep into her career by starting up her own production company. “Gringas Furious is a production No. 40 BSC ENE

Jenny Joslin Article By: Poonam Patel Courtesy Photos By: Jenny Joslin

company I co-founded. It’s a result of my production partner, fellow Texan Annette Mia Flores, and me wanting to create more dynamic roles for women. Working as actors we saw so many female characters that were just the “hot girl” or “girlfriend” ... So we started making our own videos, and a few of them went viral. Then our short film Chupacabra, about sisters-byadoption who take a road trip to spread their father’s ashes, played at film festivals and received distribution from IndieFlix. We’re finishing post-production on a web series now and then moving onto creating more films.” Joslin will also BSCENE, on DVD from your local video store, this fall in the George Clooney and Julia Roberts film “Money Monster.” Though Joslin is only on screen for a few shots, and didn’t get a chance to meet Clooney and Roberts on set, she did have the opportunity to be directed by Jodie Foster. “Being directed by Jodie Foster was such an honor. She’s a very down to earth, quietly powerful woman. I’m in the film for just a few moments but it was such a treat,” Joslin shared. Being a working actor in New York City can be a tough career to keep up, but Joslin isn't complaining and enjoying the ride. “I’ve got several upcoming film projects in varying stages of development. There are more TV projects happening in New York than ever before and I’m starting to audition for those. It’s a really great time to be a NY actor!” Joslin exclaimed. And no matter the pitfalls or rejections, Joslin is staying positive. “It’s taught me a lot of perseverance and that there’s always another job around the corner.” Though she enjoys the many aspects of film and videomaking, Joslin hopes to go back to her first love someday. “I’d really like to return to the stage! I recently worked with legendary acting coach Larry Moss ,who reignited my love for the theatre. It seems like the next step in my New York journey," Joslin shared, excited for what the future holds.  So if you happen to take a trip to New York, who knows ... you may be catching a show one evening and Joslin may be the lead in that production's playbook.

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Author

Wes Ferguson

What started as a series of articles for the Longview NewsJournal in 2008, became an odyssey that turned into a book about one of East Texas’ famous rivers. Looking for a way to have fun at work, reporter Wes Ferguson and photographer Jacob Croft Botter pitched an idea to their editors about borrowing a boat and spending four days traveling down the Sabine River. They intended to tell the story of the river by chronicling its natural setting and inhabitants. “It was a wild adventure. We met some really interesting people called ‘River Rats’ who were living the way East Texans lived 100 years ago,” Ferguson recalled. The result was a series of stories, with photos, that caught the attention of the Editor of the Texas A&M University Press, who then asked the duo to expand their expedition all the way to the gulf. Both men jumped at the chance to explore the lower Sabine River. “On the very first day of our trip, we saw some people high up on a bluff. We waved at them and they waved back. Usually, if we saw people who seemed friendly, we’d stop and visit with them and listen to their stories, and maybe even camp with them. But as we were pulling up to the bank we heard pop, pop, pop, and water splashing behind us. We practically fell out of the boat trying to duck and cover,” Ferguson recalled. “Once we figured out they weren’t going to murder us, we climbed the bank and one guy said, ‘Sorry for shooting at y’all. I thought you was my brother.’ That was the first day.”

Article By: Laura Krantz Courtesy Photo By: Wes Ferguson

Ferguson tells one story about a couple they met that lived on an island in the river just before it reaches Toledo Bend Reservoir. The husband and wife didn’t have electricity, but lived comfortably off the land by eating catfish, squirrel, deer and vegetables from a huge garden. They shared whatever they had with their visitors. Ferguson, who grew up in East Texas and attended Sabine schools, says the thing that struck him most about the trip was how floating the river changed his perspective on a river he’d seen his whole life. “I was amazed at what we found. It’s a lot more beautiful than you realize when you’re driving over it on the highway at 60 mph,” Ferguson said. The book, Running the River: Secrets of the Sabine, was published in the spring of 2014. But Ferguson wasn’t quite ready to give up river exploration. When the Sabine book was finished, Ferguson took a job in Kyle, near the Blanco River, and got interested in that river. Unlike the wide, muddy Sabine River, Blanco is smaller and more shallow with clear green-blue water and a limestone bed. It’s human inhabitants are also much more guarded and possessive about the river. Ferguson had finished the book about the Blanco River, but revisited and expanded it after the deadly floods of Memorial Day 2015. Ferguson’s book about the Blanco River is expected to be published spring of next year. A magazine article he wrote about the Blanco River floods also appeared in the May issue of Texas Monthly. The main difference between the two rivers? "The Sabine is simply much more wild and natural," Ferguson added of his sights.

Running the River: Secrets of the Sabine is available for purchase on Amazon.

As the men piloted their flat-bottomed Jon Boat down the river, they had to navigate around log jams caused when the current undermined trees along the bank and sent them into the muddy river. They also saw plenty of otters, deer, hogs and the occasional alligator. Most of the people Ferguson and Botter met along the way were friendly. “Almost everyone was extremely inviting and more generous than you would have expected. Whatever food they had, they gladly shared with me and Jacob,” Ferguson added.

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No. 45


SOCIAL | SCENE

LEAH & BRIAN MURRAY

PAM LOLLAR, JAMIE LANE, DANNY JONES

JOY FOX, MARGARET DODSON, MARISSA MARTIN

KYLE GREEN, ASHLEY WILSON, SAMANTHA & CRAIG CHAIKIN

STACY RATHBUN, KELLY JENNINGS, DAN FELSENTHAL, RANJIT KODALI

JOHN MARTIN, TALI WILKINSON

KRYSTLE & JOHN SPATES, STACY & DONALD SAPP, ????????????????? NICOLE & MATT ORBAN

MARGARET DODSON, LARA CUPIT, CLAIRE HENRY, JESSICA WILKINSON, JACLYN ABERNATHY

NANCY ABERNATHY, SUE MARTIN

NANCY JACKSON, GARY WHITWELL, MARGARET DODSON

ELAINE HALE, JADEAN ROBERTS, JENNIFER CALK, CHARLOTTE TAYLOR

BECKIE THOMAS, CLINT MCMULLEN

BRONWEN MARTIN, ALICIA & MIKE NOLTE

JAN PAINE, CINDY BRESLFORD

JULIE & JEREMEY BERNARD

CHERYL & WALT CADE

JENNIFER JACKSON, CISSY ABERNATHY, WHITNEY FLOWERS, ASHLEY RUTHERFORD, ERICA FISHER

TRINITY SCHOOL OF TEXAS 2016 SPRING GALA APRIL 23 Trinity School of Texas hosted the 2016 Spring Gala to spotlight the 25 TST grandmothers answering the call for education, at the Summit Club in Longview, on April 23.

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EAT | DRINK

MAN ABOUT TOWN 48 | DINING GUIDE 53 BS CENEMAG. COM

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No. 47


MAN ABOUT

TOWN WITH DR. AUBREY D. SHARPE PHOTOS BY: BRYAN STEWART

Sinfully, Deliciously, healthy at Roast Social Kitchen Did ya ever just want to do somethin’ different? Try something new and unique? It is so easy to get in a rut, isn’t it? We go to the same places, order the same food and drink, and travel the road most traveled. Well, the “Man,” stepped out of his comfort zone and found it very comfortable. Yep, I went healthy and natural, and it was wonderfully good for me and full of flavor. To be sure, Stanley’s Famous Pit BarB-Q is a trend setter in every way, but Nick and Jen Pencis are doin’ it again, in an entirely different venue on 5th street called Roast Social Kitchen (RSK). While the name is a mouthful, it is just a precursor to the mouthful of healthy and tasty dishes that come from their new

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kitchen. The menu is evolving with plans for seasonal rotations and chef specialties of fish and steaks for healthy eating with “sane” portions. Everything is done in-house with fresh farm- to-table ingredients, and roasted to intensify the flavors. The roasted herbs and peppers embellish the multiplicity of flavors that burst in your mouth with every bite. The vibrant colors of the fresh ingredients make each platter a visual extravaganza. On top of all this, it’s healthy and good for you. How cool is that! Then there’s the bar. It is separate from the dining room and cozy with an industrial feel. The Thomas Edison

Light Bulbs that hang from the ceiling create a nostalgic effect. The bar boasts the latest in “Wine’N’Spirits” technology. You must try the cocktails on draft, yes siree. The uniquely named, premixed in-house libations, are drawn from a line of spigots on the wall. The Moscow Mule is a house favorite. Another first of the high-tech specialties is aged in oak barrels on tap. You like beer? Listen up! RSK offers up to eight craft beers on tap, including two from Tyler’s own True Vine Brewery, and a plethora of canned beers. Now, the real eye catcher is the 20 red and white wines on tap, by the glass with an average price of under $8. This “on tap” method stores the wine in cooled steel B SC EN EM A G.COM


kegs holding three cases of wine that never go bad with airing. It’s technology beyond the bottle. The dining room is also high-tech with color changing lighting along the walls, and an outlet is available at each table for electronic devices. The walls exhibit original art work by local artists for purchase. The theme is fast-casual, and inviting to families, singles, studying students, business gatherings and/or parties. You should come hungry, thirsty and ready for the Pencis’ hospitality to send ya home happy and healthy. Their motto is “Thoughtfully Prepared— Joyfully Shared.” RSK is the perfect spot for lunch, dinner or a late night snack. It’s open MondayThursday, 11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.; Friday, 11:00 a.m.-1:00 a.m.; and Saturday 11:00 a.m.-2:00 a.m.. Plan to visit Happy Hour Monday-Friday, 3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m., with craft beers for $5, domestics for $3,

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cocktails for $5 and wine for $6. Come early and stay late, or order by phone (903-202-0295) for take out. It’s easy to find at 1125 E. 5th Street in Tyler, across from the new TJC Nursing and Health Science Center. Owner Nick Pencis, and managers Leo Morales and Michael Finlay pulled out all the stops to make our evening a hoot. Chef Brian Arnold worked his magic in the open state of the art kitchen to produce the most beautiful and flavorful food under heaven. Our party served as a team builder for the Better Business Bureau of East Texas Executive Committee. The festivities started in the bar with libations of the gods, accompanied by beautiful meat and cheese board platters, pork and ricotta meatballs and much more. From the bar, we eased to the dining room where the fun and food just kept a comin.’ The taste bud bursting delights ranged from creative salads to the best

ever pizzas taken to a gourmet level (gluten free upon request). The “Bees Knees” pizza of roasted garlic, RSK 4 cheese blend, soppressata and the RSK sausage topped with Mike’s hot honey, thyme and fresh orange were all show stoppers. Add a side of Yukon Golds topped with ricotta, parsley, rosemary and gremolata, and you’ve got a marriage made in heaven. With libations still a-comin,’ our super-star server, Elisa Hook, laid on us desserts of strawberry, mascarpone mousse and house specialty “Date Late” which left us “hollering Uncle!” Having been served generously and treated like royalty it was time to not overstay our welcome. So we moved off| into the humid summer night promising to do it again at RSK. So if you’re out and about, look for us, we’ll be about town.

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DAKOTAS

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Live music every Friday & Saturday night, Saturday & Sunday Brunch HOURS Now open Tues. through Thurs. for dinner only, 4p.m. to 10p.m., Fri. 4p.m. to 12a.m., Sat. 11a.m. to 1a.m., and Sun. 10a.m. to 8p.m. DINNER • SAT. & SUN. BRUNCH Closed on Mon. FIND US ON FACEBOOK! • lagodelpino.com 14706 County Rd. 1134 • Tyler, TX 75709 • 903.561.5246 BS CENEMAG. COM

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FIND US ON FACEBOOK! 1024 W. SW Loop 323• Tyler, TX 75701 • 903.747.8558 J U L Y | A U GU ST 2 0 1 6

No. 53


Author

Melissa DeCarlo Article By: Veronica Terres Photo By: Batten Photography

While Mattie is a character readers find that they may love to hate and hate to love, DeCarlo’s protagonist, at one point, may have never even landed onto bookshelves. As DeCarlo explained, there was a point in her life when writing became less about her and more about others reading it. This realization came when she was in her forties and the train of life had slowed down enough to begin letting some ideas ink back onto paper. But at that point, she was still too preoccupied with how little she had written, how little she had published, and whether or not other people would end up liking what she had penned. She stressed so much about the end-result of her work that the enjoyment was more difficult to come by. It was then Since Melissa DeCarlo was a little girl, she had always dreamed that she made the decision to quit writing entirely—a choice of one day writing a book. Her early years in life were spent that would last nearly a decade. putting pen and paper to work, crafting short stories and poems to hone her passion for literature. But with cautionary “I just quit writing for seven years … completely! I just quit. parents who steered her clear from obtaining a college degree And then after a while, I missed it,” DeCarlo explained. “At that that wouldn’t “pay the bills,” DeCarlo did what was prudent time, I went back into it thinking, ‘You know, I’m just going to and studied computer science, a field that would ensure being kind of do it to amuse myself.’” able to support herself after college because of the highdemand for jobs in that arena. So, DeCarlo got her groove back by concentrating on writing to have fun and joined with an online-writer group of friends. Once her career path was determined and progressing, the Ironically, once she quit worrying about the end result of Oklahoma native married while still in school. Putting her getting her work published, it was then that the character degree to work, she was able to help pay the bills while her of Mattie Wallace began developing in the writer’s head and husband attended medical school. Before long, motherhood onto paper. “I thought, ‘I’m just not going to worry about quickly ensued. publication because it’s so hard.’ I mean, it messes with your head so badly when you start putting the focus there. But DeCarlo, who has called Tyler, Texas home for more than 25 that [ended up being] the book though, [the outcome of not years now, had three children. And, like a locomotive traveling focusing on publishing]. It’s kind of funny how that works,” full steam ahead, the everyday business of running an active DeCarlo recounted. household and organizing the daily to-dos of family, speedily traveled along the tracks of life, slightly diverting her dream The rest wasn’t history, yet, however. Even though DeCarlo for a time—maybe even a few decades—but never derailing it. got back to her computer in 2010. She explained that her writing process ended up being the opposite of the cut and In September of 2015, DeCarlo’s dream became a reality when dry process that a lot of writers experience: where they are one of the world’s leading book publishers, HarperCollins able to craft a story and call it “good” once they’ve clicked and Publishers, released her debut novel, The Art of Crash clacked out a first draft. In contrast, her first draft took about Landing. DeCarlo’s novel is the story of its narrator, a young a year to complete. When she was ready to enlist the help of a woman named Mattie Wallace, who journeys—penniless, professional to review it, she contacted a literary agent who told pregnant, and adrift—to her mother’s childhood home in the her that while he loved the voice of the story, one in which even tiny town of Gandy, Oklahoma. DeCarlo explained in a press in that first draft DeCarlo tackled the complex relationship release that the protagonist finds herself with the key to her between mother and daughter, it wasn’t quite there yet. recently deceased grandmother’s house, and the burden of two chubby French bulldogs that she inherited. Through her “He talked to me about what he thought did work and what journey, Mattie is forced to make sense of her family’s history didn’t work, and he pointed out that I hadn’t fully explored the and the circumstances that led her troubled mother to leave mother-daughter relationship, which was absolutely true. He so abruptly and mysteriously. Her travels to her deceased offered to read it again if I wanted to resubmit, and of course I mother’s childhood home help Mattie understand the volatile did. So I cut out parts, added new sections, rearranged scenes. relationship between her mother and herself, while coming to In fact the manuscript went back and forth a few more times grips with her past, present and her future. before it was ready to go. I know there are some authors who

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can sit down and write a book from start to finish and it’s great, but that’s not me. I have to write something terrible and then take it apart and rebuild it,” DeCarlo shared, laughingly. Even the title of her book changed from Wash and Wear Wings, to its current title after she enlisted a few of her friends to help brainstorm book title ideas. This was a suggestion that came after her editor politely expressed that the original title sounded like a feminine products commercial. “You just can’t un-hear that!” DeCarlo exclaimed. In her rewrites, she also recruited her 20-something daughter to help her come up with colorfully, youthful-sounding profanity. Never giving up and only moving forward, she went back and forth with a few iterations of the story. Three years from the time she had written her first draft, DeCarlo put her story out for auction and sold it to HarperCollins in August of 2014. It was at that point when DeCarlo’s childhood dream finally took off, and as most can surmise, that is also the point at which she considers reaching the pinnacle of her success. But, that’s not the end of DeCarlo’s story, either. When she sold The Art of Crash Landing to HarperCollins, it was a twobook deal. With her second book currently in the works, the first draft is due to her publisher this fall. And in June, she also announced on her Facebook page that The Art of Crash Landing might one day fly into a movie theater near you.

sarcastic, obnoxious, and in general, a bit of a pain in the youknow-what. At the same time, she is redeemable. Jokingly, she further explained that Mattie is her evil twin—someone who she was able to make misbehave on the page while DeCarlo herself did not have to suffer any of the actual consequences, especially since she is quite the opposite personality—a selfproclaimed people pleaser. “I don’t like to cause trouble and it was a lot of fun to just go ahead and pick a main character that doesn’t mind causing trouble,” DeCarlo explained. “I mean… it was refreshing.” While the author continues to fly high with the character that she created, DeCarlo hopes that one of the main takeaways from her book is that people gain an understanding of the overarching theme of the story—being able to let go of the past and forgive oneself in order to embrace the future. From her own life’s story, DeCarlo hopes that fans find hope in the fact that age is only a number and that achieving a dream can happen at any point in life—just through sheer perseverance. “I’m literally starting a new career in my fifties,” DeCarlo expressed. “And that is kind of weird. It’s scary. But at the same time, I think I’m a great lesson in not giving up.”

Her post read: “Excited to announce that The Art of Crash Landing has been optioned for film! Of course optioning is just the first step of a very long and difficult road—so it’s all very much a ‘we’ll see’ sort of thing. But, I’m happy and honored that Bluewater Ranch Entertainment is going to try and make it happen. :D” While the success of her first book has kept DeCarlo busy with attending book signings and skyping with book clubs, she finds herself in a bit of a conundrum as she’s living her dream, even though she gets to check her achievement off of her bucket list. Now, she also has to continue working to sell her current book, all while writing her next. “It changed a hobby to a job. I mean … I’ve been paid for the next book, so I need to get it done. It’s been a challenge, but it’s been a fun challenge. It certainly gives me validation for my hobby of ‘typing,’ as my daughter explained in an assignment when she was a little girl,” DeCarlo added. Until her next book is out, DeCarlo hopes readers indulge themselves with the story she has given them in Mattie. With the positive reception and feedback from happy readers, she also equally welcomes any criticism she’s received from audiences. As she explains, she created a character nothing like herself [except for a bit of sarcasm]. And while she’s never had her own “crash landing, per se,” she cites a few life-changing challenges that transpired, such as her brother’s return from Vietnam, the loss of both her parents in adulthood and witnessing the challenges of a disabled sister. Despite these notables, art did not mimic life in the story’s case. As she explained, Mattie is someone who is complicated, immature, BS CENEMAG. COM

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Author A love of military history led one East Texan to focus on a war that very little is written about, and even less is known by the general public. That curiosity, coupled with a talent for writing, led Larry Krantz to write a Band of Brothers, a style trilogy about the Korean War and the men who fought and died there. “I consider myself to be an amateur military historian. There are endless books and movies about World War II and Vietnam, and I am sure there will be many more to come about Iraq and Afghanistan, but there is very little by comparison about the Korean War,” Krantz said. “I think I understand why since there was no clear winner, but to gloss over that period of time in our history, that 20-year period between World War II and Vietnam, is to miss a lot of how our current foreign policy was born and what shaped us as a post-war nation. Like World War I before it, World War II created many more problems than it solved. The world changed dramatically in those 20 years our textbooks tend to skip, and it all really got started in Korea, and spread through East Asia and the Middle East where many of the world’s problems are still seeking resolution today.” That interest in a war that is little-discussed, but had farreaching consequences, led Krantz, a former journalist, to begin sketching out what would eventually become his first novel. Although he did not set out to write a book initially, inspiration struck as he learned more about the Korean War and its veterans. “I started writing down my thoughts. Eight months later, Divisions was largely complete for several rounds of editing, and the inspiration carried me through far enough to do one more book and most of a third. It has been a fascinating bit of self-discovery along with what I have learned from my research along the way,” Krantz shared. During the writing process, Krantz sought out Korean War veterans in East Texas. He interviewed the men and listened to their first-person accounts of Korea. Once the rough draft of the book was complete, he went back to these veterans and asked for their feedback. “Not many people know that Tyler has

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Larry Krantz Article By: Laura Krantz Courtesy Photo By: Larry Krantz

a strong Korean War veteran community, and veterans Jim Gill, Dwight Wenger and Bill Lynn were extremely helpful in helping me get access to that community and its knowledge. The entire group welcomed me and embraced the project. That meant a lot,” Krantz praised. Divisions is the first book in a planned trilogy that takes place between the start of the Korean War in 1950 and the fall of the French outpost at Dien Bien Phu, in Vietnam in 1954. The second book, Dominos, is in the final editing stages, and after that the last of the trilogy, Hedgehog, will be released. Those who aren’t fans of military books don’t need to worry about graphic battle scenes or the minutia of military equipment or maneuvers. The focus here is the characters and their place in an historically significant, yet forgotten conflict. “While there is some combat in each of the three books, I tried not to get into too much blood and guts. That’s been done,” Krantz added. “What has not been done is a series of books that uses historical fiction, fictional main characters navigating real places, times and personalities, to tell the story of our emergence in the post-World War II world as a major player in world politics. My intent with the trilogy is to help fill in some gaps in our history by whetting the reader’s appetite to ask their own questions and do their own research. But if you want to know how the world arrived at where it is today, those 20 years between the end of World War II and the Vietnam War are the most critical.”   Krantz dedicated Divisions to his late grandfather, Cdr. William H. Krantz, USNR, who was one of the first officers assigned to the then-brand new SeaBees, the Navy’s combat engineers, at the outset of World War II. He never saw combat, but that was only because the ship he was on was too slow to join the the initial invasion force headed for Guadalcanal in 1942. “His stories about his service inspired me to read more about World War II and really lit the flame inside me to learn about history,” Krantz said. Divisions is available for purchase on Amazon.

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SLIM CHICKENS Pull up a chair or take out, and enjoy fresh ingredients and handcrafted recipes that are always cooked to order. From Chicken & Waffles, to our signature SLIMS Salad, to tasty sides such as our Mac & Cheese and Potato Salad, there is something for everyone at SLIM Chickens! Catering is also available with free delivery.

Come visit us at our S. Broadway location. NEW Troup Hwy. location opening August 2016!

THE DINER HOURS Open 6am to 2pm daily. A one of a kind Diner experience! Famous omelettes, skillets, mouthwatering burgers, sandwiches and everything in-between. Seattle’s Best coffee, free Wi-Fi and a great atmosphere. Nothing can be finer, than eating at The Diner!”

HOURS Mon. - Sun., 10:30a.m. to 10p.m.

View our Menu and Catering Options online at thedinertyler.com.

7925 S. Broadway • Tyler, TX 75703• 903.561.7546 3922 Troup Hwy. • Tyler, TX 75703

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SHOWROOM HOURS: M-F 8:00 - 5:00 • SAT 8:00 - 1:00 • SUN CLOSED 4917 Old Jacksonville Hwy • Tyler TX • 903.561.2943 • 866.561.2943 www .allamerican partyandtent .com • www.facebook.com/allamerican party 4917 Old Jacksonville HwyServing • Tyler 903.561.2943 • 866.561.2943 AllTX of • East Texas. www.allamericanpartyandtent.com • www.facebook.com/allamericanparty Serving All of East Texas.

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No. 57


SOCIAL | SCENE

KEN WAITS, MARY-BIRDSONG GABRIEL, MALLORY CURTIS, WILL MARTIN, SAMUEL BOCHOW, OWEN HARRISON, ELLA ROSE EMBRY, JACQUELINE JACKSON, LOUISE MCCAIN, LUCY WOLF, LOU LOU WEDELL

BONNIE PALMER, GINGER HABERLE

TAYLOR SMITH, DIANA TAYLOR SMITH, GLENN TAYLOR

MAYOR MARTIN HEINES

KEN WAITS, HANNA WAITS, LAURA WAITS

CAROLINE FROST, CLAIRE HIMES, LYNDY FROST

LINDSAY & MICHAEL HARRISON, LOCKLIN HARRISON, OWEN HARRISON

EMMA FERGUSON, CARTER ANNE JONES, MALLORY CURTIS, MARY-BIRDSONG GABRIEL, MEGAN KIRKPATRICK, TAYLOR SMITH

BRUCE FAULKNER, RAY COZBY

ELLIE WALKER, ANDREA WALKER, KELLY KIRKPATRICK

BIRDIE JACKSON, MELISSA JACKSON

MOSES LENGUA, MARIA LENGUA, RACHEL LENGUA, JAIME LENGUA

ROSE SUNDAY APRIL 24 President of the 2016 Texas Rose Festival, Ken Waits, welcomed Tyler area residents to a celebration to mark the end of Winter and arrival of Spring, and the beginning of the “Tyler Roses” growing season, at the Rose Garden in Tyler, on April 24.

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No. 59


Summer Style Staple:

White Pearl Snap Button Down Every closet needs a white pearl snap button down—especially if you live in East Texas! Wear and pair it with almost anything. Can’t figure out what to wear to Cattle Barons' this year? Think: White pearl snaps! Outfits and accessories available at Cavender’s.

For daytime or nighttime, a monochromatic play on the white is achieved with more pearl accessories by Wired Heart. Add a western headband to top off the look.

Pair it with an A-line, racer-back top. This HYFVE version with crochet detail says flirty, fun, feminine and cool.

What’s more American than selling a brand that helps others? Selling a brand that helps others and offering it in an American flag design—like these TOMS! Throw on your denim shorts to keep cool at your Fourth of July or Labor Day picnic. Try these 7 for All Mankind on for size.

Don’t leave your pearl snaps at home. Think of it as a lightweight jacket for breezier summer nights, like this one by Cumberland Outfitters.

Tuck it into a great pair of distressed denim jeans, like these by Sneak Peek.

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5215 Old Jacksonville Hwy Tyler, Texas 75703

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No. 61


Summer Style Staple:

Fringe Kimono A lightweight fringed kimono’s versatility can take you to the beach or to the local bar and grill! Outfits and accessories available at Steele’s. This Ivy Jane Kimono’s fringe and fun print packs a punch over a simple tank or tank dress.

Add these Mbellish earrings to complement the bracelet. Throw on a mixed metal bracelet that won’t conflict with the kimono’s bold pattern.

A small Kurtmen clutch that has some of the same color and pattern as the Kimono can complement the look.

Play up some of the color in the print with a bold tank like this NikiBiki one worn underneath the kimono.

Flip-flop your way to the beach bar, comfortably, in these orthopedic GlitterFlops.

Shade yourself from the rays with an Atwood straw hat.

Tuck the tank into these Ethyl Vintage Denim capris.

Add this Mbellish necklace to play on the Bohemian vibe of the look.

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Article By: Laura Krantz Courtesy Photo By: Traci Borum

Traci Borum never forgot the beauty of the British Isles. The rolling hills and small villages stayed in her heart long after she toured them as a teenager, with her grandmother, more than two decades ago. Just a few years earlier, Borum had also discovered her love of writing. It may have been inevitable that the two would one day come together.

Author

Traci Borum “I’ve been writing since I was 12. I remember this English class where we had a creative writing unit. My friends groaned about the assignment, but I got so excited. From that moment on, I’ve been writing,” Borum recalled. Mostly poetry and short stories in the beginning, Borum began writing novels at the age of 21. For years, she continued to pursue her passion and regularly submitted her work to magazines and publishers, all the time knowing how difficult it is to get published. She channeled her creativity into helping others with their writing at Tyler Junior College, where she’s been teaching creative writing classes for the last 10 years. But something happened about two years ago that changed her perspective. She got published. After hundreds of rejection letters, Borum never stopped writing and it was her seventh novel that struck a chord with a small publisher. “I knew I wanted to write another book. I thought, selfishly, ‘where would I want to live?’” she said, recalling the trip with her grandmother. That setting served as inspiration for Painting the Moon, which was published in 2014. Borum used the rolling hills and grasslands of the rural Cotswolds in England as the setting. “I never forgot the images. It was a once-in-a-lifetime trip,” Borum recalled of her experience. “I also knew I wanted the main character to be American, so I got her over there and created this little village.” The book is the first in a series of three set in a quaint village of Borum’s creation called Chilton Crosse. The first book follows an American woman who has inherited a cottage and an art gallery from her aunt. “The crux of the first story is her first BS CENEMAG. COM

love. This book really explores first loves because everyone has this first love, but that’s not usually the person you end up with,” Borum added. The book is considered contemporary fiction, but has an old-fashioned feel that it draws from the setting Borum created. After the first book was published, her publisher asked for a second. Borum had already written the second and third novels in the series. But her approach to the series was unique in that she stayed in the same village, but switched to a different character’s point of view for each book. “It’s a stand-alone series. You can see progress with the main characters from the other books, but each book could also stand alone. You could pick up book three and not be lost, although there might be a few minor spoilers.” A fourth book is currently in the works. This book will be set in the same village, but Borum isn’t revealing which villager she plans to spotlight this time. She says she’s still in shock that her books are actually published and available for anyone to read. “I tried so hard for so long. It’s so much harder than you think,” Borum said. “I’ve been teaching for 10 years and haven’t been published for about eight of those 10 years. I definitely feel a little more confident. But I think the thing that hit me the most was that you could go on Amazon and search my name. That was pretty cool.”

Painting the Moon, Finding the Rainbow and Seeking the Star, are available in print or e-book formats through Amazon. For more information about the author, visit her website at TraciBorum.com.

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No. 63


Summer Style Staple:

Denim A-Line Skirt

This Frame version can be styled to take you out to brunch, lunch or a patio cocktail hour. Outfits available at Jewel.

Tuck in a casual, light-weight, sleeveless button-down top with a minimalistic print, like this one by Frame.

Intemporelle Designs’ bold floral clutch punches up the daytime look to make a style statement.

Spice up the basics with a coordinating necklace and bracelets in the same tones as your outfit. Try it with gold to complement the yellows in these pieces.

A coordinating bracelet like this leather-wrap, with gold and pearl-like details complements the overall look.

Take off your daytime accessories and throw on some earrings in an interesting shape like these “starburst” darlings. There’s just enough bling to add more sparkle to your night.

Sunny, yellow, block-heeled suede sandals, like these by Steve Madden, will make your day brighter. (Available at Macy's.)

By night, swap out the sleeveless blouse for one with a bit more drama, like this bold, black and beige striped Misha Nonoo blouse/bodysuit. Switch out your floral clutch for a basic, black, envelope to coordinate with the rest of the outfit. Dance your way into the dark with a black pair of the Steve Maddens!

As the sun goes down, add more drama with some cat-eye sunnies, like these by Krewe. They’ll fashionably keep you from squinting while sipping your evening cocktail.


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Summer Style Staple:

Cowboy-Conservative Button Down Yes, East Texas gentleman, you can wear your favorite western button down from desk to dinner, to the dance hall! The key is finding one that doesn’t look like you’re headed straight to the ranch, and can be styled by alternating just a few key pieces. Outfits and accessories available at Cavender’s. Top the look off with a Bex ball cap that looks less like you’re a baseball fan and more like you’re a bucking bronco.

Take this navy plaid western Ariat Pro shirt from day to night.

Pick a pair of boots, like these by Ariat, that coordinate with your shirt and pants.

A Justin leather belt that matches the same tone as your boots pulls your western-work look together.

The same belt and boots work, for work!

Throw on a pair of Wrangler Retro jeans in a darker wash that complement your navy plaid, then hit the dance hall!

Tuck your western plaid into a pair of these relaxed fit, khaki Ariat pants in “stone.” They are made to fit over boots!

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No. 67


SOCIAL | SCENE HEARTSWAY HOSPICE 21ST ANNUAL MEMORIAL GOLF TOURNAMENT MAY 4

SCOTT HENDERSON, GLENN NOBLE, DAVID WRIGHT, DOUG BARNARD

BEN SLATER, REX FENNELL, GRAYSON LEWIS, MIKE REIS

BURGE LINTON, TALI WILKINSON, JOHN BEN BLACKBURN, DICKENS WILKINSON

PATRICK BRISCOE, ANTHONY BROOKS, ROBERT WHEELER, CASEY ROBERTSON

LANCE ROE, BOB SANSOM, TIM WHEDBEE, MIKE FITZHUGH

CHAZ HEIL, ERIC POPE, LUCAS HAWK, SPENCER PATTERSON

ANDREW MORROW, APRIL ALEXANDER, MELANIE MATKIN, JOCELYN MICHAELS, GEORGE WILLIS

JON CROMER, BO POWERS, DONNIE POWERS, KEVIN HOOD

MATT GANDY, BLAIR COLBY, JEFF KRAUS, CHAD CHENOWETH

DAKOTAS GRAND OPENING MAY 4

JASON PRESTON, RUSTY LUKER, STEVE HELLMUTH, CARY BYRD

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TYLER DAVIS, BLAKE HALL

DEBBIE WOOD, REBECCA ROARK, STACY BETTS

LANA SCHROEDER, LINDA RUDD

HEATH AGGEN, JIM CLARK

DANNY ELZNER, KURT KITCHINGS

CONNIE & CARL OWENS, JOSH BETTS, REBECCA ROARK

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LET US OUTFIT YOU IN LUXE ACTIVE AND LOUNGE WEAR, TRANSITIONING YOU FROM STUDIO TO STREET.

No. 70

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Article By: Laura Krantz Courtesy Photo By: N.E. Brown

During the spring of 1900, no one could have predicted that a monster storm would sweep the bustling port city of Galveston, and more than 8,000 souls from the Earth. The Great Storm, as locals call it, is the backdrop and inevitable turning point in the first novel by East Texas author N. E. Brown.

Author

N. E. Brown

Brown, who most East Texans may know by the name Nancy Brown Larson, is a former real-estate agent who moved with her husband to Tyler in 1982. “I always kind of had a burr in my saddle to write. You cannot just do real estate parttime. So I walked away from real estate four years ago to do something that was on my bucket list. The stories kind of wrote themselves. I had been thinking about them for a long from the fact that women suffered greatly during the early time,” Brown recalled. part of the century, without the right to vote, own their own property or have control over their own destinies. Brown drew from her experiences to write the first book, which has now become a series of five. She grew up in San But how did her story go from one novel to five? She says when Marcos and often visited Galveston as a child. She had heard all she was about two-thirds of the way through the first book, she the stories and was fascinated with the old city and its history. realized the story was going to be a series. The decisions made She also visited England in 1986 where she spent two weeks by her villain also meant the action of the book was going to traveling the countryside. “I had heard stories from relatives move to other locations in Texas. “It was a challenge each time about crossing to America on the ships. I wanted to tell a story to come up with something different, but I always came back that looked at immigrants and how they were treated when to Texas history. I wanted to give a history of Texas throughout they got here,” Brown added. the series. So each book moves to follow Texas history from Galveston to Spindletop. I think people can learn a lot from the As a result, Brown chose to make her heroine a 15-year- books,” Brown said. old English immigrant, who comes to Galveston, Texas by steamship with her mother in early 1900. The two navigate Brown’s series has been very well-received in Galveston where the difficulties of being new to a country where they know the series of books is available at The Galveston Bookshop, and no one, and where life is hard and unpredictable. The result is popular among visitors to the island. Brown often travels is also built-in tension as many Texans realize what awaits the to the city for book signings and to meet fans. While she is characters in September of that year. glad the books have done well commercially, the series is very personal for Brown who says she modeled her female heroine Brown says pouring after her mother. “My mother was a very courageous woman, over documents at the so I patterned her (the heroine) after my mother. This book Rosenberg Library greatly really started as a tribute to my mother,” Brown shared. enriched her book and how she was able to describe With the success of the Indignities series, Brown has also Galveston of that period. branched out into mystery and suspense with Carson Chance, Much of the historical P.I.: Over the Edge. This book, published in 2014, follows a documents aren’t available Dallas private investigator during the Vietnam era and also online, making the archives draws from Brown’s own experience. She explains that she was a goldmine for interesting a legal secretary at the time and also worked part-time for a facts and information detective in Dallas in the 1960s. Brown has now published six about early Galveston. It books in four years and says she only has one regret. “I wish I also helps make her books would have started writing earlier in my life,” Brown added. historically accurate, which Brown says is extremely Brown’s historical fiction books are available on Amazon. For important to her. Even more information about N.E. Brown, visit her author website the name of the series, at nebrown-author.com. Indignities, was drawn BS CENEMAG. COM

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No. 71


SOCIAL | SCENE CASA JUSTICE IS SERVED 2016 APRIL 19

NAN & LARRY MOORE

LEAH WANSLEY, KELLEY CLARIDA, ABBY CLARIDA

TIFFANY & JOHN HONEA

CINDY KLEIN, ASHLEY KUTACH

ALICE ANN BROWN, GLORIA & BRIAN GABRIEL

KELLY & DAVID STINNETT

ANGIE & KENN TELLMAN

ROSA & BOB GONZALES, BRENDA SIMMONS

KATHRYN & PATRICK BELL

TASTE OF TYLER APRIL 19

AUBRY SHARPE, NAM & BLAKE BAILEY

LYNN HANEY, JEANNA HILL

CHELSEA DOUGLAS, RYAN AHLQVIST

EARNEST WELCH, LINDA RUDD

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STEVE HELLMUTH, DAVID WEAVER

NATALIE OVERSTREET, WILLIAM HILL

CINDY BRANDY, BRENNEN BRADY, DANA CARGILE

DEVIN HUNTER, KAY BATES, ROY AUSTIN

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PATRIOT

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2016

No. 73


SOCIAL | SCENE

JOAN & MITCH ANDREWS, JIM PERKINS

RENE & GAYLORD HUGHEY, BETSY & ELMER ELLIS

ALISON & BILL NEWBURG

BOB RICE, AMY FAULCONER, ROBIN ROGERS

JON PERRY, JENNIFER GASTON

LAURA & KEVIN O’HALLORAN, BROOKE COAN, TUCKER MOORE

JIMMY WYNNE, NANCY ADDISON, ALLIE & ROBERT WOOD

BILLIE HARTLEY, HARRY CASERTA, VIRGINIA GATEWOOD

ROBIN & SCOTT LIEBERMAN

HAL CAMERON, TRICIA WIGGS

KAREN LANFORD, RALPH SPENCE, SUSAN NORVELL

JUNE & STEVE HILLIS, BARBARA JOHNSON, ELEANOR CAMERON

JOYCE BUFORD, SHERYL PALMER, JEANNIE HIBBS

RUTH MCGEE, LEATRICE JOHNSON

NITA & BYRON MEADS

DR. & MRS. STARLING

JOHN GASTON, TOM CAMPBELL

ROBERT OWEN, VAL HARNESS, WESLEY HART, CALEB BELL

TMA 45TH ANNIVERSARY GALA MAY 7 Tyler Museum of Art’s 45th Anniversary Gala was held to honor the philanthropy of Mary John and Ralph Spence and celebrate the Tyler Museum of Art's 45th year, at Willow Brook Country Club in Tyler, on May 7.

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HOME | DESIGN

Courtesy Photo By: Disney Parks

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No. 75


Weird Clubs You Never Knew Existed Article By: Addi McNeel

Clubs bring together people who share common interests and hobbies. While most have probably heard of book club, chess club and French club, there are several others

that target a very specific group of people. If you stand for abolishing pizza crust discrimination, then – surprisingly – you are not alone! There are probably just as

many clubs and associations as there are apps in the iTunes store. So browse our list of weird and wacky clubs you never knew existed, and if you have a certain affinity for something strange, trust us, there’s a club for that.

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AMERICAN COASTER ENTHUSIASTS                                     

01

American Coaster Enthusiasts (ACE) was founded in 1978 by three people who participated in a coaster riding contest, and decided to make their passion for roller coasters into a club. It has over 5,000 members from 16 countries and is the largest ride enthusiasts organization in the world. Ace’s mission is “to promote and enjoy roller coasters everywhere, regardless of type or size,” according to the ACE website. This club has been featured on The Discovery Channel multiple times, and is countlessly cited in several media articles due to the members’ vast knowledge of and passion for roller coasters. While ACE hosts many events throughout the year, it is most known for its annual “Coaster Con,” which takes place in June and includes six days of rides, presentations, video contests and keynote speakers. ACE also publishes bi-monthly newsletters and has published a book series of guides for coaster enthusiasts. Members also take part in the preservation of wooden roller coasters across the country. To become an American Coaster Enthusiast, all you have to do is fill out a form, pay an annual fee of $65 and adhere to a code of conduct.

    AMERICAN BIGFOOT SOCIETY                                     

02

This club is composed of Bigfoot hunters. Their goal is to find and document evidence of Bigfoot’s existence and report their findings. The American Bigfoot Society has a plethora of photographs on their website – none of which actually contain images of Bigfoot, but they continue the search nonetheless. Their organization contains researchers, investigators, a board of directors and advisors from all over the nation. They do not accept members on a rolling basis, so you must check their website for periodical membership openings. To join you must fill out a questionnaire, and then a telephone interview will be conducted. If accepted, you are able to join various expeditions with other club members in order to hunt down Bigfoot. However, the American Bigfoot Society is a “No-Kill” organization, so if you see Bigfoot on your expedition, you won't be able to shoot it.

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No. 77


DISNEYLAND’S CLUB 33                                      Courtesy Photo By: Disney Parks

03

There is only one place in Disneyland that serves alcohol: Club 33. This club is extremely exclusive and incredibly expensive, but not at all secretive. The club is located in the New Orleans Square, above Café Orleans, and is considered one of the most exclusive five star restaurants in the world. It was conceptualized and brought to life by Walt Disney himself, and since its opening in May of 1967, many U.S. presidents, foreign dignitaries and business leaders from around the world have visited. To join, you must submit a formal, written inquiry. First you will be subjected to a rigorous background check. If approved, your name will be put on a waiting list. The average wait time varies, but new applicants can expect to wait 14 years before being accepted. (Occasionally, the waiting list becomes so long that they stop taking inquires altogether.) Once accepted, there is an initiation fee of $25,000, and then $10,000 annually. Being a member means having access to the Club 33 restaurant, where you can expect to pay an average of over $100 a plate. Also, members are able to ride in the park on Disney’s private train car called the Lilly Belle.

    HAMMOCK HANGERS                                      Photo By: Bryan Stewart

04

To join the Texas Hammock Hangers club you must love two things: the great outdoors, and hanging around in hammocks all day. According to the Texas Hammock Hangers’ Facebook, the club likes to “hang out, talk about our favorite subject, plan a hang or post some show-and-tell photos.” The Hammock Hangers’ website is a forum where club members can discuss everything from hiking trail tips and adventures to hammock equipment. The club typically hosts two meet-ups a year where members can bring their hammocks, converse and hangout … literally. Potluck dinner, door prizes, classes that teach you how to work with specific hammock equipment and hammock youtube celebrities were all features of the most recent “group hang.” In the fall, the annual meet-up is called “Fall Hang." However, if it’s cold enough, it is called “Frozen Butt Hang.” And because summers in Texas are always hot, the summer meet-up is called the “Butt Bake.”

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No. 79


WORLD ROCK PAPER SCISSORS

SOCIETY                                     

05

If you solve all matters with a game of Rock, Paper, Scissors (best two out of three!), then this club is for you. The World Rock Paper Scissors (RPS) Society, which was founded in London in 1842, not only has local and regional operational branches, but national and international offices as well. The offices plan and execute tournaments, conferences, symposiums, retreats and get-togethers all over the world. However, if you think Rock, Paper, Scissors can be just a fun way to pass the time – you’re wrong. According to the World RPS Society website, English laws dating back to 1842 state that Rock, Paper, Scissors may only be played to make a decision on something. Although the game can only be played if a decision needs to be made, there are many loopholes that enable players to play just for fun. For example, many tournaments crafted by the World RPS Society are played to decide who will leave with honor and notoriety. If you think that Rock, Paper, Scissors is just a game of chance, you’re wrong about that too. The website has a plethora of information and articles all about game strategy. Ready to sign up yet? Rock, paper, scissors, shoot!

    DIGNIFIED EDUCATED UNITED

CRUST EATERS                                     

06

This club at Western Michigan University has one goal: “to make sure that no crust go uneaten and to bring a stop to the discrimination of crust,” according to the organization’s website. The club was born in 2010 from a debate between friends while eating lunch in the dining hall on campus. One friend didn’t eat the crust of his pizza and a few of the others started giving him a hard time about it. Some argued that it was the best part of the pizza, while others argued it was not. The debate lasted for days. Finally, the non-crust-eaters said that if the crust-eaters felt so strongly about crust, then they should start a club. They took the comment to heart and applied to become an official campus club. They were accepted, and the Dignified Educated United Crust Eaters Society (DEUCES) was born. If you don’t attend Western Michigan University, you can still become an honorary member! According to the DEUCES constitution and bylaws, to qualify as a member you must: “eat crust in every situation, have an appreciation and respect for crust, and have the desire to promote crust and efforts to stop the discrimination of crust.” However, to run for an officer position, such as CEO (Crust Eating Official), you must attend the University.

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No. 81


SOCIAL | SCENE ALL HANDS ON DECK MAY 28

SHANA & TJ MARTIN

LORI BELL, AMY WALTERS, JULIE GIBSON

CASEY & JONATHAN OLAND

OLIVIA GRIFFITH, SHANE PAYNE, JENNIFER ADAMS

MARCI FELICIANO, RENEE RAY, TIFFANY CLARK, VALERIE MCQUEEN, JENNIFER TIDWELL, MISTY HEROD

TOMMY ELLIS, CATHLEEN & STEVE HARDY

RYAN MARTIN, IAN MARTIN

TYLER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS APRIL 26

LEATHA TAYLOR, KEESIA HILL

TIM OGRODNIK, JENNI WILSON, HOLLY THEDFORD, CINDY SMOAK, FELIPE GARCIA

SILAS LACY, CATHIE ASHBY

JORDAN BOYD, DILLON MYRICK

CHRIS REYNOLDS, SARAH BOSOLD

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AL IPPOLITO, CARI ALVAREZ, DON BRISTOW

JENNIFER & CHRIS CARLYLE

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Artist

Becky Martin Article By: Poonam Patel Courtesy Photos By: Becky Martin

Where some may use smaller canvases afraid of creating a disaster, Martin is a bit more confident. She believes in the creations she thinks up, and enjoys painting her ideas on giant canvases. She also uses the Gyotaku technique or fish prints on silk fabric. “As a contemporary abstract artist, she works primarily with acrylics and foils on large-scale canvases. Through her unique method of layering, various qualities of luminous light, vivid color and energy are unveiled. Unafraid of strong color she submerges emotionally into the painting process. The final artwork brings energy to the viewer,” as stated on her website.

Think back to when you were a child. Were there ever times when you’d find yourself thinking there was nothing to do. As in, you’ve already gone to school, played outside and finished your chores, so now what? Becky Martin had moments like that when she was a child, and her mother knew exactly how to keep her entertained. She sent her to art lessons, and Martin was never bored again. Martin’s love for art grew in Tyler, where she was born and raised. She attended Robert E. Lee and then went off to Austin to pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree from University of Texas at Austin. “I continued my art education throughout my education,” Martin said. According to her website, she has studied numerous art techniques and is especially fond of the ancient Japanese method of fish printing, known as Gyotaku. Whether she is traveling or just relaxing at home, Martin is usually thinking of the next art project she can tackle. She dedicates much of her life to being an artist. “I paint everyday that I am home. Sometimes I paint for hours on end and other days I may paint only for a few minutes. I love to paint! If I am traveling, I usually take lots of pictures and tuck a sketch book in my suitcase so that I can do some drawing,” Martin shared. “I love for my grandchildren to come over and paint. It is always a fun time and they are so creative! I have painted everything from furniture and props, to toy stores.” If you’ve attended the Tyler Museum of Art’s annual fundraiser, you may recall the “Little Black Dress” girl. Martin has been drawing her for the last several years. Others may have seen her art work around Tyler, where Martin’s paintings have been available to purchase at various stores.

As for what the future holds, Martin hopes to continue to be an artist and dedicate any free time she gets to painting . “I enjoy exploring all of the new techniques that have developed, and experimenting with all of the new products that are available. Hopefully, I will continue to love painting and will have more time to spend working on some of my ideas for paintings. Seems as if I have more ideas than I have time,” Martin added. You can contact Becky Martin at her website bmartinart.com, or purchase her paintings at Gold Leaf Gallery in Tyler, Texas.

Martin, who uses acrylics, oil and ink to paint with, finds inspiration in the outdoors. “Most of my inspiration comes from nature. I really enjoy being outside and am in awe of all of the bright color combinations that we see in everyday life. I also love to paint pets. My husband and I currently have one dog and three cats, and it is always fun to paint these guys!” Martin exclaimed. No. 84 BSC ENE

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J U L Y | A U GU ST 2 0 1 6

No. 85


Artist Though she grew up in a big family, Carrie Davis’ parents gave each of their children the attention a child deserves. “I am one of five children and a ton of pets! My parents fostered a home full of love, respect, integrity, fun and creativity. My Dad, an attorney and mathematician, has always had a great eye for drawing and rendering. I still remember him teaching me at a very early age to draw a horse. I was so young and thought he was the coolest,” Davis recalled. “My mom celebrates life and family on every possible occasion. We grew up making holiday t-shirts, baking for events, built forts in the formal living room, dug mud pits, put on plays and many other great memories a kid could dream up. They wanted us to be kids and have fun, create, [and] explore.” And that is exactly how Davis remembers her childhood to be. Davis was born in Dallas, Texas, but raised in Tyler, Texas. She let her creative spirit shine from a very young age, and with that she discovered that she loved art. “In elementary school my parents gave me a box my mother decorated to say 'Carrie’s Treasure Chest,' to house all the little collections I had going of rocks, bubblegum, dried paint strings, etc. ... I started my college art career at Baylor in 1999 and finished my BFA from the incredible art department at UT Tyler,” Davis shared. After college, time had to be shared. Davis decided to focus on growing her own family. Her husband, Richard, and she had three children, while she maintained a career as a full-time artist. “During my third pregnancy, I agreed to do a fundraising event in Dallas where I was a “live” painter for the evening. Yes, I stood on my feet in heels and hose for hours, painting a piece from scratch, while onlookers enjoyed the evening and asked questions,” Davis remembered of an event that benefited the Livada Orphan Care for children in Romania. “My life as an artist and mother are completely intertwined. My children come and paint with me, then go back to work on their own mud pits! Then sometimes I leave the art to help them build the pits, only to return to my art with a new shade of brown to work with, or a neat shovel I can use in the piece. That’s just how it works in my world.” No. 86 BSC ENE

Carrie Davis

Article By: Poonam Patel Courtesy Photos By: Carrie Davis

Besides creating and celebrating art with her children, and at public events, Davis has been hesitant to show off her creations to others. “Before this past year, I went more than 10 years without showing any art publically. As a professional, I’m not proud of that. But as a mother of three babies, I was thrilled to live life on a small scale. That allowed my art and ideas for art to marinate. My loving friends Kate and Andria told me it's time to serve it up and send it out,” Davis remembred. And she did just that. Davis, who paints on canvas, and occasionally on heavy card stock paper, looks to life and her surroundings as her inspiration. With a little extra push from her friends and her husband, she has decided to start showing off her work. “My extremely supportive husband, Richard, created a wonderful garage studio, and allotted a whole room in our house as a studio space! Secretly, I think he is hoping I stop painting in every single room, the yard and sometimes in his workshop,” Davis said. With the help from her friends, Davis held an art show last fall to jump start her journey into sharing her work with others. Because Davis doesn’t use any social media platforms, nor check her email, getting a spotlight on her art is taking some time. But she, and Richard, are hopeful to get her work out there. Richard posts some of her artwork through his Facebook page, and they are in the final stages of setting up a website. “I am also planning on furthering my skills by getting my MFA in Art from UT Tyler, starting this Fall,” Davis added.

You can check out Davis’ artwork at www.facebook.com/ remnantfineart/ and www.remnantfineart.com. B SC EN EM A G.COM


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Artist

Dana Cargile

Unlike the featured artists in this issue, Dana Cargile is fairly new to Tyler, Texas. She moved around the U.S., a few times, before settling in Tyler 8 years ago. “I grew up in Midland, Texas, and graduated from Baylor in Waco, Texas. My first job after college was in San Antonio, Texas, where I met Chad, my husband. We have lived in San Antonio, Houston, Texas, Birmingham, Alabama, and Jackson, Mississippi. As for her journey as an artist, that began 30 years ago.

Article By: Poonam Patel Photos By: Bryan Stewart & Dana Cargile

school. “I painted an American History Mural on a huge wall in the Olde Towne Middle School, in Ridgeland, Mississippi … One of my greatest challenges was illustrating Pet Fairy, a children’s book written by Christie Joy.” When she’s not instructing children with art, she can be found in her at-home studio. “I paint almost every day! I am blessed to be able to walk out to my backyard to work in my studio every chance I get! My husband is very supportive of my art career, and my greatest art critic! He pushes me to create my very best,” Cargile shared. Cargile refers to her studio as “My Back Porch Art Studio,” and many of the paintings she paints and sells from there are featured on her Facebook page at facebook.com/mybackporchartstudio.

“I began painting in the 5th grade with my grandmother, who was an artist. I have always taken art [in school] and painted,” Cargile remembered. “I have studied art at the Southwest Museum of Art in Midland, at Baylor University and in workshops, in Jackson and Tyler.” For the most part, Cargile uses all forms of paint and paints on canvas. “My style is loose, painterly and impressionistic.  I paint landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes, animals, portraits and abstract art,” as stated on Cargile’s website. As for inspiration, she finds it most in what she sees when traveling. She challenges herself by visiting art galleries and museums in the country, and finding inspiration in what she observes. “I love to follow other artists online and be inspired by the world around me!” If not there, Cargile finds inspiration in her daily surroundings. “The greatest influences of my painting style came from living in the deep south for over fourteen years.  Living in Jackson gave me the chance to visit New Orleans, Louisiana frequently to study southern art,” Cargile added.

Cargile hopes to keep painting, and showing children the wonderful world of art. She also plans to keep her art out there so that others can find a place for it in their homes and businesses. “I would love to paint large size commissions for companies that have large walls to fill,” Cargile added. Cargile’s art can be purchased on Etsy, via her website at danacargile.com. She is also teaching an Acrylic Painting & Mixed Media art class this summer, as a TJC Continuing education workshop.

Besides being an artist and a painter, Cargile can also be referred to as a teacher. In the past, she has taught various children’s and private art classes, and worked with children, at events, to bring out the artist in them. “I have been fortunate to be the children’s artist for Cattle Barons’ Little Wrangler event for three years. I create a collaborative painting with Tyler’s pediatric oncology patients, and it is auctioned off live during Cattle Barons’ to raise money for the American Cancer Society,” Cargile shared. One of her paintings have even ended up on the walls of a No. 88 BSC ENE

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J U L Y | A U GU ST 2 0 1 6

No. 89


Dear Friends, Please join me and the Cattle Barons’ Gala committee as we “Two Step to One Cure” at the 2016 Tyler Cattle Barons’ Gala on Saturday, August 20th at Harvey Convention Center on the East Texas Fairgrounds. The evening is sure to be one of a kind with wonderful cuisine, Vegas-style Casino gaming, Silent and Live Auction opportunities and the exciting sounds of the GRAMMY Award winning artist Vince Gill. As with each of you, the battle with cancer is a personal one for me. I am dedicating this evening and my efforts for this cause in memory of my nephew, Quintin Whatley. He fought valiantly for five years and deserved more than 29 birthdays! The fight to defeat cancer has made great strides, yet there is more work to do. With the generosity of our donors and sponsors, this battle will continue! I would like to thank the 2016 committee for their commitment to this endeavor and the American Cancer Society staff for their tireless support. Let’s join our forces on Saturday, August 20th and “Two Step to One Cure!!”

Tomi Ellis 2016 Cattle Barons’ Gala Chair

29

THE

TH

ANNUAL

TYLER CATTLE BARONS’ GALA benefitting the American Cancer Society

Saturday, August 20, 2016 Harvey Convention Center 7:00 PM Gala Cuisine sponsored by John Soules Foods Complimentary Valet Parking sponsored by Mercedes-Benz of Tyler

GALA BARON TICKET $300

GALA GENERAL TICKET $200

(No guests under 21 years of age. In celebration of life and in recognition of the American Cancer Society's mission, the Cattle Barons' Gala is a smoke-free event.) B SC EN EM A G.COM No. 90 BSC ENE


Vince Gill GRAMMY AWARD WINNING ARTIST One of the most popular singers in modern country music, Vince Gill is famous for his top-notch songwriting, world-class guitar playing and warm, soaring tenor, all wrapped up in a quick and easy wit. Gill achieved his big breakthrough in 1990 with “When I Call Your Name,” which won both the Country Music Association’s Single and Song of the Year award as well as a GRAMMY. Since then, he has won 17 more CMA honors, including Song of the Year four times – making him the most-awarded artist in that category in CMA history. Since 1990, Gill has won 20 GRAMMY Awards. The Academy of Country Music has conferred on Gill eight awards, including its prestigious Home Depot Humanitarian Award and the 2011 Career Achievement Award. Gill was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2007. He is also a member of the Grand Ole Opry. In August 2012, Gill was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He is a member of the four-time GRAMMY-nominated band The Time Jumpers.

Erin Kinsey

BARON RECEPTION ENTERTAINMENT

It is very rare in today’s music industry to come across a young artist with the passion and love for music displayed by country singersongwriter Erin Kinsey. The 14-year-old performer from the Dallas, Texas area has not only had multiple appearances performing at one of Nashville’s most historically significant venues, she has also received training from some of the biggest names in the modern music industry. Erin also was chosen to perform at London’s C2C Festival which she was amongst the biggest names in country music from Miranda Lambert to Eric Church. She will be returning to Europe in the near future!

with Clay Mills (Don’t Think I Don’t Think About It by Darius Rucker). For artist development, Erin is training with Victoria Shaw who developed Hilary Scott of Lady Antebellum and who produced their very first album. Victoria is an artist as well and also is training Erin in songwriting as she has won awards including a CMA award for her hit song, “The River” written with Garth Brooks.

While many artists will say they have pursued music since a very young age, it took a little while for Erin to realize just how much music meant to her. She initially tried her hand at various sports before realizing that she wasn’t discovering a passion for any of them. It was music, however, that captivated her and allowed Erin to communicate her feelings in a manner that felt authentic to her “Music is a way for me to express my feelings and have others relate,” she explains. “With sports, I felt like I couldn’t really tell everyone what I was thinking

because there is already a game plan and sports are pretty serious on the court and the field. Some people like that but, most of the time, I couldn’t express my feelings so music and songwriting are ways for me to let all of the feelings pour out. Erin has also benefited from being surrounded by what many would consider a music industry “Dream Team”. She has studied voice with celebrity voice instructor Brett Manning, known for his long list of students that includes Taylor Swift, Keith Urban, and Paramour’s Hayley Williams. Her live performance skills are being honed under the watchful eye of live music producer Tom Jackson (Taylor Swift, The Band Perry). Erin is also studying songwriting

“One of the most important things I have learned from all of these people is work ethic,” says Erin. “They all work extremely long hours and have a family at home at the same time. They have taught me that you need to give it your all and you can’t give up even when you get put down. They are all such sweet people and I am so thankful to have the opportunity to work with them.” With her voice, songwriting, and guitar skills continuing to improve, Erin found herself blessed with an opportunity to perform at one of Nashville’s most popular venues. While the Bluebird Cafe has always featured many of country music’s top talent, it has been experiencing a surge in popularity amongst casual music fans thanks to its role in the ABC television show, Nashville. Erin has already played the venue multiple times, with her first performance there coming when she was only 13-years-old.

OTHER GALA ENTERTAINMENT Take 2 Band • DJs Doc Deason & Dave Goldman • Blaine GrAy

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J U L Y | A U GU ST 2 0 1 6

No. 91


TYLER CATTLE BARONS' GALA GENERAL COMMITTEE

Caleb Guy

2016 Li’l Wrangler

Caleb Guy turned twelve on May 31st. He has been battling Hodgkin’s Lymphoma since he was seven. At his latest oncology visit, Caleb received the news he wanted to hear for the past four and a half years: he only has to come back once a year. Caleb, a sixth grader at Canton Junior High, is the son of Cristie and Israel Guy. He has an older brother, Ashton, who is twenty. Caleb was always the tagalong-little-brother who enjoyed being with his older brother, especially watching him play football and basketball. When Caleb was two, he impressed his family by learning how to dribble. Since then, sports have been an important part of his life. He plays both football and basketball, just like his older brother. In fact, in November 2011, Caleb’s team of fellow sevenyear-olds won the Super Bowl game in Canton. It was also in November 2011 that Caleb started running a fever. Caleb had always been healthy. He never had the flu or a stomach bug like most other children got every year. In fact, his mother Cristie was

surprised when he began running a high fever every night. At first, she thought perhaps he was going to start getting the usual ailments that other children were constantly bringing home from school.

child having cancer was the most frightening thing Cristie could imagine, “Who would ever have guessed our little boy would have cancer?” More difficult than accepting the diagnosis was understanding, “Why?”

Initially, Cristie started giving Caleb Motrin at night. Other than a fever, Caleb seemed to be feeling fine. The Motrin brought the fever down and each morning Caleb’s temperature would be normal. The fever would be gone, until the next evening, when it would return. After a week or so, his parents decided he should see a doctor. Strep throat was going around. Other children at school were getting it, and the rest of Caleb’s family had it. It seemed logical that Caleb was developing a case of strep throat as well. The doctor prescribed an antibiotic.

When he was first told he had to go to Dallas to see the specialists there, Caleb cried because it meant missing basketball practice. His tears made it okay for Cristie to cry as well, because she could tell him she was sad about him missing practice, too… without letting on how frightened she actually was about what the diagnosis might be. Beginning on December 13th, Caleb started four rounds of intensive chemotherapy, followed by fourteen administrations of radiation. His treatments lasted only six months. In May 2012, doctors said the cancer was in remission. He faced the ordeal like a trouper, rarely complaining. His biggest concern was the access port that was put in for the chemo treatments.

Another week went by, and Caleb was still having fever at night. Within a week, he began to sound congested. Another visit to the doctor resulted in a treatment with steroids to alleviate the chest congestion. At first, the steroid treatments seemed to bring his fever down. Not long after starting the treatments, the fever returned and Cristie noticed that Caleb’s skin started taking on a yellowish-green color. He lost his appetite. The congestion seemed worse. His parents decided to take him back to the doctor on December 12, 2011. At this visit, the Guy’s asked about checking Caleb for pneumonia. The doctor took blood samples for a blood workup and also did a chest X-ray. He told the Guys he would not be surprised if Caleb turned out to have a case of “walking pneumonia.” Instead, the X-ray revealed a large mass located in the center of Caleb’s chest. The blood workup showed abnormalities in most areas. The doctor immediately sent the family to Children’s Medical Center in Dallas, where the diagnosis was confirmed as Stage 3B Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. “Cancer!” The thought of her

Shortly after starting his treatments, Caleb was given a puppy. He named it Hodgkin. Hodgkin has been with Caleb now for four and a half years. As he has traveled the road from treatments to remission, Caleb was named the Hero for Hope Honorary Chair at the 2012 Van Zandt County Relay for Life. While going for regular checkups with an oncologist, Caleb became involved with helping others. He was the top fundraiser for the 2014 Van Zandt County Relay for Life, raising over $10,000 with a little help from his friends. His brother Ashton showed his support by designing a “Stomp Cancer” T-shirt, emblazoned with a basketball shoe. Caleb is honored to be this year’s Li’l Wrangler for the 29th Annual Tyler Cattle Barons’ Gala scheduled for Saturday, August 20th. He understands more than any child should what it is like to fight cancer. He is happy to be moving on with his life and is looking forward to playing many more games of basketball and football.

For more information or to support the 2016 Tyler Cattle Barons’ Gala visit www.cattlebaronsgala.net or call 903-597-1383 • 903-343-6706. B SC EN EM A G.COM No. 92 BSC ENE


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No. 93


SOCIAL | SCENE TYLER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS APRIL 28

SHANNON CALHOUN, RAY PATEL

BJ HORNBOSTEL, MICHAEL ESTERABADI, SAM OLIPHANT

WILL GRAHAM, BEN PHILLIPS, BOBBY STROUPE

MANDY & JEREMY CARUTHERS

LYNN HANEY, CHRIS WIESINGER, JEANNA HILL

GUS GORDON, BLAKE GLASS, PHIL SMITH

CHAD CARGILE, DAVE ANDERSON

2016 CATTLE BARONS’ DRINK, DINE & DONATE MAY 3

LINDA DENSON, KAREN ENRIGHT

TERI KILLINGSWORTH, JULIA COODY, KATIE HEIMER, PAMELA WALTERS

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No. 94 BSC ENE

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