Page 1

Student: Bryan Thompson

Exercise 1: Lux • p. 1

Comments: In this excersie a 2D, negative, and 3D letter were used to experiment with shadows and object placement. I began altering my photo’s with color, such as negatives, and projections.

Workshop: Type+Image • 2012


Student: Bryan Thompson

Exercise 1: Lux • p. 2

Workshop: Type+Image • 2012

J.D Salinger

J.D Salinger

Comments: In this series, I experimented with the placement of an arthur with and the type “LUX.” I also altered colors and tried a few different typefaces.

J.D Salinger


Student: Bryan Thompson

Exercise 2: Visual Dialog • p.1

Comments: This series of shadows are focused around different feelings, movements, and expressions.

Workshop: Type+Image • 2012


Student: Bryan Thompson

Exercise 2: Visual Dialog • p.2

J.D. Salinger

Workshop: Type+Image • 2012

J.D. Salinger

J.D. Salinger

J.D. Salinger

Comments: The above shadow images were placed with an arthurs name, typically following an extension of a shadow.


Student: Bryan Thompson

Project: Book Cover • p.1

Workshop: Type+Image • 2012

The Catcher in the Rye

Comments: This specific book cover focuses on the confusing psyche of The Catcher in the Rye’s main character, Holden Caulfield. Combining Holdens unusual thoughts and his disaffection for growing up, Holden alienates himself. The cover carries this message through the uninspired silhouette and the mess inside of it.

J.D. Salinger


Student: Bryan Thompson

Project: Book Cover • p.2

Comments: This book cover focuses strictly on type. The type is used in a scattered and partially foggy manner. Much like the way the main character, Holden Caulfield thinks in The Catcher and the Rye.

Workshop: Type+Image • 2012

J.D. Salinger


Student: Bryan Thompson

Workshop: Type+Image • 2012

The Great Gatsby

Comments:This book cover displays the silhouettes of a married couple and a love affair from that couple. In The Great Gatsby, A past lover, and a current lover are fighting over a woman named Daisy. The green background mereges into the silhouettes because Daisy had the green light on her lawn that could be viewed from the other side of the bay at Gatsbys residence.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Franz Workshop  

Workshop for GD

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