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BRUNO MANUEL VIDAL

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BRUNO MANUEL VIDAL P

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CONTENTS

03 CONTEXTUAL MATTER An Architectural Position PROFESSIONAL 09 SUN VALLEY HOUSE Idaho, USA 17 CURZON STREET HOUSE Dublin, Ireland 25 WEST CORK ARTS CENTRE Skibereen, Ireland ACADEMIC 35 CINEMA OF VALE DE SANTO ANTONIO Lisbon, Portugal 43 HOUSE FOR A RIVER KEEPER Lisbon, Portugal CV 51 CURRICULUM 52 REFERENCES


CONTEXTUAL MATTER An Architectural Position

Matter, as a physical manifestation of existence, is the concrete substance through which one lives and expresses himself. Life and expression, as well as matter, changes and becomes something else. Like Lavoisier’s, the french chemist, law postulates “ in Nature nothing is created, nothing is lost, everything changes ”. Man, as part of this “closed” system we call Nature derives from and to it, as well as his creations. Architecture, as one of man’s fundamental creations, derived from the necessity to seek refuge for Nature’s harsh conditions, and it is not a surprise then that the basic materials come directly from it. An arrangement of stones, leaves, timber, a rational Nature. But architecture should never be reduced to a simple functional system. The response for a given problem always conveys economical, political, social, psychological conditions that go beyond the mere function it ser ves. That is why NorbergSchulz tells us that “ similar functions, even the most basic ones

such as sleeping and eating, take place in very different ways, and demand places with different properties, in accordance with different 03


cultural traditions and different environmental conditions. ” Therefore

the same typology, for example of housing, can be remarkably dif ferent from dif ferent par ts of the world.

Architecture is also a language of signs, allowing it to have also a symbolic meaning. As other ar ts it deals with composition, scale, propor tion, r ythms, texture, elements that follow a cer tain cultural structure. This structure, although not always apparent, is based on behaviour, belief and knowledge. Memor y plays a crucial role in the way we think about the spaces in architecture, since it is the only ar t form that requires one to live in it in order for it to be. The only “inner” ar t. It is always the physical presence of a place, along with its sensorial perception, that builds up our architectural imaginar y. Therefore each archetype is always present at ever y seminal creative moment, even if not conscience.

above: personal sketches as a means to understand architecture previous page: personal photo of a concrete wall

“ The return to origins is a constant of human development and in this matter architecture conforms to all other human activities. The primitive hut - the home of the first man - is therefore no incidental concern of theorists [but reflects the] essential meaning of all building for people. ” joseph r ykwer t 04


To do architecture is, in a way, creating new worlds, as it evolves throughout time, according to its specificities, including situation, environment, perspective, technology and resources available. It is what we could call create within a zeitgeist. Ever y building is creating a new time, as a new time is creating that building. “ Architecture holds the power to inspire and transform our day-to day existence.” steven holl

Space and time are the two main elements of architecture, mutable factors that build up our environment and how we relate with it. Both these elements are present in architecture by form, a material presence, an immanence of matter. “ Building demonstrates human understanding of nature and self by translating that understanding onto building form . ” c. norberg-schulz Matter is therefore contextual not only physically but especially culturally to a specific people and place within a time. Architectural matter, organized nature, is par t of the language of ourselves and our past. It reverberates these people and the way they live. But in an era of global network, reproduced images and information, culture of copy and saturation, a world of “ more and more information and less and less meaning ” 1 , we are no longer citizens of one place. The world became nomadic and dynamic, with cross references, exotic inspirations. Is it ver y impor tant then to avoid the culture of simulacrum, propense to this globalized society, giving a false sense of authenticity, a step closer to the annihilation of one’s culture. This culture of simulation is perpetuated by copying form in transmuted matter, ser ving purposes of appearance and superficial correlation, as a void mimesis of the past. We shall strive for an architecture of a place, for what I call contextual matter. 1 LEACH, NEIL, The Anaesthetics of Architecture, Cambridge, MIT Press, 1999 HOLL, STEVEN, JUHANI PALLASMAA AND ALBERTO PEREZ-GOMEZ, Questions of Perception: Phenomenology of Architecture, San Francisco, William Stout Publishers, 1994 NORBERG-SCHULZ, CHRISTIAN, Genius Loci Towards a Phenomenology of Architecture, New York, Rizzoli, 1979 RYKWERT, JOSEPH, On Adam’s House in Paradise: the Idea of the primitive Hut in Architectural History, 2nd ed.,Cambridge, MIT Press, 1981 05


PROFESSIONAL


SUN VALLEY HOUSE Idaho, United States RICK JOY ARCHITECTS

A new vacation house to an elderly couple in the foothills of Sun Valley. In an astonishing set defined by its mountains and pristine virgin landscape, the house sits within the grain as a conceptually look-out house, framing specific views in the distance or close-up, depending on the character of the spaces. This is a ski resor t area, therefore conceived as a family gathering home of ludic activities. The house is a sequence of spaces orientated towards the best views and sitting in order to minimize its impact on the landscape. The roof emulates the striving forms of the surrounding nature, tr ying to achieve a better integration. A local grey stone is used to build the lower floor walls, matching with the zinc cladding above, interplaying with big openings and small punches: a landscape obser vator y. 09


above: study model opposite above: ground floor plan opposite under: lower floor plan

1- entrance courtyard 2- guests parking 3- entry space 4- living room 5- living terrace 6- kitchen 7- dining 8- hot tub 9- pantry/bar 10- master bedroom 11- private terrace

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master bathroom ski storage room laundry toy storage garage playroom bunk beds sauna exercise/yoga room guest bedroom mechanical


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above: section through stairs under: section through garage opposite: kitchen view

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CURZON STREET HOUSE Dublin, Ireland DONAGHY + DIMOND ARCHITECTS

Reconfiguration and extension of this modest Victorian house to provide an additional bedroom/study, and to improve kitchen/ dining room facilities. The enclosure is in boardmarked fairfaced concrete lined with timber panelling and joiner y. The new rooms are displayed around a cour tyard, which is the focal point of the inter vention. The roof of the kitchen return extends to provide a covered outdoor connection between the kitchen and study/bedroom. At the junction between the two par ts the yard is open to the sk y where the gate opens to the side laneway. This gives an increased sense of space in the cour tyard garden by vir tue of the long diagonal dimension of the outdoor space.

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above: front of the house below: back of the house

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entrance living room bathroom dining kitchen bedroom courtyard

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wall: roof:

150mm exposed cast in situ concrete wall with board marked finish; 80mm air cavity; 2x75mm insupak insulation boards up to lane level/ 100mm rigid thermal insulation above; 100mm concrete block; cementitious waterproofing; lime plaster standing seam zinc roof; 22mm WBP plywood board with waterproof membrane over; 100mm rigid thermal insulation; vapour control layer; 25mm t+g douglas-fir soffit boards; 150x50mm douglas-fir rafters at 580mm centers

french drain: washed clean rock fill; polypropylene felt geotextil membrane; bituthene tanking membrane with protection board over; 100mm drain pipe floor: 100mm polished concrete screed with underfloor heating; 80mm floor rigid insulation; cementitious waterproofing; 250mm concrete slab heavy radon barrier


above: model with context below: sketch of kitchen /dining area

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WEST CORK ARTS CENTRE Skibbereen, Ireland DONAGHY + DIMOND ARCHITECTS

1ST PLACE INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION

The building is designed to create a clear and identifiable form for WCAC sitting distinctively within the grain of the town while holding the character of its site together, re-establishing the historic relationship between street, porch, backlands and water. The ghost of the original baker y is recast in new material rising from its footprint and filling its form.The project is a sequence of rooms indoor and out, continuing from street and bridge through the galleries to the upper levels with views extending fur ther into the hinterland as one rises. These rooms are contained within a concrete and framed carcass, sheathed in leaves of iron. A place to gather in.

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above: ground floor plan opposite above: first floor plan opposite middle: second floor plan opposite under: top floor plan 123456789-

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courtyard entry foyer main gallery store gallery II terrace workshop artists studio administration offices

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above: east elevation under: main gallery opposite: exploded axonometric

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roof structure

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performance space entrance foyer gallery 1 gallery 2 terrace workshop artists studios dance studio administration offices

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ACADEMIC


CINEMA OF VALE DE S. ANTONIO Lisbon, Portugal 5TH YEAR

TUTOR FERNANDO BAGULHO

Within a dense, compact and homogeneous urban grid, a piece of equipment is set– a cinema– functioning as a structuring point of centrality and reference, reinforcing and recreating the sense of an old neighborhood. This reflects the concept of my proposal for this site. The cinema would interconnect the neighborhood at two dif ferent levels and the whole community as a single unit. Its role would be similar to that of a Greek Agora or even a Medieval Castle. This would be an inter vention that would validate the urban setting to give it whole soweness.

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above: site plan under: study sketches opposite above: ground floor plan opposite under: model view from entrance next pages: section A

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entrance hall ticket office toilets exterior theatre cafe/restaurant

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theatre projection room courtyard public elevator public ‘piazza’

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entrance hall ticket office toilets cafe’s kitchen cafe’s storage

6- administration 7- courtyard 8- access to external theatre 9- mechanical 10- technical space

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multifunctional theatre group make-up room private make-up room guests parking shop


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above: model aerial view opposite: wall section at entrance 123456789-

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reinforced concrete structure waterproof membrane 40mm rigid insulation drainage mat geotextile layer compacted gravel sand limestone paving blocks 20mm “lioz” stone paving with sandblasted finish

10- 40mm “lioz” stone with sandblasted finish and conceiled steel fixings 11- concealed rain water pipe 12- 200mm clay block 13- 100mm light concrete screed 14- light concrete screed with 2% fall to 100mm wide gutter 15- galvanized steel drainage channel 16- rooflight with thoughened glass 17- painted steel casement window


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HOUSE FOR A RIVER KEEPER Lisbon, Portugal 5TH YEAR

TUTOR FERNANDO BAGULHO

Tagus river: a gateway to new worlds and adventurous explorations. Men have always protect it throughout time. Its shores were punctuated with beautiful for ts and towers giving it a new rhythm. Today dark red containers line its shores creating a wall between land and river. A house it is never only just that. In this case it is also lighthouse, tower, container ; a reference point in the river, a meeting point in the por t. This is the place where things are staggered as layers: house, crane, boat and kiosk. The stair is almost like an elevation spring, yet ever ything remains stable under four sturdy columns that are, in this case, a structural synthesis of shelter.

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under right: volume model under left: shadows study opposite above: house floor plan opposite under: ground floor plan

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entry vestibule living room kitchen observation room observation terrace bedroom bathroom kiosk/bar crane hanging small boat stairs to house above

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above: river side elevation opposite: east elevation

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CV


BRUNO MANUEL VIDAL Largo Ana de Castro Osorio 9, 3 Esq, 2760 Caxias, Portugal T. +351 967046615 E. brunovidal1@gmail.com EDUCATION Universidade Técnica de Lisboa , Faculdade de Arquitectura, 2006 Università degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Facoltà di Architettura, 2005 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Rick Joy Architects design team member, 2010 - 2011 Sun Valley House Telluride House Tucson Mixed Used Development Master Plan Donaghy and Dimond Architects project manager and design team member, 2007 - 2009 West Cork Arts Centre Competition Inchicore Model School Lord Edward Street Rehab Centre Refurbishment ‘Create’ Office Tara House Website Iveagh Gardens House Extension Curzon Street House Rathgar Road House Addition Tibradden House Gate Lodge SKILLS AutoCAD, VectorWorks, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Premiere, CorelDraw, Cinema 4D, Macromedia Flash, SketchUp, Hand Modelling, Sketching, Photography ACTIVITIES University of Arizona, invited studio critic, 2011 University College of Dublin, Cohesive Construction Workshop, 2008 Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, invited studio critic, 2007 Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, seminar “Landscape, Architecture and Water, visions and interventions through the drawing”, 2002 LANGUAGES Fluent Portuguese, English, Spanish, Italian, Basic French 51


REFERENCES Philipp Neher, Rick Joy Architects, associate director, T. + 1 520 624 14 42 philipp@rickjoy.com Marcus Donaghy, Donaghy and Dimond Architects, principal, T. + 353 1 416 81 32 marcus@donaghydimond.ie Fernando Bagulho, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, professor, T. + 351 21 347 37 75 geral@atelierchiado.pt

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Bruno Manuel Vidal Š


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portfolio