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Senior Section / Post-16 Secondary School Course Guide


The British School of Brussels Philosophy & Objectives

BSB is a world class international learning community that is: • welcoming and caring; • working together to challenge everyone to achieve their academic and • personal potential; • inspiring an on-going desire to broaden minds and horizons; • nurturing global awareness and realising success

2020 Vision By 2020 BSB will be known as the first choice for students, parents and professionals as a world class learning community recognised for: • state of the art campus facilities including sport and performing arts areas • a commitment to languages including bilingual programmes in French and Dutch • a creative and evolving curriculum providing a range of options for all learners from 18 months to 18 years, including British and International qualifications • enhancing learning through leading edge technologies • leading excellence and innovation in professional practice and development • active, ethical and purposeful engagement with the world around us Last updated by the Board of Governors: March 2013

Our School The British School of Brussels (BSB) is an independent, fee-paying, not for profit international school which meets the needs of internationally mobile and expatriate families in Belgium as well as local families who want an international education. • BSB is an inclusive, international learning community. All students who can benefit from the BSB experience are welcomed and are expected to be fully committed in their approach to learning • BSB has students from approximately 70 nations and is made up of two schools: - Primary School - ages 1-11 - Secondary School - ages 11-18 • English is the main language of tuition, with options available to follow a Bilingual French & English programme • all students follow a British-based curriculum up to age 16 - (I)GCSE. This is adapted to our European context and international cohort and is followed by the choice of two internationally recognised pre-university examination courses from age 16-18 - English A Level and the International Baccalaureate Diploma. We also offer a range of vocational courses including BTEC Business & Hospitality. • in its Governance and Management and in all its activities, the School will aspire to the highest ethical and legal standards


A Guide to the Senior Section (Years 12/13) at BSB Section 1: General Senior Section Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

06

An Introduction to Senior Section (Years 12/13) at BSB . . . . . . . . . . . Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Quality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Involvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Information and Choice Confirmation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Senior Section (Years 12/13) Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Core Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ‘Creativity, Action and Service’ (CAS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Personal, Social, Health and Careers Education (PSHCE) . . . . . . . . . . Global Perspectives and Theory of Knowledge (TOK) . . . . . . . . . . . . School Trips During Years 12 & 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Senior Section Centre (Mercator Building) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rights and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lunchtime Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Home Study Period . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tutor Group and Assemblies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Years 12 & 13 Mercator Study Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Admission to the Senior Section (Years 12/13) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The International Higher Education Programme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

06 08 09 09 10 12 12 12 14 14 15 18 18 18 18 18 19 19 21

Section 2: General Information on the International Baccalaureate Diploma

22

The IB Diploma Programme Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Award of the IB Diploma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theory of Knowledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Extended Essay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CAS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Advantages of the IB Diploma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24 25 26 27 27 28

Group 1 and 2 Studies in Language and Literature & Language Aquisition . . . 30

English A: Literature Higher Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . English A: Language and Literature Standard Level only . . . . . . . . . . . School-Supported Self-Taught Language A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Additional Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

30 32 33 34

Group 3 Individuals and Societies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Business and Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 03


Section 2 [continued]: Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Group 4 The Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Environmental Systems and Societies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Design Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

49 52 55 56 58 61

Group 5 Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Higher Level Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Further Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mathematics (Standard Level) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mathematical Studies (Standard Level) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Visual Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Film . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

64 65 66 66 67 68 69 71 73

Section 3: General Information on GCS Advanced Levels . . . . . . . . . . 76 Models of A Level Student Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Art & Design Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Business Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biology Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chemistry Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Computing Science Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Economics Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . English Literature Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . History Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Physics Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sociology A Level Linear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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78 79 81 83 84 86 87 89 90 92 94


Section 3 [continued]: Design & Technology: Product Design (3D Design) Modular . . . . . . . . . 98 Design & Technology: Product Design (Textiles) Modular . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Drama and Theatre Studies Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Geography Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Government and Politics Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Mathematics Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Media Studies Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Modern Languages Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 French Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 German Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Spanish Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Dutch Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Music Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Music Technology Modular . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Section 4: BTEC Nationals - Level 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Hospitality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Sport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

Section 5: Important Information for Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124

General Coursework Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Examination Policy for Appeals Against Internal Assessment of Coursework for External Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . Plagiarism - General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plagiarism: Harvard Referencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plagiarism: Re-Active Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arrangements for Public Examination Entries in Years 11-13 . . . . . . . . The 3 Rs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

124 127 128 129 130 131 132

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Section 1 General Senior Section Information - Time for challenge -

An Introduction to Senior Section (Years 12/13) at BSB The BSB Senior Section (Years 12/13) provides a stimulating and purposeful environment in which all individuals are challenged to achieve their full potential. Each individual is valued, and equal status is accorded to every student. At BSB we welcome students of all abilities and with all interests into our Senior Section. We aim not only to offer a broad and balanced curriculum, but also to provide opportunities for our students to develop into responsible members of the adult community. The school has an ‘open access’ Senior Section, in line with the Secondary School Admissions Policy. This means that all students are welcome and entry is based upon the individual’s desire to work hard and follow the school’s code of conduct in order to gain further qualifications or to develop and enhance existing academic skills. In providing access to qualifications at university entrance level, BSB offers a unique range and choice of routes: students can choose to follow A Level (divided into AS and A2) and/or BTEC qualifications, or pursue courses leading to the award of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma. Both A Levels and the IB Diploma are regarded by higher education institutions throughout the world as highly prestigious pre-university programmes. The BTEC qualification provides access to many UK institutions of further and higher education as well as institutions worldwide. Whichever route students opt for, our aim is to ensure clear academic progression which will meet the needs of the individual. Students for whom the A Level or IB Diploma academic programmes may not initially be appropriate can access Post-16 through selecting appropriate courses. This will most likely include the study of one or more of the BTEC programmes alongside one or more AS levels initially. Realistic and appropriate course choice at the outset is seen as vital in maximising success. Students’ requirements are assessed individually and progress throughout the Senior Section is carefully monitored and communicated to parents. Senior Section Support helps students who may need extra guidance with organisation, time management or study skills and/or additional English teaching, with learning support being provided wherever possible. Contact with parents is given a high priority. Access to Year 13 is based on performance in Year 12 with entry requirements based on the programme the student follows.

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Senior Section life should be thoroughly enjoyable and rewarding and is full of opportunities for personal enrichment. Years 12 and 13 provide a stimulating framework in which students are able to experience further study leading to qualifications, develop a mature and independent approach to life, exercise leadership skills and receive careers and higher education advice. There is also the opportunity to enjoy new freedoms and privileges: students have a number of periods for private supported study as well as the privilege of leaving the campus, with parental permission, at lunchtime or for private study at home. Senior Section students enjoy their own purpose-built centre, equipped with a wide variety of resources, including computers (all with internet access), periodicals, newspapers and reference books in a Post-16 Library. There is also a social area for use during breaks and lunchtimes. Senior Section education involves more than mere book learning, and students are encouraged to apply for positions of responsibility and to participate in a range of sporting and cultural activities, to keep up to date with the affairs of the wider world and to enjoy and contribute to the varied social life that the Senior Section has developed. It is a requirement for all members of the Senior Section to take part in the CAS (Creativity, Action and Service) programme. This applies to all students irrespective of the course they follow (IB, A Levels or BTEC). The Senior Section (Years 12/13) offers a wide range of opportunities for energetic, vital young people to enjoy and demonstrate their talents. It is not the final two years of schooling but the beginning of further and higher education and training. Staff are willing to give help and support, but ultimately the beginnings of a successful future depend on the motivation of each individual. To achieve their full potential, students must be prepared to rise to the challenge that the BSB Senior Section offers them. Take the BSB Advantage and join us! The Senior Section Team

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- Time to take the BSB Advantage The Post-16 years at school are two of the most important of a student’s life. Decisions made now, interests developed and responsibilities undertaken, are likely to have a major impact on the student’s future career. Not all students, of course, have a completely free choice, but it is important to consider all the opportunities available during the Post-16 years. Almost all BSB students continue their education into Years 12 & 13 (the Senior Section) and a significant number of new students join us at this stage. In the Senior Section at BSB students are treated as adults and enjoy the following privileges to prepare for the independence of university: • they are based in the Mercator Senior Section (Floors 2 & 3), with its impressive facilities, including computer suite with internet connection, private study area, Careers and Higher Education research facilities, Senior Section Library and relaxation areas • they are supported in using study periods effectively, in the Senior Section or can study privately in the Library • they are allowed to leave the School premises (with parental permission) at lunchtime •w  ith privileges and freedom, comes responsibility. Senior students are expected to lead by example

Courses The BSB Senior Section offers: • a choice of more than 25 AS/A2 and BTEC Level subjects which provides enormous flexibility for future Higher Education courses and careers • a choice of more than 25 IB Diploma subjects which also offers enormous flexibility and allows students to maintain breadth as well as depth • Flexibility to allow students to select appropriate combinations of courses • a Senior Section Support programme with support from highly qualified specialists for students who require English as an Additional Language (EAL) or help with their organisation, time management or study skills • Part of the core programme engages students in discussion and research about the arts, culture, ethics, politics and science. This course will help them develop key skills in communication, application of numbers and ICT as well as the wider key skills of improving independent learning and performance, problem-solving, questioning, critical thinking and working with others. The core programme offers A level and BTEC students Global Perspectives, and IB Diploma students Theory of Knowledge (TOK). • additional studies as part of the CAS (Creativity, Action and Service) programme which is designed to develop personal, as well as academic maturity

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Quality • High academic standards - a very high pass rate at A Level is usual, with approximately 70% of all grades at A or B. The pass rate in the IB is consistently above the worldwide average. BTEC students have a 100% pass rate record so far. • Approachable teachers who care about each student’s progress and discuss it both with the student and their parents •P  ersonal tutors who, together with the Head of Senior Section (Years 12/13), help document the students progress and acquisition of skills in a personal profile •C  omprehensive careers advice with an excellent record of post-Year 13 university placements, including to Oxbridge, the Russell Group, Ivy League and many international universities as well as places on excellent courses at lesser known universities • A good support service - in addition to the support offered by subject staff, tutors, senior staff, the Educational Psychologist and the school nurses, the School Counsellor offers a confidential service to all students • A special Induction Programme which gives specific and effective guidance to life and work in the Senior Section, including the study ethos • Impressive facilities - a superb Senior Section (Mercator Floors 2 & 3), with excellent learning and research facilities and Common Room in the basement for use at break and lunchtimes. In addition, in the past ten years virtually the whole school campus has been redeveloped: there are 8 superb Science laboratories, Maths rooms and ICT areas; there is a Modern Languages Centre, a Dance Studio, a Drama Studio and a Recording Studio as well as an Arts Centre, and an excellent Music Suite. Our Design and Technology workshops were completely refurbished in 2009 with state-of-the art equipment. Food & Textiles rooms, Art Studios, new rooms for Geography, History, English, Economics, Sociology, ICT and extensive sports facilities have all been recently refurbished. Our new swimming pool and sports centre will be completed by the spring of 2016. • CAS - a range of exciting opportunities for students to develop personal initiative and self-reliance.

Involvement • Service activities both in school and the local community, as well as ‘duties’, enable students to take real responsibility • Students are encouraged to develop leadership skills, for example subject captains, house captains, drama, music, sport, other extra-curricular activities and the production of school publications. Student initiatives are always welcomed • The School President and Vice President meet senior staff and younger students regularly to ensure positive channels of communication and effective liaison on student issues

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- Time to decide -

Information and Choice Confirmation December 2014

Information Evening with subject stalls in Rubens Hall

December 2014

• Individual subject presentations during lessons • New subject presentations during PSHCE • New subject “drop-in” sessions at lunchtime

January 2015

Year 11 mock examinations

30 January 2015

Course choices submitted

March 2015

Course choices confirmed NO COURSE CHANGES ALLOWED except for two windows of opportunity: • The week before Easter break • Course confirmation – September 2015

By the end of September in Year 12 should a student wish to change course, the procedure for this is as follows: 1. Arrange to see the IB or A Level & BTEC Coordinator who will check to see whether the proposed change is possible to timetable and to discuss the academic implications. 2. If it is possible to timetable the proposed change and the student still wishes to have the request considered, a course change request form will be issued and the student must obtain comments from: • the heads of departments affected by the change • the class tutor • their parents

3. The final decision will be made by senior staff. If the course change is approved, one of them will inform the student and staff involved. No student is allowed to change course unless this approval has been given. CAS choice changes need to be made through the CAS Coordinator.

- Time to get support and encouragement Students view the Senior Section as different and special. The Senior Section experience prepares them for the transition from (I)GCSE to higher level study; to the demands of leaving home; to higher education and the world of work. The programme offers many opportunities for academic, personal and social development which is underpinned by our emphasis on achievement, the development of key skills, and a full guidance programme.

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Students have the added bonus of a European dimension with extra language opportunities in the local and school environment. They can develop initiative and self-reliance and achieve a satisfying sense of adventure outside normal academic and in-school activities through the CAS programme. Teamwork and leadership skills are developed through extracurricular activities and work with younger students. Students also take responsibility for their own social events and work in partnership with staff in ensuring the ethos of the school is maintained. The events Programme provides many opportunities for students to voice opinions, organise and take on responsibilities. All Senior Section students will have interviews with a member of the Senior Section team as shown below: • in the Autumn Term of Year 12 (after the November Report) to consider subject choice and progress, including target-setting • in the Summer Term of Year 12 to look at university and Higher Education applications and subject choice • in the Autumn Term of Year 13 to finalise Higher Education applications

- Time to leave Senior Section students graduate from BSB to some of the top university and higher education (HE) institutions in the UK and globally. We are proud of our record of helping and guiding students of all abilities to the course and institution of their choice. Applications to UK universities are made through the UK system, UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service), but information can be accessed and applications processed for universities in North America, other European countries, Africa and the Far East. The BSB Senior Section Centre has its own computers for on-line UCAS (UK) university applications, university searches and research as well as its own library with prospectuses, books and resources (including audio-visual resources) on university entrance and the application procedure. Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 11


- Time to choose -

The Senior Section (Years 12/13) Curriculum Options The key element of our curriculum is flexibility. You may select options from any of the following in order that you may follow the course that is most appropriate to your individual needs, interests and abilities. BSB offers an exceptionally wide range of courses, unique in Belgium. Two year courses: • General Certificate of Education Advanced Levels (A Levels) • BTEC • Combination of A Levels and BTEC • International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma • International Baccalaureate (IB) Certificates • Combination of International Baccalaureate Certificates and A Levels One year course: • GCE Advanced Subsidiary (AS) Level (in modular subjects only) You must ensure that you seek appropriate advice at all stages in making your choices.

- Time to get involved -

The Core Curriculum The following elements of the Senior Section (Years 12/13) curriculum are compulsory for all students.

‘Creativity, Action and Service’ (CAS) BSB believes strongly that there is more to education than that which occurs in the classroom and hence all students - whichever programme they are following - will be expected to participate fully in the CAS programme of extra-curricular activities. The CAS programme takes the importance of life outside the world of academic study seriously and is designed to provide some balance in students’ lives during the time of intense study in the Senior Section. Students will be expected to engage in activities that provide a sound balance between creativity, action and service. All students will be timetabled for a double period of CAS per week, although it is expected that there will also be CAS commitments outside school in the evenings and at weekends. A twice yearly rotation pattern operates so that students can experience a range of activities on offer including at least one project, involving teamwork that integrates two or more of creativity, action and service and some of which the students have initiated themselves.

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Creativity ‘Creativity’ may be interpreted as imaginatively as possible to cover the broadest range of activities: for example, helping to produce the School Yearbook; assisting with, or participating in Drama, Art or Music events, involvement in debating, creating a charity campaign, planning an expedition, and so on.

Action ‘Action’ will include timetabled lessons where students will have the opportunity of experiencing a variety of activities. It is expected that ‘Action’ will not just be limited to this time, but will include other opportunities, such as membership of sports teams or learning a new sporting skill.

Service Student initiatives are particularly welcome in this area. In previous years a group of students organised part of the entertainment for the Special Olympics held in Brussels in May. They serve on committees such as the Charity Committee, The Best of Both – a student led charity working on educational partnership and development in Ghana the Student Council and Amnesty International. Students also support the school community in the following areas: Primary School assistance, drama productions, organising TEDx events, service learning projects, music groups, assistance at school events, e.g. Book Week. We hope too that students will use their time in both a constructive and positive manner to assist in communities outside the Senior Section. They will be able to broaden their experiences, develop communication and organisational skills and help others in a number of ways. The CAS Programme at BSB enable students to complete the requirements for the IB Diploma.


Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) PSHE is a very important element of the Senior Section (Years 12/13) curriculum which seeks to offer broad preparation for life outside school. During this time students will receive guidance on personal and social issues, have the opportunity to listen to visiting speakers on a range of topical themes and to share their own views. They will also be given advice on Further/Higher Education choices and applications, curriculum vitae and career opportunities. We believe that this demanding but exciting and educationally enriching programme provides an excellent preparation for BSB students for life in the 21st century. The topics below may be covered in both PSHE and tutor time: • current world and Belgian news • ethnic, cultural and religious issues • fundraising and links with local communities • public-speaking and interview skills • study and examination skills • analytical and critical-thinking skills • personal profiles and careers preparation • health & ethical issues • citizenship • politics, human rights & civil liberties • university applications

- Time to broaden horizons -

Global Perspectives and Theory of Knowledge (TOK) All students will be expected to broaden their curriculum and extend their academic horizons by following a course in “Thinking Matters” in Years 12 and 13 which prepares students for AS Level Global Perspectives, A Level Critical Thinking and the IB Theory of Knowledge programmes.

AS Global Perspectives (GP) for BTEC and A Level students In a world where there are often no right or wrong answers and a wealth of information is at our fingertips, the ability to think critically and be able to assess the merits and flaws of an argument or perspective is a vital skill for young people. GP is an exciting new course which broadens learners’ knowledge and understanding of 4 global issues while developing and enriching their skills in thinking and reasoning, analysis, research and communication. Their consideration of real-world, 21st-century issues through a process called the Critical Path 14 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


helps learners develop valuable skills which can be used in their study of other subjects and prepares them for their future study and beyond into the world of work. GP encourages learners to closely examine their own beliefs and attitudes in contrast to those of other people. They develop their skills in self-reflection and independent thinking as well as acquiring an understanding of alternative perspectives and the dynamics that affect the global community. The aim is to develop engaged, responsible and confident global thinking. The formal assessment takes place in Year 13 and has three components: a 15 minute presentation which students prepare using pre-release stimulus material worth 45%, a 1750-2000 word essay based on 1 global issue they have studied worth 30% and a written exam worth 25% which are all externally assessed.

Theory of Knowledge (TOK) for IB students This is a course in ‘critical thinking’ which seeks to equip students with the skills to question, and enquire about, the acquisition of knowledge in a number of areas. It involves the study of language, philosophy, mathematics, history, natural sciences and truth; students will be expected to reflect upon their own experiences in these fields and to discuss the validity of claims made about knowledge in these areas. TOK aims to make students think and answer questions with more questions rather than just providing simple answers. Students will find it challenging, stimulating and rewarding and some of the intellectual discussion and arguments will, we hope, remain with our students for the rest of their lives. The TOK course is assessed through one essay (1500 words) and one presentation made to the rest of the class (of about 10 minutes) -please see detailed entry in the subject section.

School Trips during Years 12/13 A BSB education will, “broaden students’ experience and improve their life skills by providing a range of activities and opportunities in and out of the classroom” There are a range of educational trips arranged for Year 12 and 13 students throughout the two years. The school values the contribution of educational trips and students are encouraged to participate in the wide variety of trips that are on offer. Ranging from half day local trips to week long residentials abroad. Some trips will be part of the required curriculum e.g. Geography fieldwork, while others will be part of the extra-curricular programme. Such trips provide students with opportunities for development through learning, discovery, exploration and challenge students to think and learn in ways that cannot be achieved in the classroom. The BSB carefully plan all of their trips to take place in concentrated periods of time, in order to minimise disruption to lessons. The table below contains a list of trips that have taken place recently, or that are planned for this academic year. Trips for students starting in Year 12 and 13 next September are likely to be similar, although venues do change from time to time. Parents may find this list useful when considering the trips available and the approximate costs involved, especially when students may wish to participate in several trips during the two-year period. There are other local day/evening trips for Art & Design, Textiles, Design & Technology, Business, Science, Media and Modern Languages. Music students visit exhibitions, museums, theatres and companies linked to AS/A2/IB courses.

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We have a comprehensive School Trips Policy in line with guidance from the Department for Children, Schools and Families in the UK to ensure the highest possible standards of health and safety of students and all trips are planned in accordance with the School Trips Policy and monitored by a senior member of staff. Full details of all the trips will, of course, be sent to you via a Parent Communication (PC) electronic letter and parent information meetings are organised for the longer residential trips.

School Trips – Years 12/13 Curricular Trips Subject

Trip description

Proposed dates

Art & Design

Biennial Year 12 &13 trip to Venice

September

Approximate cost in â‚Ź 800

Biology

Year 12 Fieldwork course in the Sierra de Gredos, Spain

CAS week

650

Visit to the Botanical Garden of Belgium, Meise

October

25

Business

Coca-Cola Factory Trip

January

20

Computing

Biennial Silicon Valley

October

1600

Drama

Drama Workshops at BSB

Various

20

Drama Year 12 & 13 Biennial TAPS Drama Festival, various destinations (New York 2013) or Day Trip/Overnight Theatre Production/Workshop on alternate years (various) Year 12 & 13 day trip(s) to London and Stratford theatres (English) Year 12 Fieldwork course in the Sierra de Gredos, Spain

Various

1500

English

200 - 600

Various

150-280 depending on trip

CAS week

650

Visit to the Botanical Garden of Belgium, Meise

October

50

Film

Film festivals and research visits in Belgium and London

October and November

French

Evening Theatre trips

November and December / January

Speak Academy

October and November

German

Year 12 trip to Black Forest

CAS Week

400

Geography

Year 12 course/field work, Ardennes and Brussels

September/ October

140

Biennial

Year 12/13 course/fieldwork, Iceland or Morocco

Environmental Systems and Societies

16 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014

50-200 depending on trip 20

5

1000-1200


School Trips – Years 12/13 Curricular Trips Subject

Trip description

Proposed dates

Government & Politics/Economics

Year 12 trip to London

Spring

Approximate cost in € 150

Trip to NATO

Spring

0

History

Year 12 trip to Paris

October

170

Music

Y12 and 13 Music Trip to London

November

250

Spanish

Year 12 trip to El Puerto de Santa Marìa

CAS Week

750

TOK

Year 12 trip to Magritte Museum

October

10

Subject

Trip description

Proposed dates

Best of Both

Working with the School’s Best of Both project in Ghana

June

Drama

Year 9-10 Annual ISTA Festival (Various)

Feb-April

500-1500

Careers

Year 12 visit to UCAS convention

Summer

100

General

Year 7 – 13 Ski Trip to Italy

February half-term

1250

Maths

UKMT London

March/April

Maastricht

March

MUN

Mini-MUN, The Hague

November

50

MUN

MUN, The Hague

January

600

PE & Duke of Edinburgh (DofE)

Various sports events and expeditions

Various

Various

Science

London International Youth Science Forum (not accompanied by BSB staff); participation only possible through school selection of students

July/August (dates published by organiser)

Non-Curricular Trips Approximate cost in € 2500

Subsidised for selected students

1800


- Time to be different, to lead and be special -

The Senior Section Centre (Mercator Building) This impressive resource contains a computer suite, private study area, Senior Section classrooms, Careers and Higher Education Library, Senior Section (Years 12/13) Library and Common Room. The top two floors of this purpose-built facility are for the exclusive use of BSB Senior Section students. Business and Economics, Sociology/Psychology and the whole Secondary School Library are also located in the same building. The Head of International Higher Education and Careers provides opportunities to prepare for application to top universities worldwide, to take up leadership opportunities throughout the school and to organise special activities for Senior Section students.

Rights and Responsibilities It is important that students should take increasing responsibility for the organisation of their own study programme and respect the working environment and facilities provided.

Lunchtime Privileges With parental permission and our knowledge and approval, we allow Year 12 and 13 students to leave the school grounds to purchase their lunch from local shops between 13.00-14.00 hours, provided they are not required for special duties. Alcohol must not be consumed and smoking is not allowed at any time including Carrefour and its periphery. Everyone must return punctually for afternoon classes or private study. We reserve the right to remove this privilege if it is not respected.

Home Study Privilege We review the academic progress of all students in Year 12 in the middle of November after their first written report. If a student’s effort, study habits and punctuality are all good we allow students, with their parents’ permission, to study at home for a limited time each week. Excellent facilities for private study exist within the school and we expect these to be used during allocated study periods. Students are required to sign in and out during study periods. We reserve the right to remove this privilege if academic standing, effort or attitude slip.

Tutor Group and Assemblies The tutorial and Year Group programmes are a collaborative effort between students, tutors and the Head of Senior Section (Years 12/13). Senior Section students will have a daily tutor period time, an assembly each week and Year Group meetings on alternate weeks.

18 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


- Time to study -

Years 12/13 Mercator Study Policy All Post-16 courses require a significant amount of independent work outside of lessons. The nature of this work is flexible depending on the individual student and subject, but includes preparation for lessons, wider reading, note-making, coursework, essays, portfolio work and revision. All students in Years 12 and 13 are allocated non-teaching times which are designated for private study, home study or supervised study, as appropriate.

›› Home study, always with parental consent, is a privilege granted to those students

who have demonstrated the ability to work independently, and have achieved good effort grades in their autumn and spring report. A record of home study periods will be kept and students must sign in and out. A separate letter will be sent home regarding home study.

›› Supported study will be available to all students for specific support, assistance with

study skills, organisation, time management or for those who are finding the jump from (I)GCSE to Post-16 study difficult. The majority of supported study will be provided by A Level, BTEC and IB teachers who can give specific subject support.

If a student needs to work outside of the Mercator building during a study period, e.g. to complete practical work in Art, permission from the subject teacher should be passed to the relevant coordinator. If a student needs support with private study or is not using his or her study time effectively, coordinators will monitor the student and/or contact parents.

Admission to the Senior Section (Years 12/13) In Senior Section we aim to provide courses appropriate for students of all abilities. The BSB Admissions Policy for Senior Section states: “The Senior Section of the BSB follows highly regarded, internationally recognised, pre-university courses. These are academically demanding and will certainly be suitable for BSB students” Therefore, in line with this Admissions Policy, the BSB Secondary School will apply the following additional criteria to all students wishing to join the Senior Section (Post-16). All students wishing to follow the normal A Level or IB Diploma route should have a minimum of 5 (I)GCSEs at grades C or above, with a grade B in the subjects the student wishes to study at A Level or IB Higher Level. This is simply to ensure that students will cope with the demands of the course. The exception to this is some Maths and Science courses, where the entry level is a grade A or A*. Mathematics and the Sciences have their own entry criteria, usually higher than the grade B requirement for Higher level IB or AS/A2 level study. Please refer to the individual sections in this guide for further information. All students following this programme must present their (I)GCSE certificates or grade receipts to the school as evidence of their suitability to follow these courses. Where these have not been presented to the school by the end of September of Year 12, and a member

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 19


of staff has doubts as to the student’s ability to follow the course successfully, a student may be required to alter their programme to suit their qualifications or ability. Concerns about a new student’s ability to cope with their programme will become apparent in the Student Reviews conducted for all Secondary students by the end of September. If a student has not followed the(I)GCSE programme previously, evidence must be available in the form of current (or immediate past) school reports to suggest that the levels reached are compatible with the entry requirements to cope with the requested course as cited in paragraph 1 above. For Maths and Science courses students may be set an entry paper or interviewed by the Head of Department. If an exception is ever made to the above, it is only to take into consideration extenuating personal circumstances. In such cases, the student must prove to the relevant heads of department that they can cope with the demands of the course by the end of the September of Year 12, or at the end of one full month following their arrival at BSB. Again, if a member of staff has doubts as to a student’s ability to follow the course successfully, the student may be required to alter his or her courses to suit their qualifications or ability. If a student enters the Senior Section without the qualifications to follow the IB or A Level routes, he or she will be required to follow an alternative course comprising of BTEC, AS and IB courses. The Additional Educational Needs (AEN) and English as an Additional Language (EAL) departments will provide student support in line with the policy for Post-16 provision, including Senior Section workshops and a Study Skills programme. In all of the circumstances listed in paragraphs 2-5 above, the letter of admission and parental contract will state clearly the terms of the offer of a place in the Senior Section to meet the relevant criteria. This will also be made clear to students and parents at their interview prior to admission. Entry into Year 13 is not automatic but is based on academic performance and attitude to study. A-Level students are required to achieve a minimum of 3 grade E’s in their AS exams. IB students are required to achieve a minimum of 24 points in their Year 12 mock exams. Students failing to meet these minimum requirements will be considered on a case by case basis.

Minimum entry requirements: Course A Level course, where students are studying 3 A levels, plus an additional subject which could be an AS or BTEC for one year International Baccalaureate Diploma Combination Course with BTEC, AS Levels or IB SL certificates

20 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014

Minimum entry requirements At least 5 UK (I)GCSEs at grade C, with a minimum B grade at (I)GCSE in the subjects for *A Level or *Higher Level study (where appropriate). Different entry conditions apply to Maths and Science qualifications. Please refer to the individual sections in the course guide. Other qualifications will be assessed on an individual basis Individual consultations will take place with students, parents and teachers in order to recommend the most appropriate course


• The failure to achieve the above recommended grades will not automatically mean exclusion from the course, just as the possession of those qualifications will not, of itself, guarantee acceptance. Some courses will be new to students as they will not have been studied before Year 12. • *Mathematics and the Sciences have a higher entry level criteria for most courses. Please refer to the individual entry requirements in the A level or IB sections of this guide.

The International Higher Education Programme More and more BSB students are making applications to non-UK universities, especially those in Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada and the USA. A large number of BSB students make applications to some of the most competitive courses in the world. The UK and the UCAS application system remains the most favoured route for BSB students. The Higher Education & Careers Team at BSB is here to meet those needs. As well as a Head of International Higher Education & Careers, there are also specialist Advisers in the following areas: applications to North America, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand; Belgium, The Netherlands and Western Europe; and for those students applying to Oxbridge, for Art and Design courses or for Medicine courses Students are able to book appointments with the Head of International Higher Education & Careers or the other advisers through the Senior Section Administrator. The International Higher Education & Careers Team and the whole Senior Section Team are here to support and advise on course selection, the writing of personal statements. letters of motivation and college essays, interviews and we are here on the all-important IB and A Level results days in the summer holiday. Higher Education Evening is in January for parents and students to meet the International Higher Education & Careers Team and hear their presentations. There is also a HE Day for Year 12 students in June during which HE professionals visit us and support our students in their applications. Therefore, every BSB student in Senior Section receives individual help and guidance, as well as extensive support from the PSHE programme, their tutor and the whole Senior Section Team in the Mercator Building. Careers Day takes place in October. Professionals, both local and international, from a wide variety of careers visit BSB and there are ample opportunities for students to hear talks and seek advice about careers and career paths. There is an Interview Evening in the Autumn Term for those students who are likely to be called to interview as part of the university or college selection process. BSB staff and invited specialists are on a wide variety of panels. Other BSB events include: Oxbridge Evening, Brussels College Night (organised by our friends at the Fulbright Commission), Dutch HE Evening, sessions with CATES Tutoring preparing students for ACTs and SATs and regular visits from universities from across the globe. 2014 has already seen visits from: McGill in Montreal; King’s College London; Maastricht, Leiden, Groningen, Tilburg in the Netherlands; Northeastern in Boston; SOAS, Goldsmiths and City in London; Nagoya; the Royal Veterinary College; Warwick; and HUB and Vesalius College here in Brussels. Students and parents will receive notification of Careers and HE events via email. Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 21


Section 2 General Information on the International Baccalaureate Diploma The British School of Brussels offers the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma programme. This provides an opportunity to follow a highly regarded pre-university course. The International Baccalaureate programme is a 2-year course of study which meets the needs of well-motivated students with all-round capabilities, students with a desire to learn and enjoy a broad curriculum can be successful at the IB. It offers academic rigour, genuine breadth and coherence. It develops initiative and resourcefulness. The IB is an effective preparation for university and the world of employment. Diploma holders can gain entry to more than 1000 universities worldwide, including the most prestigious.

Curriculum and Examination Format Subjects are offered at Higher Level, Standard Level or both. Qualification for the diploma requires six subjects, of which three (or perhaps four) are at Higher Level. Students must choose one subject from each of Groups 1-5 and can either make their 6th choice from Group 6 (Arts) or instead make a free choice from Groups 1-5.

The IB Learner Profile The IB programme promotes the education of the whole person, emphasising intellectual, personal, emotional and social growth through all domains of knowledge. By focusing on the dynamic combination of knowledge, skills, independent critical and creative thought and international-mindedness, the IBO espouses the principle of educating the whole person for a life of active, responsible citizenship. Underlying the IB Diploma programme is the concept of education of the whole person as a lifelong process. The learner profile is thus a profile of the whole person as a lifelong learner.

22 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


IB Learners strive to be: Inquirers

They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

Knowledgeable

They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

Thinkers

They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognise and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicators

They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

Principled

They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

Open-minded

They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring

They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

Risk-takers

They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Balanced

Reflective

They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their own strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 23


The IB Diploma Programme Model The Diploma programme model comprises the six academic areas surrounding the core, at the heart of the model are the approaches to teaching and learning. Subjects are studied concurrently and students are exposed to the two great traditions of learning: the humanities and the sciences.

The IB programme provides a first class education and Senior Section students at BSB will be able to benefit from the obvious advantages it offers: • breadth • rigour • fi rst class preparation for university and beyond •e  xcellent results If you need more detailed information or to discuss your son’s or daughter’s particular case, do not hesitate to contact the School. Please ask for the IB Coordinator, or email: RTomes@britishschool.be.

24 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Award of the IB Diploma All assessment components for each of the six subjects and the additional Diploma requirements must be completed in order to qualify for the award of the IB Diploma, except under the conditions stipulated in articles 18 and 19 of these regulations. The IB Diploma will be awarded to a candidate provided all the following requirements have been met. a. C  AS requirements have been met. b. T  he candidate’s total points are 24 or more. c. T  here is no “N” awarded for theory of knowledge, the extended essay or for a contributing subject. d. T  here is no grade E awarded for theory of knowledge and/or the extended essay. e. T  here is no grade 1 awarded in a subject/level. f. T  here are no more than two grade 2s awarded (HL or SL). g. There are no more than three grade 3s or below awarded (HL or SL). h. The candidate has gained 12 points or more on HL subjects (for candidates who register for four HL subjects, the three highest grades count). i. T  he candidate has gained 9 points or more on SL subjects (candidates who register for two SL subjects must gain at least 5 points at SL). j. T  he candidate has not received a penalty for academic misconduct from the Final Award Committee. (General Regulations: Diploma Programme, IBO)


Theory of Knowledge Nature of the Subject The Theory of Knowledge (TOK) programme is central to the educational philosophy of the IB. It challenges students to reflect critically on diverse ways of knowing and areas of knowledge, and to consider the role of knowledge in a global society. It encourages students to be aware of themselves as thinkers, to become aware of the complexity of knowledge, and to recognise the need to act responsibly in an increasingly interconnected world. As a thoughtful and purposeful enquiry into different ways of knowing, and into different kinds of knowledge, the TOK programme is composed almost entirely of questions: the most central question is: ‘How do I, or how do we know that a given assertion is true, or that a given judgement is well grounded?’ Questions are the very essence of TOK, both timeless questions on which thinkers have been reflecting for centuries, and new ones, often challenging to accepted belief, which are posed by contemporary life. Examples of questions provoked are: •h  ow is knowledge gained and from what sources? • to what extent do personal experience and ideology influence our knowledge claims? •w  hat is the difference between ‘I am certain’ and ‘It is certain’? •c  an we think without language? •c  an feelings have a rational basis? •d  oes living a moral life matter? The aims of the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) programme are to engage students in reflection on and in the questioning of, the bases of knowledge, so they: •d  evelop an understanding of why critically examining knowledge claims is important •d  evelop a critical capacity to evaluate beliefs and knowledge claims •m  ake interdisciplinary connections •b  ecome aware of the imperative nature of knowledge including personal and ideological biases • consider that knowledge may place responsibilities on the “knower” • understand the strengths and limitations of individual and cultural perspectives • develop a concern for rigour in formulating knowledge claims and intellectual honesty Assessment is by one essay of 1200–1600 words on a title prescribed by the IBO and an oral presentation to the class with internal assessors present.

26 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Extended Essay IB candidates are expected to complete an Extended Essay which is an in-depth study of a limited topic within a subject. Its purpose is to provide students with the opportunity to engage in independent research. Emphasis is placed on the process of engaging in personal research, on the communication of ideas and information in a logical and coherent manner and the overall presentation of the Extended Essay.

Award of Bonus Points A maximum of three bonus points can be awarded to a candidate’s combined performance in the Theory of Knowledge and Extended Essay according to the matrix below.

EXTENDED ESSAY

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE Excellent A

Good B

Excellent A

3

3

2

2

1 + Failing condition*

N

Good B

3

2

1

1

Failing condition*

N

Satisfactory C

2

1

1

0

Failing condition*

N

Mediocre D

2

1

0

0

Failing condition*

N

Failing condition*

Failing condition*

Failing condition*

Failing condition*

N

N

N

N

N

N

Elementary 1 + Failing E condition* Not Submitted

N

Satisfactory Mediocre C D

Elementary Not E Submitted

*From 2010 onwards, 28 points overall will be required to be eligible for the diploma if a student attains an “E” grade in either the extended essay of theory of knowledge. As previously, a grade “A” in one of the requirements earns an extra point even if the other is a grade “E”. Attaining a grade “E” in both the extended essay and theory of knowledge continues to represent an automatic failure.

CAS The Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) requirement takes seriously the importance of life outside the world of scholarship. The aims of CAS are to enable a student to appreciate the potential of the human mind and spirit, be aware of humanitarian issues around the world, recognise that education imposes lifelong ethical responsibilities, have confidence to initiate change, and engender autonomy and self-reliance amongst others. Participation in CAS encourages students to share their energies and special talents while developing awareness, concern and the ability to work cooperatively with others. The aim of the Diploma Programme is to educate the whole person, helping students to become responsible and compassionate citizens and share their energy and talents with others. The idea behind this is that a student may be a star academically, but that should not be all they are. Having CAS means that students must take part in a range of activities outside the academic curriculum too. Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 27


The essential aspect of this is that each student must complete about 50 hours each of things ‘active’ (sport), ‘creative’ (drama, art, music) and of ‘service’ (something for someone else) over the course of the two year Diploma. ‘Action’ could be participation in team or individual sports, expeditions, or camping activities. ‘Creativity’ might include doing dance, theatre, art or music, preferably in a group. ‘Service’ might be at the School, in the local community, at national or international level. BSB provides students with a number of varied activities for CAS hours.

Advantages of the IB Diploma The advantages of the IB Diploma are: • the study of six subjects from a prescribed pattern ensures that you follow a broad and balanced course of study • y ou will find that all the courses are relevant to your experiences since they are all designed specifically for international students • y ou can choose to study some subjects in depth (Higher Levels), while maintaining breadth with Standard Level courses • the other areas of the Senior Section curriculum such as Physical Education, the Theory of Knowledge and Community Service, which are compulsory for all students, actually count towards your overall Diploma • y ou will receive an overall Diploma based on points scored in each subject; therefore, if you do not do very well in one area, it can be compensated for by a better performance in another • y ou will find that the IB Diploma is welcomed by universities throughout the world as an excellent preparation for undergraduate study. It is highly regarded by European and USA institutions and is fully accepted and welcomed by all UK universities as an equally prestigious, but broader alternative to A Levels

Entry Requirements • Students should have at least 5 grade Cs or above at (I)GCSE to start the full IB Diploma programme, with a recommended minimum of a grade B at (I)GCSE in the subjects that they wish to study at Higher Level and a grade C at Standard Level • All students study Mathematics for the IB Diploma. It is essential that students choose a level matching their ability and realistic future career aspirations. Students intending to study courses at university, which do not include the use of Mathematics should choose Mathematical Studies. All other students must obtain (I)GCSEs at the minimum standards outlined below: Minimum (I)GCSE Requirement Further Mathematics HL

A*

Mathematics HL

A*

Mathematics SL

A*/A

Mathematical Studies SL

A*-C

28 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


• To study Biology, Chemistry or Physics at IB Higher Level, it is expected that students have achieved a grade AA or higher in their (I)GCSE Science (Double Award) or a grade A in their (Triple Award) Biology, Chemistry and Physics papers. To study the subject at IB Standard Level it is expected that students have achieved at least a grade C in their (I)GCSE Science (Double Award). You will also be expected to handle and interpret data, so you should also have achieved at least a grade C in (I)GCSE Mathematics. Students who followed the CIE IGCSE Combined Science will not be allowed to study IB Higher Level sciences. • Students who are new to BSB wishing to study Mathematics or any of the Sciences and have no exam qualifications in the subject may be asked to sit a placement test and will be interviewed by the Head of Department. • Entry into Year 13 to continue the study of the full IB Diploma requires the students to be in good academic standing throughout Year 12 and achieve a minimum of 24 points in the Year 12 mock exams held in May. Students failing to meet these requirements will be considered on a case by case basis and may be allowed to continue with clear targets and academic goals (including possible re-take exams), drop one or more subjects and continue with IB Certificates or they may be required to restart Year 12. Individual meetings will be held between the student, parent and IB Coordinator in liaison with the Head of Secondary School to decide on the most appropriate course of action.


Group 1 and 2 Studies in Language and Literature & Language Acquisition English A: Literature Higher Level Having followed the Language A programme at Higher Level (HL), students will be expected to demonstrate: • k nowledge and understanding of individual literary works as representatives of their genre and period, and relationships between them •a  n understanding of the ways in which cultural values are expressed in literature •a  wareness of the significance of the context in which a work is written and received •a  n ability to substantiate and justify ideas with relevant examples •a  n ability to analyse language, structure technique and style and evaluate their effects on the reader •a  bility to engage in independent literary criticism on both familiar and unfamiliar literary texts •a  n ability to examine and discuss in depth the effects of literary techniques and the connections between style and meaning •a  n ability to express ideas clearly and fluently in both written and oral communication, with an effective choice of register and style •a  command of terminology and concepts appropriate to the study of literature •a  n ability to express well-organised oral and written arguments •a  n ability to write a sustained and detailed literary commentary

30 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


The Higher Level Course 25%

Part 1: Works in Translation •T  hree linked texts originally written in another language •A  ssessment: one externally-assessed essay and reflective statement of 1000 to 1500 words each

15%

Part 2: Detailed Study • Three texts • Assessment: an Individual Oral Commentary lasting about fifteen minutes followed by discussion

25%

Part 3: Literary Genres • Four texts of the same genre • Assessment: a two-hour written examination (one question)

15%

Part 4: Options • Three texts chosen by the teachers • Assessment: an Individual Oral Presentation lasting about fifteen minutes

20%

Assessment: In addition to the above, candidates will take a two-hour examination in which they write a detailed commentary on an “unseen” poem or prose passage. The total number of texts studied at Higher Level is thirteen.

Assessment Summary: 1. Works in Translation One essay and reflexive statement internally set but externally marked

25%

2. Oral coursework

30%

• Individual Oral Commentary (15 minutes) commentary on an extract, chosen by the teacher from one of the Part 2 works followed by a discussion based on another Part 2 work • Individual Oral Presentation (15 minutes) presentation on a topic chosen by candidate based on Part 4 work(s) 3. Final examination

(15%)

(15%)

45%

There are two written papers, externally set and marked, each of two hours. One paper is a guided commentary on an “unseen” poem or prose passage and the other is an essay on a group of works studied during the course.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 31


English A: Language and Literature Standard Level only Having followed the Language A programme at Standard Level (SL), students will be expected to demonstrate: The English A Language and Literature Course aims are to: • Introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and genres; •D  evelop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections; • Develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication; •E  ncourage students to recognise the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received; •E  ncourage, through the study of texts, an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning; • Encourage students to appreciate the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts; •P  romote in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature; •D  evelop in students an understanding of how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in texts; •E  ncourage students to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose. Links with The Theory of Knowledge (TOK) is central to the IB Diploma Programme. Students should be able to reflect critically on the various ways of knowing and knowledge issues, such as ‘How does the reader shape the meaning of a text’ or ‘When does a text become defined as literature’? The Standard Level Course: Language and Literature Overview: Part 1: Language in cultural context Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media.

25%

Part 2: Language and mass communication Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media.

15%

Part 3: Literature – texts and contexts Two texts, one of which is a text in translation from the Prescribed Literature in translation (PLT) list, and one, written in the language A studied, chosen from the prescribed list of authors (PLA) for the Language A studied, or chosen freely.

25%

Part 4: Literature – critical study Two texts chosen by the teacher, both of which are chosen from The Prescribed List of Authors (PLA).

15%

Assessment: In addition to the above, candidates will take a 1½ hour examination in which they write a detailed analysis on an “unseen” text (Paper 1) and another paper (Paper 2), which consists of six questions, in which the students answer one. The essay is based on literary texts studied in Part 3 of the course.

20%

The total number of literary texts studied at Standard Level is four.

32 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Assessment Summary: 1. Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in the course. One written task is submitted for external assessment. (written coursework) This task must be 800-1000 words in length plus a rationale of 200-300 words.

20%

2. Oral coursework • Individual Oral Commentary (15 minutes) commentary on an extract, chosen by the teacher from one of the Part 4 of the course • Further oral activity – students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on Part 1 and one based on Part 2 of the course.

30% (15%)

3. Final written examination Paper 1 – Textual analysis (1 hour and 30 minutes) The paper consists of two unseen texts. Students write an analysis of one of these texts.

50%

Paper 2 – Essay (1 hour and 30 minutes) In response to one of six questions, students write an essay based on both the literary texts studied in Part 3.

(15%)

25%

25%

There are two written papers, externally set and marked, each of 1½ hours and each worth 25%. One paper is a guided analysis on an “unseen” texts, in which students analyse one and the other is an essay based on both literary texts studied in the course.

School-Supported Self-Taught Language A Students wanting to study a language other than English at A Level may take the subject as a school supported Self-Taught language A at Standard Level (SL) only. They will be expected to meet the same syllabus requirements as for taught SL candidates, but with the following exceptions: • there is no free choice of works in Part 3 and Part 4 • the study of a Part 4 World Literature work is compulsory and a Language A work cannot be studied in its place; Self-Taught candidates must study five World Literature works in addition to the six works written in their Language A • if the candidate’s choice of World Literature works in Part 3 and/or Part 4 is restricted for any reason e.g. studying with taught candidates taking another Language A, the requirement concerning links with Language A works need not apply. Self-Taught candidates will be given assistance with specific aspects of their studies. This may be done either in a special tutorial class for the Self-Taught candidates or in a class of students preparing a taught Language A. Such an arrangement is especially useful in equipping Self-Taught candidates with the information and skills necessary for carrying out the World Literature Assignment, the written commentary exercise and, to some extent, the Oral Component.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 33


Self-Taught language A is only suitable for students that have a strong independent work ethic and in languages where suitably qualified tutors can be sought. All students seeking to take this option, must communicate their intention to the IB coordinator in advance so that suitable arrangements can be made where appropriate.

Assessment All Language A components are externally assessed for Self-Taught candidates. All responses, written and oral, must be in the Language A studied. Assessment Summary: 1. World Literature (written coursework)

20%

One assignment internally set but externally marked 30%

2. Oral coursework • Individual Oral Commentary (15 minutes)

(15%)

• Individual Oral Presentation (15 minutes) Presentation on a topic chosen by candidate based on Part 4 works(s)

(15%)

50%

3. Final examination There are two written papers, externally set and marked, each of 1½ hours and each worth 25%. One paper is a guided commentary on an “unseen” poem or prose passage and the other is an essay on a group of works studied during the course.

Additional Languages All IB Diploma students follow an additional language course. Within the overall framework of the IB, languages will be offered in the first instance as follows. Language A Literature

English

Language B

Ab Initio (SL) (beginners)

French, German, Spanish, Dutch, (HL, SL)

Spanish

Language and Literature Dutch (HL, SL), French (HL, SL) (Fluent Speakers)

French/Dutch Language A – Language and Literature Who is it for? This course is designed for students who are fluent in French/Dutch; they may be students who are native speakers or those who have gone through French schooling at some stage. Such students are virtually bilingual in reading and/or writing as well as speaking the language. The course is based on the use of language rather than its acquisition. All teaching and assessment is in French/Dutch.

34 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Aims The course aims to use language in a wide range of contexts and for a variety of purposes. Through the study of a wide variety of texts, including literary texts, students are encouraged to develop an awareness of different perspectives of people from different cultures. They are also encouraged to see and explore the relationship between language and culture. Students are required to study 6 literary texts at Higher Level, or 4 texts at Standard Level. In these works students consider how writers use language and style to present ideas, themes, feelings and attitudes. Examples of non-literary texts are advertisements, cartoons, brochures, press articles, letters, opinion columns, appeals etc; students examine such texts to improve, amongst other things, their awareness and ability to analyse, persuade, evoke, convey information and entertain.

Levels The difference between Higher and Standard levels is one of degree; the aims and course outline are very similar.

Syllabus The syllabus consists of the four following sections: 1. Language in cultural context 2. Language and mass communication 3. Literature – texts and contexts 4. Literature – critical study

Assessment summary External assessment Written assessment:

Internal assessment %

%

Paper 1: (HL - 2 hours; SL – 1.5 hours) Textual analysis of one unseen text (SL) or a comparative analysis of one pair of unseen texts (HL)

25%

Individual oral – literary commentary

15%

Paper 2: (HL - 2 hours; SL – 1.5 hours) Literary essay based on two works (SL) or three works (HL) chosen from those studied

25%

Further Oral Activities – at least two activities (both HL and SL)

15%

Written coursework assignment: At least three tasks (SL) or four tasks (HL) of 800 – 1000 words each, accompanied by a rationale of 200 – 300 words

20%

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Language B: French, German, Spanish and Dutch Who is it for? Language B courses are suited to students who have completed IGCSE or a similar examination. Courses last two years with the examinations taking place at the end of Year 13. Note: for students to embark on a HL course they will be expected to have achieved at least a Grade B (but preferably higher) at IGCSE.

Aims The courses aim to enable students to understand and use the language studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes. Students are expected to master a variety of linguistic skills, to be interactive and to acquire a deeper knowledge of the countries and culture of the language studied. The Language B student should learn how to communicate effectively in a number of situations. There is an emphasis on such language skills as persuading, interviewing, defending and giving instructions. Texts studied match the skills developed.

Syllabus The syllabus consists of the following sections: • Core: Three topics are studied at both SL and HL (Social relationships; Communication and media; Global issues) • Options: At both SL and HL, two further topics are selected from a choice of five (Health; Customs and Traditions; Leisure; Cultural Diversity; Science and Technology) • Literature: (HL only) Two texts are studied.

Assessment Summary The assessment model assesses students both with terminal written exams and internal assessment tasks completed during the course of Year 13. Typically, the internal assessments take place in the second half of the Spring Term. All answers in all assessment tasks are in the target language. There is no separate Listening Comprehension paper, since this skill is tested in the Individual and Interactive orals. External assessment

Paper 1: Receptive skills

Questions on unseen texts (four texts at SL; five texts at HL)

Paper 2: Written productive skills

36 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014

Higher

Standard

25% 1 hour 30 paper

25% 1 hour 30 paper

25% 1 hour 30 paper One task from a choice of 5 (250-400 words) + one response to a stimulus text (150-250 words)

25% 1 hour 30 paper One task from a choice of 5 (250-400 words)


20% Creative writing of 500 - 600 words plus a 150 - 250 word rationale, based on one of the literary texts studied

20% Written response of 300 - 400 words plus a 150 - 200 word rationale, based on three or four previously selected texts

Individual Oral (based on the Options)

20%

20%

Interactive Oral activities (based on the Core topics)

10%

10%

Written coursework assignment:

Internal: Oral assessment

Ab Initio: Spanish Who is it for? The ab intio course is a language acquisition course for beginners; any student who has had formal instruction for a year or more in Spanish will not be eligible to take it. The ab initio course will appeal to those students who wish to make a fresh start with a new language.

Aims and description of course: The course is organised around the three following themes: • The individual and society • Leisure and work • Urban and rural environment Each theme has a list of topics that provide the students with opportunities to practise and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural competence. There is a language-specific syllabus covering the topics, grammar and vocabulary required. There is only one level: Standard. External assessment Paper 1: Receptive skills

Questions on four unseen texts

1 hour 30 minutes

Paper 2: Written productive skills

Two short written responses

1 hour

Written assignment: Receptive and written productive skills

Guided writing: 200 - 350 words

Internal assessment Individual interview: Interactive skills

Individual oral presentation based on a visual stimulus, followed by questions and general conversation (10 minutes in total)


Group 3 Individuals and Societies Business and Management IB BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT – Higher Level and Standard Level Businesses are all around us! Business and Management is a practical subject that will equip you with skills that will be invaluable for your future no matter what field you choose to go into. Whatever you choose to do in your working life, the chances are that it will involve some “business”. You will explore business and how it works from a practical approach, using real life case studies to enable you to apply your knowledge. The IB Business and Management course is designed to develop an understanding of business theory, as well as an ability to apply business principles, practices and skills. The students gain an understanding of business activities in a global market and an international perspective of business.

Nature of the Course No particular background is expected and no prior learning is necessary for students to undertake a course of study. Some of the aims of the course are to: •P  romote the importance of exploring business issues from different cultural perspectives. •E  ncourage a holistic view of the business world. •E  nable the student to develop the capacity to think critically about individual and organisational behaviour. •E  nhance the student’s ability to make informed business decisions. •E  nable the student to appreciate the nature and significance of change in a local, regional and global context. •A  ppreciate the social and ethical responsibilities associated with businesses operating in international markets. HL and SL core

HL only

• Business Organisation and Development • Human Resources • Accounts and Finance • Marketing • Operations Management

• Business Strategy

Assessment Standard Level

Higher Level

External Assessment

2 examinations 75%

2 examinations 75%

Internal Assessment

Commentary 25%

Written Research Project 25%

Course requirements and progression To follow the Business and Management course you would be expected to meet the general requirements for the IB Diploma. In addition, because the subject is largely based on developing certain numerical skills and requires higher level writing skills (I)GCSE Mathematics and English Language grade C or above are normally required.

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Economics IB ECONOMICS – Higher Level & Standard Level Economics is a dynamic social science that is fundamentally about the concept of scarcity and the problem of resource allocation. It examines the challenges common to all societies in the search for acceptable levels of wellbeing. There is a vast gulf separating the richest and the poorest inhabitants of the world – the dilemma of economies and economists is how to allocate scarce resources to their infinite and competing uses in a manner that might be considered fair, just and sustainable. The subject can be studied at both Standard and Higher Level. The first year of the course involves studying the principles that underpin economic thinking, developing a ‘toolkit’ of economic ideas, and then practicing these on a wide range of practical issues, using as sources, current periodicals, newspapers and the internet.

Nature of the Course The course at all levels is assessed by both final examinations and coursework. At both the Standard and Higher Level microeconomics and macroeconomics are studied, followed by applications of economic theory to such topics as development and international trade. Following an Introduction to Economics unit the four main topic areas are as follows: Microeconomics

Macroeconomics

• Markets – local, national, international

• Measuring national income

• Demand + supply analysis

• Introduction to development

• Elasticities

• Macroeconomics models; AD/AS analysis, full employment, Keynesian v neo-classical approach

• Market failure HL extension • Theory of the Firm; perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, price discrimination

• Demand side and supply side policies • Unemployment and inflation • Distribution of income HL extension • Multiplier, accelerator, crowding out • NAIRU, inflation, problems of measurement and the Phillips curve • Laffer Curve, Lorenz Curve, Gini Coeffecient

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 39


Development Economics

International Economics

• Growth v development

• Reasons for trade

• Consequences of growth

• Free trade and protectionism

• Barriers to growth and/or development

• Economic integration

• Growth and development strategies

• WTO

• Evaluating growth and development strategies

• Balance of payments; measurement, structure and problems • Exchange rates • Terms of trades HL extension • Trade creation and diversion • Exchange rate systems • Marshall-Lerner and J Curve Theory • Elasticity of imports and exports

Assessment Standard Level Economics

Higher Level Economics

External Assessment

2 examinations 75%

3 examinations 80%

Internal Assessment

3 commentaries 25%

3 commentaries 20%

Course Requirements and Progression To follow the Economics course you would be expected to meet the general requirements for IB Level coursing. In addition, because the subject is largely based on developing certain numerical skills and requires higher level writing skills a grade B or higher at (I)GCSE Mathematics and English Language are normally required. It is recommended that you study Higher or Standard Level Mathematics.

Geography Introduction Geography is at the interface of the Humanities and the Sciences. The IB course involves study of systematic aspects of both Human and Physical Geography, creating a platform for considering the major environmental, political, cultural and socio-economic issues facing the world today. The course is designed to accommodate students who have studied Geography before and also those who have little previous knowledge of the subject.

The world needs geographers! Geography offers you the unique perspective of place. It connects the natural sciences to the humanities and in doing so helps you understand the human impacts on our fragile world. Do you want to understand why the economic model is responsible for widespread environmental destruction? Can you explain why we are all intrinsically linked to global 40 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


poverty? Or are you interested in the natural forces that change our world and increasingly wreak havoc on human lives? Perhaps you want to help manage these impacts in the future. Then Geography is the subject for you.

What’s in store? Whether you are studying Standard Level or Higher Level the course offers valuable breadth and exposure to both human and physical geography. Over the two years all geographers follow a central core which covers population change and disparities in wealth. The course then leads on to examine patterns of environmental quality and sustainability. The students are taught to critically examine the socio-economic and political processes that develop patterns of resource consumption. In the first year both SL and HL geographer study fresh water issues. This is an enjoyable course that examines the challenges of the management of water and looks well beyond the traditional theory of river systems. In addition the HL students follow a second option course on the geography of food and health. In the second year, all students study a detailed course on hazards and disasters to include a comprehensive introduction into hazard management. HL students also examine global interactions which are an extensive study of the socio-economic, political and environmental issues that increasingly connect the global community. In addition you attend two fieldwork days and conduct a practical study of changing river characteristics and a comparison of two Brussels communes. Students then have the choice of writing their coursework on either a physical or human topic. Every other year we take all Post 16 geographers on an extended fieldtrip to study and witness the topics we study in the field. In previous years we have travelled to Morocco and Iceland. The Geography department has taken a leading role in the development of ICT within it’s curriculum.

Will it fit into my life? Geography is probably the most versatile of all subjects and strong links can be found with the three sciences and Mathematics. There is direct links with Economics, History and Sociology. Critical thinking and communication are essential skills in Geography and inevitably supports your learning in any combination of subjects.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 41


Where will the success take me? In recent years over a third of our Geography students at BSB have gone on to major in Geography or Geography related courses at some of the best UK universities, including Oxford and Cambridge as well as abroad. Recent statistics suggest that Geography graduates are amongst the most employable. Beyond postgraduate studies, management, administration and finance are the three main fields of employment. Geography is a well-respected academic subject that essentially develops transferable skills for a flexible career path.

What skills will I learn? Geography helps develop a versatile and flexible skill set. The most central skills that we seek to develop in our teaching are: • Spatially, socially and environmentally awareness • A global perspective and a sense of world interdependence • Communication skills • Teamwork • Management skills • Analytical and critical thinking skills

On your marks… Paper 1 Population in transition

1.30 hour Extreme Environments 40% Hazards and DisastersRisk Assessments and Response

Disparities in Wealth SL

Paper 2

Patterns in Environmental Quality and Sustainability

Paper 3 1.35 hours 35%

Patterns in Resource Consumption Population in transition

1.30 hour Extreme Environments 25%

Disparities in Wealth HL

Patterns in Environmental Quality and Sustainability Patterns in Resource Consumption

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Hazards and DisastersRisk Assessments and Response The Geography of Food and Health

2 hours 35%

Global Interactions

1 hour 20%


History The Nature of the Subject The study of history from an international perspective is increasingly important today. In the contemporary context, one of globalisation and technological development, different cultures and societies are increasingly in contact and interdependent. Now, more than ever, there is a need for an understanding of the present as well as the past. The aim of History in the Diploma programme at BSB is to explain trends and developments, continuity and change through time, and through individual events. The course is concerned with individuals and societies in the widest context: political, social, technological and cultural. The course will appeal to students who enjoy debate and who want to study a subject which will improve their analytical skills and encourage them to consider evidence and make up their own minds on areas of historical controversy.

Aims The aims of History at Higher and Standard Level are to promote: • the acquisition and understanding of historical knowledge in breadth and depth, and from different cultures •a  developing appreciation and understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity of its sources, methods and interpretations • international awareness and understanding of people living in a variety of places at different times •a  better understanding of the present through an understanding of the past •a  n ability to use and communicate historical knowledge and understanding •a  lasting interest in history

Objectives Having followed the programme students will be expected to: • comprehend, analyse and integrate source material critically as historical evidence • demonstrate historical understanding of 20th century world history through the acquisition, selection, effective use and synthesis of knowledge • explain different approaches to, and interpretations of, historical events and topics • place events in their historical context • explain the causes and effects of historical continuity and change • present arguments that are clear, coherent, relevant and well-substantiated • present historical explanations from an international perspective • plan, organise and present an individual historical investigation

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Syllabus Outline: Higher Level and Standard Level Both Standard and Higher students will study the following 20th century topics: • the Cold War, 1945-1989 • communism in crisis: events in the USSR & China 1976-89 •n  ationalist and independent movements, decolonisation and challenges facing new states

Higher Level Higher Level students will also study in depth aspects of European and Russian History from approximately 1789 to 1995. Both Higher and Standard students will do a historical investigation on a topic of their choice.

Assessment summary Higher Level

Standard Level

Paper 1: documents

20%

Paper 1: documents

30%

Paper 2: essays

25%

Paper 2: essays

45%

Paper 3: essays

35%

Internal assessment

25%

Internal assessment

20%

Psychology The Nature of the Subject Psychology is defined as the systematic study of behaviour and mental processes. In the 19th century, psychology began to emerge from its ties with philosophical speculation and in the 20th century its main focus was on empirical and scientific research methods. The current trend is towards a balance of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Modern psychology occupies an important position as a meeting ground for both the natural and social sciences. The variety of current research areas and applications reflects the prominent role of psychology in modern society, for example, recovered memory as evidence in criminal trials; is intelligence innate?; is prejudice and discrimination inevitable? Psychology has taken a leading role in the investigation of the relationship between physiological processes and human experience. For example, recent discoveries in the human genome project have supported current research into the relationship between humans and animals. Research in these areas raises ethical issues, especially about informed consent and whether the findings can be applied to humans. Some psychologists today are adopting a more holistic view of what it is to be human. The rapid increase in globalisation and the use of technology calls for greater insights into how individuals interpret meanings, relationships and health. Psychology addresses these complex issues in order for students to better understand themselves and others, thus offering an opportunity to focus on individuals and societies in the context of the social sciences.

44 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Aims In addition to the aims of all subjects in IB Group 3: Individuals and Societies, the aims of the psychology course at SL and at HL are to: •d  evelop an awareness of how psychological research can be applied for the benefit of human beings •e  nsure that ethical practices are upheld in psychological inquiry •d  evelop an understanding of the biological, cognitive and socio-cultural influences on human behaviour •d  evelop an understanding of alternative explanations of behaviour •u  nderstand and use diverse methods of psychological inquiry

Objectives Having followed the Psychology course at SL or at HL, students will be expected to demonstrate the following:

1. Knowledge and comprehension of specific content, specifically: • key terms and concepts in psychology • psychological research methods • a range of appropriately identified psychological theories and research studies • the biological, cognitive and socio-cultural levels of analysis • one option at SL or two options at HL

2. Application and analysis • demonstrate an ability to use examples of psychological research and psychological concepts to formulate an argument in response to a specific question • at HL only, analyse qualitative psychological research in terms of methodological, reflexive and ethical issues involved in research

3. Synthesis and evaluation • evaluate psychological theories and empirical studies • discuss how biological, cognitive and socio-cultural levels of analysis can be combined to explain behaviour • evaluate research methods used to investigate behaviour

4. Selection and use of skills appropriate to Psychology • demonstrate the acquisition of knowledge and skills required for experimental design, data collection and presentation, data analysis and interpretation • at HL only, analyse data using an appropriate inferential statistical test • write an organised response

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Syllabus Outline Part 1: Perspectives: Core (SL/HL) • The Biological level of analysis – patterns of behaviour can be inherited; animal research may inform our understanding of human behaviour; how the brain affects behaviour; interaction between cognition & physiology; genetics and behaviour • The Cognitive level of analysis – memory, perception, language; emotion; how social, cultural and biological factors affect cognition and the processing of information • The Sociocultural level of analysis – the formation and effects of stereotypes; conformity research; compliance techniques; is it our personality or the situation that shapes our behaviour and our identity?

Part 2: Options (SL/HL) – HL study all 3 / SL study just Human Relationships • Psychology of human relationships – altruism and pro-social behaviour; attraction and relationships; violence and strategies to reduce it • Abnormal psychology – disorders such as anxiety, eating, affective e.g. depression; looking at biomedical, individual and group therapies • Developmental psychology – cognitive, social & identity development e.g. attachment, gender roles, intelligence and cognitive ability

Part 3: Qualitative research methodology (HL only) • Qualitative research in psychology – interviews, observations and case studies Part 4: Simple experimental study (SL/HL) • Introduction to experimental research methodology • The completion of a simple experimental study

Objectives

1. Knowledge & Comprehension 2. Application & Analysis 3. Synthesis & Evaluation 4. Selection & use of skills appropriate to Psychology

Internal assessment

Overall

Paper 1

Paper 2

Paper 3

40%

40%

33% (HL)

30%

30%

20%

33% (HL)

25%

20%

20%

33% (HL)

15%

10%

20%

46 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014

100%

30%


Assessment Summary – Higher Level (Standard Level figures, if different, are in brackets) Assessment component

Weighting

External assessment – 4 hours (3 hours)

80% (75%)

Paper 1: 2 hours Section A: Three compulsory questions on part 1 of the syllabus. Section B: Three questions on part 1 of the syllabus. Students choose one question to answer in essay form. 46 marks

35% (50%)

Paper 2: 2  hours (1 hour) Fifteen questions on part 2 of the syllabus. Students choose two questions (one question) to answer in essay form. 44 mark (22 marks)

25%

Internal assessment A report of a simple experimental study conducted by the student. 28 marks (20 marks) In addition Higher Level students complete a Paper 3: Paper 3: (1 hour) Three compulsory questions based on an unseen text, covering part 3 of the syllabus. (30 marks)

20% (25%)

20%


Group 4 The Sciences Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental Systems and Societies Courses in the Experimental Sciences for the International Baccalaureate Diploma are designed to reflect current scientific thinking and best technological practice worldwide, in the moral, social, ethical, economic and environmental aspects of science and technology. Whilst the curriculum model emphasises the development of the principles that underpin contemporary sciences, students also learn to appreciate that the body of knowledge and understanding encompassing science and technology today, is not finite. Through studying any of the Group 4 subjects, students should become increasingly aware of how scientists work and communicate with each other. There is a clear emphasis on practical work which distinguishes the Group 4 subjects from all other disciplines.

Aims • to provide stimulating and challenging opportunities for scientific study and creativity • to provide a body of knowledge, concepts, methods and techniques characteristic of science and technology • to enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge methods and techniques that characterise science and technology • to develop the ability to analyse critically, to evaluate and to synthesise scientific information • to engender an awareness of the need for, and the value and importance of effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities • to develop experimental and investigative scientific skills • to develop and apply information and communication technology skills in the study of science • to raise awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology • to appreciate the possibilities and limitations of science and the responsibilities facing scientists • to encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method

The Group 4 Project This compulsory activity, except for Environmental Systems and Societies, emphasises the importance of the processes by which a scientist or technologist conducts an investigation. The emphasis is on interdisciplinary cooperation and the processes involved in scientific investigation, rather than the products of such investigation. As such, the exercise should be a collaborative experience where concepts and perceptions across Group 4 disciplines are shared.

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The time allocated to the Group 4 Project is 10 hours. The time should be divided into 3 stages: planning, action and evaluation. The topic chosen can be set in a local, national or international context and collaboration between schools is possible.

Requirements for specific further education courses Students who are considering a career in a scientific or technological field are advised to research degree course requirements carefully. It can be advantageous, and, in certain cases necessary, to have studied two sciences at Higher Level in seeking admission to certain degree courses.

Biology The Nature of the Subject Biologists have accumulated a huge volume of information about living organisms and it would be easy to confuse students by teaching large numbers of seemingly unrelated facts. In the IB Diploma Programme Biology, it is hoped that students will acquire a limited body of facts and at the same time develop a broad, general understanding of the principles of the subject. The Diploma Programme Biology course considers four key biological concepts: • Structure and Function – one of the most important relationships in the study of biology, operating at all levels of complexity • Universality versus Diversity – species exist in a range of habitats and show adaptations that relate structure to function; a diverse range of organisms are connected and interdependent • Equilibrium within Systems – checks and balances exist both within living organisms and within ecosystems. The state of dynamic equilibrium is essential for the continuity of life • Evolution – the concept of evolution draws together the other themes These four concepts serve as themes which unify the various topics that make up the three sections of the course: the core, the additional higher level material and the options.

Objectives As with all the Diploma Programme experimental science courses, it is the intention that students of this subject achieve the following objectives: • to demonstrate an understanding of scientific facts and concepts • to learn how to use scientific terminology adequately and how to present scientific information • to apply and use scientific methods and techniques for inquiry and problem-solving • to use scientific terminology to communicate effectively • to apply and use appropriate methods to present scientific information • to construct, analyse and evaluate hypotheses, research questions and predictions, scientific methods and techniques Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 49


• to define scientific problems and explain them in the light of acquired biological knowledge • to demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem-solving • to demonstrate the manipulative skills necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety

Who is it for? To study this subject at IB Higher Level it is expected that students have achieved at least a grade AA in their (I)GCSE Science (Double Award) or a grade AA in their (Triple Award) Biology paper. To study the subject at IB Standard Level it is expected that students have achieved at least a grade CC in their (I)GCSE Science (Double Award).You will also be expected to handle and interpret data, so you should also have achieved at least a grade C in (I)GCSE Mathematics. Students who followed the CIE IGCSE Combined Science will not be allowed to study IB Higher Level Biology. If you did not sit (I)GCSE you should have studied Biology in Secondary School. Students who are new to BSB and have no exam qualifications in the subject will be asked to sit a placement test and will be interviewed by the Head of Biology. Higher Level Biology

Standard Level Biology

Students who choose to study Higher Level Biology have a particular interest in the biological sciences. They should also have had some previous exposure to the subject and have developed a sound knowledge of the subject, expecting biology to be of fundamental importance to their university studies. They must also have an inquisitive mind and be prepared to research questions and predictions independently. Laboratory practical and fieldwork are integral parts of the study of this subject. Fieldwork is likely to be carried out in the summer of the first year of the IB programme and is often a residential trip to Spain during CAS week in the summer term.

Students who have really enjoyed studying biology and would like to understand some of the biological concepts in more detail will find that Standard Level Biology is the subject they are looking for. They will study a core of material which enables them to broaden and deepen their knowledge of the subject and will develop their skills in practical work. Topics of current interest are studied to a depth which makes them accessible to students who may not otherwise have an interest in science. Fieldwork is likely to be carried out in the summer of the first year of the IB programme and is often a residential trip to Spain during CAS week in the Summer Term.

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Higher Level Biology

Standard Level Biology

Students study 6 core and 5 higher level topics: Core:

Students study 6 core topics: • Cell biology • Molecular biology

• Cell biology

• Genetics

• Molecular biology

• Ecology

• Genetics

• Evolution and biodiversity

• Ecology

• Human physiology

• Evolution and biodiversity

In addition, we also study one option topic which will be chosen to take into account the special interests of students and staff.

• Human physiology Higher: • Nucleic acids • Metabolism, cell respiration and photosynthesis • Plant biology • Genetics and evolution • Animal Physiology In addition, we also study one option topic which will be chosen to take into account the special interests of students and staff.

Higher Level Biology Assessment External Assessment

Standard Level Biology Assessment 80%

External Assessment

80%

Paper 1: (1 hour) Paper 2: (2 ¼ hours) Paper 3: (1 ¼ hours)

(20%) (36%) (24%)

Paper 1: (¾ hour) Paper 2: (1 ¼ hours) Paper 3: (1 hour)

(20%) (40%) (20%)

Internal Assessment

20%

Internal Assessment

20%

A compulsory element of the course. This consists of one scientific investigation covering a topic that is commensurate with the level of the course of study. It should take 10 hours to complete and the write-up should be 6 to12 pages long.

A compulsory element of the course. This consists of one scientific investigation covering a topic that is commensurate with the level of the course of study. It should take 10 hours to complete and the write-up should be 6 to12 pages long.

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Chemistry The Nature of the Subject Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical skills. Quite rightly it is the central science, pivotal between physics and biology. Chemical principles underpin the physical world in which we live and govern all biological systems. Apart from being a subject worthy of study in its own right, Chemistry is a prerequisite for many other courses in Higher Education, such as medicine, biological and environmental sciences. In the IB Diploma programme, students will revisit the big ideas of Bonding, Structure Periodicity, Energetics, Kinetics, Equilibria and Organic Chemistry to extend their knowledge and understanding of chemical facts, principles and patterns. By its very nature, Chemistry lends itself to an experimental approach and this is reflected throughout the course. Optional topics ranging from Biochemistry to Analytical Chemistry allow for courses to be tailored to the interests of students.

Aims • to provide stimulating and challenging opportunities for scientific study and creativity • to provide a body of knowledge, concepts, methods and techniques characteristic of science and technology • to develop experimental and investigative scientific skills • to enable students to apply the conceptual and experimental skills they have developed • to generate the ability to analyse critically, to evaluate and to synthesise within scientific contexts • to engender an awareness of the importance of effective collaboration and communication within the context of scientific activities • to develop and apply information technology skills in the study of science • to raise awareness of the impact of science and technology on moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental aspects of contemporary society • to appreciate the possibilities and limitations of science and the responsibilities facing scientists • to encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method

Objectives • demonstrate an understanding of scientific facts, concepts, methods, techniques, terminology and methods of presenting scientific information • apply and use scientific facts, concepts, methods and techniques • apply and use scientific terminology to communicate effectively and to use appropriate methods to present scientific information • construct, analyse and evaluate hypotheses, research questions and predictions • construct, analyse and evaluate scientific methods, techniques and explanations 52 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


• demonstrate the personal skills of cooperation, perseverance, and responsibility appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem-solving • demonstrate the manipulative skill necessary to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety

Who is it for? To study this subject at IB Higher Level it is expected that students have achieved at least a grade A at IGCSE level Science (Double or Triple). You will also be expected to handle and interpret data, so you should also have achieved at least a grade C in (I)GCSE Mathematics. Higher Chemistry

Standard Chemistry

Teaching Hours: 180

Teaching Hours: 110

Students who choose to continue to study Chemistry at Higher Level will develop a particular interest in how, why and to what extent reactions take place. They will become adept at using mental models of molecules and be numerate. In short they will enjoy being imaginative, analytical and logical thinkers as well as carrying out high quality experimental work. They will have developed a good understanding of chemistry at (I)GCSE level and, in particular, be skilled with the language of chemistry formulae and equations.

Students who choose to study Chemistry at Standard Level will have enjoyed Chemistry at (I)GCSE level. They will have developed a sound feel for experimental work and be comfortable with chemical ideas and the language of chemistry.

Topics covered:

Topics covered:

Stoichiometric relationships; Atomic structure; Periodicity and Transition metals; Chemical Bonding and structure; Energetics/thermochemistry; Chemical Kinetics; Equilibrium; Acids and bases; Redox Processes; Organic Chemistry; Measurement and Data Processing (Including spectroscopy)

Stoichiometric relationships; Atomic structure; Periodicity; Chemical Bonding and structure; Energetics/thermochemistry; Chemical Kinetics; Equilibrium; Acids and bases; Redox Processes; Organic Chemistry; Measurement and Data Processing (Including spectroscopy) Option: TBC

OPTION: TBC

Assessment Summary

Standard Level Biology

External Assessment

80%

External Assessment

80%

Paper 1: Paper 2: Paper 3:

20% 36% 24%

Paper 1: Paper 2: Paper 3:

20% 40% 20%

Internal Assessment

20%

Internal Assessment

20%

Core practicals will be assessed in Paper 3, a 10 hour project must be submitted for moderation and a Group 4 subjects collaborative project is completed.

Core practicals will be assessed in Paper 3, a 10 hour project must be submitted for moderation and a Group 4 subjects collaborative project is completed.

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Environmental Systems and Societies The Nature of the Subject The main aim of this subject is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. It is intended that students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, rather than a purely journalistic appreciation of the issues. The course aims to foster an international perspective, awareness of local and global environmental concerns and an understanding of the scientific methods involved. Environmental Systems and Societies is offered at Standard Level only. Practical and fieldwork activities are integral parts of the study of this subject. Fieldwork is likely to be carried out in the summer of the first year of the IB programme and is often a residential trip to Spain during CAS week in the Summer Term.

Who is it for? This course is accessible to students who have achieved grades A*A*-CC in their (I)GCSE Science Double Award or A*-C in IGCSE Combined Science. Students coming from other backgrounds are expected to have some prior knowledge of Science.

Syllabus Students study 7 topics: •S  ystems and Models (understanding the systems concept and modelling the environment) •T  he Ecosystem (feeding relationships, biotic and abiotic factors, energy transfer, productivity and population growth) •H  uman Population, Carrying Capacity and Resource Use (human population growth and use of resources) •C  onservation and Biodiversity (evaluating and conserving biodiversity in ecosystems) •P  ollution Management (overview of pollution and its management with reference to examples from aquatic, terrestrial and atmospheric systems) •T  he Issue of Global Warming (a controversial global issue is considered in more depth and students are encouraged to develop a personal viewpoint having considered the arguments) •E  nvironmental Value Systems (understanding environmental value systems is a central theme to the course) Assessment Summary 80%

External Assessment Paper 1: 1 hour

30%

Paper 2: 2  hours

50%

Internal assessment: 30 hours

20%

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Physics The Nature of the Subject Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences as it seeks to explain the universe itself, from the smallest particles - quarks - to the vast distances of the universe. The Diploma Programme Physics course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques. The use of mathematics which is the language of physics will be developed. Practical work is an important part of the course, as is the use of IT. Data-logging is an important part of understanding the ideas studied. BSB has a wide range of data-loggers. Physics is offered at both Higher and Standard Level.

Who is it for? To study this subject at IB Higher Level it is expected that students have achieved at least a grade A*A* or AA in their (IGCSE) Double Science Award or a grade AA in their Triple Award Physics paper. To study the subject at IB Standard Level it is expected that students have achieved at least a grade A*A*-BB in their (I)GCSE Double Science Award. You will also be expected to handle and interpret data, so you should also have achieved at least a grade C in (I)GCSE Mathematics. Students who followed the CIE IGCSE Combined Science will not be allowed to study IB Higher Level Physics. If you did not sit (I)GCSE you should have studied Physics in Secondary School. Students who are new to BSB and have no exam qualifications in the subject will be asked to sit a placement test.


Overview Core (95 hours) – common for both Higher and Standard Level • Measurements and Uncertainties

• Electricity and magnetism

• Mechanics

• Circular motion and gravitation

• Thermal Physics

• Atomic, nuclear and particle physics

• Waves

• Energy production

Additional Higher Level (60 hours) for HL only • Wave phenomena

• Electromagnetic Induction

• Fields

• Quantum and Nuclear Physics

Options: Standard/Higher Level (15/25 hours) A. Relativity B. Engineering physics C. Imaging D. Astrophysics Practical scheme of work includes: Practical activities – core practicals carried out in lessons. Individual investigation (internal assessment – IA) – each student carries out an individual investigation which is assessed. Group 4 project Standard and Higher Level candidates are required to study one option topic from A-D. Assessment of theory at both Higher and Standard Level consists of 3 written papers although SL and HL papers are structured slightly differently. Written papers account for 76% of the final mark, 24% is for practical assessment. Assessment Summary Paper 1: Multiple choice

20%

Paper 2: S  tructured questions

36%

Paper 3: D  ata- based and practical questions together with the chosen Option(A-D) questions

24%

Internal Assessment

20%

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Computer Science The Nature of the Subject The IB Computer Science syllabus defines the subject as ‘the solving of problems using computers’. To be able to do this effectively requires problem-solving skills to analyse a problem and ‘deconstruct’ it by breaking it down into small, simple steps. This course is based on such skills. You will learn how to convert these steps into suitable algorithms and code them in a highlevel programming language (Visual Basic.Net & Java) to create a working, practical solution to the original problem. You will also be looking at computer systems themselves, including: computer architecture, how software and hardware interact, the representation of data in binary form, local and wide area networks, peripheral devices and the use of computers in society. The Standard Level forms the core curriculum which is also included at Higher Level together with additional topics leading to the Higher Level exam. The Standard Level requires 125 hours of study, and the Higher Level a further 80 hours. Both levels also require project solution course work element to be completed. The Higher Level requires a very demanding level of programming skills.

Aims The aims of the course are to enable students: • to develop an understanding of the principles and nature of Computer Science • to develop an understanding of methods of analysing problems and planning and implementation of solutions using computers •d  evelop an understanding of computer systems – software, hardware and data •d  evelop an awareness of the social and economic implications of using computer systems in a variety of contexts

Course content Standard Level Topic 1: Software Development

The Software Life Cycle, Systems Analysis, Software Design, Program Construction, Documentation, Array and String Operations

Topic 2: C  omputing System Fundamentals

Language Translators, Computer Architecture, Computer Systems, Data Representation, Errors, Utility Software

Topic 3: C  omputing Systems and Society

This topic is dealt with largely via the Case Study

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Higher Level – the Topics from Standard Level are required plus the following: Topic 4: Computer Mathematics and Logic

Number Systems and Representations, Boolean Logic

Topic 5: A  dvanced Data Structures and Algorithms

Terminology, Static Data Structures, Dynamic Data Structures, Objects in Problem Solutions, Recursion, Algorithm Evaluation

Topic 6: F  urther System Fundamentals

Processor Configuration, The Machine Instruction Cycle, Disk Storage, Operating Systems and Utilities, Computer/ Peripheral Communication

Topic 7: File Organisation

A variety of file structures are commonly used in computer systems. Students must be familiar with several of the most common structures. This topic extends topic 1.

Standard Level 70%

External assessment (2 hours 30 minutes) Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Paper 1 is an examination paper consisting of two compulsory sections.

(45%)

• Section A (30 minutes approximately) consists of several compulsory short answer questions. The maximum mark for this section is 25. • Section B (60 minutes approximately) consists of three compulsory structured questions. The maximum mark for this section is 45. (70 marks) Paper 2 (1 hour) (25%)

Paper 2 is an examination paper linked to the option studied, which in 2013 -2015 will be Databases. The paper consists of between two and five compulsory questions. (45 marks)

30%

Internal assessment (40 hours) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Solution (30 hours) The development of a computational solution. Students must produce: • a cover page that follows the prescribed format • a product • supporting documentation (word limit 2,000 words). (34 marks) Group 4 project (10 hours) To be assessed using the criterion Personal skills. (6 marks)

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Higher Level 80%

External assessment (4 hours 30 minutes) Paper 1 (2 hours 10 minutes) Paper 1 is an examination paper consisting of two compulsory sections.

(40%)

• Section A (30 minutes approximately) consists of several compulsory short answer questions. The maximum mark for this section is 25. • Section B (100 minutes approximately) consists of five compulsory structured questions. The maximum mark for this section is 75. (100 marks) Paper 2 (1 hour 20 minutes) Paper 2 is an examination paper linked to the option studied. The paper consists of between three and seven compulsory questions. The SL/HL core questions are common and worth 45 marks, HL extension is worth 20 marks.

(20%)

(65 marks) Paper 3 (1 hour) Paper 3 is an examination paper of 1 hour consisting of four compulsory questions based on a pre-seen case study.

(20%)

(30 marks) 20%

Internal assessment (40 hours) This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Solution (30 hours) The development of a computational solution. Students must produce: • a cover page that follows the prescribed format • a product • supporting documentation (word limit 2,000 words). (34 marks) Group 4 project (10 hours) To be assessed using the criterion Personal skills. (6 marks)

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Design Technology The Nature of the Subject The Design Technology course encourages students to gain knowledge and skills based around the design principles used ‘to conceive a plan’ for solving problems. The course also encourages students to develop practical skills. Students will be taught how to use machines, tools and equipment safely and make products using compliant and resistant materials. Design, and the resultant development of new technologies, has given rise to profound changes in society: transforming how we access and process information; how we adapt our environment; how we communicate with others; how we are able to solve problems. Design is multidisciplinary and draws from many areas including the natural and social sciences, mathematics and arts. It focuses on analysis, design development, synthesis and evaluation. Design is the link between innovation and creativity, taking thoughts and exploring the possibilities and constraints associated with products or systems, allowing them to redefine and manage the generation of further thought through prototyping, experimentation and adaptation. It is human-centred and focuses on the needs, wants and limitations of the end user. Designing requires an individual to be imaginative and creative. Decision-making needs to be supported by adequate and appropriate research and investigation. Designers must think “out of the box” to develop innovative solutions, while thinking “in the box” to conform to requirements set by clients or research. Diploma Programme design technology requires the use of the design cycle as a tool, which provides the methodology used to structure the inquiry and analysis of problems, the development of feasible solutions, and the testing and evaluation of the solution. A solution can be defined as a model, prototype, product or system that students have developed independently.

Aims The Design Technology course aims to develop in students: The aims enable students, through the overarching theme of the nature of design, to develop: 1. A  sense of curiosity as they acquire the skills necessary for independent and lifelong learning and action through inquiry into the technological world around them. 2. A  n ability to explore concepts, ideas and issues with personal, local and global significance to acquire in-depth knowledge and understanding of design and technology. 3. Initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to identify and resolve complex social and technological problems through reasoned ethical decision-making 4. A  n ability to understand and express ideas confidently and creatively using a variety of communication techniques through collaboration with others 5. A  propensity to act with integrity and honesty, and take responsibility for their own actions in designing technological solutions to problems. 6. A  n understanding and appreciation of cultures in terms of global technological development, seeking and evaluating a range of perspectives. Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 61


7. A willingness to approach unfamiliar situations in an informed manner and explore new roles, ideas and strategies so they can articulate and defend their proposals with confidence. 8. An understanding of the contribution of design and technology to the promotion of intellectual, physical and emotional balance and the achievement of personal and social well-being. 9. Empathy, compassion and respect for the needs and feelings of others in order to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment 10. Skills that enable them to reflect on the impacts of design and technology on society and the environment in order to develop their own learning and enhance solutions to technological problems.

Objectives Having followed the Design technology course students will be expected to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: a. facts, concepts, principles and terminology b. design methodology and technology c. methods of communicating and presenting technological information. 2. Apply and use: a. facts, concepts, principles and terminology b. design methodology and technology c. methods of communicating and presenting technological information. 3. Construct, analyse and evaluate: a. design briefs, problems, specifications and plans b. methods, techniques and products c. data, information and technological explanations. 4. Demonstrate the appropriate research, experimentation, modelling and personal skills necessary to carry out innovative, insightful, ethical and effective designing.

Syllabus Outline: Core Topics:

Additional Higher Level Topics:

Topic 1:

Human factors and ergonomics

Topic 7:

User-centred design (UCD)

Topic 2:

Resource management and sustainable production

Topic 8:

Sustainability

Topic 3:

Modelling

Topic 9:

Innovation and markets

Topic 4:

Raw material to final product

Topic 10:

Commercial production

Topic 5:

Innovation and design

Topic 6:

Classic design

62 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Assessment Summary Assessment

Year 13 The Design Project

Paper 1:

Paper 2:

Paper 3:

Standard Level

Higher Level

40 hours / 38 A4 sheets only A design problem selected by the student covering Criterion A: Analysis of a design opportunity Criterion B: Conceptual design Criterion C: Development of a detailed design Criterion D: Testing and evaluation

A design problem selected by the student. Produced in 40 hours covering Criterion A: Analysis of a design opportunity Criterion B: Conceptual design Criterion C: Development of a detailed design Criterion D: Testing and evaluation Criterion E: Commercial production Criterion F: Marketing strategies

30% / 45 minutes. 30 multiple choice questions on the CORE THEORY.

20% / 1 hour. 40 multiple choice questions on the CORE THEORY plus ADDITIONAL HIGHER LEVEL TOPICS.

30% / 90 minutes. Section A: Data based question plus several short answer questions. Section B: One extended question from a choice of three.

20% / 90 minutes. Section A: Data based question plus several short answer questions. Section B: One extended question from a choice of three.

Not applicable

20% / 90 minutes. Section A: two structured questions on the HL extension material. Section B: one structured question on the HL extension material based on a case study.

Design and Technology students will participate in a Group 4 project.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 63


Group 5 Mathematics Mathematics The Nature of the Subject Since individual students have different needs, interests and abilities, The British School of Brussels offers a number of different courses in Mathematics within the IB programme. In making a selection, students should consider the following, • their own abilities in mathematics and the type of mathematics in which they can be successful • their own interest in mathematics with respect to the areas which hold an appeal • their other choices of subject within the framework of the Diploma Programme • their future academic plans in terms of the subjects they wish to study • their choice of career Students opt to study at Higher Level or in one of the two Standard Level options of Mathematics or Mathematical Studies. The additional course of Further Mathematics is available only as a second Higher Level option alongside Mathematics HL.

Course Requirements and Progression Mathematics is an essential requirement to any IB course and the Mathematical Studies course provides the broad base of Mathematics and its applications to complement many combinations of choices. Those students with an expectation of related fields of study beyond IB should consider either the Mathematics HL or Mathematics SL choice. Engineering and Economics are two common directions taken. The Further Maths HL course leads to a specialisation for students hoping to study Mathematics or a very closely related field beyond IB. Minimum (I)GCSE Requirement Further Mathematics HL

A*

Mathematics HL

A*

Mathematics SL

A*/A

Mathematical Studies SL

A*-C


Higher Level Mathematics The Nature of the Subject Mathematics at higher level caters for students with a strong background in Mathematics who have an excellent range of analytical and technical skills. Students who take this option should have a strong interest in Mathematics and/or expect Mathematics to be a major part of their university studies. HL Mathematics focuses on developing important mathematical concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way. This is achieved by means of a carefully balanced approach: students are encouraged to apply their mathematical knowledge to solving problems set in a variety of meaningful contexts while, at the same time, being introduced to concepts of rigour and proof.

Syllabus Students study Mathematics within the following topics areas: • Algebra

• Vectors

• Functions and Equations

• Statistics and Probability

• Circular Functions and Trigonometry

• Calculus

Plus an additional option topic Assessment summary for Standard and Higher Level 80%

External Assessment: Paper 1: 2 hours Paper 2: 2 hours Paper 3: 1  hour

(30%) (30%) (20%)

Internal assessment: This is a piece of written work that involves investigating a chosen area of Mathematics. It allows the students the opportunity to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge, and to pursue an area of personal mathematical interest.

20%

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 65


Further Mathematics The Nature of the Subject Further Mathematics is available at Higher Level only and must be taken alongside Mathematics HL. The course caters for students with a very strong background in Mathematics who have an excellent range of analytical and technical skills and who display considerable interest in the subject. Students who take this option expect to go on to study Mathematics or expect it to be a major part of their university studies. In particular, the course is designed to allow students to learn about a variety of branches of mathematics in depth and also to appreciate practical applications. Further Mathematics focuses on different branches of mathematics to encourage the student to appreciate the diversity of the subject. Candidates should be able to begin to form an overview of the characteristics that are common to all mathematical thinking, independent of topic or branch.

Syllabus Students study core topics including: • Sets, Relations and Groups • Discrete Mathematics • Series and Differential Equations • Euclidean Geometry • Statistics and Probability

Mathematics (Standard Level) The Nature of the Subject One of the two Standard Level options, Mathematics SL is a demanding course that takes elements of the Higher Level syllabus at Standard Level (SL) only. It is principally designed for strong Mathematics students to include Higher Mathematical concepts and techniques in their IB programme. Students who take this option will be those who expect to go on to study subjects at university which have a significant mathematical content.

Syllabus Key topics within the course; • Algebra

• Vectors

• Functions and Equations

• Statistics and Probability

• Circular Functions and Trigonometry

• Calculus

66 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Assessment Summary 80%

External Assessment: Paper 1: 1½ hours Paper 2: 1½ hours

(40%) (40%) 20%

Internal assessment: This is a piece of written work that involves investigating a chosen area of Mathematics. It allows the students the opportunity to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge, and to pursue an area of personal mathematical interest.

Mathematical Studies (Standard Level) The Nature of the Subject Mathematical Studies is the Standard Level choice applicable for most students. It provides a broad range of Mathematical topics including applications to Finance and Statistical analysis to complement studies in a wide range of subject areas. Mathematical Studies is a course that concentrates on mathematics which can be applied to contexts related as far as possible to other curriculum subjects and to other commonly encountered mathematical uses.

Syllabus Students study Mathematics within the following topics areas: • Use of the the Graphic Display Calculator • Number and Algebra • Sets, Logic and Probability

• Statistics • Functions • Financial Mathematics • Introductory Differential Calculus

• Geometry and Trigonometry Assessment Summary 80%

External Assessment: Paper 1: 1½ hours Paper 2: 1½ hours

(40%) (40%)

Internal Assessment: This is a piece of written work that involves investigating a chosen area of mathematics. It allows the students the opportunity to demonstrate the application of their skills and knowledge, and to pursue an area of personal mathematical interest.

20%

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 67


Music This course will appeal to you if you: • enjoy playing an instrument or singing at minimum grade 5 standard • enjoy listening to a wide range of musical styles • enjoy composing your own music using music technology or an instrument. • have passed a (I)GCSE music exam (although exceptions can be made, depending on other previous musical experience) • enjoy working independently on your own projects

What will I learn? You will: • improve your understanding of harmony and counterpoint, through analysis and exercises •d  evelop your knowledge of particular genres of music ranging from Baroque to 20th Century Jazz and World Music, and learn to recognise characteristics of a wide range of musical styles • improve your aural skills •d  evelop your own original composition skills, and produce one piece of coursework • take part in solo and group performances throughout the course, which can include performances in and outside of school

What are the units I will follow and how will they be assessed? 1: Musical Perception – (compulsory for SL and HL students)

30%

External assessment Listening Paper (3 hours) Musical links investigation of 2,000 words This will involve the study, analysis and examination, comparing and contrasting of musical cultures. You should actively listen to a wide range of music from different: • parts of the world • musical cultures • time periods Through this study you should develop your aural perception and understanding of music by learning about: • musical elements, including form and structure • notations • musical terminology • context You will also study two prescribed works. You also need to write an investigation which compares the music of two different cultures as course work. (Musical Links Investigation).

68 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014

20%


2: Creating Internal assessment and moderated by IB Three pieces of course work with recordings and written work

25%

During this study students should be able to develop creative skills through exploration, control and development of musical elements. SL students are required to submit two pieces of coursework; HL students are expected to produce three. The following options are available • composing • music technology composing • arranging • improvising • stylistic techniques 3: Performing Internal assessment and moderated by IB During this study students should aim to develop performance skills through solo or group music-making.

25%

In performing their pieces students may use: 1. an instrument and / or voice, or 2. the computer as a musical instrument. Students may not present a combination of 1 and 2 Students will be required to submit a recording for assessment, selected from pieces presented during one or more public performances. The total performance time must be: SL - 15 minutes. HL - 20 minutes.

Visual Arts The Nature of the Subject Expression in the Visual Arts is characterised by forms of visual representation which reflect the cultures of different societies. Artistic expression ranges from traditional forms embedded in particular societies and cultures to the varied and dispersed practices associated with design, craft, electronic media, drawing, painting, printmaking and sculpture. Art, including artistic theories and practices, is a cultural manifestation. As culture itself has changed, with distinctions becoming increasingly blurred, many of the divisions between traditional and contemporary forms of art have broken down. Learning and practice in visual arts today invariably extends beyond traditional boundaries to connect many areas of study and human experience through collaborative, as well as individual, production and interpretation.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 69


Aims The aims of the Visual Arts course at Higher Level and Standard Level are to: • provide students with opportunities to make personal, socio-cultural and aesthetic experiences meaningful through the production and understanding of art • exemplify and encourage an inquiring and integrated approach towards visual arts in their various historical and contemporary forms • promote visual and contextual knowledge of art from various cultures • encourage the pursuit of quality through experimentation and purposeful creative work in various expressive media • enable students to learn about themselves and others through individual and, where appropriate, collaborative engagement with the visual arts

Objectives General • growth and commitment through the study of art • an interrelationship between their research and their artistic production

Studio Work • demonstrate through purposeful exploration an enquiring and integrative approach to a variety of visual phenomena • synthesise art concepts and skills in works that are personally, socio-culturally and aesthetically meaningful • solve formal and technical problems encountered in studio practice • exhibit technical skills and appropriate use of media • produce works of art with imagination and creativity through individual and, where appropriate, collaborative work

Investigative Workbooks (IWB’s) • demonstrate clearly in visual and written terms how personal research has led to an understanding of the topics or concepts being investigated • analyse critically the meaning and aesthetic qualities of art forms using an informed vocabulary • show some awareness of the cultural, historical and social dimensions of themes in more than one cultural context • examine the visual and functional qualities of art from the student’s own and other cultures for meaning and significance

Syllabus Outline Each Visual Arts course consists of two linked compulsory parts, with many activities integrating work in studio with workbook research. In common to each course are core elements, which include the: • introduction to art concepts, criticism and analysis

70 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


• acquisition of studio technical and media skills • relation of art to socio-cultural and historical contexts The difference in the expectations at Higher Level and Standard Level is indicated by the difference in recommended total teaching times (HL 240 hours: SL 150 hours) Assessment Summary Higher Level: 2 compulsory parts This is designed for the specialist visual arts student, with creative and imaginative abilities, who may pursue the visual arts at university or college level.

240 hours

• Part A: S  tudio Work Practical exploration and artistic production

(168 hours)

• Part B: Investigation Workbooks (IWB’s) Independent critical research and analysis, visual and written, in more than one culture

(72 hours)

150 hours

Standard Level: 2 compulsory parts • Part A: S  tudio work Practical exploration and artistic production

(105 hours)

• Part B: Investigation Workbooks (IWB’s) Independent critical research and analysis, visual and written, in more than one culture

(45 hours)

Film Aims The Film course aims to develop in students the skills necessary to achieve creative and critical independence in their knowledge, experience and enjoyment of film. The students aim to produce world-class final work – spoken, written and on digital video. These aims are usually achieved: over 90% of students achieve a Level 6 or Level 7 at Film at BSB. The course promotes knowledge of film-making traditions in more than one country. BSB film students will finish the course able to excel on a film-related course at university or able to pursue film-making as a hobby. Film-watching will never be the same again!

Programme Outline At both Standard and Higher Level, students will learn how to make their own films and analyse those of international film-makers. These two approaches – technical and textual – are interlinked; the students’ own film-making will be enriched by their study of Film Theory and History. For their practical work Film students have access to a very good range of HD cameras and excellent supporting equipment. They edit their work on Apple iMacs in the Media Suite. Final Cut is available. For textual work, there is an ever-expanding section of Film books in the Library and over 2,400 DVDs available for borrowing. Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 71


The Film course is distinctive in that there is no final written examination. In fact the course will be completely finished and assessed by the time final IB examinations begin in May. The films made by BSB students can be viewed online via the Film section on the BSB website. Assessment Summary 50%

External Assessment • Independent study Rationale and script for short documentary production on an aspect of film theory and/or history:

(25%)

•a  t Standard Level the study must be based on a minimum of two films from more than one country and the documentary production must be 8-10 minutes long • at Higher Level the study must be based on a minimum of four films from more than one country and the documentary production must be 12-15 minutes long • Presentation Oral critical analysis of a prescribed film extract:

(25%)

•a  t Standard Level the presentation must be a maximum of 10 minutes • at Higher Level the study must be based on a maximum of 15 minutes Internal Assessment One completed film project with accompanying written documentation • at Standard Level the film project must be between 4-5 minutes long • at Higher Level the film project must be between 6-7 minutes long and be accompanied by a trailer

50%


Theatre Theatre is a dynamic, collaborative and live art form. It is a practical subject that encourages discovery through experimentation, the taking of risks and the presentation of ideas to others. It results in the development of both theatre and life skills: the building of confidence, creativity and working collaboratively. The IB Diploma Programme theatre course is a multifaceted theatre-making course of study. It gives students the opportunity to make theatre as creators, designers, directors and performers. It emphasizes the importance of working both individually and collaboratively as part of an ensemble. It offers the opportunity to engage actively in the creative process, transforming ideas into action as inquisitive and productive artists. Students experience the course from contrasting artistic perspectives. They learn to apply research and theory to inform and to contextualize their work. The theatre course encourages students to appreciate that through the processes of researching, creating, preparing, presenting and critically reflecting on theatre— as participants and audience members—they gain a richer understanding of themselves, their community and the world.

Objectives Students will: •u  nderstand the importance of working individually and as a member of an ensemble •d  evelop the organizational and technical skills needed to express themselves creatively in Theatre • think critically, becoming aware of their own personal and cultural perspectives and biases and learning to understand and value those of others •d  evelop an appreciation of the diversity of theatre practices, their processes and their modes of presentation. •d  iscover and engage with different forms of theatre across time, place and culture, promoting international-mindedness Theatre students at both SL and HL are presented with a common core syllabus. Due to the nature of the course, there may be no great difference in complexity or artistic merit of work produced at SL and HL. However, it is expected that students at HL will use the extra time [240 hours rather than 150 hours] to develop their personal research and practice in Theatre, and to extend their understanding of the ideas, practices and concepts encountered during the course.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 73


Key features Students are required to investigate the core syllabus areas from the perspectives of creator, designer, director, performer and spectator. Theatre in Context

Theatre Processes

Presenting Theatre

At HL, students practically explore at least one theatre theorist collaboratively and engage with the process of creating a piece of theatre based on their theory.

At HL, students create, present and evaluate at least one theatre piece based on an aspect(s) of a theatre theorist’s work they have explored.

Students research and examine the various contexts of at least one published play text and reflect on live theatre moments they have experienced as spectators.

Students take part in the practical exploration of at least two contrasting published play texts and engage with the process of transforming a play text into action.

Students direct at least one scene or section from one published play text which is presented to others.

Students research and examine the various contexts of at least one world theatre tradition.

Students practically examine the performance conventions of at least one world theatre tradition and apply this to the staging of a moment of theatre.

Students present a moment of theatre to others which demonstrates the performance convention(s) of at least one world theatre tradition.

Students respond to at least one starting point and engage with the process of transforming it collaboratively into an original piece of theatre.

Students participate in at least one production of a collaboratively created piece of original theatre, created from a starting point, which is presented to others.

At HL, students research and examine HL ONLY the various contexts Creating of at least one theatre theatre based theorist. on theatre theory

SL & HL Working with play texts

SL & HL Examining world theatre traditions

Students reflect on their own personal approaches, interests and skills in theatre. They research and SL & HL examine at least one Collaboratively starting point and the approaches employed creating by one appropriate original professional theatre theatre company, and consider how this might influence their own personal approaches.

Students keep a theatre journal throughout the two-year theatre course which charts their development and their experiences of theatre as a creator, designer, director, performer and spectator.

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Assessment • Available at standard (SL) and higher levels (HL) • The minimum prescribed number of hours is 150 for SL and 240 for HL • Students are assessed both externally and internally External assessment tasks

SL

HL

Task 1: Solo theatre piece (HL only)

N/A

35%

35%

20%

30%

20%

SL

HL

35%

25%

•S  tudents at HL research a theatre theorist they have not previously studied, identify an aspect(s) of their theory and create and present a solo theatre piece (4 - 8 minutes) based on this aspect(s) of theory. Task 2: Director’s notebook (SL and HL) • Students at SL and HL choose a published play text they have not previously studied and develop ideas regarding how it could be staged for an audience. Task 3: Research presentation (SL and HL) • Students at SL and HL plan and deliver an individual presentation (15 minutes maximum) to their peers in which they outline and physically demonstrate their research into a convention of a theatre tradition they have not previously studied.

Internal assessment task Task 4: Collaborative project (SL and HL) • Students at SL and HL collaboratively create and present an original piece of theatre (lasting 13 - 15 minutes) for and to a specified target audience, created from a starting point of their choice.


Section 3 General Information on GCE Advanced Levels A Levels are very demanding and academically rigorous courses offered by UK examination boards. They enable you to study individual subjects in a great amount of depth and to specialise in those areas in which you feel you are particularly strong. They are highly regarded throughout the world as an excellent preparation for undergraduate study. Structure Due to major reforms of the A Level system in the UK, over the next three years, we will see a transition from modular AS and A Levels to linear A Levels. •M  odular A Levels typically comprise 4 or 6 modules, half of which are taken at the end of Year 12 to provide AS Levels. These then count towards the full A Level where the additional modules are taken at the end of Year 13. •F  or the linear A Levels, these will be studied throughout the two years with all exams taken at the end of Year 13. Students will sit internal exams at the end of Year 12 in these subjects. These subjects will not be offered at AS Level at BSB.

The advantages of A Level courses are that: • you are free to choose whichever subjects you want; you can thus concentrate on those areas in which you have a genuine interest • you can either choose a wide range of subjects or specialise in a particular area • you do not have to study those areas or subjects which you have found particularly difficult or in which you have no real interest • you are not given an overall score; if you perform poorly in one subject it will not directly affect performance in another • although other Senior Section curriculum areas such as Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) do not count towards the qualification, they are compulsory and highly valuable and will form an important part of the reference the School will provide for you for Higher Education/university entrance • you will find that A Level courses are welcomed by universities throughout the world as excellent preparation for undergraduate study. A Level students regularly gain entrance to the most prestigious universities in the world

How to select your courses • Choose 3 A Level subjects, one from each block. You cannot choose more than one subject in a block. • From the remaining blocks, choose an AS or BTEC one year course. Not all subjects are available as an AS. 76 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Entry Requirements • Students should have at least 5 grade Cs or above at (I)GCSE to start the full A Level programme, with a recommended minimum of a grade B at (I)GCSE in the subjects that they wish to continue at AS/A Level. • Students choosing Mathematics should expect to have shown strong prior understanding of Mathematics. A grade A* or A at (I)GCSE Level Mathematics is the minimum standard expected and a grade A* is expected for those hoping to follow the Further Maths course. • Students choosing Biology, Chemistry or Physics should expect to have shown a strong prior understanding in their chosen Science. A grade AA or above in their (I)GCSE Science (Double Award) or A or above in their (Triple Award) Biology, Chemistry or Physics paper. You will also be expected to handle and interpret data, so you should also have achieved at least a grade C in (I)GCSE Mathematics. Students who followed the CIE (I)GCSE Combined Science will not be allowed to study the AS/A2 Level Sciences or the IB HL Sciences. If you did not sit (I)GCSE you should have studied Chemistry in Secondary School. • Students who are new to BSB wishing to study Mathematics or any of the Sciences and have no exam qualifications in the subject may be asked to sit an entry test.

Students must obtain at least 3 grade E passes in the internal exams and external modular assessments at the end of Year 12 to ensure continuation into Year 13. Any exceptions to this regulation will be at the discretion of the Head of Secondary School in liaison with Deputy Head (Curriculum), Senior Section Leaders and relevant Heads of Department.

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Models of A Level Student Choices This shows the model that we recommend for the vast majority of our students Year 12 A Level

A Level

A Level

AS or BTEC one year course

Year 13

LINEAR This first group of A Levels follow the new linear. These will start to be taught from September 2015. They are not available as an AS Level. Students selecting these subjects must continue to study the A Level throughout the two years taking external exams at the end of Year 13 only.


Art & Design LINEAR

A2 EDEXCEL 3690

What will I learn? The main purpose of any course in art, craft and design is to develop your ability to appreciate the visual world, and to respond in a personal and creative way. The skills you will develop will be varied, such as the ability to interpret and convey your ideas and feelings using art, craft and design; developing your imaginative and creative powers and your experimental, analytical and documenting skills. You will also develop a specialist vocabulary and an understanding of the place of art, craft and design in history and in contemporary society. The skills you acquire will be determined to some extent by the area of study you choose. However, whether you see yourself as a painter, a graphic designer or a film-maker, the same basic rules and skills apply.

What kind of student is this course suitable for? The course is suitable for students: •w  ho wish to undertake further studies in art and design, usually at an art and design university •w  ho are hoping to take up careers for which an art and design background is relevant. These might include advertising, architecture, theatre or gallery work, media studies, textiles and fashion design, graphic design, interior design and product design •w  ho have an interest in, and aptitude for the subject, but who do not intend to take the subject beyond A Level

What will I study? The GCE specification requires you to develop pratical and theorectical knowlege and an understanding of: • relevant materials,processes, technoloiges and resources •h  ow ideas, feelings and meanings can be conveyed and itnerpreted in images and artefacts •h  ow images and artefacts relate to the time and place in which they were made and to their social and cultural contexts •c  ontinuity and change in different genres, styles and traditions •a  working viusal/written vocabulary and specialist terminology The GCE specifications require you to develop the skills needed to: • record experiences and observations, mainly in visual form, undertake research and gather, select and organise visual and other appropriate information •e  xplore relevant sources; analyse, discuss and evaluate images, objects and artefacts, make and record independent judgements •u  se knowledge and understanding of work of others to develop and extend thinking and inform your own work •g  enerate and explore potential lines of enquiry using appropriate media and techniques

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• apply knowledge and understanding in making images and artefacts; review and modify work and plan and develop ideas in the light of your own and others’ evaluations • organise, select and communicate ideas, solutions and repsonses, present thse in a range of visual forms

% in AS

% in A2

% in GCE

AO1

Develop their ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and critical understanding.

25%

25%

25%

AO2

Experiment with and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes, reviewing and refining their ideas as their work develops.

25%

25%

25%

AO3

Record in visual and/or other forms ideas, observations and insights relevant to their intentions, demonstrating an ability to reflect on their work and progress.

25%

25%

25%

AO4

Present a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating critical understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate, making connections between visual, oral or other elements.

25%

25%

25%

100%

100%

100%

Assessment objective Unit number

AO1

AO2

AO3

AO4

Total for AO1, AO2, AO3 and AO4

Unit 1

7.5%

7.5%

7.5%

7.5%

30%

Unit 2

5%

5%

5%

5%

20%

Unit 3

7.5%

7.5%

7.5%

7.5%

30%

Unit 4

5%

5%

5%

5%

20%

25%

25%

25%

25%

25%

Total for Advanced GCE

Students are also expected to participate in the life-drawing class that is run once a week after school, and to devote extra studio time for practical work. The historical and cultural elements of the course are often based on gallery, museum and exhibition visits. Students are therefore expected to participate in the excursions organised by the department, as well as regularly visiting exhibitions independently.

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Business LINEAR

A2 EDEXCEL 9BSO

The A Level Business course introduces students to the core business concepts and in order to develop a broad understanding of how businesses work, before looking at the decision making tools that help business people move towards a more scientific approach to management. Business students investigate, analyse and evaluate business opportunities and issues, and make supported decisions and recommendations using both qualitative and quantitative methods. The aim of the course is for students to develop a holistic understanding and appreciation of business functioning and ideas. The study of A Level Business requires some ability in interpreting statistical data, applying accounting techniques, graphs and diagrams, with more subtle interpretation needed as the course develops over the two year duration.

Course content: The specification followed is the one offered by Edexcel. This is a two year Linear A Level course. The course is assessed entirely by a final examination of four themes.

Year 12 Theme 1

Theme 2

Marketing and People

Managing Business Activities

• Meeting customer needs.

• Raising Finance.

• The Market.

• Financial Planning.

• The Marketing Mix and Strategy.

• Managing Finance.

• Managing People.

• Resource Management.

• Entrepreneurs and Leaders.

• External Influences.

Year 13 Theme 3

Theme 4

Business Decisions and Strategy

Global Business

• Business objectives and strategy.

• Globalisation.

• Business Growth.

• Global markets and business expansion.

• Decision-making techniques.

• Global Marketing.

• Influences on business decisions.

• Global industries and companies.

• Assessing competitiveness.

• Multinational Corporations.

• Managing change.

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Assessment Paper 1: Marketing, People and Global Businesses The paper assesses themes 1 and 4 of the A Level specification. The paper is 2 hours in duration and has two sections: Section A: One data response including one extended open response question. Section B: One data response including one extended open response question. This paper accounts for 35% of the total A Level grade. Paper 2: Business Activities, Decisions and Strategy The paper assesses themes 2 and 3 of the A Level specification. The paper is 2 hours in duration and has two sections: Section A: One data response including one extended open response question. Section B: One data response including one extended open response question. This paper accounts for 35% of the total A Level grade. Paper 3: Investigating Businesses in a Competitive Environment The paper assesses themes 1 to 4 of the A Level specification. The paper is 2 hours in duration and is made up of two sections and questions are based on a pre-released context and material. Section A: This section focuses on the broad context of the material and is assessed with one data response, including one extended open question. Section B: This section focuses on a strand within the context of the material and is assessed with one data response, including one extended open question. This paper accounts for 30% of the total A Level grade.

Course requirements: To follow the Business course you would be expected to meet the general requirements for A/AS Level coursing. In addition, because the subject is largely based on developing certain numerical skills and requires higher Level writing skills a grade C or higher at (I)GCSE Mathematics and a grade B or higher at (I)GCSE English Language are required.

82 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Biology LINEAR

Specification awaiting accreditation

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? To study this subject at Advance Level it is expected that students have achieved grades AA or above in their (I)GCSE Science (Double Award) or A or above in their (Triple Award Biology) paper. Maths also plays an important role so achieving a high grade at (I)GCSE Maths is desirable. Students who followed the CIE IGCSE Combined Science will not be allowed to study Advanced Level Biology. If you do not sit (I)GCSE you should have studied Biology in Secondary School. Students who are new to BSB and have no exam qualifications in the subject will be asked to sit a placement test and will be interviewed by the Head of Biology.

What will I learn? During the course you will have opportunities to: •d  evelop an interest in, and enthusiasm for Biology, including an interest in further studies and careers in the subject •a  ppreciate how society makes decisions about biology-related issues and how biology contributes to the success of the economy and society •d  evelop a deeper appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of ‘how science works’ •d  evelop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of biology and how they relate to each other You will be asked to: • recognise, recall and show understanding of scientific knowledge • s elect, organise and communicate relevant scientific information •a  nalyse and evaluate scientific processes •a  pply scientific knowledge and processes to novel situations •u  se appropriate methods, including ICT, to solve scientific problems •c  onsider ethical issues in the treatment of humans, other organisms and the environment Fieldwork will be carried out in the summer of the first year of the course and is often a residential trip to Spain during CAS week.

What kind of student is this course suitable for? This course will appeal to students who: • have an interest in, and enjoy biology, and want to find out about how things work in the biological world by the application of imaginative, logical thinking • want to use biology to progress to further studies in Higher Education or support other qualifications or enter biology-based employment • are taking Advanced Levels in other Sciences and/or Mathematics or other relevant courses such as BTEC Sport and want to take another course that will support these studies

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What examinations will I have to take? Although the details of the syllabus are not finalised, the course will be a 2 year linear model, with all examinations taken at the end of year 13. There will be practical assessment within the course.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Biology leads on to a wide range of courses and careers. These could include: •a  n undergraduate degree in life science, medicine, environmental science, forensic science and related courses, or a BTEC Higher National Certificate or Higher National Diploma (HNC or HND) qualification •e  mployment, for example in the areas of biological testing, biotechnology, independent research and the food industry

Chemistry LINEAR

Specification awaiting accreditation

Introduction Chemistry opens a window on the fascinating patterns in the behaviour of materials, well-respected in its own right, holds a key position with Physics and Biology, complementing yet extending both these subjects.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? To study this subject at Advanced Level, it is expected that students have achieved at least a grade AA in their (I)GCSE Science (Double Award) or A or above in their (Triple Award) Chemistry paper. Maths also plays an important role so achieving a high grade at (I)GCSE Maths is desirable. If you did not sit (I)GCSE you should have studied Chemistry in Secondary School, but should bear in mind that Chemistry is an extremely challenging course at advanced Level. Entry will be subject to an interview with the Head of Chemistry.

What will I learn on this Advanced Level course? We study the core principles of Chemistry and how to apply them including inorganic, organic, physical and green Chemistry. Practical work plays a vital role and you will complete an extensive practical course that will develop your skills. During the course you will: •d  iscover how enjoyable and rewarding learning Chemistry can be •c  arry out many experiments using a wide variety of practical techniques •d  evelop your imaginative and critical thinking through the study of chemical problems •d  iscover that Chemistry makes sense because there are unifying ideas linking together the theory and practical work. •d  iscover how Chemistry is applied in the wider global environment

84 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


You will also: • improve your ability to communicate, for example, by discussion, summarising, using chemical formulae, equations, graphs, calculations • learn how to interpret data from relevant practical work •d  evelop your appreciation of how important chemistry is in dealing with social, economic, environmental and technological issues •d  evelop your understanding of “how science works” •d  evelop key skills and use ICT

What examinations will I take? Although the details of the syllabus are not finalised, the course will be a 2 year linear model, with all examinations taken at the end of year 13. There will be practical assessment within the course.

What kind of student is Advanced Level Chemistry suitable for? • Can you commit enough time and effort to reaching the high standards that Chemistry demands as a subject? • Do you have an interest in and enjoy chemistry, yet are prepared for a challenge? • Do you like puzzling out why things (reactions) happen the way they do? • Do you like to solve practical chemical problems by analysing what is involved first and then trying out your ideas? • Do you need chemistry to support other qualifications or to progress to further studies? If you answered ‘yes’ to 1 or more of the questions above then you should ask your teacher for more information about the AS/A Level Chemistry course.

What could I go on to do at the end of my A Level course? Follow a degree course or Higher National programme in, for example, chemistry or another science, Sports Studies, Medicine, Pharmacology, Toxicology, Biotechnology, Beauty Therapy, Agriculture, Animal Management, Environmental Studies, Engineering, Art, Law, Accountancy.

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Computing Science LINEAR

A2 AQA 6510

What will I learn? A Level Computing Science is a both practical and theoretical course, requiring good skills in the use of computer packages and programming, but there is also a fair amount of theory and written work. The course is designed to make students think, abstract and consider the consequences of the information age. The students will be able to program in an industry standard language by the end of the first year and will develop a completely independent programmed solution to a real world problem within the internally assessed part of the course. This course will help students develop an understanding of the main principles of solving problems using computers, the range of applications of computers, and the effects of their use. You will study the organisation of computer systems, including hardware, software, data, communications, and the work of people involved in these areas. You will also acquire the practical skills to develop computer-based solutions to problems. You will learn to use common applications with more sophistication than at (I)GCSE Level. Applications used will include MS Office applications, open-sourced applications, Apple applications, Adobe applications, with programming taught mainly in Visual Basic.NET.

What examinations will I take? The course assessments are organised as follows:

Component

Weighting

Paper 1:

40% of A Level

On Screen Paper 2 hours 30 Minutes What’s assessed: this paper tests a student’s ability to program, as well as their theoretical knowledge of Computer Science On screen test where students program in a High Level Language. Paper 2:

40% of A Level

Written Paper 2 Hours 30 minutes What’s assessed: This paper assesses the student’s ability to answer questions based on the subject content. Non-Exam Assessment

20% of A Level

What’s assessed: the non-exam assessment assesses student’s ability to use the knowledge and skills gained through the course to solve a practical problem. Students will be expected to follow a systematic approach to problem solving

What could I go on to do at the end of my A Level course? The course provides a good basis for many further studies including computing degrees, engineering, business studies and economics, but can also offer an alternative to those choosing a different type of graduate study to improve thinking skills and high Level problem-solving.

86 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Economics LINEAR

Edexcel 9EC0

Economics enables students to use economic models to help them understand the complexities of the world around them. Students will be expected to use data to help them analyse markets and economies, and how governments try and influence both. Students are introduced to different perspectives, aspects of economic history and develop an understanding of economic issues. By providing students with some theoretical ideas that can be applied to topical areas of interest, like employment, trade policy and inflation; the intention is to have a critical understanding of the UK economy by the end of the course. Economics also requires some ability in interpreting statistical data, graphs and diagrams, with more subtle interpretation needed as the course develops over the two year duration. The first year of the course involves studying the principles that underpin economic thinking, developing a ‘toolkit’ of economic ideas, and then practicing these on a wide range of practical issues, using as sources, current periodicals, newspapers and the internet.

Course content The specification followed is the one offered by Edexcel. This is a two year Linear A Level course. The course is assessed entirely by a final examination of four themes.

Year 12 Theme 1

Theme 2

Introduction to Markets and Market Failure

The UK Economy - Performance and Policies

• The nature of economics.

• Measures of economic performance.

• How markets work.

• Aggregate demand and supply.

• Market failure.

• National income.

• Government intervention.

• Economic growth. • Macroeconomic objectives and policy.

Year 13 Theme 3

Theme 4

Business Behaviour and the Labour Market

A Global Perspective

• Business growth.

• Poverty and inequality.

• Business objectives.

• Emerging and developing economics.

• Revenues, costs and profit.

• The financial sector.

• Market structures.

• The role of the state in the macroeconomy.

• International economics.

• The labour market. • Government intervention.

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Assessment Paper 1: Markets and Business Behaviour The paper assesses themes 1 and 3 of the A Level specification. The paper is 2 hours in duration and is made up of three sections: Section A: Multiple choice and short answer questions. Section B: One data response. Section C: One extended open response from a choice of two. This paper accounts for 35% of the total A Level grade. Paper 2: The National and Global Economy The paper assesses themes 2 and 4 of the A Level specification. The paper is 2 hours in duration and is made up of three sections: Section A: Multiple choice and short answer questions. Section B: One data response. Section C: One extended open response from a choice of two. This paper accounts for 35% of the total A Level grade. Paper 3: Microeconomics and Macroeconomics The paper assesses themes 1 to 4 of the A Level specification. The paper is 2 hours in duration and is made up of two sections: Section A: One data response, including one extended open question from a choice of two. Section B: One data response, including one extended open question from a choice of two. This paper accounts for 30% of the total A Level grade.

Course requirements: To follow the Economics course you would be expected to meet the general requirements for A/AS Level coursing. In addition, because the subject is largely based on developing certain numerical skills and requires higher Level writing skills a grade B or higher at (I) GCSE Mathematics and English Language are required.

88 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


English Literature LINEAR

GCE 9ETO

What kind of student is the course suitable for? The course will appeal to students who have an interest in reading a wide range of literary texts of all genres from the past and the present. It will also appeal to students who enjoy exploring and discussing different interpretations of texts. While many students with this qualification do go on to study English Literature at university, it is also a useful and wellregarded qualification for students who are intending to follow other courses.

What will I learn? • to read widely, independently and critically • to articulate informed, personal and creative responses to literary texts, using associated concepts and terminology, and coherent, accurate written expression • to analyse ways in which meanings are shaped in literary texts • to explore the significance and influence of the contexts in which literary texts are written and received • to explore connections across literary texts • to explore different critical perspectives on, and different interpretations of, literary texts

What components will I have to take to get my qualification? Component 1: D  rama (30% of final grade) Content summary: • one Shakespeare play • one other drama from the category of either tragedy or comedy • a selection of critical essays related to the selected Shakespeare play Assessment: External examination: 2 hours 15 minutes. • Section A: One essay question from a choice of two on selected Shakespeare play, incorporating critical reading. 35 marks • Section B: One essay question from a choice of two on selected other drama. 25 marks. Component 2: P  rose (20% of final grade) Content summary: • Two prose texts from a chosen theme. At least one of the prose texts must be pre-1900. Assessment: External examination: 1 hour. One comparative essay question from a choice of two on studied theme.

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Component 2: P  rose (20% of final grade) Content summary: • poetic form, meaning and language • a selection of poetry from a post-2000 collection • a range of poetry from either a literary period or a named poet within a literary period Assessment: External examination: 2 hours 15 minutes. • Section A: Contemporary Poetry. One comparative essay question from a choice of two, comparing an unseen modern poem written post 2000 and one named poem from the studied contemporary collection. • Section B: Poetry Collections. One essay question from a choice of two on chosen range. Component 4: C  oursework (20% of final grade) Content summary: Students have a free choice of two texts to study. Chosen texts: •m  ust be different from those studied in Components 1, 2 and 3 •m  ust be complete texts and may be linked by theme, author, movement, or period •m  ay be selected from poetry, drama, prose or literary non-fiction Assessment: Internally assessed, externally moderated. Students produce: • one comparative essay referring to two texts • advisory total word count is 2500-3000 words

History LINEAR

A/S EDEXCEL 8264 A2 EDEXCEL 9264

What kind of student is this course suitable for? The course will appeal to students who: •h  ave an interest in the way that the world has developed through the ages •e  njoy investigation and discovery •e  njoy debate and like putting forward a well-argued case •w  ant to improve their analytical skills •w  ant to study a subject which encourages them to consider evidence and make up their own minds •w  ant to broaden science A Level studies to include a humanities subject •w  ant to keep their options open: History is widely regarded as a useful qualification for a wide range of Higher Education or career choices •n  eed not have done History at (I)GCSE

90 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


What will I learn? During your course you will learn: •h  ave an interest in the way that the world has developed through the ages •e  njoy investigation and discovery •e  njoy debate and like putting forward a well-argued case •w  ant to improve their analytical skills •w  ant to study a subject which encourages them to consider evidence and make up their own minds •w  ant to broaden science A Level studies to include a humanities subject •w  ant to keep their options open: History is widely regarded as a useful qualification for a wide range of Higher Education or career choices •n  eed not have done History at (I)GCSE

What will the course be like? You will study topics covering a 200 year period of history

Component A Level

Depth Study: F  rance in Revolution, 1774 - 1815. Breadth Study: T  he British Empire, c1857 - 1967

In addition, students will research and write a Historical Investigation which will take the form of a 3000 word essay. To support the Unit on the French Revolution, there is a trip to Versailles and Paris in the October of Year 12.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? By the end of your course you will have learned how to evaluate and analyse information, how to weigh-up evidence and how to communicate complex ideas effectively. These skills are recognised and valued by universities, colleges and employers, History combines well with maths and science subjects to create an attractive portfolio of qualifications, enabling a student to move on to a university science-based course. Combined with English and a modern foreign language, History equally provides a good basis for an arts or language-based degree. History provides an excellent foundation for a number of popular careers including journalism, law and business.

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Physics LINEAR

Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Physics (9PH0)

What kind of student is Physics suitable for? Physics is a subject that is both challenging and demanding. It is one of the fundamental sciences that deal with topics as diverse for example, as making biscuits, and the origins of the universe! To study this subject at A2 Level it is expected that students have achieved at least a grade AA or above in their (I)GCSE Science(Double Award) or a grade A or above in the (Triple Award) Physics paper. You will also be expected to handle and interpret data, so you should also have achieved a high grade at (I)GCSE Maths. Students who followed the CIE IGCSE Combined Science will not be allowed to study Advanced Level Physics. If you did not sit (I)GCSE you should have studied Physics in Secondary School and will have an entry interview with the Head of Physics.

What will I learn? You will learn how Physics plays an important part in every aspect of life. Many manufacturing processes depend on the understanding and application of physics, as do many pieces of medical equipment.

What examinations will I take? Although the details of the syllabus are not yet finalised, the course will be a 2 year linear model with all examinations taken at the end of year 13. There will be practical assessment within the course.


Component

Weighting

Paper 1: Advanced Physics I

30% of A Level

1 hours 45 Minutes This paper will examine the following topics. • Working as a Physicist • Mechanics • Electric Circuits • Further Mechanics • Electric and Magnetic Fields • Nuclear and Particle 30% of A Level

Paper 2: Advanced Physics II 1 Hours 45 minutes This paper will examine the following topics. • Working as a Physicist • Materials • Waves and Particle Nature of Light • Thermodynamics Space • Nuclear Radiation • Gravitational Fields • Oscillations

40% of A Level

Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Physics 2 Hours 30 minutes • Questions in this paper may draw on any of the topics in this specification. • The paper will include synoptic questions that may draw on two or more different topics. • The paper will include questions that assess conceptual and theoretical understanding of experimental methods (indirect practical skills) that will draw on students’ experiences of the core practicals.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Physics is a challenging subject which provides excellent training for many future careers such as medicine, engineering and management - its skills are very transferable.

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Sociology A Level LINEAR

A Level AQA 7192

What is Sociology? Sociology is the study of human social life and behaviour. Whenever two people come together and communicate Sociology helps explain their actions. The duty of the sociologist is to illuminate the everyday world and to challenge our common-sense views: for example, are gender roles ‘natural’ or are they shaped by a society’s culture? Are criminals born or made? Our world is socially constructed: what you may consider to be innate, e.g. romantic love, is a relatively recent social ‘invention’. Sociology explores life and death issues related to power e.g. violence within the family, the exploitation of developing countries and why people commit crime? These topics may appear grim but, if we are to have any chance of overcoming the exploitation and discrimination that is so widespread that it is regarded as inevitable and even acceptable, then we need to understand the assumptions that underlie the way society is organised and who benefits most from the existing system.

Why study Sociology? By opting for this course you will: • acquire knowledge about, and a critical understanding of, contemporary British and then global society; • reflect on your own experience of the social world in which you live; • develop skills which will enhance your ability to participate more effectively as a global citizen, for example how to construct an evaluative and sustained argument supported with evidence based on empirical research.

What occupations can Sociology lead to? Sociology can be useful for many occupations, not just the stereotypical one of social work. It is a valuable qualification towards a career in teaching, media, the law, marketing and public service professions (such as the police, nursing or the Civil Service) to name but a few! Effectively, Sociology is very useful for any job that requires an understanding of people and how society and wider structural forces shapes not just their behaviour but their thoughts, expectations and even desires: can you name a job in which such insight would not be useful?

Course requirements To study Sociology A Level you would be expected to meet the general requirements to undertake an A Level programme. In addition, because the subject requires higher Level writing skills a grade C or higher at (I)GCSE English Language is required.

94 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Year

Part

12

A

Topic

Details

Families and Households

• the relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy • changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, childbearing and the life course • gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society • changes in the status of children • demographic trends in the United Kingdom since 1900

12

B

Education

• the role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure • differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society • relationships and processes within schools • the significance of educational policies

13

C

Global Development

• development, underdevelopment and global inequality • globalisation and its influence on the cultural, political and economic relationships between societies • the role of transnational corporations, nongovernmental organisations and international agencies in local and global strategies for development • development in relation to aid and trade, industrialisation, urbanisation, the environment, and war and conflict • employment, education, health, demographic change and gender as aspects of development.

13

D

Crime and Deviance

• crime, deviance, social order and social control • the social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class • globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes • crime control, surveillance, prevention and punishment, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system

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Year

Part

12 & 13

E

Topic

Details

Theory and Methods

• quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design • sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, experiments, documents and official statistics • the distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data • the relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods • the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research • consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories • the concepts of modernity and post-modernity in relation to sociological theory • the extent to which Sociology can be regarded as scientific • the relationship between theory and methods • the relationship between Sociology and social policy.

Assessment The specification followed is the one offered by AQA. This is a two year Linear A Level course. The course is assessed entirely by a final examination of 3 exam papers at the end of Year 13. The Assessment Objectives cover the skills of Knowledge and Understanding, Identification, Analysis, Interpretation and Evaluation. The quality of written communication will also be assessed in all units.

96 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Component

Weighting

Paper 1: Education with Theory and Methods 2 hour written exam: 80 marks

33.3% of the A Level

Questions Education: short answer and extended writing, 50 marks Methods in Context: extended writing, 20 marks Theory and Methods: extended writing, 10 marks 33.3% of the A Level

Paper 2: Topics in Sociology 2 hour written exam: 80 marks

A Level Questions Section A: extended writing, 40 marks – Families and Households Section B: extended writing, 40 marks – Global Development Paper 3: Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods 2 hour written exam: 80 marks

33.3% of the A Level

Questions Crime and Deviance: sshort answer and extended writing, 50 marks Theory and Methods: extended writing, 30 marks

Finally, is Sociology for you? Sociology is not about remembering answers from a textbook. You may disagree with all of the textbooks (and even your teacher) and still achieve the highest grade: it all depends on the quality of the evidence you deploy to support your viewpoint. You will develop your ability to create, build and sustain your evaluative viewpoint about the social forces that shape and manipulate us. You must be willing to think for yourself and tolerate uncertainty. The successful exam results achieved in Sociology are due to students applying themselves and finding the subject stimulating and relevant to their own lives: this helps motivate students to undertake the hard work that is integral to success in any A Level. If you have ever thought about why people and social groups behave as they do and why the alternatives have not been adopted by society then Sociology is for you. A previous student said the subject was: “Hard work but very interesting”. Which part of the statement do you focus upon? Do you want to understand the world in which you live: to analyse it, engage with it, resist it?

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MODULAR These are the existing ‘old’ A Levels. These typically comprise of 4 or 6 modular exams. Half are taken at the end of Year 12 to give an AS exam, then the students continue onto Year 13 where they complete all the modules and have an opportunity to re-sit the AS modules. The AS modules count towards the overall exam mark. These exams will be phased out completely over the next three years. These can be taken as one of the 3 main A Levels or as an additional AS subject.

Design & Technology: Product Design (3D Design) MODULAR

AS Level AQA 1550 A2 Level AQA 2550

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? Product Design provides a natural progression for students of all Design and Technology (I)GCSE courses. It is also possible to follow this course if you have a genuine interest in designing and making products. Design & Technology is of great value to any student wishing to maintain an active technical and creative aspect to their further studies. In addition, BSB is accredited as a registered school for the ‘Arkwright Scholarship Scheme’. Successful Arkwright Scholarship students will be ‘linked’ to a company and receive an annual Arkwright Scholarship bursary.

What will I learn? You will learn to: •d  evelop your own innovative ideas and creativity •e  xtend your design and technology ability and produce high quality outcomes •a  pply ICT to enhance your work •d  evelop an understanding of industrial and commercial practices including CAD/CAM techniques •b  ecome a discerning customer able to make informed choices •c  onsider the wider implications of this subject including the environmental and social impact •d  evelop an enquiring mind •w  ork collaboratively and learn from considering the work of others This is very much a hands-on course. Theoretical elements are delivered (wherever possible), with reinforcement through practical activities. The coursework element of this subject (Units 2 and 4) means that students are able to pursue a task in their own area of interest and expertise. For further information go to http://store.aqa.org.uk/qual/gce/pdf/AQA-2550-W-SG.PDF 98 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


What examinations will I take?

AS

A2

Component

Weighting

Unit 1: Material and Components – written paper: 2 hours

50% AS 25% A Level

Unit 2: Coursework – approximately 50 hours

50% AS 25% A Level

Unit 3: Design and Manufacture – written paper: 2 hours

25% A Level

Unit 4: Coursework – approximately 60 hours

25% A Level

Further Studies and Career Opportunities? Since Design and Technology complements so many other subjects, further possibilities are available in many areas. Many of our students go on to take related degrees at university covering aspects such as Automotive Design, Architecture and Technology, Advertising, Product Design, Engineering, Industrial Design and Construction Technology.

Design & Technology: Product Design (Textiles) MODULAR

1561 A/S AQA A01 2561 A Level AQA A02

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? Product Design (Textiles) provides an excellent natural progression for students from (I)GCSE Design & Technology: Textiles. Candidates can be accepted without the above requirements following a personal departmental assessment. Design & Technology (Textiles) is of great value to any self-motivated, enthusiastic student wishing to maintain an active problem-solving, technical and creative aspect to their further studies. Students interested in the commercial world of Fashion and Interior Design can undertake a creative course with very much a practical emphasis.

You will learn to: • develop your own innovative ideas and creativity - turning your ideas into reality • extend your design and technology ability and produce high quality outcomes • apply ICT to enhance your work • develop an understanding of industrial and commercial practices • become a discerning customer able to make informed choices

• consider the wider implications of this subject including the environmental and social impact • develop an enquiring mind and independent study skills • work collaboratively and learn from considering the work of others • make active use of CAD facilities such as industry standard software ‘Speedstep’, CAM cutter and sublimation printers

This is very much a hands-on course. At AS Level theoretical elements are delivered (wherever possible), with reinforcement through practical activities. For example, fibre and fabric theory is developed through experimental portfolio work and pattern drafting, through

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design and make experiences. Visits will be made to exhibitions representing good design in London and Belgium. The coursework element of this subject (Units 2 & 5) means that students are able to pursue tasks in their own area of interest and expertise. In your final year you will develop independent study skills focusing on design with a personal investigation.

What examinations will I take? Component

Weighting

Unit 1: Material, Components and Application

50% AS 25% A Level

Text 1: W  ritten paper: 3 sections, 2 hours, 80 marks.

AS

Unit 2: Learning through Designing and Making Text 2: C  oursework: approx 50 hours – 80 marks Written (or electronic) design portfolio. Manufactured outcomes (single D & M or portfolio outcomes).

Unit 3: Design and Manufacture

50% AS 25% A Level

25% A Level

Text 3: W  ritten paper: 2 sections, 2 hours, 84 marks. Includes synoptic assessment.

A2

Unit 4: Design and Making Practice

25% A Level

Text 4: C  oursework: approx 60 hours – 85 marks Written (or electronic) design folder. Manufactured outcome – substantial single activity.

Are you interested in further study and career opportunities in the fashion industry? Design and Technology (Textiles) complements many other subjects and there are numerous possibilities for further study and careers. Many of our students go on to take related degrees at university covering aspects such as Graphic Design/Fashion Design, Fashion Journalism, Fashion Accessory Design and Retail, Costume Design for Theatre and Film, Conservation, Museum and Gallery work and Interior Design. Some students may move into other areas such as Sociology, Product Design, Fashion and Business Management.


Drama and Theatre Studies MODULAR

AS and A2 AQA 2240

Why should I choose to study Drama? This course is for you if you would like to: •d  evelop your interest in drama and theatre, making critical and evaluative judgements both as a participant and as an informed member of an audience •d  evelop skills in a range of practical drama elements, with a choice between acting, directing, costume, set, mask and technical design •e  xtend the practical and theoretical knowledge and understanding you need, to communicate through drama and theatre •a  ppreciate the significance of social, cultural and historical influences on theatre practice both past and present, exploring a range of styles and techniques • take a challenging, satisfying and complete course of study that broadens your experience, develops your imagination, fosters creativity and promotes personal and social development •g  ain an entry qualification for a variety of courses in higher education It is not necessary to have studied Drama at (I)GCSE.

What will I study? Course modules and summary of scheme of assessment:

AS

Component

Weighting

Unit 1: Live Theatre Production Seen and Prescribed Play Written Paper – 1 hour 30 minutes (100 marks)

60% AS 30% A Level

One question to be answered from each of two sections: • Section A: response to live theatre seen during the course • Section B: study of one set play from a choice from six plays Externally set and assessed

40% AS 20% A Level

Unit 2: Presentation of an Extract from a Play Practical: 80 marks

AS

Performance by a group of an extract from a published play, illustrating their practical understanding of a chosen practitioner. The assessment also includes students’ preparatory and development work and supporting notes Internally assessed and externally moderated continued on next page

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At A2 students have the opportunity to develop skills and extend and apply knowledge gained at AS Level.

30% A Level

Unit 3: Further Prescribed Plays including Pre-Twentieth Century Written paper: 2 hours (100 marks)

A2

Study of two further set plays. One question to be answered from each of two sections: • Section A: pre-20th century plays and Section B: 20th century or contemporary plays • Section B: is synoptic, requiring suggestions for a complete stage realisation of a short extract from the play specified in the paper Externally set and assessed Unit 4: Presentation of Devised Drama Practical: 80 marks

20% A Level

Performance by a group of devised drama in the theatrical style of their choice. The assessment also include students’ preparatory and development work and supporting notes. Internally assessed and externally moderated

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Whilst the specific skills you develop will be of obvious benefit to anyone wishing to follow either further theatre training or an arts based degree course, Drama A Level also teaches you how to research independently, evaluate critically with supporting evidence and work as part of a team engaged with creative problem solving. With 60% written examination during the course, the combination of these qualities are highly valued by universities and colleges. Some students choose to take Drama, as a contrast to science based subjects, to enable them to experience, and later offer, a well-rounded intellectual approach. Drama also provides an attractive background for a wide range of careers as the most highly sought after skills, nominated by employers, remain communication, innovation, flexibility and motivation.

Trips and Workshops In order to pass the course, it is essential that students see a range of live professional theatre, as well as the multitude of shows that take place at School. Over the two-year course, students will generally see two professional shows, either in London or Europe, in one academic year at a cost of around €150.00 a time. In alternate years, there will be a longer, residential trip, affiliated with ISTA (International Schools Theatre Association). This will include visits to several shows, as well as workshops and master classes by professional practitioners. For example, in October 2013, AS and A2 students attended a five day trip to New York, seeing shows both on and off Broadway, along with three days of intensive workshops leading to a shared performance with other international students. The cost was around €1500. Students may also attend a series of workshops in School, led by professional practitioners, throughout the course at no extra cost.

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Geography MODULAR The world in which we live is likely to change more in the next 50 years than it has ever done before. Geography explains why, and helps to prepare you for those changes. Geography is versatile and as an A Level develops one of the broadest skill sets. Its wide scope of material combines well with other subjects. In its own right Geography is a challenging and rigorous academic study, well respected at universities and by employers. Geography is distinctive in that place remains central to its study. Greater understanding of place and our interaction with place is central to the solutions that governments and industry seek.

The world needs geographers! Geography offers you the unique perspective of place. It connects the natural sciences to the humanities and in doing so helps you understand the human impacts on our fragile world. Do you want to understand why the economic model is responsible for widespread environmental destruction? Can you explain why we are all intrinsically linked to global poverty? Or are you interested in the natural forces that change our world and increasingly wreak havoc on human lives? Perhaps you want to help manage these impacts in the future. Then Geography is the subject for you.

What’s in store? The first year strikes an equal balance between Physical and Human Geography. You will develop your knowledge of rivers, floods and management. Central to the human theme are the social, economic, political and environmental consequences of population change. Alongside the core you study food supply issues and coastal or extreme environments which include both cold and desert environments. In addition you attend two fieldwork days and conduct a practical study of changing river characteristics and a comparison of two Brussels communes. This fieldwork contributes towards the assessment of fieldwork skills in paper 2. In the second year the course develops your understanding of hazards and focuses on plate tectonics and climate as well as providing an invaluable knowledge on the issue of climate change. This is supported by a course on globalisation and development which develops links with economics, sociology and history taught at BSB. The entire course is underpinned by the issue evaluation paper which develops real world skills for analysing and evaluating a pre-released resource. Every other year we take all post 16 geographers on an extended fieldtrip to study and witness the topics we study in the field. In previous years, we travelled to Marrakech, the Sahara and the Atlas Mountains.

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Will it fit into my life? Geography is probably the most versatile of all subjects and strong links can be found with the three sciences and mathematics. There is direct links with Economics, History and Sociology and the Geography Department has taken a leading role in the development of ICT. Critical thinking and communication are essential skills in geography and inevitably supports your learning in any combination of subjects.

Where will the success take me? In recent years over a third of our geography students at BSB have gone on to major in geography or geography related courses at some of the best UK universities, including Oxford and Cambridge as well as abroad. Recent statistics suggest that geography graduates are amongst the most employable. Beyond postgraduate studies, management, administration and finance are the three main fields of employment. Geography is a well-respected academic subject that essentially develops transferable skills for a flexible career path.

What skills will I learn? Geography helps develop a versatile and flexible skill set. The most central skills that we seek to develop in our teaching are: • Spatially, socially and environmentally awareness • A global perspective and a sense of world interdependence • Communication skills • Teamwork • Management skills • Analytical and critical thinking skills

On your marks… AS Year 12 Unit 1

Population Change Rivers, Floods and Management

2 hours exam 70% of AS 35% of A Level

AS Year 13 Unit 3

Weather and Climate and Associated Hazards

Coastal Management or Cold Environments Geographical Skills

2.30 hour exam 30% A Level

Plate Tectonics and Associated Hazards

Food Supply Issues

Unit 2

Globalisation and Development

1 hour exam 30% of AS 15% of A Level

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Unit 4

Geographical Issue Evaluation (pre-release resource)

2.30 hour exam 20% A Level


Government and Politics MODULAR

A/S EDEXCEL 8067 A2 EDEXCEL 9067-70

What kind of student is this course suitable for? This course is for students who: •h  ave a lively and enquiring mind •h  ave some interest in politics and current events and want to explore new ideas •w  ant to understand why and how politicians, civil servants and journalists in the mass media function •a  lready know how to communicate their own ideas effectively or who wish to learn how to do so • like studying a subject that affects their everyday lives • want to keep their options open: politics can be a useful choice for a wide range of careers and can be combined with many social science and humanities subjects

What will I learn? • a critical awareness of the nature of politics and the relationship between political ideas, institutions and processes • the structures of authority and power in the political system of the United Kingdom, and how these differ from other political systems • the rights and responsibilities of individuals that lead to participation by citizens in society • an understanding and critical awareness of political events and viewpoints, and the skills needed to argue a political case effectively • an understanding of theories, motives and values that underpin political processes and decisions and how conflicts are solved and scarce resources allocated

What qualifications will I obtain and what examinations will I take?

AS

A2

Component

Weighting

Unit 1: People and Politics

50% AS 25% A Level

Unit 2: Governing the UK

50% AS 25% A Level

Unit 3: Structures in Global Politics

50% A2 Level 25% A Level

Unit 4: Global Political Issues

50% A2 Level 25% A Level

You will obtain an AS (Advanced Subsidiary) qualification at the end of Year 12 You will obtain an A2 (Advanced Level) qualification at the end of Year 13

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 105


Mathematics MODULAR

EDEXCEL 9371 8371 / 8372 / 9371 / 9372

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? The demands of the course are such that students should expect to have shown strong prior understanding of Mathematics before embarking on A Level studies. A grade A* or A at (I)GCSE Level Mathematics is the minimum standard expected and a grade A* is expected for those hoping to follow the Further Maths course.

The Nature of the Subject Since individual students have different needs, interests and abilities, The British School of Brussels offers a number of different courses in mathematics within the A Level programme. In making a selection, students should consider the following: • their own abilities in mathematics and the type of mathematics in which they can be successful • their own interest in mathematics with respect to the areas which hold an appeal • their other choices of subject within the framework of the A Level programme • their future academic plans in terms of the subjects they wish to study at university or college • their choice of career The course is modular and alongside the compulsory units of Core Maths and Further Pure Maths students also opt to study Statistics, Mechanics or Decision Maths modules. Note that Further Mathematics cannot be taken independently and must be taken alongside Mathematics.


Syllabus The modules are offered in the following combinations.

Maths & Statistics

Maths & Mechanics

Further Mathematics

Year 12 (AS)

C1,C2,S1

C1,C2,M1

FP1, D1,S1

Year 13 (A2)

C3,C4,S2 (or D1)

C3,C4,M2 (or D1)

FP2,FP3 + D2

For A2 Maths with Further Maths students will have studied a combination of 12 modules.

Core Mathematics Unit

Summary of Unit content

C1

Algebra and functions; coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane; sequences and series; differentiation; integration.

C2

Algebra and functions; coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane; sequences and series; trigonometry; exponentials and logarithms; differentiation; integration.

C3

Algebra and functions; trigonometry; exponentials and logarithms; differentiation; numerical methods.

C4

Algebra and functions; coordinate geometry in the (x, y) plane; sequences and series; differentiation; integration; vectors.

Further Pure Mathematics Unit

Summary of unit content

FP1

Series; complex numbers; numerical solution of equations; coordinate systems, matrix, algebra, proof.

FP2

Inequalities; series, first order differential equations; second order differential equations; further complex numbers, Maclaurin and Taylor series.

FP3

Further matrix algebra; vectors, hyperbolic functions; differentiation; integration, further coordinate systems.

Mechanics Unit

Summary of Unit content

M1

Mathematical models in mechanics; vectors in mechanics; kinematics of a particle moving in a straight line; dynamics of a particle moving in a straight line or plane; statics of a particle; moments.

M2

Kinematics of a particle moving in a straight line or plane; centres of mass; work and energy; collisions; statics of rigid bodies.

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Statistics Unit

Summary of Unit content

S1

Mathematical models in probability and statistics; representation and summary of data; probability; correlation and regression; discrete random variables; discrete distributions; the Normal distribution.

S2

The Binomial and Poisson distributions; continuous random variables; continuous distributions; samples; hypothesis tests.

Decision Mathematics Unit

Summary of Unit content

D1

Algorithms; algorithms on graphs; the route inspection problem; critical path analysis; linear programming; matchings.

D2

Transportation problems; allocation (assignment) problems; the travelling salesman; game theory; further linear programming, dynamic programming; flows in networks.

Assessment All modules are assessed by examinations of 1½ hours taken at the end of Year 12 and 13. The points awarded in Year 12 can be ‘stored’ until Year 13 and the total points scored from all modules will determine the final grade awarded.

Course Requirements and Progression Mathematics is seen as a widely applicable qualification in many further courses of study. Many students go on to study in related fields such as Engineering, Economics, Business and Accountancy.


Media Studies MODULAR

AQA 2570

What is Media Studies? Media Studies is a subject that looks at the modern world with a critical eye. You will have been influenced by several aspects of the media including television, advertising, journalism and film, but have you thought about how these different influences are communicated to you? Have you considered what ideas may lie below the surface of apparently simple images? Have you an adequate vocabulary to be able to discuss the concepts of the media? Part of Media Studies is to do with looking at media texts and analysing how they work, but it is also a practical subject, and you will have the opportunity to make your own media production, such as a film trailer, and website. You will need, therefore, to be prepared to put in a considerable amount of time to learn the necessary practical skills.

What use is Media Studies? This is a course which gives you the necessary skills to study Media at university Level. It also has considerable relevance to students interested in Sociology, Government & Politics, Art, English and Drama. The A Level in Media Studies is not a vocational course, but would be useful for those interested in studying journalism or film. The analytical and practical skills developed during the course are, of course, common to other subjects and careers.

Who will teach the subject? The course covers several types of skills and will be taught by teachers with experience in these areas, including teachers from the English, Media and Film departments.

How is the course structured? We will be following the AQA specification:

AS

A2

Component

Weighting

Unit 1: Investigating Media: 2-hour written exam

25%

Unit 2: Creating Media: Coursework

25%

Unit 3: Critical Perspectives: 2-hour written exam

25%

Unit 4: Research and Production: Coursework

25%

You can find more information on the course at www.aqa.org.uk

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Modern Languages MODULAR The department follows the Edexcel AS / A2 Modern Languages course. There is a common syllabus for French, German and Spanish and the examination structure outlined below is the same for those three languages. Students taking Dutch at A Level will be prepared for the OCR AS / A2 examination. Students taking AS in a language should have a minimum of a strong grade B at (I)GCSE or equivalent, although a higher grade than this is preferable, particularly for those students intending to continue to the A2 course in Year 13.

What will I learn on this course? The course will help you to develop your general study skills, but most of all you will learn to communicate at a higher Level in your chosen language. You will also learn much more about a wide range of aspects of the society or societies in which the language is spoken.

Reading You will learn to read, understand and extract information from written passages taken from authentic sources, such as magazines, newspapers, reports, books and internet articles in the target language. Listening You will learn to listen to, and understand contemporary spoken language and answer questions on what you have heard. The passages that you will learn to listen to will be taken from a range of sources such as news reports on the radio or TV, weather forecasts, announcements, interviews and discussions. Speaking and writing You will learn how to write essays or longer written pieces and to hold conversations and discussions in the target language. You will learn all the appropriate grammar, words and phrases that will help you to: • present information in the target language • organise your argument • provide opinions • analyse your ideas

What kind of student is the course suitable for? If you are interested in languages and communication and enjoy learning about other cultures and ways of life, then the Modern Languages course could be for you. Similarly, if you are interested in the business world, in travel or tourism, or in journalism and the media, then you are also likely to find the course appropriate. There are a number of options in the course where you can choose a topic or question to suit your interests. Whether you want to use languages for work, for further study or training, or for leisure, this course will equip you with the necessary skills and knowledge.

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What examinations will I take? The assessment structure of the Edexcel AS / A2 qualifications is as follows:

AS

A2

Component

Weighting

Unit 1: Spoken Expression and Response in Target Language

30% AS 15% A Level

Unit 2: Understanding and Written Response in Target Language

70% AS 35% A Level

Unit 3: Understanding and Spoken Response in Target Language

17.5% A Level

Unit 4: Research, Understanding and Written Response in Target Language

32.5% A Level

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Commercially, industrially, culturally and politically a good knowledge of languages is an undisputed asset for internationally aware citizens. Having an A Level language qualification is an advantage in almost all career contexts.

French MODULAR

A/S EDEXCEL 8FR01 A2 EDEXCEL 9FR01

French is an international language widely used and spoken in Europe, Africa and part of North America. The teaching is almost exclusively in French with constant exposure to native speakers and authentic materials (newspapers, news magazines, textbooks, literature, films, television and a range of internet resources).

‘Fast Track’ A2 Level Students who have already completed the AS Level in French in Year 11 will be able to complete the A2 course in Year 12.

German MODULAR

A/S EDEXCEL 8GN01 A2 EDEXCEL 9GN01

German is one of the official languages of Belgium, and the most widely spoken mother tongue of the European Union. German is often considered a difficult language, but students taking AS/A2 Level German find the course enjoyable. Students will be exposed to a variety of authentic reading materials from newspapers, literature, lyrics and text books. Television and IT are used systematically to give students exposure to German based on topical issues of interest. The course also includes consolidation of German grammar rules and the study of some of the best German films. Students have the opportunity to visit Berlin as part of the course. The course caters both for students who have followed the normal IGCSE courses as well as those who may have a German language background.

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Spanish MODULAR

A/S EDEXCEL 8SP01 A2 EDEXCEL 9SP01

Spanish is a popular world language and is the second most used language in international communication. This increasingly popular AS/A2 Level exposes students to a variety of authentic material such as newspaper and magazine articles and news items from Spanish television. Students will study key events (past and present) that have had a profound effect on Spanish society, a literary text in Spanish and they will also be encouraged to study films (post- Franco) which will allow more insight into Spain’s modern day culture. This course caters both for students who have followed the normal IGCSE course as well as those who may have a Spanish language background.

Dutch MODULAR

A/S OCR F881 A2 OCR F882

Dutch is the language of the local community and it is the most widely spoken language in Belgium. The classes are taught by native speakers who make use of authentic television and radio documentaries, local newspapers and ICT. The main course book used is Niet Vanzelfsprekend. Both AS and A2 examinations consist of a listening, reading and writing paper which also contains a short translation from Dutch into English. In addition there is a 300 word directed writing task in Dutch for AS, and a 250 – 400 word essay in Dutch for A2.


Music MODULAR

AS EDEXCEL 8522 A2 EDEXCEL 9510

Why study Music? This course will appeal to you if you: •e  njoy playing an instrument or singing (at minimum grade 5 standard) •e  njoy listening to a wide range of musical styles •e  njoy composing your own music •h  ave passed an (I)GCSE music exam (although exceptions can be made, depending on other previous musical experience i.e. theory grade 5 and performance exams) •e  njoy working independently •h  ave some general musicianship skills such as aural skills and reading music

What will I learn? You will: • Improve your understanding of harmony and counterpoint, through analysis and technical exercises •D  evelop your knowledge of particular genres of music ranging from Renaissance to 20th Century Jazz, Pop and World Music, and learn to recognise characteristics of a wide range of musical styles • Improve your aural skills •D  evelop your own original composition skills, and produce coursework pieces based on set briefs • Improve your performance and take part in solo and group performances throughout the course, which may include performances in and outside of School

What are the units I will follow and how will they be assessed?

AS

Component

Weighting

Unit 1: Performing music You may choose to perform as a soloist or as part of an ensemble, and perform in any style. You must produce a performance lasting at least 5-6 minutes which will be recorded for assessment. The programme should be carefully selected to show a variety of styles. The performance will be assessed by your teacher and moderated by external examiners.

30% AS

Unit 2: Composing You must produce a piece of music lasting 3 minutes, choosing one option from a selection of briefs including music for film and instrumental music. This piece will be recorded and you will need to supply a detailed score. Your work will be assessed by Edexcel external examiners.

30% AS

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Unit 3: Developing Musical Understanding Assessment is through a 2 hour listening examination paper set and marked by Edexcel. The paper is divided into 3 sections:

40% AS

•S  ection A - Listening: this is based on musical extracts from a number of set works you will have studied. You will need to be able to identify aurally key features of the works

AS

•S  ection B - Investigating musical styles: this is also based on the set works, and requires you to compare and contrast two works, as well as to recognise the characteristics of particular musical genres •S  ection C - Understanding chords and lines: this paper assesses your ability to use a score to analyse simple harmonic and melodic features in unfamiliar music and your ability to complete a simple SATB texture.

A2

Unit 4: Extended Performance You must perform either as a soloist or as part of an ensemble. The recital should be varied and last for 12-15 minutes in total. This will be recorded for assessment by your teacher and moderation by Edexcel.

30% A2

Unit 5: Composition and Technical Study This unit has two sections: the composition section leads to the creation of a 3 minute composition in response to a chosen brief. The technical study section builds on the awareness and knowledge of harmony gained in Unit 3 section C (AS) through the medium of pastiche studies. You will be able to choose two tasks, either one composition and one technical study or two compositions or two technical studies. Composition work will be assessed by external examiners.

30% A2

Unit 6: Further Musical Understanding Assessment is through a 2 hour examination paper and marked by external examiners. The paper is divided into 3 sections:

40% A2

• Section A – Aural analysis. i. this requires you to compare and contrast two excerpts of music. ii. this requires you to recognise chords and keys and to place the music in context. • Section B – Music in Context. This section prompts you to identify given musical features from selected set works and comment on their social and historical context. • Section C – Continuity and Change in Instrumental Music. This is based on the set works and will assess your understanding of continuity and change within the works studied.

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MusicTechnology MODULAR

AS EDEXCEL 8522 A2 EDEXCEL 9510

Why study Music Technology? This course will appeal to you if you:

• have an interest in popular music and recording techniques • would like to learn to operate a recording studio • enjoy using computers to compose music • like the idea of a coursework dominated course • took (I)GCSE and enjoyed the composition element. (Exceptions can be made, depending on previous musical experience. It will help if you can already play an instrument, have some understanding of harmony and can read music) • are prepared to spend a lot of hours in the recording studio

What will I learn? • Research and learn about the development of recording techniques and technology. • Develop skills in sequencing. • Improve your arranging and composing skills using technology. • Improve your analytical listening skills

What units will I follow and how will they be assessed? Component

Weighting

Unit 1: Music Technology Portfolio 1 Externally assessed. YYou will learn and use a variety of music and music technology skills in order to complete this unit. MIDI sequencing and multi-track recording as well as arranging skills are all key components assessed through the practical work carried out.

70% AS

• Task 1A: Sequenced Realised Performance • Task 1B: Multi-Track Recording • Task 1C: Creative Sequenced Arrangement

AS

Students will produce an audio CD entitled ‘Music Technology Portfolio 1’, containing three tracks of work as specified in the three tasks above, and you will also present a log book which will detail equipment used and answer two assessed questions on your creative sequenced arrangement. Unit 2: Listening and Analysing Externally assessed in a 1 hour 45 minute listening examination. You will study popular music, tracing its development from 1910 to the present day and covering a range of styles. Two special focus styles will be selected each year for more in depth study. For the special focus styles, in addition to the main fingerprints of the style, you will be expected to have an extended knowledge and understanding of context. You will demonstrate this knowledge using aural discrimination skills.

30% AS

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 115


Component

Weighting

Unit 3: Music Technology Portfolio 2 Externally assessed. UUnit 3 builds on skills acquired in unit 1, and extends these to include a composition task. It involves the detailed study of Area of Study 3 The Development of Technology - based Music. You must complete three tasks which together make the Music Technology Portfolio 2.

60% A2

• Task 3A – Sequence-integrated Performance • Task 3B – Multi-track Recording • Task 3C – Composing Using Music Technology

A2

You will produce an audio CD entitled ‘Music Technology Portfolio 2’, containing three tracks of work as specified in the three tasks above, and you will also present a log book, detailing equipment used. Unit 4: A  nalysing and Producing Externally assessed. You will be expected to demonstrate your knowledge of music and the principles of music technology through a series of written commentaries, manipulations and production tasks using material provided on an examination paper and recorded on an audio CD. The examination will test your musical understanding, your ability to manipulate and correct recorded music and your ability to write commentaries on technological processes. You will also be tested on your ability to produce a balanced stereo mix.

40% A2


Section 4 BTEC Nationals - Level 3 As an alternative route to A Level and the IB Diploma, The British School of Brussels offers an exciting range of BTEC National Level 3 qualifications. These courses are designed specifically to meet the needs of those students who refer continuous assessment rather than the traditional external examination style of assessment. The specifications followed are offered by Edexcel. The courses are all coursework/assignment based and all assessment is in line with the BTEC National criterion referencing system which is based upon the achievement of specified learning outcomes. There are three possible levels of qualifications available:

BTEC Level 3 Certificate = ONE AS Level

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma = ONE A Level

BTEC Level 3 Diploma = TWO A Levels

3/4 Units of Study. This can be obtained after one year of study (Year 12).

6/7 Units of Study. This can be obtained after two years of study (Year 12 & 13).

12 Units of Study. This can be obtained after two years of study (Year 12 & 13). This is only available in the Business qualification.

The grading for the BTEC National qualification is different than that of A Level and IB students. Students are assessed continuously via coursework assignments and obtain a summative grade of Pass, Merit or Distinction per assignment. This grading is then transferred into an overall grade for that subject at the end of the course, where students can be awarded: PASS MERIT DISTINCTION DISTINCTION*

118 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


NEW UCAS POINTS The final grade for the subject carries the UCAS Tariff Points equivalencies of: BTEC Level 3 Certificate UCAS Tariff Points

28

24

16

8

BTEC National

D*

D

M

P

UCAS Tariff Points

56

48

32

16

BTEC National

D*

D

M

P

BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma

BTEC Level 3 Diploma - This is only available in the Business qualification. UCAS Tariff Points BTEC National

112

104

96

80

64

48

32

D* D*

D* D

DD

DM

MM

MP

PP

The BTEC National Level 3 qualifications are an entry level qualification for employment and worldwide undergraduate universities courses. Over 100 UK based universities accept the BTEC National qualification as entry using the above UCAS tariff equivalency tables. In addition to UK universities the BTEC National qualification is accepted by US and Canadian colleges as well as other countries. The BTEC National qualification provides students with the opportunity to develop a range of skills and techniques, personal skills and attributes essential for successful performance in working life and undergraduate study. We offer the following BTEC National Level 3 courses: • Certificate, Subsidiary Diploma & Diploma in Business. • Certificate & Subsidiary Diploma in Hospitality. • Certificate & Subsidiary Diploma in Sport. Students can choose to follow a full programme of BTEC National qualifications or combine a BTEC National course with an AS Level from another option block. Therefore the options open to students are:

BTEC Business Single

BTEC Business Double

This leads to a Certificate or a Subsidiary Diploma.

This leads to a Diploma.

BTEC Hospitality Single

BTEC Sport Single

This leads to This leads to a Certificate or a Certificate or a Subsidiary Diploma. a Subsidiary Diploma.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 119


To help you make the correct decisions we have put together some example study routes designed over a two year period: Example A: BTEC Business (Single) = One A Level

+

BTEC Business (Double) = One A Level

+

BTEC Business (Double) = One A Level

+

BTEC Sport (Single) = One A Level

+

BTEC Sport (Single) = One A Level

+

BTEC Hospitality (Single) = One A Level

+

BTEC Sport (Single) = One A Level

+

BTEC Hospitality (Single) = One A Level

Example B: BTEC Business (Single) = One A Level

Example C: BTEC Business (Single) = One A Level

Example D: BTEC Business (Single) = One A Level

+

AS/A2 = One A Level

** Any AS Level subject that you meet the entry requirements for and fits within the options blocks. Typical examples are Media Studies or a second language. A more detailed course description about each of the courses can be found below.

BTEC National Business BTEC National Business: Level 3 Certificate – Edexcel (500/6748/5) BTEC National Business: Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma – Edexcel (500/6750/3) BTEC National Business : Level 3 Diploma – Edexcel (500/6747/3) The department offers the option of BTEC National Business as part of the BTEC route at The British School of Brussels. The courses offered are assignment based and involves a high use of ICT. BTEC Business at this level encompasses many disciplines and covers different forms of organisations and marketing activity. Its aim is to develop broad skills, knowledge and understanding of business and marketing activity. BTEC Business provides learners with the opportunity to develop a range of skills and techniques, personal skills and attributes essential for successful performance in working life.

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BTEC NATIONAL BUSINESS – SINGLE AWARD This course is designed to cover all the essential elements of business activity and covers units which are the underpinning of business functions and business activity. Year 12

Year 13

BTEC Business (Single Award)

BTEC Business (Single Award)

Unit 1: The Business Environment

Unit 4: Business Communication

Unit 2: Business Resources

Unit 13: Recruitment & Selection in Business

Unit 3: Introduction to Marketing

Unit 18: Organising a Business Event or Unit 9: Creative Product Promotion

If you successfully follow the Business Single Award you will be able to achieve the equivalent of ONE A Level at the end of Year 13. BTEC NATIONAL BUSINESS – DOUBLE AWARD The BTEC Business Double Award allows students to achieve a ‘double A Level’ equivalent in Business. However in order to do this you must follow both the single and double award qualifications. You cannot just follow the double award qualification. This course is designed to provide a more in-depth and specialist investigation into certain areas and functions of business activity. Year 12

Year 13

BTEC Business (Double Award)

BTEC Business (Double Award)

Unit 5: Business Accounting

Unit 7: Management Accounting

Unit 19: Developing Teams in Business

Unit 10: Market Research in Business

Unit 27: Understanding Health & Safety in Business

Unit 37: Understanding Business Ethics

If you successfully follow the Business Single Award and the Business Double Award you will be able to achieve the equivalent of TWO A Level at the end of Year 13.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 121


BTEC National Hospitality Pearson BTEC Level 3 in Hospitality (QCF) Pearson BTEC Level 3 Certificate (500/8195/0) Pearson BTEC Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma (500/8197/4) The department offers the option of BTEC National Hospitality as part of the BTEC route at The British School of Brussels. The courses offered are assignment based and involve practical cookery and use of ICT. BTEC Hospitality at this level provides an opportunity to study the wide and varied aspects of the hospitality industry. Practical experience enables the study of equipment, commodities and methods used in different food preparation techniques. Study of the hospitality industry provides learners with the opportunity to explore the different organisations that support the business. BTEC Hospitality enables learners to develop a range of skills and techniques essential for successful performance in working life. BTEC NATIONAL HOSPITALITY – SINGLE AWARD This course is designed to cover all the essential elements of the Hospitality Industry and introduces learners to the many types and styles of European and Asian food. Principles of food safety and healthy nutrition are a composite part of this study. Year 12

Year 13

BTEC Hospitality (Single Award)

BTEC Hospitality (Single Award)

Unit 1: The Hospitality Industry

Unit 2: Principles of Supervising Customer Service Performance in Hospitality, Leisure, Travel & Tourism

Unit 10: European Food Unit11: Asian Food

Unit 3: Providing Customer Service in Hospitality Unit 13: Advanced Skills & Techniques in Producing Desserts & Petits Fours Unit 22: Planning & Managing a Hospitality Event

If you successfully follow the Hospitality Single Award you will be able to achieve the equivalent of ONE A Level at the end of Year 13.

122 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


BTEC National Sport BTEC National Sport: Level 3 Certificate – Edexcel (500/6753/9) BTEC National Sport: Level 3 Subsidiary Diploma – Edexcel (500/6751/5) The Department offers the option of BTEC National Sport as part of the BTEC route at The British School of Brussels. The courses offered are assignment based and give learners a basic grounding in understanding and knowledge of the sport and the active leisure sector. BTEC Sport at this level provides an opportunity to study the wide and varied aspects of the sports. Practical experience enables the study of fitness testing and assessment, principles of anatomy and physiology, fitness and risk assessment. The study of sport provides learners with the opportunity to explore the different aspects of sport and the issues associated with it. BTEC Sport provides learners with the opportunity to develop a range of skills and techniques essential for successful performance in working life. BTEC NATIONAL SPORT – SINGLE AWARD This course is designed to cover all the essential elements of the Sport and introduces learners to principles of anatomy and physiology in sport, the importance of assessing risk and the fitness testing necessary for maximised training and performance. Year 12

Year 13

BTEC Sport (Single Award)

BTEC Sport (Subsidiary Diploma)

Unit 1: Principles of Anatomy and Physiology in Sport

Unit 10: Outdoor and Adventurous Activities

Unit 2: The Physiology of Fitness

Unit 11: Current Issues in Sport

Unit 3: Assessing Risk in Sport

Unit 17: Psychology for Sports Performance

Unit 7: Fitness Testing for Sport and Exercise

If you successfully follow the Sport Single Award you will be able to achieve the equivalent of ONE A Level at the end of Year 13.

Course Progression Many students use their BTEC qualifications to go directly into employment in a related field of work. Alternatively it can be used towards UCAS points as any other subject or combination of subjects in the Senior Section.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 123


Section 5 Important Information for students

General Coursework Policy All departments follow the general school policy. Where changes apply to department areas, subject coursework policies can be found in the links attached. All other departments by definition follow the general policy only. Coursework is a critical part of growing independence in student learning and an opportunity to show that they can work to deadlines. Coursework is set by examination boards in Years 10-13 and must be completed according to strict guidelines that they produce. BSB sets interim and final deadlines for coursework to ensure that these demands can be reasonably met within the professional judgement of teachers and the schedule planned in the schemes of work to ensure that all aspects of the course and exam preparation can be completed appropriately. As such, all departments have a coursework policy, published on the VLE and Families’ Online, which must be followed by students. Indeed students must not only comply with deadlines set to meet school requirements, but also to train for university where missed deadlines are not tolerated at all.


The following principles apply School-wide: 1. All coursework done out of lessons, not required as part of the summer examinations, must be completed by the published deadlines which cannot be later than end of the Spring term. The Easter holidays onwards are preserved for revision only for GCSE & A Level candidates in Years 11, 12 & 13 and for IB candidates in Year 13. 2. Deadlines, both interim and final, along with other departmental requirements for coursework MUST be followed by all staff and students according to that published on the VLE and Families’ Online. If there are any changes to what is published every September, the Head of Department will send an email to parents of students concerned as well as updating the details on the VLE and Families’ Online. 3. All electronic coursework must be submitted via Turnitin to check for plagiarism at every step. If only hard copies are acceptable in your subject, then a receipt should be issued to students with a copy kept by the HoD. 4. The school supports the right of individual departments to allow requests for extensions to deadlines. If departmental policy allows for extensions then they can only be granted upon submission of an extension application form (available from the Head of Year) to the Head of Department and, if granted, the following conditions apply: •N  o student can have more than one extension to a deadline (in total, not per subject). This should normally be due to exceptional circumstances which might include long term illness or absence from school, family crisis over the weekend immediately preceding the deadline, a serious issue within the family or the student’s health. For any health related reason, a medical certificate must be provided to the school. •N  o extension will ever be granted for longer than 5 days and the HoY will inform relevant staff so that in supervised or supported study periods the student can be monitored doing the coursework owed before other work. In Years 12 & 13, an extension will also carry ROP alongside it until the work is handed in complete and according to necessary criteria.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 125


Coursework Sanctions Coursework Issue 1. Failure to meet a draft or interim deadline

Teacher Responsible/Action

Action for Student/Sanction

1. Give a lunchtime detention following normal procedures.

• Attend Lunchtime detention

2. Email parents if not handed in on the next working day and explain consequences of future failure to meet deadlines. 2. Request for extension to a final deadline (students use request proforma available from HoY)

1. H  oY issues proforma if student has not had a previous extension.

• Collect request form from HoY if eligible and submit to HoD.

2. If HoD approves the extension, s/he takes a copy of work in as it stands and passes approved copy of proforma to HoY.

• Give a copy of work in as it stands on initial deadline day to HoD (to avoid a zero mark later).

3. H  oD emails parents, teacher, Head of Year (HoY) to confirm what has been granted and consequences if fail to meet new deadline. 4. H  oY informs supported study or supervised study staff (where applicable) to monitor work being completed in those periods over the extension period.

• Complete the final piece of work in the immediate supported or supervised study periods (max 5 days). • Student to hand completed work in to HoD by new deadline agreed.

3. Failure to meet extended deadline

1. HoD informs parents, teacher, & HoY by email – consequences are made clear to parents (e.g. zero, lower mark than capable of).

• HoD to use previous copy of work collected in as submission version (e.g. plagiarism) or if the extended deadline is not met. (Students should note that this may result in a low or zero grade).

4. Student applies for a 2nd extension

1. HoY refuses to give form to request extension.

• HoD to use whatever work is completed at that stage. (Students should note that this may result in a low or zero grade).

126 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Examination Policy for Appeals against Internal Assessment of Coursework for External Examinations The British School of Brussels is committed to ensuring that whenever staff assess students’ work for external qualification, this is done fairly, consistently and in accordance with the specification for the qualification concerned. Assessments are conducted by teaching staff who have the appropriate knowledge, understanding, skills and training. The centre is committed to ensuring that assessment evidence provided by the candidates is produced and authenticated according to the requirements of the relevant specifications for each subject and examining board. Where a set of work is divided between staff, internal moderation and standardisation is carried out to ensure consistency. Departments are also encouraged to attend CPD, courses run by the examining boards to keep informed about procedures, examination criteria and standardisation. If a student feels that this may not have happened in relation to his / her work, he/she may make use of the appeals’ procedure. However, appeals may only be made against the process that led to the assessment and not against the mark or grade. The school cannot change any grades once they have been submitted to the examination board. The appeals’ procedure is available for parents and students to view on the BSB web link – Families on Line and a hard copy can be obtained from the Secondary School Office. A copy is also posted on the notice board in the Examination Room. 1. Appeals should be made as early as possible, at least two weeks before the end of the last externally assessed paper in the examination series. (eg. The last GCSE written paper in the June GCSE examination series) 2. Appeals should be made in writing by the candidate’s parent / carer to the Head of Secondary School who will inform the relevant Head of Department and the SMT link to the department. 3. The appeal will be investigated by at least two senior members of staff who have not been involved in the internal assessment decision, in liaison with the Head of Secondary School and where applicable, the Examinations Administrator. This will normally be the Head of department and SLT link to the department. 4. The link member of SLT will decide whether the process used for the internal assessment conformed to the published requirements of the awarding body and the examinations code of practice of the QCA. This will be done before the end of the examination series (Currently the end of June) 5. The outcome of the appeal will be communicated to the complainant in writing, as will any correspondence with the board, any changes made to the assessment of the work, and any changes made to improve matters in the future. 6. The outcome of the appeal will be made known to the Principal and will be logged and held on record. A written record of the appeal will be made available to the awarding body upon request. Should the appeal bring any significant irregularity to light, the awarding body will be informed.

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 127


After work has been assessed internally, it is moderated by the awarding body to ensure consistency between centres. Such moderation frequently changes the marks awarded for internally assessed work and as such, is outside the control of the British School of Brussels. The Examinations Administrator can supply a copy of the appeals/ enquiries about results procedure of the relevant awarding body. N.B. The School also has a separate Plagiarism Policy, Coursework Policy and Concerns and Complaints’ Policy that link to this Appeals Procedure Policy. September 2011

Plagiarism – General Coursework gives students an opportunity to do independent research into a topic. This involves you in researching on the internet, in books and journals as well as from TV and radio. Using information from published sources is a great way to help you, but you must not copy this work and claim it as your own. Similarly, if you receive help from another adult who is not your teacher, you cannot claim it as your own work. The regulations of all examining bodies require you to sign to say that the coursework you are submitting is your own work. If you use the same wording as a published source, you must put quotation marks around this and state where it comes from. This is called referencing. You must also include a bibliography at the end of your work with full details of the references you have made. If you copy the words or ideas of others and don’t show your sources in references and a bibliography, you will be committing plagiarism - and that’s cheating. BSB, along with all other schools, has ways of detecting plagiarism. Staff can easily spot when a student’s work is not in his/her usual style or level of ability. We also have plagiarism software in school to enable staff to detect plagiarism very quickly. BSB apply its own sanctions for plagiarised work submitted. These include: • Contacting parents • Meeting with parents • Re-doing work under the supervision of SLT • Re-doing work during internal suspension • External suspension. If your work is submitted to the exam board and found to have broken the regulations, exam boards will apply one of the following sanctions: • The piece of work will be awarded zero marks • You will be disqualified from that unit for that exam session • You will be disqualified from the whole subject for that exam session •Y  ou will be disqualified and barred from entering again for an appropriate period of time. The awarding body will decide which penalty is appropriate. REMEMBER – IT’S YOUR AWARD SO IT NEEDS TO BE YOUR OWN WORK

128 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Plagiarism: Harvard Referencing To prevent, as far as possible, any incidences of plagiarism school has decided to adopt the Harvard Referencing system so that there can be a unified approach to the correct citing of all sources of information in all student work. There is a standard procedure to follow whether the source material is found in books, journals or electronic articles. Most universities use the Harvard system so it will help our students to learn the basic procedures before they leave for higher education. Students preparing essays, coursework etc for external examiners will have to follow the procedures very carefully. KS3 students could begin to understand the principles by regularly completing small projects/investigations where they are requested to provide a bibliography to show evidence of research. While some assignments could be book only, practise in discriminating between online resources and how to reference them correctly is vital. KS4 and 5 students should be encouraged to cite books and authors in their assignments as well as including direct references of actual words used within quotation marks. These works are then listed in alphabetical order at the end of the written work and then included in the bibliography which will list, again in alphabetical order, a complete list of all books, journals and electronic articles. Below is a quotation from Jo Thomas’s recently published book. For the list of references and the bibliography Harvard requires: author, year of publication and page number(s), title (in italics), edition (if it is not the first), place of publication (if available) and publisher. “The invasion of Czechoslovakia seriously damaged the international reputation of Communism and the Soviet Union.” Rogers, K. and Thomas, J. (2008 p.202) History: 20th Century World: The Cold War. Pearson Education Ltd. For more details on how to follow the standard procedure please refer to: http://efn.hud.ac.uk/studyskills/refern.html http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard “Cite them right: the essential guide to referencing and plagiarism” by Richard Pears and Graham Shields. Page iii of this book provides an excellent example of how to reference an electronic article and why! “In this world of Internet information the use of scholarly documents has plummeted and the use of undependable Web resources has soared.” Cornell University (2003) Newswise. [Online] Available at: http://www.newswise.com/articles/2003/2/WEBCITE.CNS.html [Accessed: 26 July 2005]

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 129


Plagiarism: Re-Active Policy Plagiarism: The representation of the ideas or work of another person as the candidate’s own. These sanctions must only be used where there is clear evidence that plagiarism by a student has taken place (as defined by departmental guidelines on what constitutes plagiarism within that subject).

Offence

Teacher responsible for sanction and responsibilities

Sanction

KS5: First Offence KS5: Second Offence

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT Contact parents. Email subject teacher, Assistant Heads, HoY and tutor of the action taken.

• To re-do assessed work under SLT supervision: – During Friday after-school detention (HOD will enter “Friday after school detention” in SIMS). SLT will return to HOD or SLT on duty the following Friday if unfinished (Letter to parents will act as Blue File reference). – If more appropriate, at a convenient time arranged with a member of SLT. Parents informed. • HOD/HoY/tutor/Deputy Heads informed.

KS5: Third or later Offence

ASSISTANT HEAD: Curriculum and Assessment Call home and arrange meeting with parents and HoD. Email subject teacher, SLT, HoY and tutor of the action taken.

• To re-do assessed work during internal suspension. – Parents informed. – HoD/HoY/tutor/Head of School informed. – Details of this 2nd case will be placed on the students’ school records.

HEAD OF SECONDARY SCHOOL Call home and arrange meeting with parents.

• Sanctions at this stage could include: – Temporary Exclusion – Removal from subject/ course/exam • Parents informed. • SLT/HoY/tutor/HoD/ teacher informed. • Details placed on student records.

NB: For assessed examination pieces of work, examination guidelines regarding plagiarism will also be followed. At each stage at KS5, parents will be informed: • The case must be clearly explained with clear explanation of the evidence of cheating/plagiarism. • The sanction to be enforced. • The consequences of further cheating/plagiarism.

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Arrangements for Public Examination Entries in Years 11-13 Introduction: Philosophy & Objectives: “A BSB education will follow the English National Curriculum up to age 16 with the subsequent choice of two internationally recognised pre-university examination courses from age 16-18… BSB will provide preparation for a student’s next steps.”

A. Payment of Examinations Included in the school fees, the BSB pays for initial entry to these qualifications according to the following norm: GCSEs – students are entered once for all courses studied in years 10 & 11 at the end of Year 11, unless an exception has been made in consultation with parents for early entry or a moderated examination programme due to demands on the student or ineligibility for some other reason. GCE: AS & A2 Level – students are entered once for all courses including Global Perspectives, studied in years 12 & 13, unless an exception has been made in consultation with parents due to demands on the student or ineligibility for some other reason. At AS Level, all students will be entered to cash in results and will therefore receive a resulting grade with a certificate and all results will be declared on UCAS forms. IB – students are entered once for all courses studied in years 12 & 13, unless an exception has been made in consultation with parents due to demands on the student or ineligibility for some other reason. Additional examination entries – E.g. STEP papers will be paid for by parents.

B. Post Results Procedures Re-marks of all examinations • A Post Results Procedures form will be available via the BSB website giving details about how to apply for a re-mark from an examination session. This request must be approved by the school, following the procedures in the form. The school will not pay for re-marks that differ from the predicted grades or are at variance with a Head of Department’s professional judgement about the candidate’s abilities. •T  he re-mark can be ordered immediately by the Examinations Administrator if the parent is paying privately and passes the form together with the appropriate payment directly to him/her. In these cases, the Examinations Administrator will inform the relevant Head of Department. •A  Department can request a re-mark or a return of scripts in the usual way after the first departmental meeting of the year - this is paid for from department funds. • It must be understood that a grade can go up or down once a re-mark is requested.

GCSE & IGCSE Re-sits The School is committed to support a student who fails to attain a grade C (in English Language or Mathematics) at the end of year 11, or who joins the school from another system but needs these qualifications, in the following way:

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 131


• to enter them to re-sit the GCSE English Language paper already taken in the Autumn and, if necessary the Summer of Year 12 • to provide a maximum two lessons per week to prepare candidates to sit the IGCSE in the Autumn or Summer of Year 12 /13, as appropriate • to pay for a maximum of 4 entries of these exams throughout their Senior Section career, as long as the Head of Department is in agreement that the entry level will be adequate to aim for a grade C. If a student wishes to be entered for a re-sit paper and/or lessons, he/she must liaise with the relevant Head of Department and complete the Post Results Procedure form. The Head of Department will then decide the appropriate re-sit date, enter the student as applicable, informing the Examinations Administrator, the parents and the A Level Coordinator.

AS Module, A2 module and IB Re-sits • All students will be entered for AS module examinations with cash-in codes attached. This means that they will receive a certificate showing their results and these results must be declared on the UCAS entry application form. The exception will be Year 10 & 11 students who are entered early for this examination – All top set / extension students will be entered for automatic cash-in, but students in lower set(s) will be entered without cash-in codes. These students will be able to choose when or if to cash-in their results. • In their results’ envelope at the end of Year 12, students will be informed how to go about re-sitting a module or requesting a re-mark via the on-line process. Year 10 & 11 lower set(s) students will be asked if they want to cash-in immediately or later. This information will also be presented at an assembly in the first week of Year 13 by the Examinations Administrator. • The school does not pay for re-sit AS, A2 or IB level examinations. Parents must pay the re-sit entry fees in order for a student to be entered for any re-sit examination. This must be done by the deadline date stated in the results’ letter which accompanies the examination results. • Any student wishing to re-sit A2 examinations should discuss the situation with the Head of Senior Section before re-sit entry is requested.

C. Late Withdrawals and Failure to Sit Examinations Parents will be billed for exam charges if a student withdraws from an examination after the published deadline date or if they fail to sit an examination paper without a specific reason or authorisation from the School.

The 3 Rs At BSB, we live by the code of the 3 Rs: Respect, Respect, Respect 1. Respect for one another 2. Respect for our environment 3. Respect for our learning & that of others

132 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


Definition of Internationalism Internationalism at the BSB encompasses global citizenship, conflict resolution, social justice, values & perception, sustainable development, human rights, interdependence and diversity. BSB believes in reflecting and celebrating the diverse backgrounds of its community within a safe and secure environment. All members should be enriched and affirmed by this experience and be appropriate role models for others. A member of the BSB community: • is knowledgeable of and curious about the wider world and seeks to broaden and deepen understanding • reflects upon his/her role and responsibility as a global citizen • is willing and able to communicate about culture, language and beliefs • is prepared to take action and to be an effective contributor • respects and celebrates diversity, language, culture and beliefs • appreciates multiple perspectives including environmental and economic systems and current global issues This is shown by: • partnership links with other organisations, including our twinned schools in Ghana • a service learning programme that shows respect for and commitment to our host country and the wider global community • international awareness throughout the curriculum, allowing for students to share and value each other’s international experiences and mother tongue languages • international extension opportunities which include visits & exhibitions, learning opportunities & competitions, personal development & challenge, higher education offers from a range of international universities • systems and procedures that support families to integrate within the multicultural BSB community and to make links with their own and other cultural and linguistic groups • community events which reflect and celebrate a variety of cultures

Definition of Learning • The British School of Brussels (BSB) is a learning focused School. We focus on a range of learning outcomes - academic, personal, social and physical • The School’s definition of learning underpins everything that the School seeks to achieve in terms of learning and teaching. Learning is… ‘• ‘Learning is a transformational process of acquiring, applying, connecting and adapting new skills, knowledge, behaviours and attitudes to affect an alteration in long-term memory and develop a deeper level of understanding.’ Student statements… What can you do now that you couldn’t do before? What do you know now that you didn’t know before? What do you understand now that you didn’t before? What will help you to remember and use what you have learned in the future?

Learning for the 21st century • We are focused on supporting our students now and for their future. We acknowledge that the teacher’s primary role as a ‘dispenser of information’ is now more accurately described as an ‘orchestrator of learning’, helping students turn information into knowledge and knowledge into wise action. As a school we are committed to creating a ‘culture of inquiry’. • We help our students develop a robust set of skills for their life in a century that is rapidly changing.

BSB Learner Profile (based on the IBO Learner Profile):

• Inquiring

• Caring

• Knowledgeable

• Risk-takers

• Thinkers

• Balanced

• Communicators

• Reflective

• Principled

• Persistent

• Open-minded

• Resilient

Secondary School Course Guide November 2014 133


Notes

134 Secondary School Course Guide November 2014


An international learning community The British School of Brussels vzw Pater Dupierreuxlaan 1, 3080 Tervuren, Belgium Tel: +32 (0)2 766 04 30 – Fax: +32 (0)2 767 80 70 www.britishschool.be email: admissions@britishschool.be

Course Guide: Senior Section Post-16  

BSB Secondary School course guide for Post-16 students, Senior Section

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