Page 1

Annual Report 2012–2013


2


Contents Report from the Chair of the Board of Governors

5

Report from the Principal

6

Report from the Vice Principal (Secondary)

8

Report from the Vice Principal (Primary)

10

Student Diversity

12

Balance Sheet

15

Income and Expenditure

16

Examination Results 2013

18

Year 13 Leavers and their Destinations

27

Service Learning

30

Friends of BSB

32

Philosophy and Objectives

37

3


4


Report from the Chair of the Board of Governors The Board of Governors’ Philosophy for BSB is that it should become a world class international learning community and has set Objectives that it should be welcoming and caring, working together to challenge everyone to achieve their academic and personal potential, inspiring an on-going desire to broaden minds and horizons, nurturing global awareness and realising success. BSB has summarised these objectives into “Learning together, inspiring success� which is the tagline you will see everywhere at BSB. The Board of Governors has also set out a Strategic Vision for BSB such that by 2020 BSB will be known as the first choice for students, parents and professionals as a world class learning community recognised for its state of the art campus facilities including sport and performing arts areas, a commitment to languages including bilingual programmes in French and Dutch, a creative and evolving curriculum providing a range of options for all learners from 18 months to 18 years, including British and International qualifications, enhancing learning through leading edge technologies, leading excellence and innovation in professional practice and development, and active, ethical and purposeful engagement with the world around us. With this Philosophy, these Objectives and this Strategic Vision in place, BSB will continue to encourage its students to perform to the very highest level of their academic capabilities and to instil in them a lifelong love for learning. BSB will help students develop their personal and social skills, including an international outlook, to succeed in the ever-changing world around us. BSB will support its students to appreciate, enjoy and excel in whatever their interests or talents are, be it sport, music, art or drama. BSB will foster a safe, friendly and caring environment as well as making students aware of others less fortunate than themselves. I am immensely proud of the skills and opportunities that BSB provided to my children and I know that your children will benefit from the BSB experience too.

Assisting the Board of Governors, there are seven very active sub-groups: Curriculum & Learning, Finance, Human Resources & Compensation, Marketing, Premises, Governance & Co-Options and Information & Communication Technology. These sub-groups prepare much of the ground work prior to making recommendations to the Board of Governors. There is extensive voluntary involvement from parents and other external parties in these sub-groups which is crucial to the work of the Board of Governors. If you are interested in contributing your particular skill set to one of these sub-groups, I would be very interested to hear from you. Finally, I would like to thank everyone who provides so much support the BSB: the staff, the parents and the students who make it all worthwhile. I wish you all a happy and successful School Year.

Ian Backhouse Chair, Board of Governors, September 2013

The Board is to be commended for its long-term vision and vigilant dedication to continual improvements at BSB. The (CIS Visitors) Team were also impressed with the response of the Board of Governors to the macro and micro environmental factors influencing society and leading to the opening of the bilingual programmes. Council of International Schools, 2012 5


Report from the Principal As always, the Annual Report is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on some special moments from the past year at BSB. If you think that you run one of the best schools in the world – which I do believe! – then you want to share the pride you feel for the work of the students, staff and governors, all working together to make this school the success that it is. Last year was a particularly encouraging year, as we had our 5-year CIS Accreditation visit in October. It is most common when the Council of International Schools make a visit that they aim to find as many things to commend in a school as they do to recommend for further development. The ‘inspection team’ assesses the judgements that the staff, students and parents have made about the school and measures them against their exacting standards. Only the best international schools in the world can achieve CIS accreditation. Then, if it is doing well, a school might aim for twice as many commendations as recommendations. To hope for more might be considered foolhardy, so to achieve 4x as many commendations to recommendations, as BSB did – and then to have only 7 recommendations – is quite astonishing. So perhaps the main review of the year should be in CIS’s words, for these inspectors are visiting a different ‘good’ school somewhere in the world every week. They see the best, and they marked out BSB as among the best of the best, commenting on: • the way in which the School’s Philosophy & Objectives Statements are at the centre of all the decision-making processes; • the focused vision on continuous learning centred upon the students and commitment to improving student learning; • the positive and harmonious relationships amongst and between all parts of the BSB community; • the highly dedicated and professional attitude of the staff; • the Board’s long-term vision and vigilant dedication to continual improvements at BSB along with sound financial management, with a strong emphasis on sustainability;

• the level of staff participation in the extra-curricular programmes, freely and voluntarily; • the extensive choice of subjects and courses available for all students; • the outstanding quality of BSB publications and website produced from the External Relations Department. The list goes on, but you can see how every part of BSB’s life and work was analysed and assessed. The 7 recommendations are all now in progress, with substantial work on several of them already, and the Board have set us a 2020 Vision, so the School remains as forward looking and focused as ever. Of course schools are always going to be measured by examination results and this summer we had much to celebrate, as you can see in the results’ tables on pages 18 - 26 that Gary analyses in his report. However, looking also to our recent alumni, I have been so proud to celebrate some stunning achievements with them over recent months too. In April we heralded 2 Cambridge blues for Rugby and Football, plus another BSB alumnus who played for the England U21s Rugby team. We saw three former BSB students graduate from Oxford and Cambridge this summer just as we sent two to take up their places! One of our Cambridge students graduated with a first, but in fact it was a bumper year for first class honours degrees; at least seven, including three Masters in Engineering from top 10 UK universities and a Historian from LSE who also won two departmental prizes before he heads off to Oxford to do an MPhil. Here at School, last October, students took part in another wonderful Book Week, with authors and illustrators from around the world who inspired the students with their own writing and, in Primary School, their own book production. We are indebted here to the FoBSB who, from their 2nd hand Book Sales, support this project and provide much needed funds to bring over to BSB such distinguished names. We have welcomed many visitors to BSB, perhaps some of the most engaging for the students including the BBC’s Political Editor, Nick Robinson, international concert pianist, Lars Vogt and puppeteers who provided a stimulating Drama workshop.

• the incredibly articulate students; • the palpable sense of friendliness and warmth that permeates all aspects of BSB life; • the transformational change over the past five years; • the productive activities created by the parents under the auspices of the Friends Of British School of Brussels; • the whole-school community’s striving for continuous and sustainable improvement;

6

For me, the most poignant event of the year, however, came when we planted a tree in honour of Nathan Ramet, an Auschwitz survivor who was always such a good friend to BSB, speaking to our students from first-hand experience about the Holocaust. Planting a tree at the heart of the campus, with his wife and one of his daughters, will remain with me as a particularly special moment in my career and we hope that the family will come back to visit each year when it blossoms.


We all felt truly inspired by her sessions and have invited her back this year to deliver training in October on some of her previously published work, looking at gender differences in approaches to learning and teaching. However, all of the above, and the other celebrations that are evident elsewhere in this report and this autumn’s edition of Tapestry, would not be possible without a dedicated and committed team of staff and governors who work tirelessly for the good of the School. You may not be aware but our staff team includes chief examiners and moderators for A Level, IB exam markers, authors of the seminal textbooks used for key exam courses, authors of iBooks and regular articles in leading specialist journals. However, all of that commitment is because of and for our students. As numbers continue to boom, it remains an absolute privilege to work with BSB’s young people. However, any good School is at least as much about character as numbers and results. BSB students show that it is possible to work cooperatively without barriers of nationality, language or creed.

As our ‘technology for learning’ developments unfold, we have purchased 100s of iPads, indeed this year all students in Year 5 will have their own device to take home with more to follow in the next few years as we add variety to the learning processes and journeys for our students. Investment in the campus beyond technology also continues, not least as we edge ever closer to our dream of being able to build a new, state-of-the-art sports’ hall and swimming pool. The last piece of the building permission is being submitted as this report goes to print and we hope to start building before the end of 2014. BSB is a school that does not stand still but is always looking ahead and aiming to be clearly recognised as world class in every area. Aware that we should be role models to our students, as a staff we pride ourselves on encouraging life-long learning. As such, our year started with professional development for staff from a leading educator and psychologist with over 30 years’ experience. Dr JoAnn Deak’s most recent work focuses on the role of the brain and motivation and she also included some training on language acquisition, thinking of our bilingual programme and wider language provision.

They enjoy learning, they strive for their personal bests and they respect the advantages that learning brings, aware that knowledge and wisdom are two different things. However, they also care for others beyond their comfortable routines as well as thinking of their responsibility for the future of the planet. It humbles me on a daily basis when I realise how fortunate I am to lead BSB and I hope that this Annual Report appropriately reflects a year of tremendous achievements in many areas, and makes us all realise just how special BSB is.

Sue Woodroofe Principal September 2013

The communication throughout the school at all levels is excellent. The unity of purpose and positive relationships are palpable Council of International Schools, 2012

7


Report from the Vice Principal (Secondary) BSB continues to excel in public examinations. 2013 was no exception. We now provide three different and credible routes at Post-16 to higher education and beyond which offer our students flexibility, choice and genuine opportunities to prepare themselves effectively for higher education. In the IB Diploma, over 61.3% (47.1%) of our students scored 30 points or higher and 35.5% (19.5%) obtained 36 points or higher. To put this into some perspective, the respective world IB Diploma averages for these point levels in 2012 sit in brackets after our figures. 16.1% (6.6% worldwide in 2012) achieved 40 points or more. Two of these students will now go onto Oxford and Cambridge to study PPE and Maths respectively. Finally, 48.3% of our students obtained a Bilingual Diploma. BTEC produced its first graduates in Business. All students achieved a Merit or higher with 88% getting a Distinction or *Distinction. These are extremely gratifying outcomes which will give BTEC a real boost as it expands into Year 10/11 and into the area of Hospitality. A Level students also fared very well. Our pass rate was 99.4% with 84.4% at A*-C (2.8% higher than 2012). In common with grades in the UK, the A*/A rate fell a little but was still well above average levels. It is now clear that is it harder to obtain A* or A at A Level than it has been in recent years. However, all these post-16 results have borne rich fruit with our higher education applications around the world. A staggering 88% of our students graduating this year achieved their first-choice UK university place and 98% first or second choice. In a highly competitive marketplace, this is a testimony not only to the success of our students and teachers but to the quality of advice from higher education staff here and to support from parents. Some say that (I)GCSEs are the hardest examinations a young person will face. It is their first real taste of taking a large range of public, external examination papers in a relatively short space of time. Our results this summer are impressive. 94% of our grades were at A*-C: 2% higher than 2012 and 24.6% higher than UK averages – which, incidentally fell for the second year in a run. 77% of grades fell into the A*-B range against national 44.1% average. More than half of BSB students gained 5+ A*/A grades and 31% seven or more. Those 95% of students obtaining 5+ grades or more showed a noticeable rise of 4.5% on our own 2012 figures. The figures tell a human story of individual toil and application allied to ability but, for a non-selective school which, like any

8

international school, sees students arriving part-way through their Secondary careers at odd times of the year, these statistics are excellent. All these outcomes are remarkable given the diversity of our intake as a non-selective school. It is always worth remembering that, for a large number of students, English is at least their second language. Facing up examination pressure and the demands of rigorous courses is never easy; to do so in a second, third, even fourth language is remarkable. But of course today’s employers want a wide range of skills too, beyond academic results, so, as you would expect, BSB has continued to train and support students in developing all of those wider skills – we just need to look back at the sports tournaments we have hosted this year, in rugby, swimming, gymnastics to name but three. We also saw ISST successes, not least in Hockey, where our girls came 2nd, and in Cross Country where we achieved some of the best results for BSB in many decades. Remember, too, the three drama productions, the first two of which challenged the audiences immensely before the light relief of the Year 7&8 production that included our first play in French with the new Year 7 Bilingual class who performed a Molière comedy. Just look at the Music Festival and the concerts produced by musicians of all ages, including the Rock Show and not forgetting the wonderful Christmas Concert in Tervuren church last Christmas. We have also seen our public speakers aim high again in the BBC/Telenet public speaking competition, with a top ten finalist, and our students again attending the Model United Nations in the Hague. This year, we were also privileged that one of our students was invited to read the exhortation at the Armistice ceremony at the Menin Gate in Ypres, with the Ambassador and the British Chancellor of the Exchequer in attendance, in addition to the local ceremonies that BSB students participate in every November. We have seen the Science and DT departments – and the Houses – issue engineering challenges, where students have to work in teams to solve problems, and organise visits for students, not least the one to the prestigious Von Karman Institute of Fluid Dynamics where they saw some of Europe’s most advanced wind tunnels. Yet again we took part in the English@Work project which saw a number of Year 12 students entering the work place alongside local Flemish students to experience the ‘real world’. And every year, we see growing numbers taking the Duke of Edinburgh International awards.


Closer to home, some of our CAS students have expanded their service projects to include the Ganspoel centre in Huldenberg for mentally and physically handicapped children. This has shown weekly commitment and here, I want to share with you the feedback received for the staff there about BSB students… “They exceeded our expectations, we enjoyed working with them.” “It’s amazing to see such effort and enthusiasm at that age... every week they affirm our belief in young people“ “Their enthusiasm is contagious, as much for the educators here” “as the children If that is the view of BSB students in the wider community, then we should be very proud.”

However, as you would expect from BSB, this has also been a year when we have expanded our active service towards others. Charity Week was as popular as ever and this year we saw the re-launch of ‘Super Saturday’ and the BSB Talks initiative, both of which we hope will grow and grow in the coming years. We also became the first school to sign a charter with the Belgian Special Olympics and our commitment to them continues. Furthermore, last year we learned that the previous year’s Year 13 had secured funding for the School’s Best of Both (BoB) charity as long as we enrolled other schools to expand the vision beyond BSB. This year our BoB student leaders have spoken at the Geographical Association Conference in the UK – including addressing the author of the textbook that first inspired the project! – and last term another international school joined the project. One of their teachers visited Ghana with Nick Lavender from BSB this summer to plan how their school can get involved and so unlock that IKEA funding. What a tremendous achievement – how many school-age students could have achieved such a feat? BSB staff and students ran the Brussels 20K and raised over €3,000 for BoB in the process.

This is a school where the facilities are excellent, the dedication of all staff, whether teaching or administrative, is outstanding and where our students are faced with a feast of opportunities. Almost anything is possible and in such conditions our youngsters thrive and achieve astonishing heights. Something special happens every day here and I am both proud and excited to be joining such an extraordinary school. We all look forward eagerly to another amazing year for all our school community.

Gary Minnitt Vice Principal & Head of Secondary School September 2013

BSB is to be commended for its implementation of many new initiatives in the teaching and learning programme. These have been important to the school in light of their desire to improve students’ learning outcomes and to become recognised as a world class school. It is clear that BSB is a learning school. Council of International Schools, 2012

9


Report from the Vice Principal (Primary) It is with great excitement that I write the first of, hopefully, many annual reports at BSB. So much has happened in the year that we can all be truly proud of. It has been a huge honour to get to know the children in the Primary School and share in their learning journey as well as work alongside such a committed, professional team of staff who inspire and challenge the children each day. In the Primary School we are very proud of our bespoke curriculum and our focus on learning. We strive to ensure that all children enjoy learning, feel challenged and experience success. Our curriculum continues to enrich the children’s experiences by taking their learning beyond the classroom. Our staff plan and prepare a wealth of opportunities that allow the children to apply their learning in meaningful and relevant contexts. This year our children have taken their learning out into the school grounds; Tervuren, Brussels and much further afield. We have had talks and demonstrations from parents as well as from external speakers representing organisations as diverse as NATO and Chemistry with Cabbage! For our Upper Primary children a highlight of the year is most definitely the School Journey. The residential experience is an integral part of our children’s development, both academic and social. It enables them to reinforce their learning and apply newly acquired skills and knowledge in context as they are closely connected to the Integrated Learning Themes studied during the year. In addition, the journey provides the children with valuable social experiences; building on friendships and fostering greater independence and maturity, as well as encouraging them to take on responsibilities that promote self-reliance and self-confidence. Our Year 3 and 4 children remain in Belgium, whilst our Year 5 travel to The Netherlands and Year 6 to France. Our extra-curricular programme continues to offer a breadth of activities which allow the children to try something new or spend time involved in something they enjoy. All of these opportunities really do enhance and enrich the children’s experiences. For us, learning is about developing personal, emotional and social skills as well as being an intellectual and academic process and we continue to make links within the community to support this, enabling our children to develop into responsible citizens. We have furthered our charity work in each Primary year group, with Kindergarten to Year 6 adopting a chosen charity. This work raises awareness, not merely money, of the work the charity does and how individuals can make a difference. Many of the year groups focus on our very own charity, ‘Best of Both’, that goes from strength to strength each year.

10

The ‘Giving Assemblies’ are another example of the link between the school and the community. Our international theme features prominently in our Music curriculum and we continue to open up an exciting world of music to our children. Many attend instrumental lessons and are encouraged to perform for a variety of audiences. We welcomed many talented musicians and performers to entertain and teach the children including a concert pianist and songwriter. Some of the children visited the Indonesian Embassy to experience the world of Gamelan and traditional Indonesian dance. The school calendar has many events in which children of all ages are given the opportunity to perform. The Christmas and Spring concerts and the annual music festival showcased exceptional and budding talents alike. A highlight for the Primary Music department was their participation in a Choir Day organised by the British School of the Netherlands, involving a number of international schools. Our weekly assembly welcomed a regular ‘report back’ spot for children to share their recent sporting achievements. There have been many success stories and a fantastic display of sportsmanship whenever our students are participating against others. Rugby, Swimming, Gymnastics, Hockey, Tennis, Basketball, Athletics and many more provide an opportunity for our students to shine. Highlights include our swimmers in a resounding victory in the Brussels Junior Championships for the sixth year running and an impressive list of successes, both individual and team, in the GISGA Gymnastics championships in the UK. We also celebrated successes in regional and national Athletics, Tennis and Swimming championships, and outstanding achievements across all ages of Rugby. For the first time this year in the Primary School, we hosted a school from Wales who participated in a weekend of competition Rugby and Football. These activities are a great opportunity for our children to showcase their talents and develop their team spirit whilst acting as ambassadors for the school. Our ‘Technology for Learning’ strategy continues to expand and the iPad has become an integral learning tool in the classroom and beyond. Children are learning how to work collaboratively through the use of Wikispaces, Apple TV and a variety of apps. The possibilities are endless and the children continue to be creative in their application of such devices. The impact on learning has been seen from our youngest to oldest children. Our innovative curriculum is widely recognised and we regularly welcome other professionals who visit BSB to discover more about our philosophy, curriculum and practice,


There were some very skilful uses of inquiry and open-ended questioning used to stimulate students’ prior knowledge and elicit higher-order thinking. Council of International Schools, 2012

in particular our bilingual programme. We have trained and mentored new teachers and students wishing to follow a path into education. The feedback we receive is outstanding and always highlights our students as being confident, polite and engaging young people. Aided by the Secondary Science and Technology departments, we hosted Year 6 children from local Belgium and other smaller British primary schools to participate in our fun filled annual Year 6 Science and Technology day. At BSB we strongly believe in giving children a voice through our Student Council. Along with regular fortnightly meetings where they represented the views of their classmates, the Student Council representatives worked on numerous projects; cleaned up our woodland reserve, improved the playground and raised an impressive amount of money for a refugee charity in Sri Lanka. They participated in a local environmental initiative, ‘Clean Up Chimpions’ sponsored by the Jane Goodall Institute and were very privileged to be invited to attend a prestigious event at The European Parliament with a presentation by Dr. Jane Goodall herself. Links across the school continue to grow. Year 6 worked with the Physics department on a rocket project with amazing results; we saw collaboration between the Art department and Kindergarten on colour; a Textiles project involving Year 10 and Year 2, designing and modelling outfits made from Ghanaian materials; our Lower Primary students learning about ‘staying alive and ‘minibeasts’ in the labs – all of this is evidence of the benefits of being part of an all-through school. One of our after school clubs witnessed Kindercrib, Kindergarten and Upper Primary children working together in the school garden, weeding and planting. They also picked some rhubarb and made it into a rhubarb crumble – delicious! The addition of an insect hotel was particularly exciting!

We continue to provide a wide range of opportunities for parents to work in partnership with us and be involved in their children’s learning. Many parents attended our information evenings and workshops to learn more about our inquiry based approach to learning. We have been delighted to welcome parents into class assemblies and productions to see first-hand the children’s developing skills of performance and share in the learning that is happening in the class. Our Open Afternoons continue to be very well attended, allowing the children to present their learning to their parents. In addition, our Report Days provide the opportunity for parents to hear about and discuss their child’s progress and achievements. We continue to extend our use of Families Online as a means of information for parents with all of our letters to parents and presentations uploaded. Many parents come in as visitors to share their knowledge and expertise with students. We are also very well supported by the Friends of BSB and the class parents and coordinators system. Both work tirelessly to offer another channel of communication between home and school and a range of social events to promote our community ethos. Quite fittingly we rounded off the year by celebrating our outstanding students. For the first time we held a Primary Awards Assembly to formally recognise the characteristics of learning we work hard to instil. In Upper Primary, a child was selected for each of the twelve Learner Profiles characteristics. They received a certificate and prize at our special assembly and their parents were invited in to share in their achievement. In addition, three Music awards were presented and two very special awards to the Chair and Vice Chair of the Student Council for their contribution to Primary School life over the past year. This is just a flavour of the year in Primary and has not even touched on the recognition the school received through its recent CIS visit, where amongst many other commendations, our students were once again recognised as one of the outstanding features. Every day we, as professionals, are inspired and excited by the engagement and enthusiasm of our students and feel very privileged to be a part of a community that really does learn together and inspire success in all of its members.

Pauline Markey Vice Principal & Head of Primary School September 2013

11


Student Diversity BSB believes in reflecting and celebrating the diverse backgrounds of its community. We are an inclusive, non-selective School. Approximately 40% of our students are British with 70 other nationalities represented.

Over 1,300 students

Approximately 70 different nationalities An international learning community

12


The School is fully committed to expressing internationalism in as many ways as possible. Students understand the School’s code of conduct and appreciate the ethos it is trying to promulgate. They have well-developed ethical understanding and there is high level of students’ participation in internationally-focused activities. Council of International Schools, 2012

Established bilingual French/English programme for children aged 4-14 years by 2014

s

Students aged 1-18 years old

13


14


Balance sheet Actual 2011/12

Actual 2012/13

Budget 2012/13

Cost

44,268,295

45,634,385

45,507,195

Less: accumulated depreciation

29,390,339

30,988,086

31,062,838

Net fixed assets

14,877,956

14,646,299

14,444,357

1,007

1,007

1,007

18,338,380

18,007,563

17,602,268

715,545

769,682

715,545

17,622,836

17,237,881

16,886,723

Stocks

125,938

117,032

125,938

Miscellaneous receivable/accruals

251,946

143,571

251,946

19,281,857

23,999,341

19,281,857

1,934,771

2,262,117

1,934,771

Memo: total cash and investments

21,216,627

26,261,458

21,216,628

Total current assets

39,217,347

43,759,942

38,481,235

Accounts payable

1,780,709

1,723,228

1,780,709

Accrued salary expenses

4,305,546

4,323,748

4,305,546

59,319

76,300

59,319

Tuition fees invoiced/received in advance

24,833,695

26,696,952

24,833,695

Total current liabilities

30,979,269

32,820,228

30,979,269

NET CURRENT ASSETS (= current assets less current liabilities)

8,238,078

10,939,714

7,501,966

Total net assets

23,117,041

25,587,019

21,947,330

35,310

22,844

35,310

Provision social security litigation

0

0

0

Realised gain on sale of fixed assets

0

0

0

1,751,038

2,482,444

1,273,927

21,330,693

23,081,731

20,638,093

23,117,041

25,587,019

21,947,330

Financial Figures â‚Ź As at end year 30 June: FIXED ASSETS

GUARANTEE DEPOSITS CURRENT ASSETS Tuition fees receivable Less: provision doubtful accounts Net tuition fees receivable

Cash/short term deposits/cash funds Investments at market value

CURRENT LIABILITIES

Other payables

Represented by: Accruals

Surplus for the year General fund at start of year Total general fund

15


Income and expenditure Actual 2011/12

Actual 2012/13

Budget 2012/13

Students FFPE

1085

1126

1076

Students – average financial total

1185

1223

1170

125.92

131.49

127.98

Administrative staff

30.89

31.76

30.99

Other staff

41.40

40.33

40.79

92,774

261,214

600,000

Furniture and equipment

575,788

557,437

638,900

Total

668,562

818,651

1,238,900

26,052,040

28,477,393

27,288,488

Other

2,353,916

2,076,507

2,281,322

Total

28,405,956

30,553,900

29,569,810

Payroll – Teaching and ancillary staff

14,956,465

15,904,164

16,290,057

2,791,734

2,634,948

2,946,585

– Maintenance/site

698,522

777,164

737,359

– Cleaning

626,434

1,031,496

622,156

Financial figures € As at end year 30 June: STUDENTS/STAFFING

Teaching and support staff

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Buildings/land improvements

SCHOOL INCOME Tuition fees

– Administrative staff

3,611

– Other Pension

1,525,545

1,441,566

1,544,712

Other

4,668,975

5,140,254

4,936,466

– Educational

891,643

933,394

948,401

– Educational whole school

145,916

247,297

190,801

88,780

81,976

86,580

– Administrative

153,373

145,266

158,871

– Marketing

369,098

300,616

288,264

– ISS

246,477

242,359

250,727

– Maintenance

286,069

326,140

273,691

– Utilities

344,001

380,815

331,425

– Other operational

537,799

808,897

633,958

– Catering

596,939

620,935

630,967

– Bus

798,714

827,900

900,240

14,641

7,029

10,226

195,525

217,630

232,315

1,507,740

1,597,747

1,672,499

26,775,415

28,530,950

28,749,834

1,630,541

2,022,950

819,976

– INSET

– Community – Other Depreciation Total SURPLUS/DEFICIT SCHOOL

16


Financial figures € As at end year 30 June:

Actual 2011/12

Actual 2012/13

Budget 2012/13

194,951

136,994

453,953

16

132

15,401

15,141

FINANCIAL INCOME Bank interest Payment differences Profit on exchange Profit on stock Gains on Investments

142 6,745

3,336

217,255

155,603

Misc financial income Total

453,953

FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE Loss on sale Fin Investments

331,983

Unrealised loss on investments -264,434

-327,186

22

62

Loss on exchange

17,460

16,622

Bank charges

11,727

6,611

Total

96,758

-303,891

2

1,751,038

2,482,444

1,273,927

Sale of fixed asset

0

0

Total

0

0

0

1,751,038

2,482,444

1,273,927

1,751,038

2,482,444

1,273,927

– Bus service

90,607

22,120

6,867

– Community

68,230

59,579

60,198

– Cafeteria

-61,375

-60,480

-60,148

– Catering cafeteria

-84,414

-74,574

-93,953

– Catering other

-145,789

-135,054

-154,101

– Catering total

-141,644

-145,789

-123,756

13,048

-53,355

-87,036

Write back unrealised loss Other financial cost Payment differences

SURPLUS/DEFICIT SCHOOL

2

After financial operations EXCEPTIONAL INCOME

SURPLUS/DEFICIT SCHOOL After exceptional operations TRANSFER TO GENERAL FUND ANCILLARY ACTIVITIES Net surplus/deficit:

SURPLUS/DEFICIT ANCILLARY ACT.

Subject to approval by the Board of Trustees at the Annual General meeting of the Members of the Association.

17


Examination results 2013 INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) DIPLOMA – NUMBERS PER GRADE Explanation of IB examination results: • Six subjects are studied concurrently • One subject is taken from each of the six groups • At least three but not more than four are taken at Higher Level (HL). The others are at Standard Level (SL) • The exams are graded from 7 (highest) down to 1. 3 is considered a pass • A maximum number of 45 points are available for each student; 42 points from the six subjects, plus 3 bonus points for Theory of Knowledge/Extended Essay (TOK/EE)

18

Subject

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Dutch A: Lang And Literature Hl

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

Dutch A: Lang And Literature Sl

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

English A: Literature Hl

0

4

5

3

0

0

0

English A: Literature Sl

1

7

10

4

0

0

0

French A: Lang And Literature Hl

2

3

1

1

0

0

0

French A: Lang And Literature Sl

1

1

1

1

0

0

0

Korean A: Literature Self-Taught Sl

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Dutch B Sl

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

French B Hl

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

French B Sl

1

3

5

1

0

0

0

German B Hl

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

Spanish Ab. Sl

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

Spanish B Hl

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

Spanish B Sl

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

Bus.& Man. Hl English

1

2

4

3

0

0

0

Bus.& Man. Sl English

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Economics Hl English

4

2

3

0

0

0

0

Economics Sl English

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

Env. And Soc. Sl English

3

2

4

2

0

0

0

Geography Hl English

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

Geography Sl English

2

2

0

1

0

0

0

Hist.europe/Me Hl English

1

3

2

0

0

0

0

History Sl English

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

Psychology Hl English

0

1

3

3

0

0

0

Psychology Sl English

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

Biology Hl English

2

0

1

2

0

0

0


Subject

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Biology Sl English

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

Chemistry Hl English

2

0

1

1

1

1

0

Chemistry Sl English

2

0

0

0

2

0

0

Design Tech. Hl English

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

Physics Hl English

4

1

1

3

3

0

0

Physics Sl English

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

Furth. Maths Sl English

2

0

2

0

1

0

0

Math.studies Sl English

0

2

3

6

1

0

0

Mathematics Hl English

2

3

2

0

5

2

0

Mathematics Sl English

0

1

2

1

5

0

0

Film Hl English

4

1

0

0

0

0

0

Film Sl English

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

Visual Arts Option A Hl English

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

Total

41

49

61

36

19

3

0

%

20

23

29

17

9

1

0

Subject Entries: 271 (inc. TOK/EE) Number of successful diplomas: 29 (14 Bilingual)

Number of Diploma Candidates: 33

Number of Course Candidates: 3

Average points for diploma: 34

Highest diploma score: 44

Average grade per subject: 5.41

The school encourages pilot curriculum innovations and has introduced a number of innovations currently being embedded in the curriculum‌ This research at times meant visiting other schools to find out what they were doing and the extent of their success, and also benchmarking against worldwide criteria and practice in other international schools Council of International Schools, 2012

19


Examination results 2013 GCE ADVANCED LEVEL A2 – NUMBERS PER GRADE Explanation of GCE examination results: GCE – General Certificate of Education, Advanced Level • AS Level (Advanced Subsidiary) is taken at the end of Year 12 • A Level (Advanced) is taken at the end of Year 13 • Exams are graded from A* (highest) to E (minimum pass); six levels of attainment with a U grade which is ungraded/fail. (A-E for AS Level)

Subject

A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

Total

Biology

0

1

4

1

3

0

0

9

Business Studies

0

1

6

5

0

0

0

12

Chemistry

0

0

4

0

0

1

0

5

Classical Civilisation

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

D&T: Product Design (3-D)

0

1

0

0

2

0

0

3

D&T: Product Design (Textiles)

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Drama & Theatre Studies

0

3

2

1

0

0

0

6

Dutch

0

1

2

1

0

0

0

4

Economics

0

0

4

5

2

1

0

12

English Lit

1

3

0

6

1

2

0

13

Fine Art

7

0

1

0

0

0

0

8

French

1

2

1

0

0

1

0

5

Further Mathematics

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

2

Geography

0

2

4

3

0

0

0

9

German

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Gov & Politics

0

1

4

0

0

0

0

5

History

0

6

1

4

0

0

0

11

ICT

0

0

0

0

2

1

0

3

Italian

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

Mathematics

2

8

2

2

3

2

0

19

Media Studies

0

1

5

7

2

0

0

15

Music

0

1

2

0

0

0

0

3

Music Technology

0

0

1

2

0

0

0

3

Physical Education

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Physics

0

1

7

0

1

1

1

11

Sociology

0

1

3

1

1

0

0

6

Spanish

1

2

1

0

0

0

0

4

Total

13

38

57

38

17

9

1

173

Grade A* = 8%

Grade A*-A = 30%

GradeA*-B = 62%

Grade A*-C = 84.4%

Number of entries = 173

20

Grades A*-E = 99.4%

Number of students = 72


GCE AS LEVEL 2013 - NUMBERS PER GRADE Subject

A

B

C

D

E

U

Total

Biology

2

0

0

0

1

6

9

Business Studies

2

4

4

0

2

3

15

Chemistry

2

0

0

1

0

3

6

Computing

0

2

0

2

3

2

9

D&T: Product Design (Textiles)

0

0

0

6

0

0

6

D&T: Product Design (3-D)

1

0

4

1

2

4

12

Drama & Theatre tudies

0

0

2

2

0

0

4

Dutch

6

0

1

0

0

0

7

Economics

3

4

5

3

2

3

20

English Lit

2

3

4

3

0

1

13

Fine Art

9

1

1

0

0

0

11

French

19

6

2

2

2

0

31

General Studies

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Geography

1

2

3

1

0

1

8

German

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

Government & Politics

4

2

1

3

0

3

13

History

7

4

2

0

0

0

13

ICT

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

Italian

2

1

1

0

0

0

4

Mathematics

3

4

2

3

4

2

18

Media Studies

0

0

1

5

4

3

13

Music

0

2

0

0

1

0

3

Music Technology

1

1

1

0

0

0

3

Physical Education

0

1

1

0

2

3

7

Physics

3

2

1

2

4

0

12

Sociology

0

2

1

2

1

4

10

Spanish

1

1

0

1

0

0

3

Total

68

44

38

37

28

38

253

Grade A = 26.9%

Grades A-B = 44.3%

Grades A-C = 59.3%

Grades A-E = 85%

Number of entries = 253

Number of students = 117

21


Examination results 2013 BTEC NATIONAL BUSINESS LEVEL 3: SUBSIDIARY DIPLOMA. (THIS QUALIFICATION IS THE EQUIVALENT TO 1 A LEVEL) Entries

Distinction* D*

Distinction – D

Merit – M

Pass – P

2

1

0

1

0

BTEC National Business Level 3: Diploma. (This qualification is the equivalent to 2 A Levels.) Entries

D*/D*

D*/D*

D*/D*

M/D

M/M

P/M

P/P

6

0

2

2

2

0

0

0

DRAMA RESULTS 2013 – LAMDA (London Academy of Music and Drama Art) The results for this Drama examination were excellent. From 48 exams taken, 4 Passes, 22 Merits and 22 Distinctions.

MUSIC RESULTS 2012 ABRSM (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music) There were three exam sessions in December, March and June. In total 97% pass rate of which 39% were awarded a Pass, 32% awarded a Merit and 26% awarded a Distinction.

ROCK SCHOOL Performance Exams – 96% pass rate, of which 17% were awarded a Pass, 54% awarded a Merit and 25% awarded a Distinction.

Students comment that the school they love is one of diversity, tolerance, respect, and one that is international in its outlook. Council of International Schools, 2012

22


(I)GCSE RESULTS 2013 NUMBERS PER GRADE Subject

A*

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

U

Total

Biology

9

9

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

19

Chemistry

7

5

7

0

0

0

0

0

0

19

Combined Science Extension

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

Combined Science Foundation

0

0

0

2

3

1

0

0

0

6

D&T: Resistant Materials

1

5

2

4

1

0

0

0

0

13

D&T: Textiles

4

4

4

0

1

0

0

0

0

13

Drama

0

21

5

1

0

0

0

0

0

27

Dutch Foreign Language

11

0

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

14

English First Language

6

21

27

22

8

0

0

0

0

84

English First Language (Core)

0

0

2

3

1

0

0

0

0

6

English Literature

4

16

30

18

2

0

0

0

0

70

English Second Language CIE

0

0

4

1

3

1

0

0

1

10

Fine Art

8

6

3

1

2

0

0

0

0

20

Fine Art(Short Course)

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

Food & Nutrition

1

6

3

3

1

0

0

0

0

14

French First Language

0

4

2

2

4

0

0

0

0

12

French Foreign Language

51

10

14

12

1

0

0

0

0

88

Further Pure Mathematics

1

1

3

2

0

0

0

0

0

7

Geography

12

22

12

7

1

0

0

0

0

54

German Foreign Language

8

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

10

Graphic Communication Art

0

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

History

15

20

14

5

4

1

0

0

0

59

ICT

0

5

6

13

2

1

0

0

0

27

ICT (Short Course)

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

Italian

4

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

Japanese

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Mathematics

29

25

13

17

2

1

0

0

0

87

Music

1

5

4

0

1

0

0

0

0

11

Physical Education

0

5

7

7

3

0

0

0

0

22

Physics

11

6

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

19

Science (Double Award)

16

33

37

25

1

2

0

0

0

114

Spanish Foreign Language

19

7

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

27

220

241

209

148

41

7

0

0

1

867

Total

Grade A* = 25%

Grades A*–A = 53%

Grades A*–C = 94%

5 Grade A*–C (Year 11 only) = 96%

Number of entries = 867

Number of students = 160

23


Examination results 2013 COMPARISON OF EXAMINATION RESULTS 2013 GCE A LEVEL % UK National Average

ISC*

BSB

Grades

2012

2013

2012

2013

2012

2013

A*

7.9

7.6

17.99

18

10.7

7.5

A*+A

26.6

26.3

51.39

51.3

34.5

29.5

A*-B

52.6

52.9

58.3

62.4

A*-E

98.0

98.0

100

99.4

99.34

99.41

*Independent Schools Council

(I)GCSE % UK National Average

ISC

BSB

Grades

2012

2013

2012

2013

2012

2013

A*

7.3

6.8

31

32

29.3

25

A*+A

22.4

21.3

60

60.4

54.8

53

A*-C

69.4

68.1

94.4

94.4

91.6

94

5 A*-C (inc. Ma and EN

91.1

90.8

90.5

95

5 A*-C (inc. Ma, EN, ML and Sc.)

76.6

78

80.3

88

International Baccalaureate Diploma BSB 2008

BSB 2009

BSB 2010

BSB 2011

BSB 2012

BSB 2013

Worldwide 2012

Percentage pass rate

88.2

97

92.6

87.9

95.7

87.1

78.6

Percentage of students with 40 or more

12.1

8.6

7.4

15.2

13.6

16.1

6.6

Percentage of students with 36 or more

32.4

22.9

29.6

39.4

27.3

35.5

19.5

Percentage of students with 30 or more

55.9

65.7

81.5

75.8

86.4

61.3

47.1

Percentage of students with 24 points or more

87.9

91.4

89.6

88.2

96

100

84.2

Mean diploma points score

31.3

32

33.5

34.4

34.1

34

29.8

Percentage of students with bilingual diplomas

27.5

21.2

23.1

30

30

53.8

31.3

42

42

40

43

44

44

45

Highest points score

24


PRIMARY ASSESSMENT AND TESTING At the end of each year, children from Years 1 – 6 take external assessments produced by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) in English and Mathematics. The results of these assessments allow us to see how our children are progressing in core areas. Individual assessment results are reported to parents in term 3 in each child’s annual report. We also publish the Year 6 results annually. The results are reported as a National Curriculum level which enables us to see how our children are progressing compared to levels expected in schools in the United Kingdom and British curriculum schools around the world.

YEAR 6 READING TOTAL

YEAR 6 WRITING TOTAL

2% 18% 28%

48% 70%

34%

YEAR 6 MATHS TOTAL

The results are graded as follows: • The expected level of attainment for children of this age in the UK is level 4

48%

52%

• Level 5 indicates attainment well above average • Level 3 is below the level expected of children at this age

2013 RESULTS Level 4 and above English – 88% Reading – 98% Writing – 82% Mathematics – 100%

Level 5 English – 42% Reading – 70% Writing – 34% Mathematics – 52%

Against UK national expectations, the percentages of BSB children achieving Level 4 and Level 5 are predominately higher. However as BSB is an inclusive school with a significant number of children with little or no spoken or written English at the time of joining, care should be taken when comparing results from year to year.

Level 5  

Level 4  

Level 3

The Primary staff also regularly monitor the children’s progress through on-going formative assessments which provide valuable information to guide planning and personalise the children’s learning as well as identifying cohorts of children who will need additional attention and support including extension and enrichment. These assessments are moderated within and beyond the Year Group to ensure consistency and form an important part of the reporting process at the end of the school year. Every child is given a Teacher Assessment National Curriculum level in Reading, Writing and Maths.

It is also difficult to track performance through the School as the population is relatively transient and therefore the cohort of children within any one Year Group is constantly changing. All results should be viewed in the context of each individual child. The School therefore places most importance on individual ‘value-added’ analysis which gives a clearer indication of how much progress a child has made since joining BSB.

25


International Schools Assessment (ISA) The ISA is designed specifically for schools with a diverse range of students from different educational systems. The assessment provides student-level information about what individuals know and can do as well as class and schoollevel performance. Analysis also enables the school to make relevant comparisons, between like schools. These are schools with a similar ratio of English speaking background students to non-English speaking background students.

The ISA uses a scale score rather than raw scores or a percentage. This enables schools to compare results from previous years. Please note that the scales are different for each subject area. For example, an ISA scale score in Maths of 430 does not indicate the same degree of proficiency as an ISA scale score of 430 in Reading.

Y6 ISA DATA 384 380 364

Reading

459 469 458

Writing-narrative

480 478 467

Writing-non-narrative

443 436 429

Maths

0

100

BSB  

26

200

Like schools  

300

All schools

400

500


Year 13 leavers and their destinations Surname

Name

Course

University/Destination

ABBOTT

William

Culinary Arts Management

University College Birmingham

ALIYU SHINKAFI

Aisha

Applying to Nigerian universities

ALMEIDA

Fabio

Business Administration (Marketing) Deferred entry

University of Kent

ALONSO

Marc

Psychology

Sheffield Hallam University

ANDERSEN*

Sara

Liberal Arts

Boston University, Massachusetts

ASHLEY

Alexander

Chemical Engineering (Industrial Experience – 5 Years)

University of Birmingham

BAKR

Youssef

Electromechanical Engineering

Groep T, Leuven

BARLOW

Oliver

History

University of Warwick

BELFIELD

Sophie

Biological & Medical Sciences

University of Sheffield

BINDLOSS GIBB*

Harry

Business Management with Marketing

Harper Adams University

BLENKINSOPP

Chris

Logistics & Supply Chain Management

University of Huddersfield

BONNIN

Thomas

Audio Recording & Production

BRENNAN

Daniel

GAP Year then Prue Leith School of Food and Wine, London

BRUYNINCKX

Jules

Business

Bocconi University

CHAMBERLAIN

Hannah

Early Childhood Education Studies

Birmingham City University

COCKSHAW

Christopher

European Politics

King's College, London

CORRIGAN

Edward

Maastricht Science Programme

Maastricht University

DAVIES

George

Media Production

University of Lincoln

DAVIES

Lowri

Politics with International Relations

University of Bath

DE CORTE

Dieter

Liberal Arts

Boston University, Massachusetts

DE FORESTA

Charles

Geography and Environmental Management

University of The West of England

DE MERODE

Helene

Information & Communication

Université libre de Bruxelles

DE VILLE DE GOYET Maximilien

Retaking the IB Diploma

DLUDLU

Thandile

Gap Year followed by enrolment at Vesalius College, Brussels (already accepted)

DUNCOMBE

Isabella

Communication & Media Studies

ENEVOLDSEN

Laura

Management

FISK BARUQUE

Isabel

GAP Year followed by Zoology at Glasgow

FOOTNER

Freya

English Language & Literature

University of Portsmouth

FUJIHARA

Ayako

PPE

University of Oxford

GIRVAN

Shannon

Art Foundation

University of Falmouth

GWEBU

Eugene

International Business

HALSKOV*

Sebastian

Medicine

Country

University of Loughborough

Imperial College, London

27


28

Surname

Name

Course

University/Destination

HAYES

Jessica

Pharmacy

University of Bath

HERODZINSKA

Aleksandra

International Studies

Collegium Civitas, Warsaw

HUDSON

Kit

Engineering with an Integrated Foundation Year

University of Manchester

HUMPHREYS

Ethan

International Law

Maastricht University

IDIL*

Cem

Politics and International Relations

Royal Holloway, London

IONESCU

Andrei

Mathematics

University of Cambridge

JACKSON

Grainger

Accounting and Finance

University of Leeds

JAIN

Manushri

Medicine

University of Birmingham

JUNG

Yong Hee

Accounting and Finance

University of Durham

KAUTOKE

Andrew

Business Administration

United Business Institute, Brussels

KEHR

Henry

Science Foundation

University of The West of England

KOONJUL

Thara

Communications

Vesalius College, Brussels

LABOUVERIE*

Alexia

Comparative Literature/History

University of Glasgow

LEUPENA

Faioa

LINDSAY

Emily

Biology

University of Bristol

LINEGAR

William

Creative Digital Media

University of Greenwich

MacNEILL

Sean

Applying to universities in Australia

McDERMOTT

Ally

English Language and Literature

MORO

Eleonora

MOSS

Alice

Music

King's College, London

MURRAY

Shevani

International Relations with Study Abroad (4 Years)

University of Exeter

NICHOLLS

Harriet

Art Foundation

University of the Arts, London (CCW)

PEARS

Sam

Product Design and Technology

University of Loughborough

PIERCE

Joe

Business Management

University of Winchester

PRITCHARD

Callum

Electronic Engineering with Industrial Experience

University of Reading

QUEZADA

Jorge

Accepted into US universities but going to reapply to Maastricht University

Muhlenberg College, Pennsylvania

REES

Morgan

Economics & Mathematics

University of Edinburgh

ROBERTS

Philippa

Liberal Arts

Muhlenberg College, Pennsylvania

ROBITAILLE

Gabrielle

Modern Languages & European Studies (Spanish and ab initio Italian)

University of Bath

ROCCA

James

International Business

University of Hertfordshire

ROXBURGH*

Catriona

French and International Development

University of Leeds

RUTHERFORD

Mariel

Art Foundation

University of The Arts (St Martin’s)

SANDS

Zoe

GAP Year studying at Reykjavik University before taking up place at Dartmouth College, New Hampshire

SATCHELL

Ronnie

Business Administration

Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel

SCOTT

Callum

Materials Engineering

University of Loughborough

SEHGAL

Vikram

Accounting and Finance

University of The West of England

Victoria University of Wellington

King's College London University of Bolzano

Country


Surname

Name

Course

University/Destination

SHAH

Aman

Business

Hult International Business School

SHAW

Joe

Art Foundation

University of the Arts (St Martin's)

SHETH

Riddhi

Applying in 2014. Has the A Level grades just needs the language qualification.

Canterbury Christ Church University

SIBLEY

Samantha

Interior Design

Sheridan College, Ontario

SLEIFFER

Freddie

Liberal Arts

University of California, Davis

SMITH

Christopher

History

University of Sheffield

SOLVAY

Zoe

Liberal Arts

American University, DC

SONI

Sankalp

Finance, Investment and Risk

IFS School of Finance

SPENCER

Matthew

Business and Management

University of Durham

STANTON

Jemma

Early Years Education

Bath Spa University

TAYLOR

Lydia

International Business (4 Year Sandwich)

University of Brighton

THOMAS

Sam

History (with a Year Abroad)

University College, London

THOMIS

Celine

Politics and International Relations

University of Southampton

TOKAJ

Zofia

Engineering

Politechnika Warszawska

TOMLINS

Anthony

GAP Year

TREVAYNE

Chantal

Applied Psychology and Criminology

University of Brighton

TRIKOUPIS

Vangelis

Knowledge Engineering

Maastricht University

UZDIL

Denis

Liberal Arts

Kansas State University

UZDIL

Dilara

Sociology

Bahçe ehir University, Istanbul

VAN DER MERWE

Tammy

Early Childhood Studies

Canterbury Christchurch University

VAN DONINCK

Jessica

Film Radio and Television Studies

Canterbury Christchurch University

VAN DONINCK

Stephanie

Business Studies

University of Hertfordshire

VANDENBEMDEN

Helene

Film Radio and Television Studies

Canterbury Christchurch University

VICKERS

Annabel

Film Studies and French (4 Years)

University of Exeter

VISSER

Nicolas

Liberal Arts

Bates College, Maine

VON HABSBURG*

Gabriella

Middle Eastern and Arabic Studies

Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales, Paris

WARRICKER

Cameron

Accounting and Business

University of Reading

WILLSON

Henry

Chemical Engineering with a Year in Industry

University of Nottingham

WILSON

Laura

Geography

University of Aberdeen

WINSTANLEY

Harry

IBMS

Utrecht Hogeschool

WOODROOFE

Anna

Music

University of Leeds

Country

* = 2012 leavers who applied to university in 2013 The Class of 2013: 88% are doing their “first choice”; 98% “first or second choice”. (This includes planned GAP Years and applying with results) Of those who applied to university in 2013 these figures are also: 88% and 98% Of those who applied to the UK in 2013: 54% were accepted into Russell Group universities: 62% Russell + 1994 Group.

29


Service Learning Service Learning as part of BSB’s Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) has developed into an important part of the School curriculum that students find both fulfilling and rewarding. Volunteering is an essential part of the CAS module in the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma undertaken by many of our senior students. Of course, students in younger years can volunteer, too. Education is our goal. We teach students about the world, about the community and about themselves. We teach, and we are always learning. Our aim is to send young adults out into the world as balanced, self-confident, compassionate and socially-aware human beings who will be willing and able to make a difference. Students are encouraged to make a positive impact on their local community and become more self-aware, as well as becoming engaged and active citizens of the world. This is all part of BSB’s mission to challenge students beyond the classroom and service learning aims to develop students who are caring, thoughtful, and thinking about how they can make a contribution to the world around them. In previous years our service learning projects have included an environmental group that works on conservation projects; work with the Carina Residence, a home for those suffering from Alzheimer’s disease; the Amnesty International group and the Belgian Special Olympics. More recently students have volunteered at Ganspoel, which is a residential home in Huldenberg, that caters for children and adults with visual and multiple disabilities. Students have also supported ‘The Wednesday Club’, an Englishspeaking social club for older men and women in Brain-l’Alleud and assisted at St Paul’s British Primary school in Vossem. The projects that we engage in are mutually beneficial: the recipients gain our support, of course, but very importantly, our students learn about the importance of commitment as well as gaining experience and wisdom and being challenged out of their comfort zones. Students who spend time volunteering in School on Wednesday afternoons cover a whole range of areas and experiences; assisting in the AEN and EAL Departments, helping the Primary School administration team, the Community Office and even launching of our very own Radio Swoosh. One very special CAS activity is The Best of Both. A student-led, registered charity aimed at creating links between schools in Europe and rural schools in northern Ghana. It was started by BSB students who read about the work of the Urban Development and Education Foundation in a remote Ghanaian village during a Year 9 Geography lesson a few years ago. This school year began with students presenting stories and photos from their visit to Bolgatanga in July 2012 – the first group of BSB students to do so. The trip was very successful and included four days spent with our four partner schools, during which time the students helped to build an outdoor classroom at Gare Gbani School. Charities Week in February 2013 took the theme of “Sustainable Growth”. During the week The Best of Both distributed and sold ‘magic beans’ which, once germinated, displayed the message ‘Best of Both’ on their first leaves. The money raised was used to establish year-round gardens at each of our partner schools in Bolgatanga. These will provide added nutritional content to the school meals provided as well as additional income. Many hours were spent by The Best of Both CAS group in developing promotional materials as well as in preparing presentations aimed at encouraging other schools in Europe to join BSB on this exciting project. Over the course of the year, students gave presentations in a number of locations from Bratislava to France, the Netherlands to the UK and closer to home, in Belgium. In April 2013, three BSB students ran an information stall and gave a presentation about The Best of Both at the Geographical Association annual conference in Derby, UK. This was the first time that a student team had addressed this conference and audience members left very impressed by the quality of the presentation. In June 2013, our efforts were rewarded when Antwerp International School (AIS) expressed an interest in joining BSB and developing their own network of Best of Both schools. In July, Nick Lavender travelled to Bolgatanga with Jenny Fewtrell from AIS where we visited BSB’s partner schools and investigated a potential partner school for AIS. We saw the new gardens in place, visited the brand new computer suite at Dacchio School and met with students, teachers and local officials. The coming year will be an exciting one with the prospect of another student visit to Ghana, the development of a broadening network of student-led teams, an updated website and closer links with our partner schools in Bolgatanga. Service Learning initiatives are led by Paul Christmas, Nick Lavender and Gwyneth Igoe.

30


31


Friends of The British School of Brussels (FoBSB) COMMITTEE MEMBERS 2012–2013 Principal Chair Vice Chair Parents’ Information Centre

Sue Woodroofe Tony Enevoldsen Stefan Snyders Claire Cherry

Youth Club

Andrew Girvan

Secretary/Events Coordinator

Kate Pritchard

Treasurer

John Mason

Secondary School Coordinator

Claire Arnulf

Secondary School Coordinator

Claire Cherry

Upper Primary Coordinator

Lisa Adams

Lower Primary Coordinator

Mel Peach

Charities Committee Coordinator

Evelyn Simpson

Secondary School Staff Representative

Maria Schram

Secondary School Staff Representative

Simon Jones

Health & Safety Representative

Diane O’Neill

Primary School Staff Representative

Fiona Christian

Primary School Staff Representative

Bernie Miller

New Families Coordinator Trip Coordinator Language Clubs/International Coordinator Communications

Vicki Wilde Dawn Read Martine Moes Mandy Spencer

Parents who spoke with the visitors expressed enormous satisfaction with BSB. They compared the education their children receive at BSB with that of their home countries, other countries and other schools in the area, and consider BSB to be better in many ways. Council of International Schools, 2012 32


Report from the Chair of Friends of The British School of Brussels The Friends of BSB (FoBSB) is the name of the volunteer organisation that supports the School. It coordinates the class and year group representatives and plans parent activities; every parent and member of staff is automatically a member. These events are numerous and comprise the newcomers’ barbecue, coffee mornings, language clubs, car boot and book sales, the Christmas bazaar, youth clubs, cultural/local trips/visits and an annual, formal charity ball. Class/ Year representatives help to make all this happen and the parent portal, called Families Online, is where essential documents and information are located; this is accessed through the School website. The Parent Information Centre (PIC) on the campus is also managed by FoBSB and there we operate a lost property service. As my time as Chair comes to an end, I am delighted to report on another fabulous year, striving to be the best and pushing for improvements in how we operate, continuing the transition of focusing on “friend-raising” rather than fundraising, whilst using our improvement plan called “Plan C” to improve the efficiencies in our volunteer resources. This helps to drive changes in better campus usage, communications, consistency and compliance, whilst allowing us to continue to enjoy being a volunteer in a sustainable, ever changing, expatriate organisation. Some of our key changes this year have been:

• Raising a record amount of money (€11,000) at the Summer charity ball in aid of the Belgian Special Olympics • Reducing the number of committee meetings • A drastic reduction in paper slips home for School trips registration and cash sent to School for School trips • Introduction of a cashless “Leavers Fund” providing branded leavers’ gifts which the School pays for and managing the purchase and storage – thank you! • Establishing the “Friends Fund” with set budgets agreed for each School to replace the use of ad-hoc allocations spending/requests • Continuing the improvements in the safety and speed of set up/clear away for book sales – we can now do both in less than 2 man hours (used to be 8-10) • Agreeing with the English Department to help us align book sales to Book Week and consider new ideas for 2013-14 • Improved use of doodle/sign up genius sheets, email to notify parents of their children’s lost property and SMS being used for School alerts

33


• Sponsored shopping trips to Massmechelen village (and maybe Paris in 2014) • International breakfast and lunches • Themed youth club events offering leadership opportunities for senior students • A well-established ‘book club’ on the last Thursday of the month • Complete de-personalisation of volunteer email accounts over to gmail/google documents • Fuller use of school iSAMS system for e-communication via parents’ contact list Stronger links with the Belgian Special Olympics – we were the first school to sign a charter with them

Kate Pritchard – all of whom will be sorely missed. Mandy in particular has been prolific in helping to rationalise and improve the professionalism of our communications and our integration into the pre-existing school IT systems so that we incur no charges in our volunteer organisation; these same approaches are also used by many of the sports clubs within the School and it is great to see best practices being shared – a sign of being world class. Kate Prichard has also been a stalwart of the committee for some nine years now holding several roles. Their departure also means we welcome some new faces, energy and ideas; Paula Baptiste, Alice Madden, Anya Weiss all join the Committee as School Coordinators. Vicki Wilde will coordinate the PIC/trips, whilst Liz Williams is our new Vice Chair and Arne Sjolund the new Chair. We wish them all of the best as they take the Friends of BSB even further forward. Arne and Liz are also the School Parent Governors and hopefully by the time you read this you will have met some of these people already, and of course don’t forget the Class /Year representatives who are your prime contacts on a day-to-day basis.

• Development of electronic parent contact lists • Continued improvement of parent virtual calendars on PC’s/mobile devices • Continued strengthening of parental involvement in Governors’ sub-groups. In addition, there are a few things which we have been developing as part of the School’s development plans which will start in the coming months:

It’s always good to save the best until last and we must point out that we are firstly a School and the above achievements in helping the parent body can only happen with the help of all of the staff and not just the teaching fraternity but the support teams such as Maintenance, Community, Marketing, Finance, IT, the PA’s and of course the Leadership Team (LT) and Extended Leadership Team (ELT) led so ably by Sue Woodroofe. It would be remiss if I did also not say goodbye at this juncture after five years of involvement on the Committee, the last 3 years as Chair; I am sadly moving on to other pastures, no longer having any children at the School.

• Online booking of school events and school trips • Online ordering of PE kit and school supplies • Sports club alignment including the hosting process/ communications Thank you to everyone who has helped us this year, whether it has been putting books out for the book sale on a Friday evening, helping with the Youth Club, helping in the Parents’ Information Centre (PIC), flipping burgers, leading or attending language clubs, trips or more! If you’ve never helped before, please volunteer yourself or your partner to help for an hour – it is good way to help others and to meet more people. As you will see from the accounts, our annual income is equivalent to an extra student on roll, hence our change to more “friend-raising” than “fundraising”, and the School has some 1300 students! We are now running with a good surplus bolstered by a transfer from the Youth Club. Well done to Andrew Girvan, Sally Turner, Sarah Woodfin and team. As is always the case in these reports, as I also stood down at the end of June, we said goodbye to others from our Friends of BSB committee; Claire Cherry, Claire Arnulf, Mel Peach, Stefan Snyders , Dawn Read, Mandy Spencer and

34

Tony Enevoldsen, Chair (FoBSB) September 2013

The CIS visitors noted the commitment of the whole school community to the movement from being solely a British School in Brussels to one which reflects the values of the global community in which the school is situated. Council of International Schools, 2012


35


FoBSB – Funds Flow Statement (Including Youth Club) 2012/13

2011/12

47,349

28,818

-12,639

-2,932

8,073

7,142

42,783

33,028

Christmas Bazaar

9,289

10,089

Charity Ball

7,828

8,788

Second-Hand Book Sales

4,132

3,684

Car Boot Sales

2,115

2,310

293

401

Donation from Youth Club

5,000

0

Youth Club

5,104

5,076

33,761

30,348

Friends Fund

2,042

7,054

Book Week

7,669

0

Charitable Donations

7,828

9,148

New Families Events

630

0

Other Outflows

209

246

Youth Club

4,019

4,145

Youth Club Donation to Friends

5,000

0

27,397

20,593

6,364

9,755

48,550

47,349

Accounts Receivable & Prepayments

4,291

0

Accounts Payable & Accrued Expenses

-7,852

-12,639

4,158

8,073

49,147

42,783

2,523

6,120

Opening balances Cash and bank accounts Accounts payable Youth club Total Cash inflows

Other Inflows

Total Cash inflows

Total Net Cash Flow Closing balances Cash and Bank Accounts

Youth Club Total Outstanding Friends Fund Projects

36


Philosophy and Objectives BSB is a world class international learning community that is: • welcoming and caring • working together to challenge everyone to achieve their academic and • personal potential • inspiring an on-going desire to broaden minds and horizons

Our School The British School of Brussels (BSB) is an independent, fee-paying, not for profit international school which meets the needs of internationally mobile and expatriate families in Belgium as well as local families who want an international education. • BSB is an inclusive, international learning community. All students who can benefit from the BSB experience are welcomed and are expected to be fully committed in their approach to learning.

• nurturing global awareness and realising success

• BSB has students from approximately 70 nations and is made up of two schools:

2020 Vision

By 2020 BSB will be known as the first choice for students, parents and professionals as a world class learning community recognised for: • State of the art campus facilities including sport and performing arts areas • A commitment to languages including Bilingual programmes in French and Dutch • A creative and evolving curriculum providing a range of options for all learners • From 18 months to 18 years, including British and International qualifications

Primary School – ages 1-11 Secondary School – ages 11-18

• English is the main language of tuition, with options available to follow a Bilingual French & English programme. • All students follow a British-based Curriculum up to age 16 – (I)GCSE. This is adapted to our European context and international cohort and is followed by the choice of two internationally recognised pre-university examination courses from age 16-18 – English A Level and the International Baccalaureate Diploma. We also offer a range of vocational courses including BTEC Business & Hospitality. • In its Governance and Management and in all its activities, the School will aspire to the highest ethical and legal standards.

• Enhancing learning through leading edge technologies • Leading excellence and innovation in professional practice and development • Active, ethical and purposeful engagement with the world around us Last updated by the Board of Governors: March 2013

37


Definition of Internationalism Internationalism at the BSB encompasses global citizenship, conflict resolution, social justice, values & perception, sustainable development, human rights, interdependence and diversity. BSB believes in reflecting and celebrating the diverse backgrounds of its community within a safe and secure environment. All members should be enriched and affirmed by this experience and be appropriate role models for others.

A member of the BSB community: • Is knowledgeable of and curious about the wider world and seeks to broaden and deepen understanding • Reflects upon his/her role and responsibility as a global citizen • Is willing and able to communicate about culture, language and beliefs • Is prepared to take action and to be an effective contributor • Respects and celebrates diversity, language, culture and beliefs • Appreciates multiple perspectives including environmental and economic systems and current global issues

38

This is shown by: • Partnership links with other organisations, including our twinned schools in Ghana • A service learning programme that shows respect for and commitment to our host country and the wider global community • International awareness throughout the curriculum, allowing for students to share and value each other’s international experiences and mother tongue languages • International extension opportunities which include visits & exhibitions, learning opportunities & competitions, personal development & challenge, higher education offers from a range of international universities • Systems and procedures that support families to integrate within the multicultural BSB community and to make links with their own and other cultural and linguistic groups • Community events which reflect and celebrate a variety of cultures


Definition of learning

Learning for the 21st Century

• The British School of Brussels (BSB) is a learning focused School. We focus on a range of learning outcomes – academic, personal, social and physical

• We are focused on supporting our students now and for their future. We acknowledge that the teacher’s primary role as a ‘dispenser of information’ is now more accurately described as an ‘orchestrator of learning’, helping students turn information into knowledge and knowledge into wise action. As a school we are committed to creating a ‘culture of inquiry’.

• The School’s definition of learning underpins everything that the School seeks to achieve in terms of learning and teaching.

Learning is a transformational process of acquiring, applying, connecting and adapting new skills, knowledge, behaviours and attitudes to affect an alteration in long-term memory and develop a deeper level of understanding.

• We help our students develop a robust set of skills for their life in a century that is rapidly changing.

BSB Learner Profile (based on the IBO Learner Profile):

Student statements...

 Inquiring

 Caring

• What can you do now that you couldn’t do before?

 Knowledgeable

 Risk-takers

• What do you know now that you didn’t know before?

 Thinkers

 Balanced

 Communicators

 Reflective

 Principled

 Persistent

 Open-minded

 Resilient

• What do you understand now that you didn’t before? • What will help you to remember and use what you have learned in the future?

39


Notes

40


An international learning community


The British School of Brussels vzw Leuvensesteenweg 19, 3080 Tervuren, Belgium Tel: +32 (0)2 766 04 30 – Fax: +32 (0)2 767 80 70 www.britishschool.be email: admissions@britishschool.be

BSB Annual Report 2012-2013