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& G N I K A M E T NO

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Year 7 Autumn Term – Skills Booklet 1

NAME & FORM: __________________________________

RESEAR CH &

STUDY

THINKING SKILLS SKILLS

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LEARNING HOW TO LEARN

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RESEARCH AND NOTEMAKING STRATEGIES

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MAKING NOTES FROM TEXTS During your lifelong learning you will read an enormous range of different texts. Just a few of these might be: NO RIES WEB O VEL T PA TEXTBOOKS S RT S O S GE H S M S E EN CY CL O PA ED IA S PO LEAFLETS NEWSPAPE RS When do you think it might be useful to When you are researching and make notes from a text? making notes, you need to make Write down your ideas: sure that you have the ‘right’ ____________________________________________ text for the job. To do this, you ____________________________________________ need to do the following: ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________  read the title ____________________________________________  read the table of ____________________________________________ contents  skim over the How would carrying out these activities help you? introduction ____________________________________________ Look at the first and last ____________________________________________ chapter/verse/page ____________________________________________  look through the index or ____________________________________________ glossary ____________________________________________ 9


HOW SHOULD I TAKE NOTES FROM TEXTS? Think about when you should make notes in your own words and when you should copy down the exact words from a text. Give an example for each of these: I should use my own words when ________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ I should copy exact words from the text when _____________________ _________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________

TOP TIP

USING YOUR NOTES TO HELP YOU REMEMBER: It is sometimes difficult to listen to someone speaking and then to remember what they have said. As soon as a speaker has stopped talking, we often forget some, if not all, of what we have been told. Taking notes helps you to be involved with what is being said; it helps you understand, interpret and retain what you are learning. The notes you take will help to jog your memory when you need to apply and transfer what you have learned later on. 10


HOW GOOD ARE MY NOTES? Look at some of the notes you have taken in class, these can be from any subject, and consider if they meet all the standards of good note taking.

Checklist

 Are they brief/short, not retelling a story and not dwelling on every last detail?  Are they clear? Can you read them?  Are they clear? Do you understand them?  Are they organised? Have you categorised the information you have collected carefully?  Are they relevant? Do they answer the question? Do they fulfil your objective?

Write down what you need to improve the next time you use your note making skills :

_________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________ 11


M I N D M A P SELECT THE MAIN IDEAS

DRAW WHAT THE TEXT IS SAYING

NOTE-MAKING IDEAS

Record your own note-making suggestions here: • • • • • • • • • •

COLOUR CODE CATEGORIES OF DIFFERENT POINTS AND VIEWS ATE I V E SUMMARISE ABBR , D AN H T R S HO USE IDENTIFY AND HIGHLIGHT THE POINTS IN A M E H T MAIN POINTS OF AN ARGUMENT RANK ORDER WRITE YOUR OWN VIEWS IN RESPONSE RE-WRITE IDEAS IN YOUR OWN WORDS TO WHAT THE TEXT IS SAYING 12


KEY VOCABULARY

TOP TIP

When you make notes you may come across words you do not know. When this happens, you need to find out the words’ meanings before you include them in your notes. To help you make the best notes possible in your English lessons, it is an excellent idea to create a list of subject specific technical vocabulary with linked definitions. You could do this for other subjects too.

Complete the table below: Key Word

Definition

text

any of the various forms in which writing exists

meaning

what is intended to be expressed by words and other types of communication

simile

a comparison of two things using the words ‘like’ or ‘as’

Key Word

Definition

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WHAT TO WRITE AND WHAT TO LEAVE OUT

There will always be the danger that you will take too many notes and that they will therefore become confusing and difficult to use. As such, it is important just to keep what you really need. This may include: HER T O D S AN N S O I TEXT A T IMPORTANT POINTS A E A T D M O I QU E FRO KEY C N YOUR OWN E EVID INTERPRET A RECORD OF YOUR FEELINGS A T IO N S AND THOUG IN RESPONSE TO WHAT THE HTS AUTHOR HAS SAID TOP TIP Try reading a text, closing the book and then writing your notes. This is a good way of testing whether you have understood what you have just read. Activity 1: Choose a book about an animal of your choice and make notes from one of its chapters as you go along.

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Activity 1 continued...

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Activity 2 Now choose another book about a different animal; read a chapter, close the book and make Notes about what you have just read.

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Activity 3 Compare your notes from activities 1 and 2. Which way do you prefer to make notes? Which way suits you better? Why is this?

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HOW GOOD ARE YOUR SOURCES? SOURCE

STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

ENCYCLOPAEDIA INTERNET BLURB REFERENCE BOOK AUTOBIOGRAPHY SCHOOL TEXTBOOK

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MINI

RESEARCH PROJECT

Select an author to find out about. Use a variety of texts to help with this task including electronic resources. You may wish to find out about:  what they have written and for whom  facts about their life  how they go about writing and where they source their ideas  their reasons for writing  their personality, interests and home life  what they like reading  their achievements as a writer  what the critics say about their work Use your notes to write three paragraphs to summarise what you find out about your chosen author. Store your research and write up on file paper in your library wallet. 19


READING WEBSITES

Look carefully at a website you have used in your research project. Then answer the following questions:

How is the site set out? Is its layout easy to navigate?

What techniques are used to convey information? E.g. Pictures, persuasive language, videos etc.

What types of information are given?

How useful did you find this site?

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WORD ASSOCIATION CHAINS

Look at the front covers of three non-fiction books and create a word association chain for each one based on the key words, pictures and illustrations they present.

1 2 3 21


WHAT DO I WANT TO FIND OUT?

Look at the information you have gathered and record what you already know for certain about the book and what you want to find out based on this information.

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KNOW

WANT TO FIND OUT

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MINI

INFORMATION TRANSFERRAL PROJECT

Choose a section from one of the non-fiction books you used for the last activity. Recreate this information in a different format, e.g. a leaflet, article, diagram or advertisement. Store your work in your library wallet. Now sequence the key information contained in this book from most important to least important.

MOST IMPORTANT

LEAST IMPORTANT 23


MINI

INFORMATION TRANSFERRAL PROJECT

Read a passage from the book, then draw a picture or series of pictures to explain what you have just read.

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MINI

INFORMATION TRANSFERRAL PROJECT

Read a different section of the book and write down a sub-heading for each paragraph of that section to summarise each set of information. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 25


MINI

INFORMATION TRANSFERRAL PROJECT

Read a section from a book one of your other chosen books and create a storyboard to outline what you have read:

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MINI

INFORMATION TRANSFERRAL PROJECT

Read another section from one of your selected books and write a paragraph, in your own words, to summarise what you find out.

Now, reduce the information in this paragraph to three sentences, then two key words and finally to the most important word of all which is the best indication of what is contained in the section of the book you have read. 26


MINI

INFORMATION TRANSFERRAL PROJECT

Write a blurb for each of the three books you have studied.

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Y7 STUDY SKILLS  

Essential research and study skills to use across the entire curriculum.

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