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AUGUST 2012

SPLASH INTO SOUTHERN CUISINE NEW LOOK RETRO STYLE

GET SCHOOLED: EAST TEXAS EDUCATION

AND The Beat GOES ON

THE FREEDOM TO GENERATE NEW IDEAS AND NEW SERVICES ... OUR PATIENTS DESERVE IT

BACK TO SCHOOL

COUTURE KIDS

4

SAVOR SUMMER WITH OUR FRUITY DRINKS

IS YOUR BRAIN IN THE GAME? CONCUSSION REPERCUSSION

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STRICTLY DRUMLINE: MAKING THE RANKS


P U B L I S H E R AUGUST 2012

SHAWN MICHAEL HANEY /// PRESIDENT & CEO

SHAWN@H3-MEDIA.COM

No. 2

bs cene

“The heart wants what it wants.” It's a common quotation – seen everywhere from Woody Allen movies to the Darren Hayes song of the same name. It's generally taken to mean that there's no explaining the mysteries of love or how our heart reacts daily with those we care about. But what if you look at it from another way? From a more logical, even medical, way? What our heart wants, more than anything else, is to keep beating. With heart disease ranked as the No. 1 health problem in the United States, and even more so in East Texas, we've all had experience with this. Members of Kelly's and my families have gone through operations and procedures, there have been heart attacks and recurring problems … and I know for a fact there's nothing out of the ordinary about that among the people in East Texas. So, when I look at this month's cover story about the medical professionals of Cardiovascular Associates of East Texas, I know just how close to home it hits. The doctors, nurses, PAs and support staff of CAET are doing everything they can to help curb this growing epidemic. They've taken an enormous step with the construction and opening of their new, stateof-the-art facility in Tyler. It's got the basics you'd expect from a cutting edge medical facility: the amazing equipment, the spacious patient areas, the most highly trained staff. But what's more, they've built this place with a sincere desire to improve the lives of the people in their community – they're trying to help the heart get what it really wants, to be healthy and to keep beating. Speaking of the heart, I'm reminded of that first quote. That quotes is really talking about the heart conflicting with the head. And though one of those wins out over the other too often, you've still got to be in your right mind to give your head a shot. This issue, we talk to medical professionals from around the area about a problem that's always been there, but has gathered much more notoriety in recent years: concussions in contact sports. We delve into the risks and research of everything from football to soccer, and the potential pitfalls for our youth as they go through the leagues. It's something I'm keeping an eye on myself, as a former football player with a Cowboys-crazy son! Speaking of my son, I know I represent for all the parents out there with kids home for the summer when I say that I love having them around, but I'm also just a little bit excited for

school to start back up! And, wouldn't you know it, this issue BSCENE is taking you back to school. We've got a guide to the local educational outlets around East Texas, there are many great businesses offering everything form clothing to tutoring services, and we've got them all ready and waiting for you! Plus, there's even a part of this issue's Style Section devoted to the coolest back-to-school looks for the kiddos. So, when you get ready to send those kids back to the teachers in a few weeks, they'll be all set and ready to go! It's crazy to think that we've blown through almost the entire summer so quickly. It seems like just yesterday we were over the cold and wishing for some fun in the sun. But don't worry! We've still got quite a bit of heat left in the year and BSCENE is bringing you the hottest food, fashion and finds in East Texas to match the temperature outside. We take a look back to retro styles in this issue's Style File to offer some modern reinventions of classic looks that will cap off your summer perfectly. And since summer is almost up, we're getting right back into the swing of another events season. It seems like we just finished up Cattle Barons' and tons of other great events, but there are always more right around the corner. Just a few of the awesome happenings included in this issue are the Texas Rose Festival Kickoff, the Country for Our Country Kickoff, Alzheimer's Alliance's Mah Jongg for Memory and a peek in on our friends at Texas Bank & Trust in Longview. This thing is just packed! But don't worry, no need to be overwhelmed. The end of summer, the beginning of school, the calendar quickly filling up … BSCENE is here to help you with all of it. We've got the BSCENE app available for any smart phone, the Facebook and Twitter accounts stocked with knowledge, stories and events, and, of course, the live sneak peeks from BSCENE TV. It may still be hot out there, but with BSCENE Magazine, it won't be any trouble at all to stay cool.

b s ce n e M AG.coM


E D I T O R AUGUST 2012

WILLIAM KNOUS /// MANAGING EDITOR

WKNOUS@H3-MEDIA.COM

No. 4

bs cene

Not too long ago, I went to my 10-year high school class reunion. There are a host of words I could use to describe that balmy night at the Piney Woods Country Club in Nacogdoches, but for the purposes of this magazine, I'm going to stick with “entertaining.” Seeing old friends, catching up with people I hadn't talked to in a decade, seeing who became successful and missing people I didn't realize I ever would: it was like a memory slide show, with a few extra pounds and a lot less hair. Then, there was the actual slide show portion of the evening. Luckily I wasn't too embarrassed by the photos I saw of myself. I wasn't a devotee of The Cure or anything like that, so the jeans, T-shirts and polos I sported weren't too scathing of a fashion indictment. In fact, it might be time to break out the old Dr. Martens again! Then again, maybe not. I'm thinking about this now, because we've got a few special back-to-school-themed features in this issue of BSCENE. I know a decade seems like a long time now, but it's gone by in an absolute flash. It's been 10 years since I had to get up and go to school every morning and sit through class all day. Knock a few years off of that, and I was in college at Texas A&M, living my life in semesters. That is a habit that takes a long time to break, indeed. I still find myself looking forward to Christmas, spring break and other school holidays with the vague notion of getting a week off from responsibility and trying to swing a trip to my roommate's cabin in Colorado for a few days. During the break of July 4, I was able to spend some time on the lake and by the grill with several friends that have families of their own now. Their children range in age from 21 months to 13 years old, and most of them will be going back to schools of some sort this month. It made me a bit nostalgic for a time when the most I had to worry about was a test coming up or who I

was going to ask to homecoming (and who I was going to pay to design that year's gigantic and ridiculous mum). But as the school year starts back up, I realize that so much of what I might have been feeling nostalgic about is still right here for me to enjoy as an (semi-professional) adult. The end of August means baseball is winding down – and I get to enjoy the familiar feeling of the Astros sliding further into irrelevance. It also means college football is starting and I get to watch the Aggies choke – this year on an even bigger stage! Most importantly, I get to spend time doing things that I enjoyed back then – and still enjoy today – with the people I care about. Whether it's a late summer evening on the lake, a sweltering Saturday on the golf course or reading a spectacular new novel − the best parts of back-to-school in East Texas are still pretty much intact for me. Like a new school year or a new semester that is getting underway, the end of summer is a bittersweet time. But there's enough of what's great about both to continue to feel blessed. The lakes and pools will be warm enough to enjoy for another month or two. I don't have to go to calculus II (no offense, Mrs. Clark or Dr. Harris), or worry about getting all my credits in for student council. But most of the things I enjoyed about that time of life in East Texas are here in some form or fashion. All except the spring break, that is.

b s ce n e M AG.coM


60

DAVIS-GREENPAINT & BODY

1952-2012

SOCIAL EDITOR AUGUST 2012

HOLLY HEAD /// SOCIAL EDITOR

HHEAD@H3-MEDIA.COM

YOU’RE DRIVING HOME OUR REPUTATION... AND HAVE BEEN FOR 60 YEARS

5005 OLD JACKSONVILLE HWY 903.581.0020 WWW.DAVIS-GREEN.COM

Any teacher will testify that the summer blazes by more rapidly each year. This year is no exception to the old adage, “Time flies when you are having fun.” It's hard to believe that the 65 Roses Gala, the Tyler and Longview Cattle Barons' Galas, La Table Des Artistes, the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure – all these events synonymous with summer are now wrapping-up and are preparing for next year's functions. With the passing of summer comes the onset of events that coincide with early fall. In late July, the 2012 Texas Rose Festival celebrated this year's festivities with a South Sea Soiree. As is tradition, Willow Brook Country Club hosted the event and provided plenty of fabulous cocktails and hors d'oeuvres. Guests enjoyed live music by Take2 and this year's court mingled with Festival officials, family, friends and the event's chairmen: Cadie Johnson, Zoe Lawhorn and Jennifer Pierce. Swann's Furniture even provided the furniture and design for the fabulous event. If you haven't had a chance to attend an event hosted by BSCENE, be sure to attend one of our fall cover unveils! Tyler's newest culinary destination, ZaZa's, opened its doors for the July Cover Unveil and the evening was phenomenal! BSCENE's July cover man, the legendary Dr. Aubrey Sharpe, livens-up any party – cover unveils included. If you are craving Northern-Italian cuisine, then ZaZa's is the place! Their menu features custom creations by Chef Christian Chavann and includes stuffed quail, delicious pasta and even hand-tossed pizzas, like in Italy! And it's all in walking distance of FRESH, literally across the parking lot. It was a great time and a fantastic chance to get a taste of Tyler's newest hot spot! With all of the fabulous upcoming fall events like the Texas Rose Festival, LMFA Casino Night and Country for Our Country (to name a few), East Texas is sure to be a busy place in the coming months. As always, BSCENE will be there with camera in-hand to document the generous people of East Texas doing what they do best! Until next issue,


C O N T E N T S ARTICLES / SPECIAL SECTIONS / STYLE / EVENTS

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14

COVER STORY 014 AND THE BEAT GOES ON

BWELL SECTION 024 CONCUSSION REPERCUSSION / B WELL 034 BATTLE OF THE BULGE / FITNESS IQ

COOK WELL SECTION 050 FOOD FOR THOUGHT 053 DINING GUIDE

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056 FRUIT OF THE SUMMER / TASTING ROOM 061 HIBACHI HUMDINGER: NIGHT AT YAMATO / MAN ABOUT TOWN

STYLE SECTION 066 RETROSPECT / STYLE FILE 074 THE FINE PRINT / STYLE IQ 078 BACK TO COOL / STYLE IQ 082 THE VEIN TRUTH / V'S WORDS ON BEAUTY 084 CLASS IS NOW IN SESSION / EDUCATION GUIDE

AT HOME SECTION 090 SEEING STYLE CLEARLY / AT HOME 096 TWISTING THE PLOT / THE PAYNEFUL TRUTH

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100 APACHE PUNCH DRUMLINE 106 OUTTAKES 112 WHAT'S THE MEME-ING OF THIS? / BACK PAGE


BDIRECT FEEDBACK FROM READERS

/// AS READERS, YOU'RE AN INTEGRAL PART OF THE PROCESS AND WE WANT TO HEAR WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND. CALL US AT 903-509-4703, E-MAIL US AT INFO@H3-MEDIA.COM OR LEAVE A COMMENT AT FACEBOOK.COM/ BSCENETX. SMOKE SIGNALS AND CARRIER PIGEONS ARE ALSO WELCOMED.

Will, I wanted thank you VERY much for the wonderful write up in BSCENE [for Texas Adaptive Aquatics] !!!!! We have gotten several skiers from this! We will have over 20 skiers and their families from as far away as Little Rock, Arkansas!!! So with all the volunteers there will be about 150 at our home. MIKE SCHOVANEC EVENT ORGANIzER /// TEXAS ADAPTIVE AQUATICS IN TYLER

96

BSCENE is my magazine of choice. I can't wait to get the new issue each month. The articles are always unique and interesting, the coverage of all the events helps me keep up with what's going on, since I can't attend all of them, and the pictures are beautiful and delightful. BSCENE is the best resource for the best of the best who advertise in it and it is the single best place to "put faces with names" of folks throughout all of East Texas. I just love BSCENE and its staff! DR. AUBREY D. SHARPE CONTRIBUTING WRITER /// MAN ABOUT TOWN Thank you for thinking of us for the style file! We were honored to be asked and had a great time doing it! It was a pleasure meeting all of you!

LIMELIGHT 044 TEXAS ROSE FESTIVAL KICKOFF 052 JULY COVER UNVEIL

SEE & BSCENE 020 COUNTRY FOR OUR COUNTRY KICKOFF 028 MAH JONGG FOR MEMORY 038 "ARACHNOQUAKE" PREMIERE 040 CAET GRAND OPENING 046 TEXAS BANK & TRUST ANNIVERSARY 048 BAH AT FELICIANO FINANCIAL 075 SALVATION ARMY / AWARDS DINNER 108 LONGVIEW AFTER HOURS AT HAMPTON INN & SUITES

MIX & MINGLES 032 WOUNDED WARRIORS LUNCHEON GALLERY MAIN STREET ARTIST RECEPTION 042 MEALS ON WHEELS CAR SHOW DANCING WITH THE TYLER STARS KICKOFF 054 LEADERS OF THE PACK LONGVIEW AFTER HOURS 110 UT TYLER PATRIOT CLASSIC WRAP PARTY TEXAS ROSE FESTIVAL SUMMER LUNCHEON

BETH & LEALON GAMMEL STYLE FILE MODELS /// BSCENE JULY 2012 ISSUE I was very happy to see that BSCENE had Dr. Aubrey Sharpe on the cover of the July issue. Dr. Sharpe does amazing things for our community and is very deserving of being on the cover. Dr. Sharpe always has a smile on his face and something witty to say, and with that he puts a smile on my face. He is a great asset that we have in our community and I am lucky to call him a friend. Thank you, BSCENE, for giving thanks and appreciation to Dr. Aubrey Sharpe. Oh Happy Day!!! CADIE JOHNSON REAL ESTATE AGENT /// TRUST PROPERTIES I have been involved with BSCENE Magazine in different ways for many years now, and it wasn't until I began working in the non-profit sector that I began to realize the power of BSCENE's critical support of community organizations. As the Director of Development for Meals on Wheels Ministry, I know how invaluable the magazine's event coverage, promotional information and insightful articles can be for organizations who rarely have advertising budgets. I know I speak on behalf of many other local non-profits when I say, "Thank you, we truly could not do it without your support!" zOE LAWHORN DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT /// MEALS ON WHEELS MINISTRY


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THE MAGAZINE OF EAST TEXAS

CONTRIBUTORS

903.509.4703 • info@h3-media.com bscenemag.com • bsceneTV.com Facebook.com/bsceneTX

TWITTeR.com/bscenemag

Available on the

Android Market shawn michael Haney - President / ceo kelly Laine Haney - Vice President accoUnTIng kelly Laine Haney adVeRTIsIng saLes baylee brown. david carter, carlyle mehling, sonya York managIng edIToR William knous

MARGARET PUKLICZ

/// PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Margaret Puklicz was born in Windsor, Ontario, then moved to Grapevine, Texas when she was 3 months old. She grew up in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex and fell in love with the great state of Texas. In high school, Margaret was an active member of the Colleyville Heritage Panther Marching Band. She played French horn and then joined the drumline to play synthesizer her senior year. Margaret has loved writing her entire life and also dabbles in poetry.

socIaL edIToR Holly Head cReaTIVe Team Lauren gould, noel martin, Lindsey Todd morgan, kim Jackson Wheeler edIToRIaL Team

She will be a senior at York University in Toronto, Ontario working toward a bachelor's degee in professional writing. Over the summer, she has been working at BSCENE and has enjoyed every minute of it. Margaret has been lucky enough to write several stories; her favorite are the Spotlight stories because she gets to express the strength of local businesses and business owners. After graduation, Margaret hopes to become a magazine editor and writer.

Holly Head, William knous Interns: brittany burks, deandra Lieberman, margaret Puklicz

All summer, Margaret has been baking sweet treats for the BSCENE staff. If writing doesn't work out, she can always fall back on her baking skills. She accepts either path, as long as it's deep in the heart of Texas!

conTRIbUTIng WRITeRs chef dean Fearing, shane Payne amy brocato Pearson, dr. aubrey d. sharpe, Veronica Terres PHoTogRaPHY cRedITs Paul anderson - Longview convention & Visitors bureau, casey Jay benson, batten's Photography, better business bureau, donna cummings, Heather gatlin - Tyler chamber of commerce, susan guice, Jacob butler, susan guthrie & The city of Tyler, Images by becki, Lindale chamber of commerce, Longview chamber of commerce, marcus Lovely, Lufkin chamber of commerce, matthew Hogan Photography, Romonia Isaac, dr. scott Lieberman, nacogdoches chamber of commerce, PaTH, Randy Phillips Photography, Regency ceiling Fans, salvation army, bryan stewart, stepping stone, angel sonnentag, Jordan strassner, Texas bank & Trust, Tyler Isd Foundation sTYLe FILe models: Julie & chris gibson Photography: matt Hogan Photography makeup: Holly Head sTYLe IQ models: charlie bigbie, cline cavender coVeR

AMY BROCATO PEARSON /// CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Amy Brocato Pearson has been in journalism for almost 20 years now and loves that she can learn something new and meet someone new, every single day on the job. Originally from Richmond, Va., Amy came to Texas in 1998 to pursue a master’s degree in journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. Despite her bewilderment over white Wonder bread being served with slabs of beef and called ‘barbecue,’ she stayed in Texas after graduating, and found her way to Tyler in 2008.

Physicians of cardiovascular associates of east Texas Photography: noel martin

©

H3 Media, L.L.C. 2012. All Rights Reserved.

BsCene welcomes unsolicited submissions and photographs, but does not assume any responsibility for publication or return of materials. When any editorial or photography submission, whether in advertisements or editorial, is provided to BsCene, by any means, whether electronically or otherwise, the person/business making the submission assumes all responsibility that the submission does not infringe on any third party’s rights and title, including all copyrights and/or releases. no fees are due to anyone, including photographer or models, unless previously agreed upon by all parties involved. The opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the representative writers and authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of this magazine.

Amy loves being the mother of two active boys and is passionate about cooking, writing about food and cooking some more.


STREETSCENE NEWS / VIEWS / FACES

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

WWW.LEHMANNEYECENTER.COM

/// FOR MORE PHOTOS GO TO BSCENEMAG.COM

a dEdication cErEMony was hEld for thE Jack Mann sPlash Pad in longviEw on JunE 29. kids froM thE boys and girls club EagErly awaitEd thE ribbon cutting to cool off undEr thE onE-of-a-kind watEr fEaturEs.

MEntoring Minds hostEd a PrEss confErEncE on July 2, for thE Path school suPPly train — a PrograM dEsignEd to ProvidE sMith county studEnts with MuchnEEdEd school suPPliEs.

larry lott intEriors hostEd thE annual aMErican rEd cross MEEting/Party on JunE 28, in tylEr. a cErEMony was hEld to PrEsEnt thE aMErican rEd cross chaPtEr awards to dEsErving chaPtEr MEMbErs.

thE woMEn’s fund cElEbratEd thE organization’s fifth annivErsary at its “PhilanthroPy blooMs” suMMEr social at thE tylEr rosE gardEn on JunE 14.

Pink tuMblEwEEds JoinEd thE tylEr chaMbEr of coMMErcE on July 9. thE cutting of thE criMson taPE signifiEd to all that thE storE is oPEn for businEss.

EdiblE arrangEMEnts cElEbratEd thEir induction into thE city of tylEr chaMbEr of coMMErcE with a ribbon cutting at thEir location on JunE 27.

thE tylEr chaMbEr of coMMErcE wElcoMEd anothEr businEss into thE fold on JunE 23. thE grEat aMErican cookiE co. sPlit thE rEd ribbon and swEEt-toothEd Patrons got to tastE thEir dynaMitE cookiEs.

tExas bank and trust hEld an EconoMic lunchEon at thEir location in tylEr on July 9. guEsts EnJoyEd good food and thE chancE to discuss local EconoMics with fEllow collEaguEs.

thE boys and girls club of tylEr Proudly cut thE ribbon on thEir nEw sPlash Park in tylEr on JunE 6. kids got thE chancE to cool off in a fun nEw way, in a fun nEw PlacE.


street scene What is street scene: glimpses of glitter, photos of friends, a feW lines of life and laughter. like a school's yearbook, street scene chronicles life in east texas. you'll find businesses and others commemorating anniversaries. celebrations and charities gloss these pages, accompanied by the faces you knoW. music, theater and other cultural events also make the scene.

/// FOR MORE PHOTOS GO TO BSCENEMAG.COM

On May 17, agriland FarM and Credit held a ribbOn-Cutting at their lOCatiOn in tyler. the CereMOny Marks their induCtiOn intO the tyler ChaMber OF COMMerCe.

On July 19, susan rObinsOn held a trunk shOW FOr designer gregg ruth. COurtlend shOPPer, rePresentatiVe FOr the COlleCtiOn, assisted VisitOrs by Finding the PerFeCt stateMent PieCe.

breakers seaFOOd restaurant sPent June 26, Celebrating their three year anniVersary in tyler. guests enJOyed liVe MusiC by tOdd rinlee.

Will knOus, Managing editOr OF bsCene Magazine, Was the guest CheF at Fresh by brOOkshire's FOr tuesday MOrning COFFee talk. knOus shOWed hungry VisitOrs hOW tO PrePare his FaMOus red sauCe.

a Plaque Was aWarded tO eMPOWer PrOCessing by the better business bureau in tyler On June 6.

hOMes FOr herOes Cut the ribbOn signiFying their neW Venture On June 28, at the Marine COrPs league OF lOngVieW.

hungry haMburger lOVers haPPily Celebrated the ribbOn Cutting at the MOOyah burger JOint in tyler On May 18.

bikers traVeled 105 Miles aCrOss east teXas tO COlleCt sChOOl suPPlies as Part OF the FOurth annual bikers rule 4 sChOOl Fundraiser On July 21 FOr Path.

On aPril 18, 413 strengthgear held a ribbOn-Cutting CereMOny With the tyler area ChaMber OF COMMerCe tO signiFy its neW FOCus tO PrOVide PrOMOtiOnal ClOthing tO east teXas businesses.


AND THE

BEAT

WITH THEIR NEW FACILITY IN TYLER, CARDIOVASCULAR ASSOCIATES OF EAST TEXAS SETS THE STANDARD FOR TECHNOLOGY, SERVICE AND CARE FOR THE PATIENTS THEY TREAT LIKE FAMILY.

GOES ON


Dr. Alex Petrakian, Dr. Sherif Iskander, Dr. Kyle Smith, Dr. Michael Tobes, D. Hector Ceccoli, Dr. Scott Wright, Dr. Richard Lowry, Dr, Scott Lieberman, Dr. Jeffrey Carr, Dr. Noah Israel

I

t was 30 years ago when Dr. Noah Israel, MD, FACC, founded what was to become Cardiovascular Associates of East Texas. It was 30 years ago that he was the first cardiologist to establish a private practice in Tyler. Prior to CAET, patients requiring advanced cardiac care were forced to travel to Dallas, Houston or another metropolitan area. Things are, without a doubt, much different now. The advancements in everything from standard of care to available technology have grown by leaps and bounds; and the practice that Dr. Israel founded three decades ago, Cardiovascular Associates of East Texas, has grown in step. Today, CAET has expanded to include satellite offices in Athens, Canton, Crockett, Jacksonville and Quitman. The staff which once was just a few people, now includes 10 physicians, all of them with specific gifts and skills that help to make CAET the medical powerhouse it is. These talented practitioners include: Dr. Israel; Scott Lieberman, MD, FACC; Jeffrey Carr, MD, FACC; Michael Tobes, MD, PhD, FACC; PhD; Alex Petrakian, MD, FACC; Sherif Iskander; MD, FACC; Scott Wright, MD;

Hector Ceccoli, MD, FACC; Richard Lowry, MD, FACC; and Kyle Smith, MD. All are trained in Internal Medicine and Cardiac Disease, and the variety of subspecialties include Echocardiography, Nuclear Cardiology, Electrophysiology, Cardiac Intervention and Cardiac Sports Medicine. The staff of CAET also includes more than 60 Physicians Assistants, RNs, LVNs, Echocardiologists, Vascular Technologists, Nuclear Medicine Technologists and support staff who help to care for the thousands of patients that CAET see each year. CAET is certainly a large and capable organization of medical professionals trained and equipped to serve the people of East Texas and beyond, with the absolute highest levels of medical care and attention. It speaks of a devotion to excellence, but more so of a sincere desire to do what is in the best interest of their patients, and the community as a whole. That devotion has led to perhaps the greatest leap forward the 30-year history of CAET: their brand new, state-of-the-art facility less than a mile from the major hospitals and medical district in Tyler.


W

e have been working on a new facility for about five years,” said Jim Heitz, CEO of Cardiovascular Associates. “We went through a phase where we spent a great deal of time looking at what our patients liked and didn't like about where we were ... We knew what we needed to do.” CAET employed the expert services of Fitzpatrick Architects, and lead architect Brian Phillips, to fashion space from the emptied Lack's Furniture building in the Green Acres shopping center. “It's a perfect location for us, near the hospitals, other businesses – it really couldn't have worked out any better for us,” Heitz said. “When we started 30 years ago, we weren't even using all of the building we were in,” Lieberman explained. “We were leasing part of it. The first thing we had to do was expand to the whole building. Then we bought the building next door, on Broadway. Then we took over that facility and moved research, administration and medical records. We gained a little space going to electronic records, but after developing our office space

and cardiac catheterization lash, we took over most of the rest of that building. Then we relocated our administration to an off-site facility. For the last several years, we've been in three separate buildings. Even with all that, we weren't able to do a lot of what we wanted.” Luckily, the new facility is truly breathtaking, both in form and function. It's fully stocked with equipment that offers the highest standard of care available, space for all the physicians and staff to maneuver, and a level of patient comfort rarely seen in the medical field. However, each doctor, member of the staff (and even patients) echoed Heitz's sentiment when he declared the most important improvement was access. “Our patients were always complaining that it was so hard to get in

“THE SPACE IS DESIGNED TO BE COMFORTING TO PATIENTS ... WE WANT AN ENVIRONMENT THAT IS CLEAN, COMFORTABLE AND RELAXING, TO TRY TO DECREASE ANXIETY WITH COMFORTABLE SURROUNDINGS, TELEVISIONS, LARGE HALLS FOR WHEELCHAIRS, ETC. A PATIENT’S EMOTIONAL AND PHYSICAL COMFORT IS VERY IMPORTANT.”

to see the doctor. We were working out of eight exam rooms, and we had to be creative as to what we turned into an exam room. But you can only do so much at that … What's more, we were land-locked for expansion, and for the most basic things, like parking spaces ... We had to do something ... so this is what we did,” Heitz said, with a sweeping gesture across the offices. For current and future patients of CAET, “access” is about more than just finding parking spaces – though there are now certainly more than enough of those. With the new, larger facility, patients will find it much easier to get in to see their doctors, and to use their services (no longer scattered across several locations). And CAET was spatially able to hire the staff needed to support the expansion. “We were limited in our services, what we could offer,” said Israel. “We were limited in the number of patients we could see, as well as how many physicians we were able to hire ... There were a lot of limitations, plus the office needed to be remodeled,” he added, with a smile. The result is CAET's sparkling new facility, something “not only convenient for us, if we had to go to the hospital quickly, but a location that's easy to find. And of course over 65 percent of our practice is from out of the county. We have a lot of people traveling, going distances,” Israel said. “We can have up to six or seven cardiologists here at the same time,” added Ceccoli. “I've seen patients able to get appointments quicker, and we can do much more of everything. It's a big advantage. Patient satisfaction is a big issue everywhere. My patients come and say how nice the place is, how comfortable it is and how much more efficient it is, and that's exactly what we want.”


“ONE THING WE LOVE ABOUT THE NEW PLACE IS JUST THE FREEDOM TO GENERATE NEW IDEAS AND NEW SERVICES ... OUR PATIENTS DESERVE IT, THEY [HAVE] STRUGGLED FOR A LONG TIME. NOW WE CAN OFFER THEM SOMETHING THAT’S NICE, AND THAT THEY CAN BE PROUD OF AS WELL.” “First of all, being larger, we're open to being able to offer new services, not only now, but also prepare across the space to be able to offer future services,” continued Israel. “Possibly the technology that is not available now that will be available five, 10 or 15 years from now ... We have the facilities and space to be able to grow. The space is designed to be comforting to patients ... we want an environment that is clean, comfortable and relaxing to try to decrease anxiety with comfortable surroundings, televisions, large halls for wheelchairs, etc. A patient's emotional and physical comfort is very important. We have availability for our ancillary services, all our diagnostic and stress testing, echocardiogram, and so on. We have a full vascular lab now with multiple vascular technologists. We also have therapeutic EECP (enhanced external counterpulsation) for patients that are resistant to medical therapy, that have a


“WE HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN RESEARCH, THE LAST 15 YEARS, WHICH PERMITS US TO HAVE NEW DEVICES THAT ARE NOT QUITE AVAILABLE ON THE MARKET FOR PATIENTS.” bad angina and heart failure, basically that they're not a candidate for procedure. There is a plan for specialty clinics, possibly to bring in specialists to help us with complex lipid management. We have pulmonologists interested in coming in to work with patients with pulmonaryhypertension and shortness of breath evaluation, and also nephrologists interested in coming in for intractable hypertension... “We're trying to enlarge our scope as far as what we can to offer patients in cardiology and otherareas connected, in some way, with cardiology. Our Vein Center of 7 years, has been expanded and given us more opportunity to help those suffering with painful varicose veins, leg pain, and spider veins. For the past 15 years our involvement in a wide range of research programs has permitted us to have new devices that are not quite available on the market for patients. We look through these research protocols very carefully, and we want research that makes sense, that would help a certain group of patients. It also maintains our position on the cutting edge,” said Israel. Another remarkable feature of the new CAET facility is the multi-purpose education center. “We have dedicated a fairly large piece of the building to an area we can bring the public, bring in nursing students, medical students, other physicians, and we are able to educational programs here inside our own environment, with the direct feed from our cath lab. It provides excellent audio/visual presentation to really educate the next generation of patients and doctors,” iterated Lieberman. “We think that's going to be an added asset to the practice … that will directly effect what we can do for patients, how we can educate them, doing risk factor management on a larger scale. [We can discuss] smoking cessation, cholesterol management or how to deal with hypertension, while bringing in experts in their fields from around the country to do guest lectures or appearances.” The physicians of CAET believe this center will benefit the community, even people who are patients of other groups of cardiologists, not just their own patients. One of the first pieces of the ever-growing

RENDERINGS COURTESY OF FITZPATRICK ARCHITECTS

puzzle that already includes CAET and The Vein Clinic is the new weight loss center, headed up by Dr. Scott Wright. “The obesity and risk factors for cardiovascular disease are so common that if we can attack obesity, we'll be lowering all the risk factors for heart disease,” explained Wright. “Therefore, we'll prevent cardiovascular death. So we're attacking it from that angle as well. It's one of our primary measures and we're pretty excited about it. It's individualized for every patient, but it involves low-calorie meals, meal replacements, behavioral counseling, education, fitness instruction, appetite depressants – it's everything. They will be seen by either myself or one of my PAs initially, to customize a plan and then follow up with a nurse for all of the counseling models that go along with helping them not just lose weight, but maintain weight loss. It's a lifestyle.” The Weight Loss Clinic is, as the doctors detailed, just one of the things they plan to unveil in the future – though the rest of their plans remain very discreet. However, the idea is indicative of a desire to push the practice forward, and it's a purpose that enthralls all the employees of CAET. “One thing we love about the new place is just the freedom to generate new ideas and new services,” Wright said enthusiastically. “To me, it's exciting! And the patients absolutely love it. They get excited about it. It's improved on the patient satisfaction. Our patients deserve it ... Now we can offer them something that's nice, and that they can be proud of as well. The response from the patients

THE NEW FACILITY IS TRULY BREATHTAKING, BOTH IN FORM AND FUNCTION. IT’S FULLY STOCKED WITH EQUIPMENT THAT OFFERS THE HIGHEST STANDARD OF CARE AVAILABLE, SPACE FOR ALL THE PHYSICIANS AND STAFF TO MANEUVER, AND A LEVEL OF PATIENT COMFORT RARELY SEEN IN THE MEDICAL FIELD.


has been overwhelming.” Despite the varied degrees and specialties of these talented physicians, the sentiment that constantly arises is one of concern for the welfare and well-being of the patients: their access to care and their peace of mind. Lieberman summed things up like this: “I really think that form follows function, and the building allows us to function better in everything we've been doing up to now and really allows us a great number of options of being able to deal with things in the future and having the flexibility to have new therapies and new options, new treatments that come on out. … So we're keeping our fingers crossed that there's going to be even more we can do. We'll be able to help more people because of the facility we've designed, and so far, so good. In fact, we have enough room in case BSCENE needs to have a space!” by William Knous wknous@h3-media.com

CAET IS CERTAINLY A LARGE AND CAPABLE ORGANIZATION OF MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS TRAINED AND EQUIPPED TO SERVE THE PEOPLE OF EAST TEXAS AND BEYOND, WITH THE ABSOLUTE HIGHEST LEVELS OF MEDICAL CARE AND ATTENTION.


/// SEE & BSCENE

COUNTRY FOR OUR COUNTRY KICKOFF Once again, East Texans geared up for the boot-scootin’ celebration known as Country For Our Country, an annual event that raises money and assistance for wounded warriors seeking higher education. This year’s kick-off party was graciously hosted in the home of Linda Rudd and Steve Hellmuth on July 6. Guests dined on a bevy of delicious dishes, beer and wine; all while enjoying the smooth county stylings of Curtis Grimes.

Linda Rudd, Steve Hellmuth

Julia & Pete Rutter, Donna & Bill Liebbe

Barbara & Darrel Musgraves

Shawn & Robert Phelps

Linda Tracey, Merri Walsh, Betty Paul

Lauren Shroeder, Ashley Kirby Ashley & Scott Gibson

Taylor Richey, Jacob Whatley, Josh Greer, Nick Pencis

Andrea & Bill Suttereth, Adam Clem, Brenda & Sherman Clem Katrina & Todd Crouch

Will Knous, Mary 6 Pennington


B W E L L

HEALTH / BEAUTY / FITNESS

CONCUSSION REPERCUSSION /// 24 FITNESS IQ /// 34

Image by Trinity Mother Frances

CONCUSSION REPERCUSSION / 24


B WELL

RepeR Repe Rcus R cus What happens to the future of contact sports When athletes get burned by the gridiron?


A

nyone in the State of Texas will attest that one sport reigns supreme: football. In America, sports fans love any and all contact sports. In fact, the rougher, the better. But technically, they are no longer referred to as “contact sports.” The current PC term in the U.S. is “collision sport,” and like in most collisions, there is often serious damage upon impact. Sports such as American football, lacrosse, ice hockey and rugby football all fall within the realm of collision sports. Even the sports of wrestling, basketball, gymnastics and pole vaulting can put athletes at risk for high-impact injuries and possible collision with other objects or players – which may result in a concussion. Still, head injury is not limited to collision sports. The monkey bars hold as much potential for a head injury as the 50-yard line. The American Academy of Family Physicians also claims several other sports can put children (and adults) at a higher risk for brain trauma. David S. Kushner, MD, explains on the official AAFP website that sports activities such as gymnastics, skiing, sledding, ice skating, rollerblading and horseback riding share increased risk for mild traumatic brain injury or concussion. And while the use of monkey bars could potentially result in head trauma, the dangers and repercussions of concussions and head injuries while on the turf are often part of the game. Medical professionals and parents of athletes have forced the issue to the forefront of the playing field. Pro-football legend and four-time Super Bowl winner Terry Bradshaw often speaks out on the topic and has even used nighttime talk shows to share with America that he, personally, wouldn’t let his children play football after the brain injuries he has endured

better. You don’t know how many times I was in the huddle, asking my teammates to help me call a play.” He attributes his motivation to go public with a desire to share his story because, as a quarterback, he sustained fewer injuries than most defensive players, such as teammate Mike Webster. The famous center, also known as “Iron Mike,” was diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (after his death in 20020 from heavy hits sustained during his football career. Webster is said to be the first diagnosed case of “footballer’s dementia.” Doctors reported after 25 years of playing football, his brain had been through the equivalent of “25,000 car crashes.” Bradshaw’s openness about his struggle with short-term memory loss and concentration problems paves the way for other pro-players to go public with the effects of their own injuries. “By looking at the damage to my own brain, I can see what I’m dealing with and what I have to do [to keep from] making it worse. ... But I really think it is important for players to talk about what they are going through after their playing days are over. The research, the talking is going to help someone else. I really believe that.” While pro-players opening up about brain injuries sustained on the field may be new, the risk and concern from medical professionals of injuries from collision sports is not. Tobola says the medical community is in no way ‘just now acting’ on concussions. As she said, perhaps now that pros are speaking out and going public with their struggles, people (and parents) are finally listening. “This has been an area of major concern for decades. There have been, and are now, many ongoing studies to try and help us learn more about concussions,” she explained. Throughout the '90s, doctors and organizations provided descriptions and grading systems to rate concussions. In 2000, an international medical consensus group was developed to encourage discussions and develop an agreement of descriptions and classifications of concussions. The group continues to meet every four years to evaluate and share new information in the field. Tobola stressed, “Medical providers in the fields of Sports Medicine and Neurology have always been concerned about concussions in our patients. However, the brain, including injuries to the brain, is a challenging field of study and there is a still a great deal we have yet to learn.” In sports that encourage players to “suck it up,” and “get back on the field,” brain injuries have become a critical concern for pre-adult athletes. Tobola explains that a concussion is more than “lights out.” It is an actual injury to the brain – an organ of critical importance and not yet fully understood complexity. “There remain many questions as to longterm consequences of any type of head injury to the immature brain,” she said. “A concussion is an injury that has immediate symptoms but also has the potential for lifelong consequences.” More specifically and regardless of age, a brain injury can

sion from a career of heavy hits on the field. Yet football is not a new sport, and neither are the collision-heavy hits that players experience during the game. So, why is the media just now hopping on the bandwagon of awareness? Allison Tobola, MD and Primary Care Sports Medicine specialist at Trinity Mother Frances, says that while she cannot speak for the media, she speculates it is due to the many celebrity athletes that have significant injuries and medical issues from sustaining such heavy hits. And, as often occurs, outspoken celebrities draw attention to issues that make attractive stories for the news media. Bradshaw is one such athlete who went public with current problems caused by brain trauma from his NFL days. Nighttime talk shows, interviews – he speaks out quite openly about the challenges he now faces as a result of multiple concussions. Bradshaw shared in an exclusive interview with Fox Sports, “When I played for the Steelers and I got my ‘bell rung,’ I’d take smelling salts and go right back out there. All of us did that. We didn’t know any

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“there remain many questions as to long-term consequences of any type of head injury to the immature brain. a concussion is an injury that has immediate symptoms but also has the potential for lifelong consequences.” be severe enough that it affects that person throughout their entire life. Despite age, a person can sustain permanent brain and neurological injuries or even death from head injuries. Specifically, Tobola describes a concussion as “significant injury to the brain,” no matter how minimal the symptoms. Some of the many potential symptoms that can be experienced after having sustained a concussion include: headache, dizziness, nausea, feeling confused, feeling groggy, loss off awareness of time and place, and change in vision. Severe symptoms can include loss of memory (short-term and long-term amnesia) and “blackouts” – as in losses of consciousness after the injury. While there a myriad of brain injuries that can be sustained from sports, such as a brain hemorrhage or skull fracture, they are also “structural” and can be seen on a CT scan or MRI. Tobola says while structural damage can be life-threatening, with concussions there is no “structural” damage, resulting in diagnosis relying on clinical exams and symptoms rather than on imaging. As a result, concussions can be more difficult to diagnose and can be missed if medical providers are not aware of all symptoms the athlete is experiencing. Another danger is “second impact syndrome,” which is a highly fatal event. “Due to the concussion, from which the person has not yet recovered, the brain cannot regulate blood flow and pressure as well. As a result, there can be a brainstem herniation and death within minutes of [a] second injury,” she warned. “There can be situations where a person who has sustained a concussion continues to participate in sports/activities and is injured again [and suffers from second impact syndrome].” Some of the sports that Tobola says put athletes at high risk for brain injury include: football, soccer, lacrosse, basketball, rodeo, hockey, wrestling and also any sport with the potential for an athlete to fall from tall heights, such as

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cheering, gymnastics or pole vaulting. Even more worrisome is the occurrence of concussions while on the playing field. In fact, the NCAA has surveillance systems to monitor sports injuries, and their data for men ranks football first, wrestling second and soccer third in sports ranked the most frequent cause of injuries in games. Soccer is ranked first as the most frequent cause of injuries in women’s sports. Some doctors and pro-athletes have even gone so far as to predict this recent hit to the sport of football may result in athletes seeking out other sports – potentially, even leading to the rise of soccer as America’s No. 1 sport. Tobola says she doesn’t foresee this happening anytime soon, as least not in the Lone Star State. “It is difficult to speculate. At this point, with the atmosphere around football in America, especially in Texas, I doubt soccer will become more popular.” Yet if football is to reign supreme, how will parents and schools adapt to the growing knowledge and awareness of collision sport-related brain injuries? Tobola stresses that parents should be the ultimate decision makers as to what activities their children participate in, and should educate themselves and their children in the risks of sports. She suggests that parents should make the call that a young, high school boy that has not yet reached puberty may be better suited for flag football instead of contact football. “He could focus on learning these critical sport-specific skills and then, when he is older, parents could consider having him start to learn proper tackling techniques and join a contact league,” she said. “For all other sports, similar considerations can be made as well.” Another possibility is that as understanding and awareness of sports injuries increase, there may be rule changes to sports in schools. “I think it could be possible that there could be some limits as to what age some of the

Doctors reporteD after 25 years of playing football, His brain HaD been tHrougH tHe equivalent of “25,000 car crasHes.” No. 26 bs cene

contact activities are allowed to begin,” Tobola forecasted. “There could also be changes to the way that leagues and teams are grouped. Rather than going strictly by age alone for creating teams as it is overall now (having all 12 to 14 year olds in one league), it is possible there can be changes so that teams/ leagues are grouped more based on maturational age [size/strength].” For example, those closer to puberty could be grouped differently than those still pre-pubertal (those who have already entered puberty are physically stronger, bigger and faster than a pre-pubescent 14 year old). “These are just my speculations, though. … I would encourage parents to be proactive.” She suggests to keep the athlete’s health and safety at the front of any decisions made. “As medical professionals, this is our primary goal, but there is no better megaphone for a child than his or her parents.” As for total prevention of injury and brain injury in collision sports, Tobola says there is no clear-cut answer (or sensor). While there are some studies that place sensors in football helmets to measure the force and frequency of hits each player sustains, Tobola states the sensors are more for research and are not used by the general public. They also do not help medical professionals diagnose concussions, which are defined by symptoms. Helmets with senors only detect impact to the helmet/head, while a concussion could also be sustained from a hit to the player’s body. “If there was a sensor in the helmet that detected a significant blow to the skull occurring, but the athlete had absolutely no symptoms, then it is not a concussion,” she explained. “On the other hand, if an athlete took a hit to the shoulders without triggering the sensor, but then developed a headache, nausea and dizziness, the athlete sustained a concussion.” Another important aspect that people are not educated in how to treat potential concussions. She said if an athlete is hit in the head or body and develops symptoms after the collision (which aren’t necessarily instantaneous), the person should presume they have a concussion, and seek treatment from a medical provider. If symptoms worsen, they should visit the emergency room. “Once a person has sustained a concussion, all activities should be stopped. The person should have complete rest from any and all physical activities until all symptoms have completely resolved,” Tobola clarified. “There is a gradual return to activities that we have a person perform, once asymptomatic, that is also very important, but the medical provider managing the concussion can discuss this in more detail with you in the clinic.” by Holly Head hhead@h3-media.com b s ce n e M AG.coM


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"ARACHNOQUAKE" PREMIERE Movie lovers packed the Liberty Theatre in downtown Tyler for the premiere of the syFy original movie “Arachnoquake” on June 23. Guests mingled before the premiere in the lobby for the VIP reception. east Texas actress Olivia Hardt made her silver-screen debut as Petra, the movie’s fearless heroine, who, along with her brother, takes on firebreathing spiders on the big screen.

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MATT COLE, AMY KING

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There was reason to celebrate for Cardiovascular Associates of East Texas, on July 13. The date marked the practice's 30th anniversary, and also served as the official grand opening of their new state-of-the-art facility in Tyler. Guests had the opportunity to tour the new facility and help commemorate 30 years of service in the medical community of East Texas.

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/// MIX & MINGLE MEALS ON WHEELS CAR SHOW /// LONGVIEW / STREET CREATIONS / JULY 14

/// SEE MORE PHOTOS AT BSCENEMAG.COM

RACHEL MANDREGER, CHANDRA MOORE

MYKA SCOTT, ZOE LAWHORN, ERIN MCCOY, KIMBERLY UNDERWOOD, NAOMI ONEY

SANDRA & ELIOUS DANIELS III

KELLIE GAUDET, REBEKAH SEARCY

MICHELLE MILLER, KENDRA ELLIOTT, LExI SCHEPLENG, CAITLIN BARBER

SONDRA FOWLER, TOM DECOLA

CHESTER VAUGHN, NORA REYES

LINDA & STEVE NEWTON

DANCING WITH THE TYLER STARS KICKOFF /// TYLER / VILLA MONTEZ / JULY 16

MARY ELIZABETH JACKSON, DR. JEANETTE DEAS CALHOUN, CHRIS COCHRAN

MECHELE MILLS, SHELBY BURKETT, SUSIE WALLER, SKIP OGLE, JEFF MILLS

MONICA BLY, JOHN FELICIANO

MUNDO VILLAPUDUA, CAROLINE MEADS

RACHEL LANDEROS, TERRI LANDEROS

SUSIE WALLER, CHRIS COCHRAN, JOHN CARRASCO

ELLERY BURKETT, SHELBY BURKETT, KRISTIN JONES

HOLLY HEAD, SAL LANDEROS, ZAYJEAN CLARK


EXPERT’S CORNER

EXPERT’S CORNER

WILLIAM G. BRELSFORD, MD FACP FACR

JAMES D. SAAR, MD BOARD CERTIFIED COSMETIC SURGEON

ARTHRITIS AND OSTEOPOROSIS CLINIC

Prescription Skin Care

Forms Of Arthritis Arthritis literally means "pain and swelling of the joint." The most common joint disorder is osteoarthritis (OA) – the non-crippling type. With OA there might be an element of inflammation, but the problem is not internal. OA is really a condition and not a disease. Disorders of the immune system, on the other hand, are the causative factor in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus (SLE). These conditions arise from an over-active immune system. With RA, the immune system attacks the cartilage or padding of the joint, and with SLE, the immune system attackes DNA. These conditions cause an illness or disorder and are not merely conditions. With RA, the immune system reads your body’s cartilage as a foreign object and tries to “eat it” – much like the killing of an infection. What causes this to happen, we are not sure, but it could be an inciting infection, most likely a virus. RA can attack any organ in the body replete with cartilage: heart valves, the trachea, the white part of the eye, blood vessels and even the ear. Blood tests and X-rays can help determine your risk for this disease that typically strikes young females. SLE attacks the internal buildingblock protein of the body called DNA. SLE can cause arthritis, but is generally not crippling because the danger and severity are linked to how much damage occurs internally, particularly to the skin, lungs, kidneys, blood vessels and even the brain. In my view, just about all the therapies are safer than the untreated disease – both for SLE and RA. (903) 596-8858 1212 Clinic Drive Tyler, TX 75701 www.drbrelsford.com

B SCENEMAG. CO M

Pinched Nerves Aches & Pains Necks & Backs Jonathan Blau, M.D.

Board Certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Pain Medicine and Electrodiagnostic Medicine

Texas Spine & Joint Hospital 1814 Roseland Blvd., Ste 200 903.593.6500 • 866.755.BLAU www.doctorblau.com

One of the easiest and most dramatic changes one can make in their appearance is achieving healthy, clear and younger looking facial skin. This can be accomplished with the use of a high quality, prescription skin care program. The Obagi® Nu-Derm System is a physician-dispensed, prescription-strength, skin care program which actually transforms your skin. The skin care program consists of creams, which are applied twice daily at home. The creams penetrate below the surface of your skin to transform skin cell functions at the cellular level and correct the damage within. By addressing the signs of sun damage and restoring the healthy function of your skin cells, this system is clinically proven to result in younger looking and healthier skin in as little as six weeks. Obagi® treatments, which are widely praised for their effectiveness, can be used on all skin types regardless of age, condition or color. Ideally, you would want to start your skin care program 6 to 12 weeks prior to any important social engagements, as you will experience a period of time during the initiation of therapy when your skin will be dry, red and irritated. James D. Saar, MD is certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery, a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, the Director of the Trinity Mother Frances Center for Cosmetic Surgery, and the Chief of Plastic Surgery for Mother Frances Hospital. 903-510-8888

3200 Troup Hwy Ste. 240 Tyler, TX 75701 cosmeticsurgerytyler.com

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LIMELIGHT

TEXAS ROSE FESTIVAL KICKOFF

Media, family and festival officials gathered at Willow Brook Country Club on July 20, for a press conference to kickoff the 2012 Texas Rose Festival. Afterward, Queen of the Texas Rose Festival, Haley Anderson, and Duchess of the Texas Rose Festival, Joy Ramey, mingled with the court, family and guests at the “South Sea Soiree” party to celebrate the event. Live music by Take2, fabulous tropical-inspired food and oceanside décor transported guests to the South Seas.

Rowe Anderson, Queen Haley Anderson, Betty Anderson

Conley Cavender, Hadley Brewer

Cliff Brookshire, Wells Pfeffer

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Lynn Ramey, Duchess Joy Ramey

Blake Armstrong, Avery Armstrong, Kelli Armstrong

Emily Closuit, Julie Dawson, Holly Head Sterling Borah

Katherine Kirkland, Pattie Webber, Julianna Ruff 6

Stefanie McAndrews, Wade Jones

Brady Brewer, Hadley Brewer, Katheryn Brewer

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Queen Haley Anderson, Duchess Joy Ramey


ey

Texas Rose Festival Press Conference

Zoe Lawhorn, Jennifer Pierce, Cadie Johnson

Jack Skeen, Betty Anderson

Winn Anderson, Annie Wallace

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Connor Hunt, Tommy Butchi, Derek Brook

Melanie & Rick Seidel Powell Fitzgerald, Blake Smith

Jill & Tom Ramey6

Emily Gabriel, Garrett Cowin, Ginger Fair

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April Feliciano, Rachel Dullis Clay Cavender, Conley Cavender, Jacqueline Cavender

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/// SEE & BSCENE TEXAS BANK & TRUST

Texas Bank & Trust celebrated their 30th Anniversary on June 30, by hosting a photography contest at Pinecrest Country Club in Longview. Eric Draper, former chief photographer and special assistance for President George W. Bush, served as head juror for the exhibit held July 1. Guests enjoyed food and beverages and the chance to view pictures and hear stories about the former president.

Alyssa & Lee Evenson

Hayden Hodges, Rogers Pope Jr., Kellie Stover, Will Pope

Janice & Tom Barnett

Jan & Harry Barth

Tania McDonald, Amy Slaback

Della Lewis, Carolyn & Mike Northcutt Helen Carter

Lori Osborne, Tammy Gage, Lauren Webb, Karen Partee, Eric Draper, Elizabeth Abrams, Wendy Writt

Rhonda & Chuck King Hazel Hickey, Joyce Pope

Hannah & Jon Cromer 6


at Oa k h i llS A Premier Memory Care Community AS feATUred iN BSCeNe’S NOV/deC 2011 iSSUe

IBENEFIT CONCERT Country for our Country would like to thank linda rudd & Steve hellmuth for all of their Continued Support.

PleASe CAll TO SChedUle A TOUr ANd See whAT A differeNCe A wAlk TOgeTher AT SUNdANCe CAN mAke

we would alSo like to Say thank you for SponSoring our event friday oCt. 5, a tribute to vietnam veteranS, benefiting the texaS State veteranS home in tyler, tx.

A

Together

®

“At Sundance, each day is offered up for the greater honor and glory of the lord; he is the driving force for everything that happens there. his light shines over everyone – that is why my sweet mom is thriving at Sundance. her improvement is miraculous.” – linda Thelen

CONTACT US AT 903.747.3927 www.SUNdANCeATOAkhillS.COm 2651 elkTON TrAil, Tyler Tx 75703 / liCeNSe #105019

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/// SEE & BSCENE

BAH AT FELICIANO FINANCIAL The Feliciano Financial Group hosted a Business After Hours at their offices in Tyler on June 21. Guests had the opportunity to mingle and network with fellow business professionals and chamber members. Those in attendance enjoyed music, cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and the chance to let their hair down and talk business in a relaxed setting.

LANE NORVELL, JOHN FELICIANO, ADAM TODD, LEE TRAMMELL, GREG DACUS

ALEX SMITH, TRACI MEYER

ANGELA ARNOLD, TINA MAKOWSKY

SUSAN HARRIS, KIM DEMOTT, DR. DAVID FLYNN

JONATHAN SHAW, JOSH GREER

KELLEY & JERRY WOOLVERTON

MICHELLE MUCKLEROY, BETTY DEWEESE

2012 Texas Rose Festival Queen

ADAM TODD, HENRY BELL, LEE TRAMMELL

Haley Anderson

/// SEE MORE PHOTOS AT BSCENEMAG.COM

No. 48

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C O O K W E L L CULINARY / DINING GUIDE FOOD FOR THOUGHT /// 50 DINING GUIDE /// 53 TASTING ROOM /// 56 MAN ABOUT TOWN /// 61

Pesto Shrimp Po Boy with citrus slaw at Chez Bazan

EAT FOR YOUR HEALTH / 80

SEAFOOD SALVATION / 50


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

SEAFOOD SALVATION

CHEF DEAN FEARING mAkEs tHE most oF tHE CoAst wItH somE DElIGHtFul sEAFooD DIsHEs FoR A FIvE-stAR DINING ExpERIENCE. Most every Texan finds his or her way to a beach at some point during the summer. It’s just too darn hot not to, plus Texas has access to some of the best around! Whether it’s a quick flight to the Caribbean or a weekend drive to the Gulf, the salty smell in the air and the promise of fresh seafood are enough to get me to the beach each and every year. But it’s August now. That means summer is almost over and you may be feeling some of those back-to-school blues … You’re aching to return to paradise and feel the sand beneath your toes. And while I can’t help you with the sand, I can help you whip up a dish that just may convince your taste buds that you’re on the surf, if only for a meal. AT FeARInG’S ReSTAuRAnT, One OF The SIGnATuRe dISheS On OuR Menu IS The TexAS SuRF & TuRF. I TOOK The CLASSIC COnCepT OF SuRF & TuRF, STeAK And LOBSTeR, And MAde IT MY WAY: ChICKenFRIed LOBSTeR SeRved WITh A BARBeCue-SpICed BeeF FILeT.

Long known as the “Father of Southwestern Cuisine,” Chef Dean Fearing has won accolades from such publications at Zagat, Wine Spectator, Esquire and countless more for his restaurant – Fearing's – at the Ritz-Carlton, Dallas.

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Being close to the Gulf Coast doesn’t just make beach trips easy, it also means that we have pretty great access to fresh-caught seafood in our grocery stores. The Gulf has long since recovered from the oil spill a few years back and yields impressive amounts of freshly caught seafood. The “big four” coming out of the Gulf are lump crab, shrimp, red snapper and red fish. (Red fish is not the same as red snapper. Yes, they’re both red, but they’re totally different in flavor.) Let’s first start with a basic seafood salad of mayonnaise, lemon juice, snipped chives, salt and a splash of Tabasco. This is fabulous on its own to bind lump crab meat or even poached (or grilled) shrimp, but more importantly it makes a great base if you want to get a little more fancy. Add in celery and/or pecans for a good crunch. Or, opt for diced jalapeños or red bell peppers for a

really robust flavor. Another idea, chiffanade some basil to mix in for summertime freshness. If you can still find some fresh from the stalk corn on the cob, that makes a fantastic addition to seafood salad. It has a great crunch and a sweet flavor; no need even to cook it. And if you want to get really fancy, it never hurts to add some lobster! IF YOu CAn STILL FInd SOMe FReSh FROM The STALK CORn On The COB, ThAT MAKeS A FAnTASTIC AddITIOn TO SeAFOOd SALAd. IT hAS A GReAT CRunCh And A SWeeT FLAvOR, nO need even TO COOK IT. Speaking of lobster … It’s just so delicious. That buttery, melt-in-yourmouth flavor – mmmm! At Fearing’s Restaurant, one of the signature dishes on our menu is the Texas Surf & Turf. I took the classic concept of surf & turf, steak and lobster, and made it my way: chicken-fried lobster served with a barbecue-spiced beef filet. Talk about a hit! The “BIG FOuR” COMInG OuT OF The GuLF ARe LuMp CRAB, ShRIMp, Red SnAppeR And Red FISh. (Red FISh IS nOT The SAMe AS Red SnAppeR. YeS, TheY’Re BOTh Red, BuT TheY’Re TOTALLY dIFFeRenT In FLAvOR.) OK – back to our seafood salad. Sure, you could serve it traditionally over some romaine lettuce leaves drizzled with olive oil and a little salt and pepper, or as a dip with toast points. But what I’m thinking is to serve a spoonful of our delicious lump crab concoction on little slider buns! They are the perfect appetizer or cocktail bites – easy to prep and easy to eat. And maybe, just for a minute, you’ll feel like you’re back on the coast indulging in some of the best meat the ocean has to offer. b s ce n e M AG.coM


We brew our beers to be enjoyed responsibly by adults and always have. In 1982, we elevated our efforts by launching our first national responsible drinking campaign, Know When to Say When. C

Today, Anheuser-Busch and our family of wholesalers continue our leadership in working with retailers, parents, law enforcement and others to promote alcohol responsibility. Together with you, we are making a difference. However, there’s more we can do. Take the pledge and join the Nation of Responsible Drinkers.

N AT I ON O F R E SPONSIBLE D R INKER S . c o m

b sceneMAG. co M

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No. 51


LIMELIGHT

JULY COVER UNVEIL

BSCENE celebrated the release of the July issue at ZaZa’s on June 28. Guests enjoyed the new venue in true Man About Town style, especially since the cover featured “the Man” himself, Dr. Aubrey D. Sharpe. The party was fantastic – with appetizers, drinks and a chance to sit down and dine on Chef Cedric Fletcher’s menu, all while jamming along with DJ Funktion Authority.

Kelly & Shawn Haney

Dr. Aubrey Sharpe, Amy Pearson

Jeff Byers, Cody Green, John Miller

BS CENE NSusan o. 52 Crane, Michael Martin

Dr. Aubrey D. Sharpe

Kim Jackson Wheeler, Cedric Fletcher

Debbie Wood, Ann Payne

Zoe Lawhorn, Sarah Newburn, Dustin Becker 6

Jamie Osteen, Rhonda Rolen

Clarissa Andrews, Ronnie Higgins Danielle Herd, Jon Childers

B S CE N E M AG.COM


DINING GUIDE

BrEAKErs: A sEAFooD JoiNt Breakers is now serving dinner until midnight. thursday through saturday from 9 p.m. to midnight, come pick a live loBster from the tank for only $14.95; or graB some Buffalo wings, Boiled shrimp, Burgers and more. 5106 Old Bullard Road • Tyler, TX 75701 903.534.0161 • www.breakerstyler.com Hours of Operation: MON – WED 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. THURS – SAT 11 a.m. – 12 a.m., SUN 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.

BruNo’s PiZZA & PAstA Family Owned and Operated since 1976 Bruno’s Pizza & Pasta has been providing East Texans with delicious homemade Italian food, pizza, pasta and more for decades. We have catering and takeout available, and our banquet room seats around 55. We also offer appetizers, salads, specialty pizzas and sandwiches. Whether it’s a quiet evening with the family or sharing a slice after the game, Bruno’s has you covered! Be sure to call us and ask for our daily lunch special! 1400 S. Vine Tyler, TX 903.595.1676

15770 Old Jacksonville Hwy Tyler, TX 903.939.0002

CHEZ BAZAN This second-generation, family-owned/operated bakery is much more than a great place to share a simply delicious pastry and gourmet coffee. Chez Bazan offers stellar catering services and truly innovative cake and pastry design to accompany their unparalleled bakery and café. Let Chez Bazan satisfy your sweet tooth with signature pies, cookies and homemade breads. Don’t forget to stop in for one of our wonderful, healthy lunch options!

Café Hours: 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. M-S Bakery Hours: 7 a.m. – 6 p.m. M-F, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. S Closed Sundays 5930 Old Bullard Rd. • Tyler, TX • 903.561.9644 www.chezbazan.com Remember to “like” us on Facebook!

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DINING GUIDE

ZAZA'S MODERN ITALIAN CUISINE for you to satisfy your appetite with a modern twist on crafted by Chef Christian Chavann, includes steaks, roasted chicken, stuffed quail, salads, a large variety of pastas and freshly made hand-tossed pizza. Having more than 5,000 square feet, Zaza's provides both a small and a large private room for all kinds of parties and get-togethers. With quality food and great service, Zaza's is sure to make you an offer you shouldn't refuse! 6899 Oak Hills Boulevard Tyler, TX 75703 903.617.6050

Shogun I & II Why settle for a normal dinner when you can have an exotic dinning experience? Order at the sushi bar and watch our expert chefs create your made-to-order roll. You can also dine in our newly redesigned sushi lounge. Stop at our metropolitan-inspired bar for one of our delicious signature drinks and to watch the game. And for the ultimate dining experience, dine in our hibachi where our expert hibachi chefs cook to entertain. Be sure to visit our outdoor patio at both Shogun locations. Come dine at Shogun: Tyler’s first and best sushi and hibachi restaurant. Walk-ins Welcome, Reservations Recommended. Shogun #1 5515 S. Broadway 903.534.1155

Shogun #2 3521 S. Broadway 903.561.9890

Not Your AverAge MeAt MArket grocery & market

1708 JudsoN roAd LoNgview

903.753.4930 . skiNNersgrocerY coM

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SMITH COUNTY’S LARGEST

903.877.3750

528 South Main Winona, Texas 75792

SCAN THIS QR CODE TO WATCH A VIDEO BY WHERE’S RUFUS

now open for lunch, seven days a week, at 11 a.m. Join Us for Daily Specials, Live Music and Good Times! Call Now! 903-581-9999 • 6100 S. Broadway Ave. Suite 100 B SCENEMAG. CO M

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Chatueau Ste. Michelle is designed for the sophisticated riesling fan. The mellow sweetness of this wine plays well with a robust grilled flavor such as barbecue chicken.

Like any good zinfandel, this beringer is dry, with a satisfying oak finish that's perfect to enjoy on A warm summer night.

of the

Summer

Fruit savor the summer with any of these lovely wines at Hollytree Country Club.

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No. 56

Like most Texas summers, j. Roget’s brut is very dry. There is a mild apple-like crispness making this great for any summer-time celebration.

TASTING ROOM


DiNiNg gUiDe

JuLiAN’s AsiAN rEstAurANt Oh Sweet Summertime Come REFRESH yourself at Julian’s with our new group pitchers Everything is better in groups! Don’t forget WE CATER! Visit our Facebook page for our daily specials and events. Happy Hour Mon-Thur 4p.m.-7p.m. “Step Out of Tyler and Into Julians” ILoveJulians.com

JErsEY MiKE’s What makes Jersey Mike’s so terrific? The secret’s in the sub! We start with the highest quality meats and cheeses. Add onions, lettuce, tomatoes, oil, vinegar and spices. Even our bread is baked fresh daily, right in each store. But what really sets us apart is that each and every sandwich is made fresh to order. Meats and cheeses are sliced fresh for each sandwich and piled high on the in-store baked bread right before the eyes of the customers – Just the way the first subs were made at the original Jersey Mike’s almost 50 years ago!

let us cater your next event!

4754 S. Broadway 903.561.4955

2199 Gilmer Rd. 903-297-4962

1690 S. Beckham 903.747.3437

LAgo DEL PiNo great food - live music - fantastic views Come to Lago del Pino to experience all that makes Tyler’s destination restaurant an oasis in the countryside. Executive chef Ashley Hotchkiss prepares a variety of New American cuisine including fine steaks, seafood and signature chicken dishes. Dine on classics such as prime rib enchiladas, house-made macaroni & cheese, and pork chops and applesauce. From its spectacular private lake views and its distinctive fountain show to its eclectic live music, relaxed dining and boutique wine list, you’ll quickly recognize all that makes dining at Lago del Pino a colorful experience in southern hospitality. Location 14706 CR 1134 • Tyler, Texas 75709 • Off Spur 364 www.lagodelpino.com Closed Mondays & Tuesdays Open Wednesday – Thursday 11:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Friday 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Sunday Brunch 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.,Open til 10:00p.m.

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No. 57


/// MIX & MINGLE LEADERS OF THE PACK /// TYLER / CLARK HOME / JUNE 19

/// SEE MORE PHOTOS AT BSCENEMAG.COM

LAURIE GREATHOUSE, RUSSELL BISHOP

RACHEL BERKLEY, REBECCA & SCOTT BERKLEY, KIRA

AUDREY & ALAN WHARTON

NANCY & CHARLES CLARK

PARKER CLARK, MUNDO VILLAPUDUA

NANCY & JOHN HART

DEBORAH DOBBS, VICKI KAY

KEN TOWNSEND, SUSAN GOTTSCHALK

AFTER HOURS /// LONGVIEW / NETWORK COMMUNICATIONS / JULY 24

/// SEE MORE PHOTOS AT BSCENEMAG.COM

MIKE LABORDE, BARBARA BIGGS, GAYLE POLAND

KRISTIN JONES, KRISTA MATTE, WENDY GAUTHIER

TONY DORIA, DAVID CARTER, KEITH LLOYD

MICHELLE JONES, ABBEY JONES

LAUREN HANYKA, KERRY BROWN

BARBARA BERRY, MIKE LABORDE, JULIE SPENCER

CARLA DIXON, CHAPIN MILLER, TROY NEUMAN

MICHELLE HEFLIN, DEENA SHELTON


DINING GUIDE

HollytREE coUNtRy clUB Come and enjoy a wonderful experience at Hollytree Country Club and let our professional staff make you feel right at home. Indulge yourself with any of our great items from our versatile menu created by our chef, while overlooking our beautiful golf course. If outdoor dining is what you crave, hang out with friends by the fire while enjoying your favorite cocktails and appetizers at our newly renovated tennis patio. Whether it is a business luncheon, spending time with family or hanging out with friends, Hollytree Country Club is a great place to be! A Private Club with memberships available. For information on how to join BSCENE Magazine Readers’ Choice “Best Country Club in East Texas,” please contact Casey Dirksen at (903) 581-4952 or CDirksen@HollytreeClub.com

SMASHBURGER Smashburger was born to satisfy the modern burger lover by offering the best cooked-to-order burger you have ever tasted and all the good things that go with it. Where smash means we literally smash 100 percent Angus beef at a high temperature to sear in all the juicy burger goodness, and our seasoning blend and fresh toppings take our burgers over the top. Where sizzle means the service is friendly and fast – a place that values your time. Where savor means a place that is modern and cool where you can sit back and enjoy a better burger that doesn’t break the bank. Smash.Sizzle.Savor 3314 Troup Hwy 3080 N. Eastman Rd., Ste. 115 7484 S. Broadway Tyler, TX 75701 Longview, TX 75605 Tyler, TX 75703 903.526.7982 903.663.2319 903.534.3719

PANERA BREAD You Can’t Fake Freshness At Panera Bread, we hand-cut summer fruits for our Strawberry Poppyseed & Chicken Salad and slice perfectly ripe avocados onto our Chopped Chicken Cobb Salad. So when you sit down to enjoy your salad, it tastes the way that good food should. And since perfection’s window is a short one, unlike other places, we don’t create your salad until you’ve ordered it. You can’t assemble perfection – you have to create it. Come experience our offerings Monday through Saturday from 6:00a.m. until 9:00p.m., or from 7:00a.m. until 8:00p.m. on Sunday Now Open in Longview

www.panerabread.com 5755 S. Broadway Ave. Tyler, TX 75703 903.561.1303

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481 E. Loop 281 Longview, TX 75605 903.663.5200

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soJu susHi BAr & AsiAN Bistro Soju’s stylish modern dining experience is sure to excite and delight diners of all varieties seeking something truly unique. Soju features CuLINARY-TRAINED staff concocting a progressive menu of amazing Asian-fusion cuisine, backed by a lounge and full bar, an extensive wine list and full, hospitable service. live music on the patio Thursday, friday & saturday 6361 Old Jacksonville Hwy Tyler Tx 75703 903.939.1100 • www.SojuTyler.com Hours Of Operation Open 7 days a week LuNCH 11a.m. - 2:30p.m. DINNER 5p.m.-9:30p.m., 10:30p.m. (Friday & Saturday)

stANLEY’s FAMous Pit BArBECuE Stanley’s has been family owned and operated since 1958 and is the oldest operating BBQ joint in Tyler, Texas – serving up true, pit-smoked BBQ for over 50 years. Honored, grateful and proud to be named “BEST PORK RIBS” in both 2010 AND 2011 at the Texas Monthly BBQ Festival. Breakfast is served Mon.–Fri. from 7 a.m.-10 a.m. Lunch MonSat 11a.m.-2p.m. (earlier if SOLD OuT). Dinner Coming Soon! VO TE D B S C E N E M A G . C O M

expert catering services at your place or ours. we can create any menu to suit your needs. let us do the work so you can enjoy the party!

®

BeST 2010

THE Magazine of East Texas!

THE MAGAZINE OF EAST TEXAS!

BEST OF

525 South Beckham Ave., Tyler 903.593.0311

READERS’ CHOICE TWITTER@BSCENEMAG FACEBOOK.COM/BSCENETX

Photo by Alex M

BESTOF11_Version5.indd 1

tCBY

10/11/11 11:19 AM

Today, TCBY leads the market in nutrition, taste and new product innovation, with a contemporary look and an atmosphere that appeals to customers of all ages. And the new self-serve platform, introduced in 2010, is perfect for attracting today’s active, on-the-go consumers. Come try our 16 exciting flavors! We offer four types of yogurt that include 98 percent fat free, non-fat, no sugar added/non fat and a nondairy/nonfat sorbet. We have over 35 different toppings that are sure to please even the most choosy of eaters. Sprinkle on a few toppings or pile them high - at TCBY, it’s Your life. Your yogurt. Your way.

7484 S. Broadway Tyler, TX 75703 903.747.3434

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tcby.com

1694 S. Beckham Tyler, TX 75701 903.747.3924

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MAN ABOUT TOWN

T

ZHU'S rEciPES ArE 30 YEArS olD AnD HiS toP HiBAcHi grill cHEfS HAvE BEEn At it tHE SAmE AmoUnt of timE.

the same atmosphere, the same service, the same quality food and the same spectacular presentations. The décor is distinctly Japanese in its colors, clean lines and design, with waterfalls and bamboo to boot! Yamato is the perfect place for a party. Take your pick of two large private dining rooms for up to 45 folks each, the partially covered patio with a “dazzling” fire-pit sporting, all at the same time, multi-colored lights, continuously flowing fountains and fire, or have a party for 10 to 18 people seated around one of the teppanyaki grills while being beautifully entertained by the experienced chefs whose shows seem part-circus act and part-magic. These connoisseurs of circus and cuisine with their clashing blades of steel, flying eggs and morsels of meat flipped from the grill to mouths opened like chirping birds’ around the table, keep ya' entertained and a-beggin’ for more. Assistant manager Holly Durham, escorted us to our private room at 7:00 p.m. After engaging in the niceties of meeting some new friends and ordering Dr. AUBrEY D. SHArPE libations, our Yamato host ushered in a ExPEriEncES A nigHt of large sushi and sashimi boat for starters. rAin, firE AnD jAPAnESE It was beautiful, with every color of the rainbow and a mind-blowing array of

he night was threatening rain – then the rains came – lots of thundering rain. But we were all cozy settled around a hibachi grill in a private room at Yamato. There were 12 of us called together by “The Man’s” longtime friend, Hans Vercruysse. He’s been my barber for 20 years, but we use that term loosely. Hans is actually an accomplished hair stylist/colorist, but there is little for him to do in that regard on “the Man.” He is also a degreed photographer and a sought-after karaoke DJ in the Tyler party scene, where he is known as "Mr. Music." So, ya' see, if ya' get Hans to pull the party together, it’ll be a “humdinger” – and ours was just that. Yamato is an authentic Japanese hibachi and sushi restaurant. It boasts a different style and flavor than many other Asian eateries. Owner Ben Zhu, who owned a sushi restaurant in New York City and opened this restaurant in Tyler two years ago, refers to it as “California style” Japanese cuisine. Zhu's recipes are 30 years old and his top hibachi grill chefs have been at it the same amount of time. Listen, at Yamato, you can have it both ways. The place is divided into the hibachi grill side and sushi bar side. Either way, you’ll have

HibacHi Humdinger: nigHt at Yamato

liStEn, At YAmAto, YoU cAn HAvE it BotH wAYS. tHE PlAcE iS DiviDED into tHE HiBAcHi grill SiDE AnD SUSHi BAr SiDE.

cUiSinE

choices for consumption. The breaded sushi was to die for! Soon, our hibachi master, Henry, arrived on the scene with the gusto of a gladiator. He came in smilin', flashing and clashing his blades of steel and immediately started pouring, mixing and stirring the beginnings of the fabulous meal that we were about to savor. He prepared a little bit of everything this full-service menu offers. “The Man” will not soon forget this festival and fare. As the night progressed, our party seemed never to tire. Ultimately, we meandered into the bar for refills and then to the patio, under roof, for limerick-telling time. The rain was rendering its relaxing sounds as it splashed around the patio, as if singing our lullaby of good night. This hoot of a group closed the place down. So, with lights nearing “go out time,” we dodged raindrops to our cars for departure. It was a good night for all, and to all it was good night.

TOP PHOTO, LEFT TO RIGHT: BRENDA & ROGER DICKERSON, LEXI & JOE NARTIA, MAREN VERCRUYSSE, HANS VERCRUYSSE, DIANE NICHOLSON, NOREEN NARTIA, DR. AUBREY D. SHARPE


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ViLLA MoNtEZ The Official Drink of Cattle Barons’ 2012 At Villa Montez, choose from a menu of the finest, freshest ingredients prepared with care and skill by Executive Chef Carlos Villapudua. Or work with our expert staff to create a catering feast that will ensure your gathering is a smashing success. Our dishes are seasoned with herbs grown in the Villa Montez garden for an unmatched freshness. Dine in one of Tyler’s most beautiful settings, both indoors and out, mixing the magic and glamour of Old Tyler with a progressive, flavor-filled, adventurous menu and a spectacular wine list. 3324 Old Henderson Highway • Tyler 903.592.9696 • http://villamontez.com menu starting at $7.99

ViLLAgE BAKErY since 1948 In 1980, we served the first Italian Cream cake to be made for a wedding in Tyler. It has become our “Signature Cake.” The recipe for our famous Chocolate/Chocolate cake has been in our family for four generations and is also used in the Dobash cake, another first for Tyler. It’s a copy of the Doberge cake made in New Orleans, but with a Texas Twist! Other flavors include strawberry, lemon, black-and-white, carrot and red velvet! Pastries, Pies, Cookies! Everything Sweet! 111 East 8th Street • Tyler 903.592.1011 • villagebakerytyler.com

WHErE’s ruFus sPorts BAr Come out to the newly renovated and innovative Where’s Rufus Sports Bar in Tyler. Indulge in one of your favorite beers or a perfectly mixed cocktail at our top-shelf bar while enjoying our amazing pub fare. From singularly delicious hot wings to perfectly cooked, seasoned fries, we’ve got you covered. There are also daily drink specials to accompany billiards, darts and cutting edge arcade games – and don’t forget the live music and cookouts hosted regularly! 6100 S. Broadway, Ste. 100, Tyler, Tx 903.581.9999 • Facebook.com/wheres.rufus now open for lunch, 7 days a week opening at 11a.m.! daily drink specials! lounge area available

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YAMAto JAPANEsE stEAKHousE & susHi BAr From the finest hand-rolled sushi to the most delectable and entertaining hibachi, Yamato has something to offer everyone. With a full bar, constantly changing specials, and some of the freshest exotic seafood in East Texas, Yamato will surprise and delight you with every visit! Ladies Night every Wednesday with a Live DJ and half-off of all ladies' drinks. Drink specials and a Live DJ every Friday Saturday Evenings, Karaoke! come enjoy our newly extended patio with the recently added fire-water display. 2210 WSW Loop 323 • Tyler 903.534.1888 • www.yamatotexas.com find us on facebook!

WiNg stoP • Wings, Boneless Wings and Boneless Strips • • Always Cooked to Order • • 9 Special Wing Sauces • Something for Everyone • • No Heat Lamps, Microwaves or Holding Bins • • We Cut Our Fries Fresh Every Day from Real Potatoes • • You’ll Always Be Greeted With a Smile • Hours of Operation: Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. – Midnight Phone ahead or order online at wingstop.com Proudly Serving Tyler and Longview Wingstop. The Wing Experts.

JEN’s PoP sHoPPE Big things are happening at Jen's Pop Shoppe! We've been invited to the 39th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards! We will be putting together gift bags for the television stars to enjoy. Not to mention, we'll be partnering up with Southern Girl Pies at a new location! Get a taste of what the stars will have! Our Cake Pops are the trendiest dessert around and are always made with the finest and freshest ingredients. It's a great way to satisfy your sweet tooth without crashing your diet! Perfect for weddings, parties or any event on your calendar! Call Jennifer Kidd at 903-262-4942 or email at info@jenspopshoppe.com Visit our website at jenspopshoppe.com or our store at 7922A S. Broadway, Tyler TX

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STYLE FILE /// 66 THE FINE PRINT /// 74 BACK TO COOL /// 78 V'S WORDS ON BEAUTY /// 82 Blouse by Raoul, skirt by Tracy Reese, Mary V's by Shelby; “Leela” wedges by Ivanka Trump, Bridgette's Shoe Collection; Jewelry: Pave diamond interlocking link earrings, yellow gold cuff with Pave diamonds, mother of pearl/diamond ring, 6-interlocking bracelet by Roberto Coin, Rolex Datejust with gold crystal diamond dial, Susan Robinson Jewelry

RETROSPECT / 66

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StYLe FiLe

Sweater by Gran SaSSo, “HuGe Hefner” SunreaderS by eyebobS, jeanS by 7 for all Mankind, belt by will leatHer GoodS, “Prowler” loaferS by HuSH PuPPieS, Harley'S; black dial battalion watcH by wenGer, cole & co.

RetRospect

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SPortS coat by lbM, SHirt by kennetH Gordon, knit tie by dion, Pocket Square by altea, kHakiS by HaSley, belt by w. keinberG, “retroSPect” lace-uPS by HuSH PuPPieS, Harley'S; rolex cellini w/ black arabic dial, SuSan robinSon jewelry.


Dress by Freeway, ruFFleD Feathers; “leela” weDges, briDgette's shoe ColleCtion; hematite/ white sapphire ring by elizabeth showers, white quartz maltese Cross ring by eliabeth showers, DeCo hematite rings by elizabeth showers, leather w/golD CirCle braCelet by Cole & Co. ColleCtion, Cole & Co.; silver braCelets w/golD DisCs, stone earrings, Katie's.


SUIT BY RNG, CUSTOM SHIRT BY HARLEY'S, TIE BY ROBERT TALBOTT, POCKET SQUARE BY J.Z. RICHARDS, BELT BY W. KLEINBERG, “LORENZO” SHOES BY TOSCHI, HARLEY'S; ORANGE-DIAL DIVE MASTER BY SWISS ARMY, SUSAN ROBINSON JEWELRY.

MODELS: JULIE & CHRIS GIBSON PHOTOS: MATT HOGAN PHOTOGRAPHY SPECIAL THANKS: DANNY JACKSON, LOOP EAST MOTOR CO. MAKEUP: HOLLY HEAD


DRESS BY BAILEY 44, BRIDGETTE'S; SHOES BY IVANKA TRUMP, BRIDGETTE'S SHOE COLLECTION; SUNGLASSES BY CAVENDER'S; JEWELRY: HOOPS BY CATHERINE PAGE, BRIDGETTE'S EXCLUSIVE GOLD CHAIN AND PEARL STRAND, BRIDGETTE'S; WATCH BY ROLEX, PAVÉ RING BY SUSAN ROBINSON JEWELRY, SUSAN ROBINSON.


BLOUSE BY RAOUL, SKIRT BY TRACY REESE, MARY V'S BY SHELBY; “LEELA” WEDGES BY IVANKA TRUMP, BRIDGETTE'S SHOE COLLECTION; JEWELRY: EARRINGS, YELLOW GOLD CUFF, RING, 6-INTERLOCKING BRACELET BY ROBERTO COIN, ROLEX DATEJUST, SUSAN ROBINSON JEWELRY


STYLE IQ

Clairebella tough case with initials at Cole & Co. $65

Parker dress, at Spinout $215

TheThis Fine Print season's “It” pattern:

Tolani palazzo pants, at Bridgette’s $154

Chevron

Sanctuary belted tank dress at Spinout $110

Laquette racerback maxi, at Morgan Abbigail $139

Plenty by Tracy Reese dress with belt at Mary V's by Shelby $248

Charlotte Tarantola tank atMorgan Abbigail $99

French Connection Dolman top at Spinout $98

Scarves at Katie’s $10 each


/// SEE & BSCENE

SALVATION ARMY AWARDS DINNER The Salvation Army honored and awarded outstanding volunteers for the organization at the Salvation Army Volunteer Appreciation Awards Dinner on July 12. Guests, volunteers and organization leaders walked the red carpet and enjoyed dinner and an awards presentation at the Salvation Army Headquarters in Tyler. The organization offers hope, compassion and care to thousands of individuals and families 365 days a year, and has for the past 115 years.

MAJORS DORIS & BEN LAWRENCE AWARD RECIPIENT AMY HOWELL

TISA & BILLY HIBBS JR., LONDON HIBBS

DEBBIE & ANTHONY HAYS

KATHY & HAROLD SMITH

PEGGY HONEYCUTT, JEAN MUELLER, NEVA WADE

VERNITA & ARCHIE SMITH

BILLIE & JIM JENKINS

KARRIE & JAMES LAMPIN

/// SEE MORE PHOTOS AT BSCENEMAG.COM

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STAYING ON TOP OF THE TRENDS BERGFELD CENTER 101 EAST 7th STREET TYLER, TX 75701 903.595.5111

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STYLE IQ

BOY

SHIRT: CUT BY 2 BLONDES AT HAUTE TOTZ, $64 / JEANS: 7 FOR ALL MANKIND AT HAUTE TOTZ, $79 / SHOES: TOMS CLASSICS AT RACQUET & JOG, $40 / BACKPACK: MAD PAX “SPIKETUS REX” AT SPINOUT, $60 / WATCH: SWISS ARMY DIVE MASTER AT SUSAN ROBINSON, $795

GIRL

BACK TO COOL

TOP: ELLA MOSS AT HAUTE TOTZ, $58 / JEGGINGS: JOE’S JEANS AT HAUTE TOTZ, $54 / HEADBAND: HAUTE TOTZ EXCLUSIVE, $8 / HAIR FLOWER: HAUTE TOTZ EXCLUSIVE, $8 / SHOES: LELLI KELLY SNEAKERS, $65 / LUNCHPACK: MAD PAX “GUMBALL NIBBLER” AT SPINOUT, $32 / CHARM BRACELET: CHARM IT! AT SPINOUT, $5 (CHARMS $6 EACH) / NECKLACE: DAVID YURMAN CHAIN WITH CROSS & INITIAL CHARMS AT SUSAN ROBINSON, PRICE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST / BRACELETS: DAVID YURMAN CABLE BRACELETS AT SUSAN ROBINSON, PRICE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST

WE’VE GOT THE GEAR TO MAKE THE SCHOOL HOUSE ROCK

MODELS: CHARLIE BIGBIE & CLINE CAVENDAR


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903.234.9944 1505 Judson Rd. Longview, TX

E X C L U S I V E LY AT

1 1 7 E . 8 t h S t . Ty l e r, T x • 9 0 3 . 5 2 6 . 2 2 2 6 • s h o p s p i n o u t . c o m

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Clothes Shoes Purses Body

100 N. Kilgore St. KILGORE, TX

903-806-3216

1515 JUDSON ROAD LONGVIEW, TX 903.757.2955

crystalspurboutique.com

B SCENEMAG. CO M

Colored Acrylic Sterling Silver 14k Gold Gold Filled YOUR PERSONALIZED JEWELRY HEADQUARTERS!

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V'S WORDS

V’s Words oN

THE VEIN TrUTH

VeronIcA terreS InVeStIgAteS how to keeP your legS From beIng VeIn.

AmbulAtory Phlebectomy Ambulatory phlebectomy is another in-office procedure done at the Vein Center of East Texas. This procedure has replaced what once were the two surgeries of choice: vein stripping and surgical ligation to remove large, visible varicose veins. The latter form had many risks involved, like bleeding and increased chance of infection. Plus, there was a longer and more difficult recovery period. This is not the case with ambulatory phlebectomy. During ambulatory phlebectomy, the patient stands while the varicose veins are marked using a VeinLite to maximize visualization under the skin. After the patient has been prepped, the physician makes a series of micro incisions along the marks and proceeds to remove the veins. Bandages are then placed over the areas of the removed veins. Compression stockings are put on the treated leg and must be worn for 24 hours, but can then be taken off. After this procedure, patients are also asked to refrain from strenuous activities and heavy lifting for a short period of time, but otherwise they are able to return to a normal daily routine immediately following treatment. The patient is again encouraged to walk right away and may take an over-the-counter antiinflammatory for any soreness. VISuAl SclerotherAPy Another treatment done at the center is an FDA-approved sclerosing agent called Asclera (Polidocanol).

A

The in-office-administered injection is used to remove unwanted spider veins. Following

fter I had my son, I was very lucky not to have to deal with many of the tell-tale signs left from pregnancy, like weight gain, prominent stretch marks or even the much-hated spider and varicose veins. For a short time, I did notice a few little spider veins, but they gradually went away the more I worked out. For many women, however, the unsightly problem continues to bother them long after their children have grown up and are out of the house. Additionally, pregnancy may not be the only culprit leading to vascular woes, because both men and woman can be plagued by the symptoms of vein disease such as pain; aching; heaviness; fatigue; burning; itching; throbbing; leg cramps; swelling in the ankles; tiredness and finally, varicose and spider veins. Amanda Addison, a registered vascular Amanda Addison, a registered vascular technologist at the Vein Center of East Texas at Cardiovascular Associates of East Texas, explained some of the issues people encounter when suffering from vein disease problems. She explained that it’s not just a cosmetic issue, it can also be a health concern. “People think that varicose veins are only a cosmetic problem, but [they are] not. [They] can also be a medical issue, [but] one where there are minimally invasive treatments,” she explained. “[Furthermore], patients may suffer with wall, also known as the "lumen." The vein chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), a recognized is sealed closed and the blood is re-routed medical condition.” to other, healthy veins. The closed vein is broken down by the body and over time, will Thankfully, Addison provided me with detailed disappear and not be seen by ultrasound. information about some of the latest treatments and procedures that Dr. Jeffrey G. Carr and Dr. Following the procedure, a small, simple C. Noah Israel perform regularly at the Vein bandage is placed over the incision site and Center of East Texas for those suffering from then compression stockings must be worn for venous insufficiency issues and the marks they a total of two weeks on the treated leg. can leave behind. Here are a few to consider and find out more about: Patients are encouraged to walk immediately following and through the next week. During rAdIoFrequency AblAtIon recovery, it’s recommended to refrain from Radiofrequency ablation is a procedure strenuous activities like heavy lifting. The performed in an outpatient setting. Using patient is otherwise able to return to their ultrasound guidance, the physician accesses normal daily routine immediately after the vein and places the radiofrequency catheter treatment. Addison said there is little to no in the diseased vein via a small micro incision pain with this type of procedure. For patients or small opening in the skin. The catheter is who do experience soreness, an over-the powered by radiofrequency energy (RF) and counter anti-inflammatory is suggested. delivers heat (thermal energy) to the inner vein

these injections, patients must refrain from strenuous activities for about 10 days, as well as keep their injection areas out of the sun. Compression stockings must be worn for two weeks after the treatment. Ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy, which is sclerotherapy of larger veins in the leg using the sclerosing agent with ultrasound guidance, is also available. Those interested in free vein screenings to get a start on taking care of their vascular health or those just wanting more information about these procedures can visit Cardiovascular Associates of East Texas at caet.net.

by VeronIcA terreS


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A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 No. 83


EDUCATION GUIDE

It's time to learn about the best education in East Texas.


hen Traci and Larry Johnston moved to East Texas almost 10 years ago to pursue a job opportunity, first and foremost in their minds was finding a good educational environment for their children, Katelyn, now 22; Jacob, now 20; and Jessica, now 19.

earning college credit attests to the courses’ rigor. An increasing number of National Merit scholars, GLOBE scholars, and Advanced Placement Scholars, and a long-term winning tradition in University Interscholastic League competition offer further evidence of quality curriculum and instruction at LHS.”

They’d moved from a small town in Missouri and were looking for small class sizes, low teacher-to-student ratios and an abundance of extracurricular activities. “It’s hard when you move to a place almost sight-unseen,” Traci said. “We called around a lot and a supervisor at Larry’s company helped us with information, too.”

Lindale ISD has six schools with 3,700 students. A “recognized” school district by the Texas Education Agency in 2011, Lindale has a graduation rate of 98 percent. Predominantly Caucasian, Lindale students are 10 percent African-American and 7 percent Hispanic.

The Johnstons settled in Whitehouse, TX, appreciating the fact that the small city had only a handful of schools and the children would stay with their friends from late elementary school through high school. “But really, I don’t think we could have gone wrong, no matter where we looked,” Traci said. “We looked out in Lindale and were impressed, Tyler has some great schools and there are so many good private schools here, too.” In East Texas, the opportunities for education are diverse and varied. From public and private, to charter and alternative options, there’s certainly something to fit every family’s educational needs.

Going Public in East Texas The largest school district in northeast Texas, Tyler Independent School District, boasts 27 schools with some 18,600 students in grades pre-K through 12. With a 2011 rating of “academically acceptable,” the district is comprised of two high schools, six middle schools, 17 elementary schools, two alternative schools and one special education campus. “The philosophy of Tyler ISD is that we believe every child who comes through our doors has the desire and potential to succeed,” says outgoing Superintendent Randy Reid. “We are committed to providing students with the opportunity to obtain a quality education and a variety of programs that all students deserve.”

“We are committed to providing students with the opportunity to obtain a quality education and a variety of programs that all students deserve.” Tyler ISD is 41 percent Hispanic, 30 percent African-American and 26 percent Caucasian, with approximately 67.2 percent of students ranked as “economically disadvantaged,” which means they are eligible for free or reducedprice meals under the National School Lunch and Child Nutrition Program or other public assistance. Longview ISD, in Gregg County, has 13 schools with just under 8,500 students. Also rated “academically acceptable” in 2011, its socio-economic demographics are very similar to those of Tyler ISD. “Offering the most extensive course selection opportunities in East Texas, Longview High School is the leader in advanced courses,” says Superintendent Dr. James Wilcox. “LHS offers more Pre-AP and Advanced Placement courses than other schools in the area. The large number of students

“Within a safe environment, exemplary and up-to-date curriculum will be provided to all district students for their highest level of academic and character development,” says school Superintendent Stan Surratt.

“Within a safe environment, exemplary and upto-date curriculum will be provided to all district students for their highest level of academic and character development.” Kilgore ISD, also in Gregg County, has 3,900 students spread throughout five schools. Rated "academically acceptable," Kilgore ISD’s motto is: “Making a difference, whatever it takes.” Kilgore ISD is 53 percent Caucasian, 24 percent Hispanic and 18 percent African-American. Kilgore ISD is currently building two new campuses, according to Superintendent Jody Clements. Smaller districts in the area include Troup, Whitehouse, Bullard, Arp, Athens, Chapel Hill, Frankston, Brownsboro, Van, Grand Saline, Winona and Hawkins.

Testing 1, 2, 3 … This year, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR™) replaced the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) as the state standardized test in public schools. The STAAR™ test is administered from grades third through eighth and assesses math, reading, writing and science. In high school, STAAR™ tests cover Algebra I, geometry, Algebra II, biology, chemistry, physics, English I, English II, English III, world geography, world history and U.S. history. Tests scores for the first STAAR™ tests will not be available until January 2013, to the puzzlement of many parents. According to the Texas Education Agency, raw score results that show the number of questions students answered correctly will be available this summer, but the passing standards for these tests will not be established until fall 2012. Passing standards will be available to districts in early January 2013.

Friday Night Lights Football reigns supreme in East Texas and the region boasts two current championship teams (in 1973 and 1994). Ending the 2011 season, the Chapel Hill Bulldogs squeezed out a win over Alvarado, 20-19, earning the 3A division championship title. In the private sector, Bullard’s Brook Hill School Guard trounced Austin’s Regents, 26-3. Tyler’s John Tyler High School Lions have won two state football championships in 1973 and 1994. Robert E. Lee High School won the 2004 football state championship by defeating Spring Westfield 28-21. Robert E. Lee has also recently had a state championship boys’ golf team. Henderson and Chapel Hill vied for the state football championship in 2011, with Henderson coming out on top.

Private Offerings There is no dearth of private schools in East Texas. “Faith-based education is important to us, so we chose to send our children to a

Photos: Batten's Photography, Tyler ISD Foundation and Stepping Stone

Continued on pg. 87


EDUCATION GUIDE

The STAR program offers free preventive, short-term services for youth and their families. In addition to assisting youth and their families in mastering new skills through skills based training, our staff helps to reduce the occurrence of truancy, runaways, family conflict and delinquent behavior. The program helps families resolve problems within the home. Anyone can make a referral to the NETWORKS STAR program and the process is easy. Phone: (903) 581-2835 Fax: (903) 581-2810 24Hour line: 1-866-630-3551 Mail: NETWORKS STAR 2624 Kensington Dr. Ste 113 Tyler, TX 75703

Networks “ A STAR Program”

Teléfono: (903) 581-2835 Fax: (903) 581-2810 Línea de 24 horas: 1-866-630-3551 Correo: NETWORKS STAR 2624 Kensington Dr. Ste 113 Tyler, TX 75703

We serve Smith, Wood, Henderson, Van Zandt, Kaufman, Navarro & Ellis Counties. The NETWORKS STAR Program Serves Youth Ages: 0 -17. CALL FOR ELIGIBILITY Funded By The Texas Department of Family And Protective Services

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private school in Tyler where they’d attend religious classes,” says Raymond Lewis. Faith-based and private schools in Smith County include: The Brook Hill School, All Saints Episcopal School, Bishop T.K. Gorman Catholic School, Christian Heritage School, East Texas Christian Academy, Good Shepherd School, Grace Community School, King’s Academy, Carpenter’s Cross Christian, St. Gregory Catholic School and Tyler Adventist Christian School. Gregg County private and faith-based schools include Christian Heritage School, East Texas Christian School, Longview Christian Academy, Longview Christian School, New Life Christian School, Trinity School of Texas, Crisman School, St. Mary’s Catholic School and Trinity School of Texas.

Charter schools in Texas are public schools funded by state (not local) tax dollars and held to "No Child Left Behind" standards. They provide educational options outside of the regular school district and sometimes target specific needs, such as technology or the arts. Charter schools were authorized by the Texas Legislature in 1995 to provide an alternative to traditional public schools. In Texas, the 437 charter schools operate under and receive academic accountability ratings from the Texas Education Agency (TEA). All charter school students take the same STAARTM and End of Course (EOC) tests as traditional public school students. Enrollment in Texas charter schools has increased; last year, there were over 40,000 students on waiting lists for charter schools across the state.

This fall, the University of Texas at Tyler will launch its charter school, Innovation Academy, a university charter school “dedicated to developing, implementing and disseminating new and promising practices in education.” Area charter schools include Pineywoods Community Academy in Lufkin, East Texas Charter Schools in Longview, Cumberland Academy and Azleway Charter School in Tyler. This fall, the University of Texas at Tyler will launch its charter school, Innovation Academy, a university charter school “dedicated to developing, implementing and disseminating new and promising practices in education.”   UTTIA  will be opening this fall in Tyler, Longview and Palestine, according to its website.

Homeschooling With the number of homeschooled students on the rise some 15 to 20 percent each year, according to the National Home Education Research Institute, the Texas Home School Coalition provides support for families who choose to provide an education for their children in a home environment. Parents can choose to teach their children on their own or participate in co-ops, where different parents teach different subjects to a small group of children. Homeschooled students can then earn their general equivalency diplomas to graduate from high school. A Homeschool Athletic Association allows homeschooled students to participate and compete in team sports.

How to Enroll At area public schools, parents must register their student at their home campus. Parents must provide a birth certificate, Social Security card, current immunization records, proof of residency (water bill, electric bill, etc. in the parent or guardian's name) and a photo ID or driver’s license. Some area private schools have application forms online, but most require an interview and scheduled appointment with the school admissions counselor. by Amy Brocato Pearson B S CENEMAG. CO M

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EDUCATION GUIDE

Charting New Territory


EDUCATION GUIDE

TOp fiVe back-TO-SchOOl ORganizing TipS THE START oF A NEw SCHooL yEAR IS LIkE A FRESH Box oF CRAyoNS - FULL oF PoSSIBILITIES.

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Ginny Bean, mother of three and publisher of Ginny's catalog, suggests families take advantage of this clean slate by establishing some new organizing routines. Think ahead. Mornings are chaotic in most households with school-aged children. Consider handling as many daytime preparations as possible the night before. Lay out clothes. Pack lunches. Set out the breakfast dishes and cereal. Pack backpacks. Bean suggests making systems kid-friendly, so young helpers can feel involved, and save mom some time in the process. "Carve out a spot on a lower shelf of the pantry for lunch boxes and lunch-making supplies. Then make children responsible for putting away their empty lunch boxes at the end of the school day, or even packing their own lunch." Tackle school paperwork. Make a habit of sorting through children's backpacks with them the same day they come home. Allot time after school, when you arrive home from work, or after dinner, depending on your family's schedule. Use a tiered letter sorter or filing system with designated slots for each child's papers, and an "A.S.A.P." space for teachers' notes, permission slips and anything else that requires immediate attention. For schoolwork and artwork you want to keep, try a two-step approach. First, purge unwanted items as soon as they come in the door. Collect the possible keepers in a storage bin or wheeled cart with color-coded drawers that allow for easy separation by child or project type. Go through stored items at regular intervals, perhaps once a month or once a quarter. Keep in mind, the more you accumulate, the easier it will be to pare down, as the best pieces will stand out from the crowd. Designate a homework spot. Decide on the best spot in your home to set up homework central. Take into consideration how involved you need to be with homework and your child's style. Does he focus better with people around or in a private setting? Is he better suited to sit at a desk or curled up in a favorite chair with a laptop cart? Once you have a place picked out, gather together handy homework tools and supplies into a nearby bin, drawer or cabinet. Stock up on age-appropriate supplies such as pens, pencils, erasers, paper, crayons, markers, a ruler, dictionary, calculator and a pencil sharpener. Create a communication hub. Include the family calendar, a chalk or bulletin board for posting messages and reminders, a binder for key documents, colored markers, pens and pencils. If you're a visual person, consider color coding your calendar by assigning each family member a different color. Remember not to forget. Use wall hooks and baskets or bins near the front door to corral the items you need to remember each day: backpacks, books, lunches, gym shoes, sports equipment and musical instruments. To request a copy of Ginny's catalog, visit Ginnys.com or call 800-487-9024. - (ARA)

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HOUSE / REAL ESTATE / FINANCE SEEING STYLE CLEARLY /// 90 THE PAYNEFUL TRUTH /// 96 TJC DRUMLINE /// 100 OUTTAKES /// 106 BACK PAGE /// 112 Lucite chair at blueprint TOO

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ew trends are difficult to keep up with and television reigns supreme as the go-to guru. People love wearing styles the Kardashians wear and even fashion their home decor after the top TV drama. With all the hype surrounding AMC’s “Mad Men” in the last five years, the demand for Mid-century designs has been revitalized. You know the look of a marshmallow-white couch with egg chairs that resemble the Jetsons' house? Well, this trend is back, and it’s time to update. There’s no need to completely change your living room, because small updates here and there can spruce up your decor in a big way. After World War II, designers looked for a way out of the post-traumatic symptoms of warfare and the depressed economy. The result was a fresh, futuristic style: Midcentury modern. “No other era has made the impact on design as Mid-century [has]," says Leslie Jenkins of blue print TOO. Not only was the aim to become clean and seamless, there was the common goal to have everything be affordable for Americans. Homes became windows to a new world, thus creating glass walls to connect the indoors with the outdoors. For design in 2012 and into 2013, a green and open room is all the rage once again!

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What if you have an Old World charm in your home and only want to spice it up? You can add small pieces or switch out the sofa. “They blend perfectly together,” says Larry Lott of Larry Lott Interiors. “Taking old French antiques and mixing them with modern, contemporary items … Look anywhere in Paris at design, you’re going to see that happen. They’re a perfect complement to each other, the old and the new.” You can also rearrange furniture to create an open floor plan that flows from room to room. Consider replacing blinds or heavy curtains with screen shades, airy curtains – or go bare. The main way to acquire the Midcentury style is to go with neutral colors in whites and off-whites to set the clean palette of the era. Incorporate geometric shapes into accessories and furniture, and keep the overall room sleek and clutter-free. “Less is definitely more,” advises Jenkins. “Remember, restraint is key to achieving this fresh look.” B S CE N E M A G.CoM


One material that’s synonymous with Mid-century decor is lucite. Lucite, a close friend to plexiglass, is a clear plastic that originates in Italy. It's basically a strong plastic that looks great in the living room. It is a popular material used in furniture, jewelry, art, shoes, lighting (and even guitars) to create a modern look. It was invented in the '30s as a war material used for airplane windshields, bomber noses and submarine periscopes due to its durability, resistance to wind and low density. Lucite was later used in the '60s for furniture. “Lucite is a simple design element that can be pulled into any decor,” says Jenkins. “A simple touch of lucite can update a room.” Many furniture stores, including blue print TOO, Silk Threads, Larry Lott Interiors and Fixture This, carry updated pieces that embody the "far-out" style.

Along with furniture, light fixtures are jumping on the lucite bandwagon. A lucite chandelier or a portable lamp are simple ways to update any room. The plastic-like appearance won’t have the same rainbow prism as authentic crystal, but it will be a new and mod take on an old classic. “It’s a new transition to modern styling for chandeliers,” says Jion Dietz from Fixture This. Larry Lott is also huge fan of lucite chandeliers. “The design is old French, but it’s made out of something modern,” Lott explains. If a chandelier is not your style, try adding an accent or round lucite finial on the end of sconces or the tops of lamps to bring in the Midcentury effect. These accents will give your home a luxe look and are perfect if you don’t want to commit to clear furniture. If crystals don’t fit your home, a lucite table lamp in any room will tie in the modern trend. To bring in the Mid-century flair, add an industrial lamp to the room, such as a stem lamp. These lighting changes are sure to brighten your home. B S CENEMAG. Co M

Lucite furniture ranges from tables and chairs to accessories and beyond. These pieces give your home a clean, clear and unobtrusive atmosphere that is very inviting. “Everything now is going toward an easy, comfortable look,” says La Rae Musslewhite from Silk Threads. “That’s the direction everyone’s going in, that less-decorative, easier, more-welcoming look.” The clear furniture creates a ‘ghost’ or ‘glacial’ characteristic. Lucite furniture opens up any room and keeps the eyes moving around. To tie in the Mid-century design, consider changing your couch to one that sits lower, has clean lines and isn’t over-stuffed. There are couches and arm chairs that have lucite legs, if you want to be daring. You can also add a side table, coffee table and chairs or even redecorate your eating space with a matching table and chairs!

Lucite furniture ranges from tables and chairs to accessories and beyond. These pieces give your home a clean, clear and unobtrusive atmosphere that is very inviting.

A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 No. 91


Beyond furniture and lighting, there are many lucite accessory options that include vases, picture frames and other home decor to put on shelves and tables. According to Larry Lott there are even lucite cubes that can be used as pedestals to hold antique dishes. "That makes it look more modern,” says Lott. You can also use crystal cubes to make any antiques look a bit dressier. “Lucite can be incorporated with a [rustic] Frenchstyle farm table or beautiful antique Fr e n c h - s t y l e commode for an updated, simple, clean look,” explains Jenkins. You can find vases made of lucite to display silk flowers (blue print TOO has a few). There are also many organizers that are perfect for the office. These accessories are very affordable, plus they add fantastic flair without changing any furniture or lighting. Even adding a mirror, particularly one with a sunburst shape, can open up the room and reflect the Mid-century design. Accessories are the perfect touch if you’re happy with the way your home is decorated but want an edgy piece to set your home apart from others.

If you are looking for a fresh, stylish appearance, consider adding lucite or acrylic to your home.

A close alternative to lucite is acrylic. Acrylic pieces look great, cost less than lucite pieces do and are even available in a variety of colors. However, since it’s not authentic lucite, the quality won’t last as long. The clear pieces can become a little cloudy after too many cleanings, even when using the most effective hot water cleaning method. The variety of acrylic that sets it apart from lucite are the color options. If you want to add a color accent with a modern twist, acrylic pieces will work great in your home. You can find chairs, lamps and home accessories made of acrylic. They still have that stylish edge, but can incorporate your color preferences. “If you’re a decorating purist, you’re only going to have lucite,” says Musslewhite. “But not everyone can afford it. That’s why other manufacturers have come up with an acrylic alternative that will still incorporate the lucite effect.” If you are looking for a fresh, stylish appearance, consider adding lucite or acrylic to your home. Check out designer Candice Olson, at Larry Lott Interiors, for Mid-century furniture and lucite pieces. Or, stop by blue print TOO. Their store is full of beautiful Mid-century and lucite pieces. Not daring enough for a table and chairs? Then just get a portable lamp to brighten the room. Or even try lucite cubes to transform your Old World objects. Guests will talk about your impeccable taste and lucite will give your home a clear view of what’s in style! by Margaret Puklicz

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A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 No. 95


The paYnefUl TRUTh verbally that required you (and the listener), to keep up mentally with all the different characters and their separate plots until they all tie together. I doubt there are any ancient myths that begin by introducing us to 12 different characters, with six different plot lines, while insisting that we wait an hour before explaining their connection! WHEN THE DIRECTOR DETERMINES THAT IT’S NOT NECESSARY TO SHOW THE AUDIENCE EVERYTHING IN A CHARACTER’S PAST, THE FLASHBACK IS NOT ONLY AN EASY WAY TO PROVIDE USEFUL INFORMATION, BUT IT CAN BE DELIVERED AT A PRECISE POINT IN THE MOVIE FOR A RELEVANT IMPACT.

TWiSTing The plOT

SHANE PAyNE REVEALS How SToRyTELLING HAS EVoLVED oN THE SILVER SCREEN ... If you’ve been to a movie lately, pay attention to this. Slowly, almost imperceptibly, we’re being re-programmed for the storytelling experience. As the technology for digital cinema continues to advance, the demands of our imagination are getting lower and lower. From ancient oral storytellers like Homer to the 3-D IMAX directors of the 21st century, our ability to ‘keep up’ has been radically improved. Consider a few of the following techniques that have become commonplace in modern filmmaking. Flashbacks are a way of quickly providing the audience with background information that helps them understand the current plot details. When the director determines that it’s not necessary to show the audience everything in a character’s past, the flashback is not only an easy way to provide useful information, but it can be delivered at a precise point in the movie for a relevant impact. As the flashback’s opposite,

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flashforward is a post-modern mechanism that is growing in popularity. A recent example of this is well executed by Guy Ritchie in "Sherlock Holmes," ALTHOUGH DEMONSTRATIONS TOOK PLACES MANY DECADES EARLIER, "THE JAzz SINGER," MADE IN 1927, IS CONSIDERED TO BE THE FIRST FEATURE-LENGTH FILM PRESENTED AS A TALKIE. as the detective uses his skills to plan ahead and escape a dangerous situation. As you would expect, it’s somewhat disconcerting to jump ahead in the timeline of a story that is unfolding on the screen, but you quickly understand what’s happened, and your brain relaxes again. On the other hand, flashbacks are so common that we are seldom confused by them any more. However, the first time audiences witnessed flashbacks

in a movie theater, they may have thought the film reels were playing out of order! Another interesting strategy for effective storytelling is interwoven plot lines. Often we are introduced to an ensemble of characters who are seemingly unconnected. As their stories unfold, we begin to make predictions about their relationships, but must wait until the filmmaker decides it’s time to reveal the truth. When this happens, it’s natural to watch the movie again and see if there were clues that we missed the first time. "Love Actually" is one of my favorite films that does a superb job of combining interwoven plot lines. We are watching what appear to be almost 10 separate stories at the beginning of the film, but before the credits roll, they have been seamlessly combined into one multi-faceted story. This device is certainly prolific in written literature, but imagine trying to tell a story

An even simpler example of modern filmmaking technology is the use of a soundtrack. Not that many years ago, relative to the history of storytelling, motion pictures were silent. Yeah, think about that for a minute. If you went to a theater to watch a movie, there might have been an organist providing the musical score as a live performance, and all of the actors on screen would have been silent. As commonplace as movies with sound may seem now, it was an entertainment breakthrough in the 1920s when mass audiences heard voices synced with the on-screen films. Although demonstrations took place many decades earlier, "The Jazz Singer," made in 1927, is considered to be the first featurelength film presented as a talkie. Lastly, think about all the great films that were produced in black and white. The addition of color was a radical transition for audiences to experience. After generations of moviegoers had become accustomed to the lack of color on screen, they were now being presented with color that was probably as unreal-looking as black and white had been. The next time you relax for a couple of hours to enjoy a classic film, take note of the filmmaking style. See for yourself if the surround sound, computer generated imagery and 3-D effects really enhanced the story or merely added another layer of technology to the process. by Shane Payne *Shane Payne is owner of IDEA Post Production, providing both creative and technical services for the advertising and entertainment industries. B S CE N E M A G.CoM


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A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 No. 97


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enTeRTaineR

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W

hat does “drumline� make you think of? Possibly Nick Cannon transforming from a rebellious New York drummer to a victorious collegiate awardwinning snare drum expert? Maybe you relive a high school football game memory where you heard a faint beat coming from one end of the stands. Or perhaps you think about the halftime show and the wail of a marching band that echos to the concession stand lines. Do you think of heavy competition? Probably not. Well, the Tyler Junior College's Indoor Drumline, the Apache Punch, knows a thing or two about serious competition. The Apache Punch gained their name in the '80s and promptly started a line of traditions that included an official nickname for each member and lots of hangout time away from the band. In 2001, the line's current director, Tom McGowan, came on the scene and decided to shapeup the group. "The drum room was kind of their clubhouse, and they kind of alienated themselves from the band," McGowan recounted. "So it became, 'This clubhouse is coming down and we're going to be part of the band, instead of a clubhouse away from the band, and if you're with

No. 100 BS CENE

me, you're with me.'" From there, the group worked toward a new goal: a tradition of excellence. "We started two nights a week training; from 'this is how you hold a [drum]stick' and the next year the size improved a little and the playing really improved," explained McGowan. They started competing in Winter Guard International (WGI) competitions in 2007, a premier organization producing national indoor color guard and percussion ensemble competitions during concert season. They started in the "A Class" (beginning programs), and worked their way up to "Open Class "(intermediate developmental level), and now "World Class" (the most advanced programs). Year after year, the drumline improved musically, the group's numbers grew and its members became focused on being the best. "We have 40 kids that are coming to get a spot in the drumline or the pit [this upcoming year]," McGowan says. "We're estimating 10 snare drummers, probably five tenors, five bases, probably six cymbals. The pit will probably have five marimba players, four vibraphones, a xylophone, two auxiliary players, probably a synthesizer player, and we'll see what happens from there with our other members." Percussionists come from all around Texas and even out of state to be part of the largest independent indoor drumline in Texas. "It really has been the most successful indoor group I think Texas has seen," McGowan mused. "On the independent level, it's the most success we've seen in Texas, and I think a lot of that is due to the support we get." The drumline's staff consists of a few core members, and a lot of people who come in just to help out. McGowan is the director, with executive power over all decisions involving the group. Karmen B S CE N E M A G.CoM


Trotter is the choreographer, assisting with all visual effects for the band, drumline and color guard. She joined the drumline to teach visuals, dance moves and different foot precision techniques. The group even has its own composers/ arrangers. Bryan Harmsen creates the pit score and Shane Gwaltney writes for the battery (snares, tenors, cymbals and basses). These men are well known in the marching band world; Gwaltney writes for Music City Mystique, a six-time world championship theatrical percussion ensemble, and the infamous Phantom Regiment, a national band that competes in Drum Corps International – pretty much the Major League of marching band competitions. Apache Punch alumni typically return after graduation as technicians and help out those playing their instrument of expertise. And just like pro sports, the drumline even has “sponsors.” Several companies aid the group with supplying, renting and selling instruments and equipment, such as Dynasty USA Percussion, Sabian Cymbals, Evans Drumheads and Innovative Percussion. These renowned companies provide the group with drum heads, mallets, cymbals, harnesses and equipment. Without their support, there wouldn't be a group. The training is intense. Not only do members have to stretch, run and build muscle to carry the heavy equipment; the technique and choreography to compete at a world championship level is also extremely difficult. The battery has to play at high speeds while keeping their foot movement in unison, not to mention staying in formation and using the correct foot style – all while staying in “drumline” character. If one person is even an eighth-note off, the whole audience (and judges) will notice. Practices are long and frequent, and include running and rerunning a measure until it is executed perfectly. "With the indoor season, our rehearsals this year [were on weekdays]," explains McGowan. "Wednesday night from 6 p.m. to 10

sport injuries and carrying around the excess weight of all the instruments and moving at a very fast pace, sometimes at 200-plus beats per minute, one form to the next, over and over again, run after run. It's very physical in a dance sort of orientation, not just musically." It's no wonder Winter Guard International calls itself "The Sport of

the Arts." Combining all the aspects of drumline, timing, form, music,"it's tough for your mind to really be engaged in every single aspect for that 7 minute show. It really has to be totally engaged; it's pretty difficult, I think." Percussion shows focus on one theme, and

THE TRAINING IS INTENSE. NOT ONLY DO MEMBERS HAVE TO STRETCH, RUN AND BUILD MUSCLE TO CARRY THE HEAVY EQUIPMENT; THE TECHNIQUE AND CHOREOGRAPHY TO COMPETE AT A WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP LEVEL IS ALSO EXTREMELY DIFFICULT. photos by Marcus Lovely

p.m. – that was just a 'playing' rehearsal. So we worked on music and broke down all the different sections, had somebody working with them to clear up their individual problems. We divided the group up as basses, snares, tenors, cymbals and then the pit was all in one room. And then we all got together and ran the music and cleared things up. Then we started Friday, and basically we went from 2 p.m. until 11 p.m. Saturdays we went in the morning from 9:30 a.m. until 6 p.m. The weekend rehearsals, the Friday and Saturday, usually started with the pit in the band hall working music. The drumline started with a visual block, so they got with Karmen the whole time and did some physical training, did a lot of stretching, practiced a lot of their dance movements and she would constantly add more things to the music when it came to movement. After that, we would break up into sub-sectionals and the techs would have time working with them in subs. Afterward, we would do a visual rehearsal in Gentry Gym on campus, with the tarp pulled out [on the floor]. We would add in the new movement stuff that Karmen [had] worked with them and they would add playing with it, but it would be in small chunks, adding in the new visual moves and relearning a new drill movement if we needed to." And if rehearsals don't sound long enough, once you add the physical strain it takes to perform in a competitive drumline, or any marching ensemble, it becomes very intense. "When you're in it, you see some injuries that would be normal sport injuries," explains McGowan. "You see kids having

they bring it to life through music, visuals and technique. A group of judges observe every aspect and rate one group against the rest; ranking from first to however many groups there are, and taking 12 to 15 groups to finals. The Apache Punch has had a successful few years. Their first year competing in WGI they placed eighth in independent open; that's quite an accomplishment for a first year. In 2008, the group worked on a show entitled "Body Language," which


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placed first in WGI Percussion Independent Open (PIO) Class. The next year, they placed ninth in the Independent Open Class. In 2010, they had the chance to travel to Belgium and moved up to Independent World Class and placed 15th, qualifying for finals. In 2011, they pushed even harder and made 11th place in World Class. This past season, 2012, Apache Punch competed in the Mid-South Percussion Championship and earned the Percussion Independent World (PIW) Mid-South Percussion Champion title. After that, WGI promoted them to the advanced level. They didn't place in finals by only a few points, but took pride in their accomplishment of reaching the World Class level in only five years. When they preformed in Belgium, the group was able to unite with other groups through their love of music. Dynasty USA Percussion, one of the drumline's top sponsors, wanted Apache Punch to represent them overseas at a competition at the Indoor Percussion Europe Competition. The group performed in their finals as an exhibition group and facilitated clinics for drumlines participating in the competition. "Dynasty took care of all of our instruments there and they also took care of all of our housing and over half of our food," McGowan explained. “Then TJC helped us out, mainly the TJC Foundation helped, and it was a big thanks to the Student Senate. So, through [those groups] and the kids fundraising the rest of the money, we got to go to Europe. That was a lot of fun. It was a great experience, especially [for] some of our kids coming from East Texas, it's a once-in-alifetime chance. They had a great time, and [they] represented TJC very, very well."

Percussionists come from all around texas and even out of state to be Part of the largest indePendent indoor drumline in texas. www.platinumpropertiestx.com

No. 102 BS CENE

TJC's 2012 show theme was "Geisha." The performance embodied an oriental vibe, displayed through different instruments, dancers, lighting and presence. The seven dancers embodied geishas to help tell the story and to add visual effect. "We borrowed some taiko drums from Clear Brook High School, south of Houston," explains McGowan. "So we had some taiko drums in there, we also had to create some [synthesizer] parts, but instead of it just being played on the synthesizer, we had an electronic mallet instrument that one of the students played that had sounds of different Japanese instruments. And a bunch of different cymbal sounds, something we haven't had before; a lot of China cymbals, a lot of gongs, and we tried to mimic that [type of ] atmosphere. We had a rain stick to add a little bit of rain sound to create moods... and that [type of ]atmosphere. We used different synthesizer effects of waves, sea sounds and just different things to cause effects. We thought of the ideas for the costumes, especially kimonos, and then we [used] a company called Creative Costuming. We told them the colors and they came up with the patterns and different types of material and sewed them all for us. [Each costume] was [custom sewn for each person]. We actually had a student from the theatre department at TJC sew another kimono that we really wanted last minute and she did an incredible job! Also the theatre department helped us with some of the [geisha] make-up for the girls. Hats off to them for helping there." The Apache Punch is very distinguished and has accomplished a lot in a short amount of time. McGowan and the team are already brainstorming for the 2013 WGI season show. Check them out in the fall with the rest of the band to hear what excellence sounds like. by Margaret Puklicz B S CE N E M A G.CoM


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A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 No. 105


OUTTakeS 2

1

3

4 1. Fountains in the Summer Palace of the Czars in Saint Petersburg, Russia. 2. Flowers in the lower gardens of Summer Palace of the Czars in Saint Petersburg, Russia. 3. A Tern in Stockholm, Sweden. 4. The lighthouse at warnem端nde, Germany, at Sunset.

with dr. Scott lieberman, md, FAcc


51.4 beautiful acres of rolling terrain and great views perched on a hillside just off of CR 3601, in BullarD Bullard Schools Owner will divide. May be purchased in 25 acres, 26 acres or 13 acre lots.

LyNN HANEy ABR, SRES, SFR 903.245.9289 TyLERSHomETEAm.Com

B S CENEMAG. Co M

A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 No. 107


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longVIew AFter hourS The Hampton Inn & Suites hosted the Longview Chamber of Commerce’s monthly After Hours event on June 28. Guests enjoyed delicious food and beverages in a relaxed environment, all while getting the chance to mingle with new and established area businesses.

Lisa nuLL, susie Dacus

richarD ManLey, chapin MiLLer

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ricK poLanD, richarD Lazarus

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aManDa fesi, aManDa portLey

ranDy bLacKshear, cJ cLayton

Mary Whitton, KayLa cantey, Missy saunDers

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No. 108 BS CENE

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/// MIX & MINGLE UT TYLER PATRIOT CLASSIC WRAP PARTY /// TYLER / EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS / JULY 19

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OFFICIAL CHECK PRESENTATION

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TEXAS ROSE FESTIVAL SUMMER LUNCHEON /// TYLER / WILLOW BROOK COUNTRY CLUB / JULY 20

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A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 No. 111


BACK PAGE information of all kinds: sports, technology, finance – all of it. Given unfettered access to that much of anything, eventually any phenomenon will turn on itself. Think of "Anchorman" or The Onion poking fun at that too-serious and superficial section of the news media. Memes are the same thing – perhaps thinner in substance and broader in origin. It’s the internet collapsing in on itself. Add the variety and profundity of what’s out there on the web and that simply means that the jokes can be scattered all over the map: tame and cute, satirical, farcical or literally insane – and sometimes all of that at once if you’re really lucky (or unlucky).

WHAT'S THE MEME-ING OF THIS?

THE PHENOMENON OF MEMES HAS HIT THE WEB. WHAT IS A MEME? WELL, IF THE WORDS "HONEY BADGER" AND "LEAVE BRITNEY ALONE" SOUND FAMILIAR TO YOU, THEN YOU KNOW THE MEANING. It’s the time-tested art of mixing be something as absurd as those What do Tom Selleck, a waterfall the sacred and the profane, but photoshopped images of Tom and a sandwich have in common? framed through the much smaller, Seleck, a sandwich and Go on, I’ll wait ... right here. hipper window of a flippant joke. a waterfall. Put the magazine down for a Mix together irony, mockery and Memes can spread few minutes and think about it. forcibly turning the uncool into throughout the world in a matter Really wrack your brain. Okay, something cool – and you’ve got of days: a creepy kid screaming are you back? Do you give up? a meme. It’s the hipster of the at everyone to “leave Britney THE VERY BASIS OF Internet. It’s a joke in skinny jeans alone” can garner millions upon MEMES IS THAT THERE millions of hits on YouTube in less and a knit cap. IS NO BACKGROUND, than a week. This mix of obscure SOMETHING STARTS SETTING OR references, widespread popularity EVEN COHERENT of something that probably should OUT AS UNKNOWN AND POSSIBLY COOL, THEN be an inside joke and the speed MOTIVATION FOR ADVERTISERS WILL HITCH with which it spreads is a perfect THEM INDIVIDUALLY. encapsulation of the beauty and A RIDE ON THAT COOLNESS inanity of the World Wide Web. Well, sorry to disappoint TO SELL SOMETHING ... It’s both a blessing and a curse, a you, but the answer is “nothing.” WHICH OFFICIALLY MAKES These things are totally unrelated, double-edged sword. IT UNCOOL You might be able to see ridiculous and nonsensical – in I’m sure the pioneers of the the liberation of a country as it other words, they are the perfect technology foresaw the amazing happens in real time, to view fodder for an internet meme power of what they were doing, people rise up and stream into (pronounced like “mēēm”). You at least in theory. The idea of the streets, demanding the right might not be familiar with the sharing data and information to govern themselves and to have term “meme,” but whether you’re had to be invented to open up a hand in the future of their aware of it or not, you definitely our minds to new information in country. But that also means know what it is. A meme is a medicine, news and other noble you’re going to have to look at concept that spreads virally pursuits. Well, it seems we’re way the same stupid photo of a cat throughout the Internet ... and past that now – for better or for hanging off a tree limb with a that’s it. It can be something like worse. Sure, you can still read a sarcastic quote written below for an intentionally misspelled word, news story about the economic the 400th time this week. a link, a repeated phrase, a video crisis in Greece mere seconds after Maybe it’s that dichotomy – almost anything, really. it happens … but there is also That “Ultimate Dog Tease” that makes memes a distillation probably a short cartoon in a link of the Internet’s powers, promises video your mom sent you? nearby that’s already making fun and epic failures. In America’s Meme. The pictures of people of the Greek Prime planking? That’s a meme, too. It overly ironic culture, nothing Minister’s mustache. seems to be taken at face value can be based in the real world, A lot is made of the any more; and sincerity, in most like people taking snapshots of constant news and information forms, is simply low-hanging themselves impersonating Tim cycle and, behind that, our fruit for those looking to aim Tebow’s one-knee prayer pose culture’s voracious appetite for their mockery and their mouses. in random locations. Or it can

No. 112 BS CENE

MEMES CAN SPREAD THROUGHOUT THE WORLD IN A MATTER OF DAYS: A CREEPY KID SCREAMING AT EVERYONE TO “LEAVE BRITNEY ALONE” CAN GARNER MILLIONS UPON MILLIONS OF HITS ON YOUTUBE IN LESS THAN A WEEK. Any sort of trend will be co-opted for profit eventually and, unsurprisingly, memes are heading that direction quicker than most people have actually learned the word “meme.” Something starts out as unknown and possibly cool, then advertisers will hitch a ride on that coolness to sell something ... which officially makes it uncool. Welcome to the world of being sold by memes. There’s that weird Vitamin Water commercial that incorporates about 20 different memes into one rolling, ludicrous montage exploding all around a guy as he goes to the corner store to buy some overpriced flavored water. And that’s the final step, usually. The very basis of memes is that there is no background, setting or even coherent motivation for them individually. Any two might be eerily similar or totally unrelated. So, that means that after the idea has been taken over and used to sell us goods and services, will that in itself become a new meme? Probably. In the bubbling cauldron of public consciousness – culture, art, news, health or anything else we devote any part of our minds to – memes are the bubbles that make it to the top and eventually burst. But, as long as the fire is lit, the bubbles will keep coming ... and there will always be a new picture of Tom Selleck, a waterfall and a sandwich to admire. by Will Knous wknous@h3-mediacom B S CE N E M A G.COM


Now Leasing • Upscale shopping experience • Ready for immediate occupany • Spaces ranging from 800 sq. ft. - 4,000 sq. ft. • European-inspired architecture with authentic elements • Fastest developing area in Tyler

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August 2012  

BSCENE Magazine