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BRUNSWICKANARTS

12 • Jan. 29, 2013 • Issue 18 • Volume 146

It Girl fashion Morgan Mullin The Brunswickan When Edie Sedgwick walked into a room, all the men stopped to stare, while all the women stopped to take notes. Often described as “the original It Girl”, Edie Sedgwick embodied the 1960s. She quickly became Andy Warhol’s muse after they met each other at a party. Sedgwick went on to star in almost every Warhol film ever made, including Kitchen and Ciao, Manhattan. Along the way, she earned the title of Queen of Underground Cinema. Sedgwick parlayed her success in the film world into a brief modelling career at Vogue, making her unique sense of style absolutely iconic. Former editor-in-chief of Vogue, Diana Vreeland, once told Sedgwick, “You, my dear, are the real thing... While the rest of us remain purely superficial and have no intent of changing.” Sedgwick soon became a fashion icon among the ranks of Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe and Jane Birkin. Inspiration for Sedgwick’s style came from her love of dance. She practiced once a day, in opaque black tights and leotards. She said she “was too lazy to bother changing afterwards” and they became the foundation of her look. Complimenting the tights were boxy-cut mini dresses, big earrings, floppy hats and outrageous amounts of eyeliner and mascara. Dangerously high heels and a blonde pixie cut finished the look. Sedgwick’s look was bold yet effortless, and dripped of glamour. If you

Karsten Saunders / The Brunswickan

want the same effect, try wearing black opaque tights topped with long, brightly-coloured sweaters. Dangerously short, loose-fitting cocktail dresses were another Sedgwick staple. Try ones with bright colours, sequins, or outrageous prints. Sedgwick was known for her long, shoulder-grazing earrings. If you want to embody her style, put on your biggest pair of earrings and every necklace and bracelet you own. Sedgwick was a firm believer that more is more. Sedg w ick was often photographed i n a n a r r ay of hats. In fact, Bob Dylan’s Leopard Print Pillbox Hat was about her. Her makeup was as legendary as Sedgwick herself. Wear nude lipstick and false lashes, apply white eye shadow from lash line to brow bone, top it with sheer silver shadow, and then define the crease with a dramatic sweep of black eye shadow. Finish the look with black winged eyeliner on the lids, black kohl liner on the bottom lash line, and loads of mascara. Lastly, Edie’s dramatic pixie cut was regularly discussed in fashion magazines such as Vogue. For those truly brave and brazen, get a shaggy pixie cut yourself and bleach it blonde, as she famously did in Warhol’s studio.

Issue 18, Vol. 146, the Brunswickan  

Canada's oldest official student publication

Issue 18, Vol. 146, the Brunswickan  

Canada's oldest official student publication

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